Neha Narula: The future of money

TED@BCG Paris

Neha Narula: The future of money

May 18, 2016


What happens when the way we buy, sell and pay for things changes, perhaps even removing the need for banks or currency exchange bureaus? That's the radical promise of a world powered by cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin and Ethereum. We're not there yet, but in this sparky talk, digital currency researcher Neha Narula describes the collective fiction of money -- and paints a picture of a very different looking future.

Gerard Ryle: How the Panama Papers journalists broke the biggest leak in history

TEDSummit

Gerard Ryle: How the Panama Papers journalists broke the biggest leak in history

June 26, 2016


Gerard Ryle led the international team that divulged the Panama Papers, the 11.5 million leaked documents from 40 years of activity of the Panamanian law firm Mossack Fonseca that have offered an unprecedented glimpse into the scope and methods of the secretive world of offshore finance. Hear the story behind the biggest collaborative journalism project in history.

Adam Savage: My love letter to cosplay

TED2016

Adam Savage: My love letter to cosplay

February 16, 2016


Adam Savage makes things and builds experiments, and he uses costumes to add humor, color and clarity to the stories he tells. Tracing his lifelong love of costumes -- from a childhood space helmet made of an ice cream tub to a No-Face costume he wore to Comic-Con -- Savage explores the world of cosplay and the meaning it creates for its community. "We're connecting with something important inside of us," he says. "The costumes are how we reveal ourselves to each other."

Emma Marris: Nature is everywhere -- we just need to learn to see it

TEDSummit

Emma Marris: Nature is everywhere -- we just need to learn to see it

June 26, 2016


How do you define "nature?" If we define it as that which is untouched by humans, then we won't have any left, says environmental writer Emma Marris. She urges us to consider a new definition of nature -- one that includes not only pristine wilderness but also the untended patches of plants growing in urban spaces -- and encourages us to bring our children out to touch and tinker with it, so that one day they might love and protect it.

James Green: 3 moons and a planet that could have alien life

TED Talks Live

James Green: 3 moons and a planet that could have alien life

November 6, 2015


Is there life beyond Earth? Join NASA's director of planetary science James Green for a survey of the places in our solar system that are most likely to harbor alien life.

Martin Reeves: How to build a business that lasts 100 years

TED@BCG Paris

Martin Reeves: How to build a business that lasts 100 years

May 18, 2016


If you want to build a business that lasts, there may be no better place to look for inspiration than your own immune system. Join strategist Martin Reeves as he shares startling statistics about shrinking corporate life spans and explains how executives can apply six principles from living organisms to build resilient businesses that flourish in the face of change.

Anthony Goldbloom: The jobs we'll lose to machines -- and the ones we won't

TED2016

Anthony Goldbloom: The jobs we'll lose to machines -- and the ones we won't

February 15, 2016


Machine learning isn't just for simple tasks like assessing credit risk and sorting mail anymore -- today, it's capable of far more complex applications, like grading essays and diagnosing diseases. With these advances comes an uneasy question: Will a robot do your job in the future?

Leila Hoteit: 3 lessons on success from an Arab businesswoman

TED@BCG Paris

Leila Hoteit: 3 lessons on success from an Arab businesswoman

May 18, 2016


Professional Arab women juggle more responsibilities than their male counterparts, and they face more cultural rigidity than Western women. What can their success teach us about tenacity, competition, priorities and progress? Tracing her career as an engineer, advocate and mother in Abu Dhabi, Leila Hoteit shares three lessons for thriving in the modern world.

Shubhendu Sharma: How to grow a forest in your backyard

TED@BCG Paris

Shubhendu Sharma: How to grow a forest in your backyard

May 18, 2016


Forests don't have to be far-flung nature reserves, isolated from human life. Instead, we can grow them right where we are -- even in cities. Eco-entrepreneur and TED Fellow Shubhendu Sharma grows ultra-dense, biodiverse mini-forests of native species in urban areas by engineering soil, microbes and biomass to kickstart natural growth processes. Follow along as he describes how to grow a 100-year-old forest in just 10 years, and learn how you can get in on this tiny jungle party.

Dave Brain: What a planet needs to sustain life

TEDxBoulder

Dave Brain: What a planet needs to sustain life

September 19, 2015


"Venus is too hot, Mars is too cold, and Earth is just right," says planetary scientist Dave Brain. But why? In this pleasantly humorous talk, Brain explores the fascinating science behind what it takes for a planet to host life -- and why humanity may just be in the right place at the right time when it comes to the timeline of life-sustaining planets.

Oded Shoseyov: How we're harnessing nature's hidden superpowers

TED@BCG Paris

Oded Shoseyov: How we're harnessing nature's hidden superpowers

May 18, 2016


What do you get when you combine the strongest materials from the plant world with the most elastic ones from the insect kingdom? Super-performing materials that might transform ... everything. Nanobiotechnologist Oded Shoseyov walks us through examples of amazing materials found throughout nature, in everything from cat fleas to sequoia trees, and shows the creative ways his team is harnessing them in everything from sports shoes to medical implants.

