Vernā Myers: How to overcome our biases? Walk boldly toward them

TEDxBeaconStreet

Vernā Myers: How to overcome our biases? Walk boldly toward them

November 15, 2014


Our biases can be dangerous, even deadly — as we've seen in the cases of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, and Eric Garner, in Staten Island, New York. Diversity advocate Vernā Myers looks closely at some of the subconscious attitudes we hold toward out-groups. She makes a plea to all people: Acknowledge your biases. Then move toward, not away from, the groups that make you uncomfortable. In a funny, impassioned, important talk, she shows us how.

Dave Troy: Social maps that reveal a city's intersections — and separations

TEDGlobal 2014

Dave Troy: Social maps that reveal a city's intersections — and separations

October 13, 2014


Every city has its neighborhoods, cliques and clubs, the hidden lines that join and divide people in the same town. What can we learn about cities by looking at what people share online? Starting with his own home town of Baltimore, Dave Troy has been visualizing what the tweets of city dwellers reveal about who lives there, who they talk to — and who they don’t.

Catherine Crump: The small and surprisingly dangerous detail the police track about you

TEDGlobal 2014

Catherine Crump: The small and surprisingly dangerous detail the police track about you

October 14, 2014


A very unsexy-sounding piece of technology could mean that the police know where you go, with whom, and when: the automatic license plate reader. These cameras are innocuously placed all across small-town America to catch known criminals, but as lawyer and TED Fellow Catherine Crump shows, the data they collect in aggregate could have disastrous consequences for everyone the world over.

Thomas Hellum: The world's most boring television ... and why it's hilariously addictive

TEDxArendal

Thomas Hellum: The world's most boring television ... and why it's hilariously addictive

August 15, 2014


You've heard about slow food. Now here's slow ... TV? In this very funny talk, Norwegian television producer Thomas Hellum shares how he and his team began to broadcast long, boring events, often live -- and found a rapt audience. Shows include a 7-hour train journey, an 18-hour fishing expedition and a 5.5-day ferry voyage along the coast of Norway. The results are both beautiful and fascinating. Really.

Aakash Odedra: A dance in a hurricane of paper, wind and light

TEDGlobal 2014

Aakash Odedra: A dance in a hurricane of paper, wind and light

October 21, 2014


Choreographer Aakash Odedra is dyslexic and has always felt that his best expression comes through movement. “Murmur” is his ode to that experience, teaming up with co-creators Lewis Major and Ars Electronica Futurelab. Watch him spin his way through the center of a storm, as pages of books take flight all around him.

Anastasia Taylor-Lind: Fighters and mourners of the Ukrainian revolution

TEDGlobal 2014

Anastasia Taylor-Lind: Fighters and mourners of the Ukrainian revolution

October 14, 2014


“Men fight wars, and women mourn them,” says documentary photographer Anastasia Taylor-Lind. With stark, arresting images from the Maidan protests in Ukraine, the TED Fellow shows us intimate faces from the revolution. A grim and beautiful talk.

Barbara Natterson-Horowitz: What veterinarians know that physicians don't

TEDMED 2014

Barbara Natterson-Horowitz: What veterinarians know that physicians don't

September 16, 2014


What do you call a veterinarian who can only take care of one species? A physician. In a fascinating talk, Barbara Natterson-Horowitz shares how a species-spanning approach to health can improve medical care of the human animal -- particularly when it comes to mental health.

Rainer Strack: The workforce crisis of 2030 -- and how to start solving it now

TED@BCG Berlin

Rainer Strack: The workforce crisis of 2030 -- and how to start solving it now

October 20, 2014


It sounds counterintuitive, but by 2030, many of the world's largest economies will have more jobs than adult citizens to do those jobs. In this data-filled -- and quite charming -- talk, human resources expert Rainer Strack suggests that countries ought to look across borders for mobile and willing job seekers. But to do that, they need to start by changing the culture in their businesses.

Ben Saunders: To the South Pole and back — the hardest 105 days of my life

TED2014

Ben Saunders: To the South Pole and back — the hardest 105 days of my life

March 20, 2014


This year, explorer Ben Saunders attempted his most ambitious trek yet. He set out to complete Captain Robert Falcon Scott’s failed 1912 polar expedition — a four-month, 1,800-mile round trip journey from the edge of Antarctica to the South Pole and back. In the first talk given after his adventure, just five weeks after his return, Saunders offers a raw, honest look at this “hubris”-tinged mission that brought him to the most difficult decision of his life.

Oren Yakobovich: Hidden cameras that film injustice in the world’s most dangerous places

TEDGlobal 2014

Oren Yakobovich: Hidden cameras that film injustice in the world’s most dangerous places

October 14, 2014


To see is to believe, says Oren Yakobovich — which is why he helps everyday people use hidden cameras to film dangerous situations of violence, political fraud and abuse. His organization, Videre, uncovers, verifies and publicizes human-rights abuses that the world needs to witness.

