Gregory Heyworth: How I'm discovering the secrets of ancient texts

TEDxUM

Gregory Heyworth: How I'm discovering the secrets of ancient texts

October 31, 2015


Gregory Heyworth is a textual scientist; he and his lab work on new ways to read ancient manuscripts and maps using spectral imaging technology. In this fascinating talk, watch as Heyworth shines a light on lost history, deciphering texts that haven't been read in thousands of years. How could these lost classics rewrite what we know about the past?

Jocelyne Bloch: The brain may be able to repair itself -- with help

TEDGlobal>Geneva

Jocelyne Bloch: The brain may be able to repair itself -- with help

December 8, 2015


Through treating everything from strokes to car accident traumas, neurosurgeon Jocelyne Bloch knows the brain's inability to repair itself all too well. But now, she suggests, she and her colleagues may have found the key to neural repair: Doublecortin-positive cells. Similar to stem cells, they are extremely adaptable and, when extracted from a brain, cultured and then re-injected in a lesioned area of the same brain, they can help repair and rebuild it. "With a little help," Bloch says, "the brain may be able to help itself."

Dorothy Roberts: The problem with race-based medicine

TEDMED 2015

Dorothy Roberts: The problem with race-based medicine

November 18, 2015


Social justice advocate and law scholar Dorothy Roberts has a precise and powerful message: Race-based medicine is bad medicine. Even today, many doctors still use race as a medical shortcut; they make important decisions about things like pain tolerance based on a patient's skin color instead of medical observation and measurement. In this searing talk, Roberts lays out the lingering traces of race-based medicine -- and invites us to be a part of ending it. "It is more urgent than ever to finally abandon this backward legacy," she says, "and to affirm our common humanity by ending the social inequalities that truly divide us."

Mike Velings: The case for fish farming

Mission Blue II

Mike Velings: The case for fish farming

October 10, 2015


We're headed towards a global food crisis: Nearly 3 billion people depend on the ocean for food, and at our current rate we already take more fish from the ocean than it can naturally replace. In this fact-packed, eye-opening talk, entrepreneur and conservationist Mike Velings proposes a solution: Aquaculture, or fish farming. "We must start using the ocean as farmers instead of hunters," he says, echoing Jacques Cousteau. "The day will come where people will demand farmed fish on their plates that's farmed well and farmed healthy -- and refuse anything less."

Matthew Williams: Special Olympics let me be myself -- a champion

TEDxVancouver

Matthew Williams: Special Olympics let me be myself -- a champion

November 14, 2015


How much do you know about intellectual disabilities? Special Olympics champion and ambassador Matthew Williams is proof that athletic competition and the camaraderie it fosters can transform lives, both on and off the field. Together with his fellow athletes, he invites you to join him at the next meet -- and challenges you to walk away with your heart unchanged.

Pardis Sabeti: How we'll fight the next deadly virus

TEDWomen 2015

Pardis Sabeti: How we'll fight the next deadly virus

May 27, 2015


When Ebola broke out in March 2014, Pardis Sabeti and her team got to work sequencing the virus's genome, learning how it mutated and spread. Sabeti immediately released her research online, so virus trackers and scientists from around the world could join in the urgent fight. In this talk, she shows how open cooperation was key to halting the virus ... and to attacking the next one to come along. "We had to work openly, we had to share and we had to work together," Sabeti says. "Let us not let the world be defined by the destruction wrought by one virus, but illuminated by billions of hearts and minds working in unity."

Andrés Ruzo: How I found a mythical boiling river in the Amazon

TEDGlobal 2014

Andrés Ruzo: How I found a mythical boiling river in the Amazon

October 6, 2014


When Andrés Ruzo was a young boy in Peru, his grandfather told him a story with an odd detail: There is a river, deep in the Amazon, which boils as if a fire burns below it. Twelve years later, after training as a geoscientist, he set out on a journey deep into the jungle of South America in search of this boiling river. At a time when everything seems mapped and measured, join Ruzo as he explores a river that forces us to question the line between known and unknown ... and reminds us that there are great wonders yet to be discovered.