Alexander Betts: Why Brexit happened -- and what to do next

TEDSummit

Alexander Betts: Why Brexit happened -- and what to do next

June 29, 2016


We are embarrassingly unaware of how divided our societies are, and Brexit grew out of a deep, unexamined divide between those that fear globalization and those that embrace it, says social scientist Alexander Betts. How do we now address that fear as well as growing disillusionment with the political establishment, while refusing to give in to xenophobia and nationalism? Join Betts as he discusses four post-Brexit steps toward a more inclusive world.

Eric Haseltine: What will be the next big scientific breakthrough?

TED Talks Live

Eric Haseltine: What will be the next big scientific breakthrough?

November 5, 2015


Throughout history, speculation has spurred beautiful, revolutionary science -- opening our eyes to entirely new universes. "I'm not talking about science that takes baby steps," says Eric Haseltine. "I'm talking about science that takes enormous leaps." In this talk, Haseltine passionately takes us to the edges of intellectual pursuit with two ideas -- one that's already made history, and the other that's digging into one of humanity's biggest questions with admirable ambition (and a healthy dose of skepticism from many).

Marwa Al-Sabouni: How Syria's architecture laid the foundation for brutal war

TEDSummit

Marwa Al-Sabouni: How Syria's architecture laid the foundation for brutal war

June 26, 2016


What caused the war in Syria? Oppression, drought and religious differences all played key roles, but Marwa Al-Sabouni suggests another reason: architecture. Speaking to us over the Internet from Homs, where for the last six years she has watched the war tear her city apart, Al-Sabouni suggests that Syria's architecture divided its once tolerant and multicultural society into single-identity enclaves defined by class and religion. The country's future now depends on how it chooses to rebuild.

Lisa Dyson: A forgotten Space Age technology could change how we grow food

TED@BCG Paris

Lisa Dyson: A forgotten Space Age technology could change how we grow food

May 18, 2016


We're heading for a world population of 10 billion people -- but what will we all eat? Lisa Dyson rediscovered an idea developed by NASA in the 1960s for deep-space travel, and it could be a key to reinventing how we grow food.

Safwat Saleem: Why I keep speaking up, even when people mock my accent

TED2016

Safwat Saleem: Why I keep speaking up, even when people mock my accent

February 15, 2016


Artist Safwat Saleem grew up with a stutter -- but as an independent animator, he decided to do his own voiceovers to give life to his characters. When YouTube commenters started mocking his Pakistani accent, it crushed him, and his voice began to leave his work. Hear how this TED Fellow reclaimed his voice and confidence in this charming, thoughtful talk.

John Legend: "Redemption Song"

TED2016

John Legend: "Redemption Song"

February 15, 2016


John Legend is on a mission to transform America's criminal justice system. Through his Free America campaign, he's encouraging rehabilitation and healing in our prisons, jails and detention centers -- and giving hope to those who want to create a better life after serving their time. With a spoken-word prelude from James Cavitt, an inmate at San Quentin State Prison, Legend treats us to his version of Bob Marley's "Redemption Song." "Won't you help to sing these songs of freedom?"

Julia Galef: Why you think you're right -- even if you're wrong

TEDxPSU

Julia Galef: Why you think you're right -- even if you're wrong

February 28, 2016


Perspective is everything, especially when it comes to examining your beliefs. Are you a soldier, prone to defending your viewpoint at all costs -- or a scout, spurred by curiosity? Julia Galef examines the motivations behind these two mindsets and how they shape the way we interpret information, interweaved with a compelling history lesson from 19th-century France. When your steadfast opinions are tested, Galef asks: "What do you most yearn for? Do you yearn to defend your own beliefs or do you yearn to see the world as clearly as you possibly can?"

Prosanta Chakrabarty: Clues to prehistoric times, found in blind cavefish

TED2016

Prosanta Chakrabarty: Clues to prehistoric times, found in blind cavefish

February 15, 2016


TED Fellow Prosanta Chakrabarty explores hidden parts of the world in search of new species of cave-dwelling fish. These subterranean creatures have developed fascinating adaptations, and they provide biological insights into blindness as well as geological clues about how the continents broke apart million of years ago. Contemplate deep time in this short talk.

Gill Hicks: I survived a terrorist attack. Here's what I learned

TEDxSydney

Gill Hicks: I survived a terrorist attack. Here's what I learned

May 24, 2016


Gill Hicks's story is one of compassion and humanity, emerging from the ashes of chaos and hate. A survivor of the London terrorist bombings on July 7, 2005, she shares her story of the events of that day -- and the profound lessons that came as she learned how to live on.

Wanda Diaz Merced: How a blind astronomer found a way to hear the stars

TED2016

Wanda Diaz Merced: How a blind astronomer found a way to hear the stars

February 16, 2016


Wanda Diaz Merced studies the light emitted by gamma-ray bursts, the most energetic events in the universe. When she lost her sight and was left without a way to do her science, she had a revelatory insight: the light curves she could no longer see could be translated into sound. Through sonification, she regained mastery over her work, and now she's advocating for a more inclusive scientific community. "Science is for everyone," she says. "It has to be available to everyone, because we are all natural explorers."