Mark Plotkin: What the people of the Amazon know that you don’t

TEDGlobal 2014

Mark Plotkin: What the people of the Amazon know that you don’t

October 10, 2014


"The greatest and most endangered species in the Amazon rainforest is not the jaguar or the harpy eagle," says Mark Plotkin, "It's the isolated and uncontacted tribes." In an energetic and sobering talk, the ethnobotanist brings us into the world of the forest's indigenous tribes and the incredible medicinal plants that their shamans use to heal. He outlines the challenges and perils that are endangering them — and their wisdom — and urges us to protect this irreplaceable repository of knowledge.

Emily Balcetis: Why some people find exercise harder than others

TEDxNewYork

Emily Balcetis: Why some people find exercise harder than others

November 1, 2014


Why do some people struggle more than others to keep off the pounds? Social psychologist Emily Balcetis shows research that addresses one of the many factors: Vision. In an informative talk, she shows how when it comes to fitness, some people quite literally see the world differently from others -- and offers a surprisingly simple solution to overcome these differences.

Robert Muggah: How to protect fast-growing cities from failing

TEDGlobal 2014

Robert Muggah: How to protect fast-growing cities from failing

October 13, 2014


Worldwide, violence is on the decline, but in the crowded cities of the global south — cities like Aleppo, Bamako and Caracas — violence is actually accelerating, fueled by the drug trade, mass unemployment and civil unrest. Security researcher Robert Muggah turns our attention toward these “fragile cities,” super-fast-growing places where infrastructure is weak and government often ineffective. He shows us the four big risks we face, and offers a way to change course.

Joe Landolina: This gel can make you stop bleeding instantly

TEDGlobal 2014

Joe Landolina: This gel can make you stop bleeding instantly

October 14, 2014


Forget stitches -- there's a better way to close wounds. In this talk, TED Fellow Joe Landolina talks about his invention -- a medical gel that can instantly stop traumatic bleeding without the need to apply pressure. (Contains medical images.)

Nancy Frates: Meet the mom who started the Ice Bucket Challenge

TEDxBoston

Nancy Frates: Meet the mom who started the Ice Bucket Challenge

October 2, 2014


Remember the Ice Bucket Challenge craze this summer? Meet the mom who started it all. When Nancy Frates's son Pete hurt his wrist in a baseball game, he got an unexpected diagnosis: it wasn’t a broken bone, it was ALS, and there is no cure. In this inspiring talk, Nancy tells the story of what happened next.

Rosie King: How autism freed me to be myself

TEDMED 2014

Rosie King: How autism freed me to be myself

September 9, 2014


“People are so afraid of variety that they try to fit everything into a tiny little box with a specific label,” says 16-year-old Rosie King, who is bold, brash and autistic. She wants to know: Why is everyone so worried about being normal? She sounds a clarion call for every kid, parent, teacher and person to celebrate uniqueness. It’s a soaring testament to the potential of human diversity.

David Grady: How to save the world (or at least yourself) from bad meetings

TED@State Street Boston

David Grady: How to save the world (or at least yourself) from bad meetings

October 17, 2013


An epidemic of bad, inefficient, overcrowded meetings is plaguing the world’s businesses — and making workers miserable. David Grady has some ideas on how to stop it.

Michael Green: What the Social Progress Index can reveal about your country

TEDGlobal 2014

Michael Green: What the Social Progress Index can reveal about your country

October 8, 2014


The term Gross Domestic Product is often talked about as if it were “handed down from god on tablets of stone.” But this concept was invented by an economist in the 1930s. We need a more effective measurement tool to match 21st century needs, says Michael Green: the Social Progress Index. With charm and wit, he shows how this tool measures societies across the three dimensions that actually matter. And reveals the dramatic reordering of nations that occurs when you use it.

Leana Wen: What your doctor won’t disclose

TEDMED 2014

Leana Wen: What your doctor won’t disclose

September 18, 2014


Wouldn’t you want to know if your doctor was a paid spokesman for a drug company? Or held personal beliefs incompatible with the treatment you want? Right now, in the US at least, your doctor simply doesn’t have to tell you about that. And when physician Leana Wen asked her fellow doctors to open up, the reaction she got was … unsettling.

Ramanan Laxminarayan: The coming crisis in antibiotics

TEDMED 2014

Ramanan Laxminarayan: The coming crisis in antibiotics

September 18, 2014


Antibiotic drugs save lives. But we simply use them too much — and often for non-lifesaving purposes, like treating the flu and even raising cheaper chickens. The result, says researcher Ramanan Laxminarayan, is that the drugs will stop working for everyone, as the bacteria they target grow more and more resistant. He calls on all of us (patients and doctors alike) to think of antibiotics -- and their ongoing effectiveness -- as a finite resource, and to think twice before we tap into it. It’s a sobering look at how global medical trends can strike home.