Dambisa Moyo: Economic growth has stalled. Let's fix it

TEDGlobal>Geneva

Dambisa Moyo: Economic growth has stalled. Let's fix it

December 8, 2015


Economic growth is the defining challenge of our time; without it, political and social instability rises, human progress stagnates and societies grow dimmer. But, says economist Dambisa Moyo, dogmatic capitalism isn't creating the growth we need. As she shows, in both state-sponsored and market-driven models, capitalism is failing to solve social ills, fostering corruption and creating income inequality. Moyo surveys the current economic landscape and suggests that we have to start thinking about capitalism as a spectrum so we can blend the best of different models together to foster growth.

Judson Brewer: A simple way to break a bad habit

TEDMED 2015

Judson Brewer: A simple way to break a bad habit

November 18, 2015


Can we break bad habits by being more curious about them? Psychiatrist Judson Brewer studies the relationship between mindfulness and addiction -- from smoking to overeating to all those other things we do even though we know they're bad for us. Learn more about the mechanism of habit development and discover a simple but profound tactic that might help you beat your next urge to smoke, snack or check a text while driving.

Auke Ijspeert: A robot that runs and swims like a salamander

TEDGlobal>Geneva

Auke Ijspeert: A robot that runs and swims like a salamander

December 8, 2015


Roboticist Auke Ijspeert designs biorobots, machines modeled after real animals that are capable of handling complex terrain and would appear at home in the pages of a sci-fi novel. The process of creating these robots leads to better automata that can be used for fieldwork, service, and search and rescue. But these robots don't just mimic the natural world -- they help us understand our own biology better, unlocking previously unknown secrets of the spinal cord.

Melati and Isabel Wijsen: Our campaign to ban plastic bags in Bali

TEDGlobal>London

Melati and Isabel Wijsen: Our campaign to ban plastic bags in Bali

September 29, 2015


Plastic bags are essentially indestructible, yet they're used and thrown away with reckless abandon. Most end up in the ocean, where they pollute the water and harm marine life; the rest are burned in garbage piles, where they release harmful dioxins into the atmosphere. Melati and Isabel Wijsen are on a mission to stop plastic bags from suffocating their beautiful island home of Bali. Their efforts -- including petitions, beach cleanups, even a hunger strike -- paid off when they convinced their governor to commit to a plastic bag-free Bali by 2018. "Don't ever let anyone tell you that you're too young or you won't understand," Isabel says to other aspiring activists. "We're not telling you it's going to be easy. We're telling you it's going to be worth it."

Linda Liukas: A delightful way to teach kids about computers

TEDxCERN

Linda Liukas: A delightful way to teach kids about computers

October 9, 2015


Computer code is the next universal language, and its syntax will be limited only by the imaginations of the next generation of programmers. Linda Liukas is helping to educate problem-solving kids, encouraging them to see computers not as mechanical, boring and complicated but as colorful, expressive machines meant to be tinkered with. In this talk, she invites us to imagine a world where the Ada Lovelaces of tomorrow grow up to be optimistic and brave about technology and use it to create a new world that is wonderful, whimsical and a tiny bit weird.

Tania Simoncelli: Should you be able to patent a human gene?

TEDxAmoskeagMillyard

Tania Simoncelli: Should you be able to patent a human gene?

November 15, 2014


A decade ago, US law said human genes were patentable -- which meant patent holders had the right to stop anyone from sequencing, testing or even looking at a patented gene. Troubled by the way this law both harmed patients and created a barrier to biomedical innovation, Tania Simoncelli and her colleagues at the ACLU challenged it. In this riveting talk, hear the story of how they took a case everybody told them they would lose all the way to the Supreme Court.

Elizabeth Lev: The unheard story of the Sistine Chapel

TEDGlobal>Geneva

Elizabeth Lev: The unheard story of the Sistine Chapel

December 8, 2015


The Sistine Chapel is one of the most iconic buildings on earth -- but there's a lot you probably don't know about it. In this tour-de-force talk, art historian Elizabeth Lev guides us across the famous building's ceiling and Michelangelo's vital depiction of traditional stories, showing how the painter reached beyond the religious iconography of the time to chart new artistic waters. Five hundred years after the artist painted it, says Lev, the Sistine Chapel forces us to look around as if it were a mirror and ask, "Who am I, and what role do I play in this great theater of life?"

