Hugh Herr: The new bionics that let us run, climb and dance

TED2014

Hugh Herr: The new bionics that let us run, climb and dance


Hugh Herr is building the next generation of bionic limbs, robotic prosthetics inspired by nature's own designs. Herr lost both legs in a climbing accident 30 years ago; now, as the head of the MIT Media Lab’s Biomechatronics group, he shows his incredible technology in a talk that's both technical and deeply personal — with the help of ballroom dancer Adrianne Haslet-Davis, who lost her left leg in the 2013 Boston Marathon bombing, and performs again for the first time on the TED stage.

Del Harvey: The strangeness of scale at Twitter

TED2014

Del Harvey: The strangeness of scale at Twitter


When hundreds of thousands of tweets are fired every second, a one-in-a-million chance -- including unlikely-sounding scenarios that could harm users -- happens about 500 times a day. For Del Harvey, who heads Twitter’s Trust and Safety Team, these odds aren’t good. The security maven spends her days thinking about how to prevent worst-case scenarios while giving voice to people around the globe. With deadpan humor, she offers a window into how she keeps 240 million users safe.

Jennifer Golbeck: The curly fry conundrum: Why social media “likes” say more than you might think

TEDxMidAtlantic 2013

Jennifer Golbeck: The curly fry conundrum: Why social media “likes” say more than you might think


Do you like curly fries? Have you Liked them on Facebook? Watch this talk to find out the surprising things Facebook (and others) can guess about you from your random Likes and Shares. Computer scientist Jennifer Golbeck explains how this came about, how some applications of the technology are not so cute -- and why she thinks we should return the control of information to its rightful owners.

Bran Ferren: To create for the ages, let's combine art and engineering

TED2014

Bran Ferren: To create for the ages, let's combine art and engineering


When Bran Ferren was just 9, his parents took him to see the Pantheon in Rome — and it changed everything. In that moment, he began to understand how the tools of science and engineering become more powerful when combined with art, with design and beauty. Ever since, he's been searching for a convincing modern-day equivalent to Rome's masterpiece. Stay tuned to the end of the talk for his unexpected suggestion.

Ed Yong: Zombie roaches and other parasite tales

TED2014

Ed Yong: Zombie roaches and other parasite tales


In this fascinating, hilarious and ever-so-slightly creepy talk, science writer Ed Yong tells the story of his favorite parasites -- animals and organisms that live on the bodeis (and brains!) of other organisms, causing them to do their bidding. Do humans have them too? Maybe ...

Ziauddin Yousafzai: My daughter, Malala

TED2014

Ziauddin Yousafzai: My daughter, Malala


Pakistani educator Ziauddin Yousafzai reminds the world of a simple truth that many don’t want to hear: Women and men deserve equal opportunities for education, autonomy, an independent identity. He tells stories from his own life and the life of his daughter, Malala, who was shot by the Taliban in 2012 simply for daring to go to school. "Why is my daughter so strong?” Yousafzai asks. “Because I didn’t clip her wings."

Larry Page: Where’s Google going next?

TED2014

Larry Page: Where’s Google going next?


Onstage at TED2014, Charlie Rose interviews Google CEO Larry Page about his far-off vision for the company. It includes aerial bikeways and internet balloons … and then it gets even more interesting, as Page talks through the company’s recent acquisition of Deep Mind, an AI that is learning some surprising things.

Richard Ledgett: The NSA responds to Edward Snowden’s TED Talk

TED2014

Richard Ledgett: The NSA responds to Edward Snowden’s TED Talk


After a surprise appearance by Edward Snowden at TED2014, Chris Anderson said: "If the NSA wants to respond, please do." And yes, they did. Appearing by video, NSA deputy director Richard Ledgett answers Anderson’s questions about the balance between security and protecting privacy.

Chris Hadfield: What I learned from going blind in space

TED2014

Chris Hadfield: What I learned from going blind in space


There's an astronaut saying: In space, “there is no problem so bad that you can’t make it worse.” So how do you deal with the complexity, the sheer pressure, of dealing with dangerous and scary situations? Retired colonel Chris Hadfield paints a vivid portrait of how to be prepared for the worst in space (and life) -- and it starts with walking into a spider’s web. Watch for a special space-y performance.