Blaise Agüera y Arcas: How computers are learning to be creative

TED@BCG Paris

Blaise Agüera y Arcas: How computers are learning to be creative

May 18, 2016


We're on the edge of a new frontier in art and creativity -- and it's not human. Blaise Agüera y Arcas, principal scientist at Google, works with deep neural networks for machine perception and distributed learning. In this captivating demo, he shows how neural nets trained to recognize images can be run in reverse, to generate them. The results: spectacular, hallucinatory collages (and poems!) that defy categorization. "Perception and creativity are very intimately connected," Agüera y Arcas says. "Any creature, any being that is able to do perceptual acts is also able to create."

Michael Murphy: Architecture that's built to heal

TED2016

Michael Murphy: Architecture that's built to heal

February 17, 2016


Architecture is more than a clever arrangement of bricks. In this eloquent talk, Michael Murphy shows how he and his team look far beyond the blueprint when they're designing. Considering factors from airflow to light, theirs is a holistic approach that produces community as well as (beautiful) buildings. He takes us on a tour of projects in countries such as Rwanda and Haiti, and reveals a moving, ambitious plan for a memorial intended to heal hearts in the American South.

Tom Hulme: What can we learn from shortcuts?

TED2016

Tom Hulme: What can we learn from shortcuts?

February 17, 2016


How do you build a product people really want? Allow consumers to be a part of the process. "Empathy for what your customers want is probably the biggest leading indicator of business success," says designer Tom Hulme. In this short talk, Hulme lays out three insightful examples of the intersection of design and user experience, where people have developed their own desire paths out of necessity. Once you know how to spot them, you'll start noticing them everywhere.

Brian Little: Who are you, really? The puzzle of personality

TED2016

Brian Little: Who are you, really? The puzzle of personality

February 16, 2016


What makes you, you? Psychologists like to talk about our traits, or defined characteristics that make us who we are. But Brian Little is more interested in moments when we transcend those traits -- sometimes because our culture demands it of us, and sometimes because we demand it of ourselves. Join Little as he dissects the surprising differences between introverts and extroverts and explains why your personality may be more malleable than you think.

Elise Roy: When we design for disability, we all benefit

TEDxMidAtlantic

Elise Roy: When we design for disability, we all benefit

September 25, 2015


"I believe that losing my hearing was one of the greatest gifts I've ever received," says Elise Roy. As a disability rights lawyer and design thinker, she knows that being Deaf gives her a unique way of experiencing and reframing the world -- a perspective that could solve some of our largest problems. As she says: "When we design for disability first, you often stumble upon solutions that are better than those when we design for the norm."

Keolu Fox: Why genetic research must be more diverse

TED2016

Keolu Fox: Why genetic research must be more diverse

February 15, 2016


Ninety-six percent of genome studies are based on people of European descent. The rest of the world is virtually unrepresented -- and this is dangerous, says geneticist and TED Fellow Keolu Fox, because we react to drugs differently based on our genetic makeup. Fox is working to democratize genome sequencing, specifically by advocating for indigenous populations to get involved in research, with the goal of eliminating health disparities. "The research community needs to immerse itself in indigenous culture," he says, "or die trying."

Chris Milk: The birth of virtual reality as an art form

TED2016

Chris Milk: The birth of virtual reality as an art form

February 18, 2016


Chris Milk uses innovative technologies to make personal, interactive, human stories. Accompanied by Joshua Roman on cello and McKenzie Stubbert on piano, Milk traces his relationship to music and art -- from the first moment he remembers putting on headphones to his current work creating breakthrough virtual reality projects. VR is the last medium for storytelling, he says, because it closes the gap between audience and storyteller. To illustrate, he brought the TED audience together in the world's largest collective VR experience. Join them and take part in this interactive talk by getting a Google Cardboard and downloading the experience at with.in/TED.

Seema Bansal: How to fix a broken education system ... without any more money

TED@BCG Paris

Seema Bansal: How to fix a broken education system ... without any more money

May 18, 2016


Seema Bansal forged a path to public education reform for 15,000 schools in Haryana, India, by setting an ambitious goal: by 2020, 80 percent of children should have grade-level knowledge. She's looking to meet this goal by seeking reforms that will work in every school without additional resources. Bansal and her team have found success using creative, straightforward techniques such as communicating with teachers using SMS group chats, and they have already measurably improved learning and engagement in Haryana's schools.

Tristan Harris: How better tech could protect us from distraction

TEDxBrussels

Tristan Harris: How better tech could protect us from distraction

December 1, 2014


How often does technology interrupt us from what we really mean to be doing? At work and at play, we spend a startling amount of time distracted by pings and pop-ups -- instead of helping us spend our time well, it often feels like our tech is stealing it away from us. Design thinker Tristan Harris offers thoughtful new ideas for technology that creates more meaningful interaction. He asks: "What does the future of technology look like when you're designing for the deepest human values?"