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TEDxWomen 2012

Sue Austin: Deep sea diving ... in a wheelchair

Filmed:

When Sue Austin got a power chair 16 years ago, she felt a tremendous sense of freedom -- yet others looked at her as though she had lost something. In her art, she aims to convey the spirit of wonder she feels wheeling through the world. Includes thrilling footage of an underwater wheelchair that lets her explore ocean beds, drifting through schools of fish, floating free in 360 degrees. (Filmed at TEDxWomen.)

- Performance artist
In repurposing her wheelchair to create fantastical art, Sue Austin reshapes how we think about disability. Full bio

It's wonderful to be here
00:16
to talk about my journey,
00:18
to talk about the wheelchair
00:20
and the freedom it has bought me.
00:22
I started using a wheelchair 16 years ago
00:25
when an extended illness
00:27
changed the way I could access the world.
00:29
When I started using the wheelchair,
00:33
it was a tremendous new freedom.
00:35
I'd seen my life slip away and become restricted.
00:38
It was like having an enormous new toy.
00:41
I could whiz around and feel the wind in my face again.
00:44
Just being out on the street was exhilarating.
00:48
But even though I had this newfound joy and freedom,
00:51
people's reaction completely changed towards me.
00:56
It was as if they couldn't see me anymore,
00:59
as if an invisibility cloak had descended.
01:02
They seemed to see me in terms of their assumptions
01:06
of what it must be like to be in a wheelchair.
01:09
When I asked people their associations with the wheelchair,
01:13
they used words like "limitation," "fear,"
01:18
"pity" and "restriction."
01:22
I realized I'd internalized these responses
01:25
and it had changed who I was on a core level.
01:29
A part of me had become alienated from myself.
01:33
I was seeing myself not from my perspective,
01:37
but vividly and continuously from the perspective
01:41
of other people's responses to me.
01:45
As a result, I knew I needed to make my own stories
01:48
about this experience,
01:53
new narratives to reclaim my identity.
01:55
["Finding Freedom: 'By creating our own stories we learn to take the texts of our lives as seriously as we do 'official' narratives.' — Davis 2009, TEDx Women"]
01:58
I started making work
02:01
that aimed to communicate something
02:03
of the joy and freedom I felt when using a wheelchair --
02:06
a power chair -- to negotiate the world.
02:11
I was working to transform these internalized responses,
02:16
to transform the preconceptions that had so shaped
02:22
my identity when I started using a wheelchair,
02:26
by creating unexpected images.
02:29
The wheelchair became an object to paint and play with.
02:33
When I literally started leaving
02:39
traces of my joy and freedom,
02:41
it was exciting to see
02:45
the interested and surprised responses from people.
02:47
It seemed to open up new perspectives,
02:51
and therein lay the paradigm shift.
02:54
It showed that an arts practice
02:57
can remake one's identity
02:59
and transform preconceptions by revisioning the familiar.
03:01
So when I began to dive, in 2005,
03:06
I realized scuba gear extends your range of activity
03:10
in just the same way as a wheelchair does,
03:14
but the associations attached to scuba gear
03:16
are ones of excitement and adventure,
03:19
completely different to people's responses to the wheelchair.
03:21
So I thought, "I wonder what'll happen
03:25
if I put the two together?" (Laughter) (Applause)
03:28
And the underwater wheelchair that has resulted
03:33
has taken me on the most amazing journey
03:37
over the last seven years.
03:40
So to give you an idea of what that's like,
03:42
I'd like to share with you one of the outcomes
03:45
from creating this spectacle,
03:48
and show you what an amazing journey it's taken me on.
03:50
(Music)
03:54
(Applause)
07:24
It is the most amazing experience,
07:31
beyond most other things I've experienced in life.
07:34
I literally have the freedom to move
07:37
in 360 degrees of space
07:40
and an ecstatic experience of joy and freedom.
07:43
And the incredibly unexpected thing
07:47
is that other people seem to see and feel that too.
07:49
Their eyes literally light up,
07:54
and they say things like, "I want one of those,"
07:56
or, "If you can do that, I can do anything."
07:59
And I'm thinking, it's because in that moment
08:03
of them seeing an object
08:06
they have no frame of reference for,
08:09
or so transcends the frames of reference
08:11
they have with the wheelchair,
08:14
they have to think in a completely new way.
08:16
And I think that moment of completely new thought
08:19
perhaps creates a freedom
08:23
that spreads to the rest of other people's lives.
08:25
For me, this means that they're seeing
08:29
the value of difference,
08:33
the joy it brings
08:35
when instead of focusing on loss or limitation,
08:37
we see and discover the power and joy
08:41
of seeing the world from exciting new perspectives.
08:45
For me, the wheelchair becomes
08:49
a vehicle for transformation.
08:51
In fact, I now call the underwater wheelchair "Portal,"
08:54
because it's literally pushed me through
08:57
into a new way of being,
09:00
into new dimensions and into a new level of consciousness.
09:01
And the other thing is,
09:05
that because nobody's seen or heard
09:07
of an underwater wheelchair before,
09:09
and creating this spectacle is about creating
09:12
new ways of seeing, being and knowing,
09:14
now you have this concept in your mind.
09:17
You're all part of the artwork too.
09:20
(Applause)
09:24
Translated by Joseph Geni
Reviewed by Morton Bast

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About the speaker:

Sue Austin - Performance artist
In repurposing her wheelchair to create fantastical art, Sue Austin reshapes how we think about disability.

Why you should listen

Multimedia, performance and installation artist Sue Austin keeps a fascinating mission at the center her work: to challenge the idea of disabled as “other” and represent her experience as a wheelchair user in a brighter light. She does this by creating quirky, unexpected juxtapositions -- bringing a sense of whimsy and empowerment to the discussion of disability.

Austin is the founder and artistic director of Freewheeling, an initiative aiming to further the genre of Disability Arts. In 2012, she was asked to be a part of the Cultural Olympiad in Britain, a celebration of the arts leading up to the Olympic and Paralympic Games. The work she created for the event, called “Creating the Spectacle!,” is a groundbreaking series of live art and video works of an underwater wheelchair.

More profile about the speaker
Sue Austin | Speaker | TED.com