David Gruber: Glow-in-the-dark sharks and other stunning sea creatures

Mission Blue II

David Gruber: Glow-in-the-dark sharks and other stunning sea creatures

October 10, 2015


Just a few meters below the waves, marine biologist and explorer-photographer David Gruber discovered something amazing -- a surprising new range of sea creatures that glow in many colors in the ocean's dim blue light. Join his journey in search of biofluorescent sharks, seahorses, sea turtles and more, and learn how these light-up creatures could illuminate a new understanding of our own brains.

Yanis Varoufakis: Capitalism will eat democracy -- unless we speak up

TEDGlobal>Geneva

Yanis Varoufakis: Capitalism will eat democracy -- unless we speak up

December 8, 2015


Have you wondered why politicians aren't what they used to be, why governments seem unable to solve real problems? Economist Yanis Varoufakis, the former Minister of Finance for Greece, says that it's because you can be in politics today but not be in power -- because real power now belongs to those who control the economy. He believes that the mega-rich and corporations are cannibalizing the political sphere, causing financial crisis. In this talk, hear his dream for a world in which capital and labor no longer struggle against each other, "one that is simultaneously libertarian, Marxist and Keynesian."

Jill Farrant: How we can make crops survive without water

TEDGlobal>Geneva

Jill Farrant: How we can make crops survive without water

December 8, 2015


As the world's population grows and the effects of climate change come into sharper relief, we'll have to feed more people using less arable land. Molecular biologist Jill Farrant studies a rare phenomenon that may help: "resurrection plants" -- super-resilient plants that seemingly come back from the dead. Could they hold promise for growing food in our coming hotter, drier world?

Oscar Schwartz: Can a computer write poetry?

TEDxYouth@Sydney

Oscar Schwartz: Can a computer write poetry?

May 20, 2015


If you read a poem and feel moved by it, but then find out it was actually written by a computer, would you feel differently about the experience? Would you think that the computer had expressed itself and been creative, or would you feel like you had fallen for a cheap trick? In this talk, writer Oscar Schwartz examines why we react so strongly to the idea of a computer writing poetry -- and how this reaction helps us understand what it means to be human.

Sean Follmer: Shape-shifting tech will change work as we know it

TEDxCERN

Sean Follmer: Shape-shifting tech will change work as we know it

October 9, 2015


What will the world look like when we move beyond the keyboard and mouse? Interaction designer Sean Follmer is building a future with machines that bring information to life under your fingers as you work with it. In this talk, check out prototypes for a 3D shape-shifting table, a phone that turns into a wristband, a deformable game controller and more that may change the way we live and work.

Jill Heinerth: The mysterious world of underwater caves

TEDYouth 2015

Jill Heinerth: The mysterious world of underwater caves

November 14, 2015


Cave diver Jill Heinerth explores the hidden underground waterways coursing through our planet. Working with biologists, climatologists and archaeologists, Heinerth unravels the mysteries of the life-forms that inhabit some of the earth's most remote places and helps researchers unlock the history of climate change. In this short talk, take a dive below the waves and explore the wonders of inner space.

Achenyo Idachaba: How I turned a deadly plant into a thriving business

TEDWomen 2015

Achenyo Idachaba: How I turned a deadly plant into a thriving business

May 27, 2015


The water hyacinth may look like a harmless, even beautiful flowering plant -- but it's actually an invasive aquatic weed that clogs waterways, stopping trade, interrupting schooling and disrupting everyday life. In this scourge, green entrepreneur Achenyo Idachaba saw opportunity. Follow her journey as she turns weeds into woven wonders.

Melvin Russell: I love being a police officer, but we need reform

TEDxMidAtlantic

Melvin Russell: I love being a police officer, but we need reform

September 25, 2015


We've invested so much in police departments as protectors that we have forgotten what it means to serve our communities, says Baltimore Police officer Lt. Colonel Melvin Russell. It's led to coldness and callousness, and it's dehumanized the police force. After taking over as district commander in one of Baltimore's toughest neighborhoods, Russell instituted a series of reforms aimed at winning back the trust of the community and lowering the violent crime rate. "Law enforcement is in a crisis," he says. "But it's not too late for all of us to build our cities and nation to make it great again."