Vincent Moon and Naná Vasconcelos: Hidden music rituals around the world

TEDGlobal 2014

Vincent Moon and Naná Vasconcelos: Hidden music rituals around the world

October 9, 2014


Vincent Moon travels the world with a backpack and a camera, filming astonishing music and ritual the world rarely sees -- from a powerful Sufi ritual in Chechnya to an ayahuasca journey in Peru. He hopes his films can help people see their own cultures in a new way, to make young people say: "Whoa, my grandfather is as cool as Beyoncé." Followed by a mesmerizing performance by jazz icon Naná Vasconcelos.

Ethan Nadelmann: Why we need to end the War on Drugs

TEDGlobal 2014

Ethan Nadelmann: Why we need to end the War on Drugs

October 15, 2014


Is the War on Drugs doing more harm than good? In a bold talk, drug policy reformist Ethan Nadelmann makes an impassioned plea to end the "backward, heartless, disastrous" movement to stamp out the drug trade. He gives two big reasons we should focus on intelligent regulation instead.

Haas&Hahn: How painting can transform communities

TEDGlobal 2014

Haas&Hahn: How painting can transform communities

October 8, 2014


Artists Jeroen Koolhaas and Dre Urhahn create community art by painting entire neighborhoods, and involving those who live there -- from the favelas of Rio to the streets of North Philadelphia. What's made their projects succeed? In this funny and inspiring talk, the artists explain their art-first approach -- and the importance of a neighborhood barbecue.

Alejandro Aravena: My architectural philosophy? Bring the community into the process

TEDGlobal 2014

Alejandro Aravena: My architectural philosophy? Bring the community into the process

October 9, 2014


When asked to build housing for 100 families in Chile ten years ago, Alejandro Aravena looked to an unusual inspiration: the wisdom of favelas and slums. Rather than building a large building with small units, he built flexible half-homes that each family could expand on. It was a complex problem, but with a simple solution — one that he arrived at by working with the families themselves. With a chalkboard and beautiful images of his designs, Aravena walks us through three projects where clever rethinking led to beautiful design with great benefit.

Ameenah Gurib-Fakim: Humble plants that hide surprising secrets

TEDGlobal 2014

Ameenah Gurib-Fakim: Humble plants that hide surprising secrets

October 27, 2014


In this intriguing talk, biologist Ameenah Gurib-Fakim introduces us to rare plant species from isolated islands and regions of Africa. Meet the shape-shifting benjoin; the baume de l'ile plate, which might offer a new treatment for asthma; and the iconic baobab tree, which could hold the key to the future of food. Plus: monkey apples.

Jose Miguel Sokoloff: How Christmas lights helped guerrillas put down their guns

TEDGlobal 2014

Jose Miguel Sokoloff: How Christmas lights helped guerrillas put down their guns

October 7, 2014


“In my lifetime, I have never lived one day of peace in my country,” says Jose Miguel Sokoloff. This ad executive from Colombia saw a chance to help guerrilla fighters choose to come home -- with smart marketing. He shares how some creative, welcoming messages have helped thousands of guerrillas decide to put down their weapons -- and the key insights behind these surprising tactics.

Ilona Szabó de Carvalho: 4 lessons I learned from taking a stand against drugs and gun violence

TEDGlobal 2014

Ilona Szabó de Carvalho: 4 lessons I learned from taking a stand against drugs and gun violence

October 28, 2014


Throughout her career in banking Ilona Szabó de Carvalho never imagined she’d someday start a social movement. But living in her native Brazil, which leads the world in homicidal violence, she realized she couldn’t just stand by and watch drugs and guns tear her country apart. Szabó de Carvalho reveals four crucial lessons she learned when she left her cushy job and took a fearless stand against the status quo.

Kare Anderson: Be an opportunity maker

TED@IBM

Kare Anderson: Be an opportunity maker

September 15, 2014


We all want to use our talents to create something meaningful with our lives. But how to get started? (And ... what if you're shy?) Writer Kare Anderson shares her own story of chronic shyness, and how she opened up her world by helping other people use their own talents and passions.

Jeremy Heimans: What new power looks like

TEDSalon Berlin 2014

Jeremy Heimans: What new power looks like

June 23, 2014


We can see the power of distributed, crowd-sourced business models every day — witness Uber, Kickstarter, Airbnb. But veteran online activist Jeremy Heimans asks: When does that kind of "new power" start to work in politics? His surprising answer: Sooner than you think. It’s a bold argument about the future of politics and power; watch and see if you agree.

Debra Jarvis: Yes, I survived cancer. But that doesn't define me

TEDMED 2014

Debra Jarvis: Yes, I survived cancer. But that doesn't define me

September 10, 2014


Debra Jarvis had worked as a hospital chaplain for nearly 30 years when she was diagnosed with cancer. And she learned quite a bit as a patient. In a witty, daring talk, she explains how the identity of “cancer survivor” can feel static. She asks us all to claim our hardest experiences, while giving ourselves room to grow and evolve.