Edward Snowden: Here's how we take back the Internet

TED2014

Edward Snowden: Here's how we take back the Internet


Appearing by telepresence robot, Edward Snowden speaks at TED2014 about surveillance and Internet freedom. The right to data privacy, he suggests, is not a partisan issue, but requires a fundamental rethink of the role of the internet in our lives — and the laws that protect it. "Your rights matter,” he says, "because you never know when you're going to need them." Chris Anderson interviews, with special guest Tim Berners-Lee.

Charmian Gooch: My wish: To launch a new era of openness in business

TED2014

Charmian Gooch: My wish: To launch a new era of openness in business


Anonymous companies protect corrupt individuals – from notorious drug cartel leaders to nefarious arms dealers – behind a shroud of mystery that makes it almost impossible to find and hold them responsible. But anti-corruption activist Charmian Gooch hopes to change all that. At TED2014, she shares her brave TED Prize wish: to know who owns and controls companies, to change the law, and to launch a new era of openness in business.

Steven Pinker and Rebecca Newberger Goldstein: The long reach of reason

TED2012

Steven Pinker and Rebecca Newberger Goldstein: The long reach of reason


Here's a TED first: an animated Socratic dialog! In a time when irrationality seems to rule both politics and culture, has reasoned thinking finally lost its power? Watch as psychologist Steven Pinker is gradually, brilliantly persuaded by philosopher Rebecca Newberger Goldstein that reason is actually the key driver of human moral progress, even if its effect sometimes takes generations to unfold. The dialog was recorded live at TED, and animated, in incredible, often hilarious, detail by Cognitive.

Norman Spack: How I help transgender teens become who they want to be

TEDxBeaconStreet

Norman Spack: How I help transgender teens become who they want to be


Puberty is an awkward time for just about everybody, but for transgender teens it can be a nightmare, as they grow overnight into bodies they aren't comfortable with. In a heartfelt talk, endocrinologist Norman Spack tells a personal story of how he became one of the few doctors in the US to treat minors with hormone replacement therapy. By staving off the effects of puberty, Spack gives trans teens the time they need. (Filmed at TEDxBeaconStreet.)

Daniel Reisel: The neuroscience of restorative justice

TED2013

Daniel Reisel: The neuroscience of restorative justice


Daniel Reisel studies the brains of criminal psychopaths (and mice). And he asks a big question: Instead of warehousing these criminals, shouldn’t we be using what we know about the brain to help them rehabilitate? Put another way: If the brain can grow new neural pathways after an injury … could we help the brain re-grow morality?

Toby Shapshak: You don't need an app for that

TEDGlobal 2013

Toby Shapshak: You don't need an app for that


Are the simplest phones the smartest? While the rest of the world is updating statuses and playing games on smartphones, Africa is developing useful SMS-based solutions to everyday needs, says journalist Toby Shapshak. In this eye-opening talk, Shapshak explores the frontiers of mobile invention in Africa as he asks us to reconsider our preconceived notions of innovation.

Anne-Marie Slaughter: Can we all "have it all"?

TEDGlobal 2013

Anne-Marie Slaughter: Can we all "have it all"?


Public policy expert Anne-Marie Slaughter made waves with her 2012 article, "Why women still can't have it all." But really, is this only a question for women? Here Slaughter expands her ideas and explains why shifts in work culture, public policy and social mores can lead to more equality -- for men, women, all of us.

Gabe Barcia-Colombo: My DNA vending machine

TED Fellows Retreat 2013

Gabe Barcia-Colombo: My DNA vending machine


Vending machines generally offer up sodas, candy bars and chips. Not so for the one created by TED Fellow Gabe Barcia-Colombo. This artist has dreamed up a DNA Vending Machine, which dispenses extracted human DNA, packaged in a vial along with a collectible photo of the person who gave it. It’s charming and quirky, but points out larger ethical issues that will arise as access to biotechnology increases.

Manu Prakash: A 50-cent microscope that folds like origami

TEDGlobal 2012

Manu Prakash: A 50-cent microscope that folds like origami


Perhaps you’ve punched out a paper doll or folded an origami swan? TED Fellow Manu Prakash and his team have created a microscope made of paper that's just as easy to fold and use. A sparkling demo that shows how this invention could revolutionize healthcare in developing countries … and turn almost anything into a fun, hands-on science experiment.