James Veitch: This is what happens when you reply to spam email

TEDGlobal>Geneva

James Veitch: This is what happens when you reply to spam email

December 8, 2015


Suspicious emails: unclaimed insurance bonds, diamond-encrusted safe deposit boxes, close friends marooned in a foreign country. They pop up in our inboxes, and standard procedure is to delete on sight. But what happens when you reply? Follow along as writer and comedian James Veitch narrates a hilarious, weeks-long exchange with a spammer who offered to cut him in on a hot deal.

David Sedlak: 4 ways we can avoid a catastrophic drought

TEDxMarin

David Sedlak: 4 ways we can avoid a catastrophic drought

September 17, 2015


As the world's climate patterns continue to shift unpredictably, places where drinking water was once abundant may soon find reservoirs dry and groundwater aquifers depleted. In this talk, civil and environmental engineer David Sedlak shares four practical solutions to the ongoing urban water crisis. His goal: to shift our water supply towards new, local sources of water and create a system that is capable of withstanding any of the challenges climate change may throw at us in the coming years.

Sebastian Wernicke: How to use data to make a hit TV show

TEDxCambridge

Sebastian Wernicke: How to use data to make a hit TV show

June 18, 2015


Does collecting more data lead to better decision-making? Competitive, data-savvy companies like Amazon, Google and Netflix have learned that data analysis alone doesn't always produce optimum results. In this talk, data scientist Sebastian Wernicke breaks down what goes wrong when we make decisions based purely on data -- and suggests a brainier way to use it.

Aomawa Shields: How we'll find life on other planets

TED2015

Aomawa Shields: How we'll find life on other planets

March 16, 2015


Astronomer Aomawa Shields searches for clues that life might exist elsewhere in the universe by examining the atmospheres of distant exoplanets. When she isn't exploring the heavens, the classically trained actor (and TED Fellow) looks for ways to engage young women in the sciences using theater, writing and visual art. "Maybe one day they'll join the ranks of astronomers who are full of contradictions," she says, "and use their backgrounds to discover, once and for all, that we are truly not alone in the universe."

Tim Harford: How frustration can make us more creative

TEDGlobal>London

Tim Harford: How frustration can make us more creative

September 29, 2015


Challenges and problems can derail your creative process ... or they can make you more creative than ever. In the surprising story behind the best-selling solo piano album of all time, Tim Harford may just convince you of the advantages of having to work with a little mess.

Wael Ghonim: Let's design social media that drives real change

TEDGlobal>Geneva

Wael Ghonim: Let's design social media that drives real change

December 8, 2015


Wael Ghonim helped touch off the Arab Spring in his home of Egypt ... by setting up a simple Facebook page. As he reveals, once the revolution spilled onto the streets, it turned from hopeful to messy, then ugly and heartbreaking. And social media followed suit. What was once a place for crowdsourcing, engaging and sharing became a polarized battleground. Ghonim asks: What can we do about online behavior now? How can we use the Internet and social media to create civility and reasoned argument?

Robert Waldinger: What makes a good life? Lessons from the longest study on happiness

TEDxBeaconStreet

Robert Waldinger: What makes a good life? Lessons from the longest study on happiness

November 14, 2015


What keeps us happy and healthy as we go through life? If you think it's fame and money, you're not alone – but, according to psychiatrist Robert Waldinger, you're mistaken. As the director of a 75-year-old study on adult development, Waldinger has unprecedented access to data on true happiness and satisfaction. In this talk, he shares three important lessons learned from the study as well as some practical, old-as-the-hills wisdom on how to build a fulfilling, long life.

Rodrigo Bijou: Governments don't understand cyber warfare. We need hackers

TEDGlobal>London

Rodrigo Bijou: Governments don't understand cyber warfare. We need hackers

June 16, 2015


The Internet has transformed the front lines of war, and it's leaving governments behind. As security analyst Rodrigo Bijou shows, modern conflict is being waged online between non-state groups, activists and private corporations, and the digital landscape is proving to be fertile ground for the recruitment and radicalization of terrorists. Meanwhile, draconian surveillance programs are ripe for exploitation. Bijou urges governments to end mass surveillance programs and shut "backdoors" -- and he makes a bold call for individuals to step up.