Christopher Soghoian: Government surveillance — this is just the beginning

TED Fellows Retreat 2013

Christopher Soghoian: Government surveillance — this is just the beginning


Privacy researcher Christopher Soghoian sees the landscape of government surveillance shifting beneath our feet, as an industry grows to support monitoring programs. Through private companies, he says, governments are buying technology with the capacity to break into computers, steal documents and monitor activity — without detection. This TED Fellow gives an unsettling look at what's to come.

Mary Lou Jepsen: Could future devices read images from our brains?

TED2013

Mary Lou Jepsen: Could future devices read images from our brains?


As an expert on cutting-edge digital displays, Mary Lou Jepsen studies how to show our most creative ideas on screens. And as a brain surgery patient herself, she is driven to know more about the neural activity that underlies invention, creativity, thought. She meshes these two passions in a rather mind-blowing talk on two cutting-edge brain studies that might point to a new frontier in understanding how (and what) we think.

Philip Evans: How data will transform business

TED@BCG San Francisco

Philip Evans: How data will transform business


What does the future of business look like? In an informative talk, Philip Evans gives a quick primer on two long-standing theories in strategy -- and explains why he thinks they are essentially invalid.

Annette Heuser: The 3 agencies with the power to make or break economies

TEDGlobal 2013

Annette Heuser: The 3 agencies with the power to make or break economies


The way we rate national economies is all wrong, says rating agency reformer Annette Heuser. With mysterious and obscure methods, three private US-based credit rating agencies wield immense power over national economies across the globe, and the outcomes can be catastrophic. But what if there was another way? In this bold talk, Heuser shares her vision for a nonprofit agency that would bring more equality and justice into the mix.

Henry Lin: What we can learn from galaxies far, far away

TEDYouth 2013

Henry Lin: What we can learn from galaxies far, far away


In a fun, exciting talk, teenager Henry Lin looks at something unexpected in the sky: distant galaxy clusters. By studying the properties of the universe's largest pieces, says the Intel Science Fair award winner, we can learn quite a lot about scientific mysteries in our own world and galaxy.

Siddharthan Chandran: Can the damaged brain repair itself?

TEDGlobal 2013

Siddharthan Chandran: Can the damaged brain repair itself?


After a traumatic brain injury, it sometimes happens that the brain can repair itself, building new brain cells to replace damaged ones. But the repair doesn't happen quickly enough to allow recovery from degenerative conditions like motor neuron disease (also known as Lou Gehrig's disease or ALS). Siddharthan Chandran walks through some new techniques using special stem cells that could allow the damaged brain to rebuild faster.

Ajit Narayanan: A word game to communicate in any language

TED2013

Ajit Narayanan: A word game to communicate in any language


While working with kids who have trouble speaking, Ajit Narayanan sketched out a way to think about language in pictures, to relate words and concepts in "maps." The idea now powers an app that helps nonverbal people communicate, and the big idea behind it, a language concept called FreeSpeech, has exciting potential.

Catherine Bracy: Why good hackers make good citizens

TEDCity2.0

Catherine Bracy: Why good hackers make good citizens


Hacking is about more than mischief-making or political subversion. As Catherine Bracy describes in this spirited talk, it can be just as much a force for good as it is for evil. She spins through some inspiring civically-minded projects in Honolulu, Oakland and Mexico City — and makes a compelling case that we all have what it takes to get involved.

Christopher Ryan: Are we designed to be sexual omnivores?

TED2013

Christopher Ryan: Are we designed to be sexual omnivores?


An idea permeates our modern view of relationships: that men and women have always paired off in sexually exclusive relationships. But before the dawn of agriculture, humans may actually have been quite promiscuous. Author Christopher Ryan walks us through the controversial evidence that human beings are sexual omnivores by nature, in hopes that a more nuanced understanding may put an end to discrimination, shame and the kind of unrealistic expectations that kill relationships.

Roselinde Torres: What it takes to be a great leader

TED@BCG San Francisco

Roselinde Torres: What it takes to be a great leader


The world is full of leadership programs, but the best way to learn how to lead might be right under your nose. In this clear, candid talk, Roselinde Torres describes 25 years observing truly great leaders at work, and shares the three simple but crucial questions would-be company chiefs need to ask to thrive in the future.