sponsored links
TEDGlobal 2010

Emily Pilloton: Teaching design for change

エミリー・ピロトン:変革のためのデザイン教育

July 16, 2010

デザイナーであるエミリー・ピロトンは、貧しい農村地域であるノースキャロライナ州バーティ郡に移住し、デザインの力でコミュニティに変革を引き起こす果敢な実験を行いました。エミリーは「スタジオH」というデザインと建築のクラスで教鞭をとり、中高生を心身ともに惹きつけながら、米国で最も貧しい地域に、良質なデザインと新しい機会をもたらしました。

Emily Pilloton - Humanitarian design activist
Emily Pilloton wrote Design Revolution, a book about 100-plus objects and systems designed to make people's lives better. In 2010, her design nonprofit began an immersive residency in Bertie County, North Carolina, the poorest and most rural county in the state. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
So this is a story
これから、今や私にとって
00:16
of a place that I now call home.
「地元」になった場所の話をします
00:18
It's a story of public education
テーマは、公教育と、農村地域
00:20
and of rural communities
この両方をよりよくするために
00:23
and of what design might do to improve both.
デザインに何ができるのかです
00:25
So this is Bertie County,
ここは米国ノースキャロライナ州
00:28
North Carolina, USA.
バーティ郡です
00:30
To give you an idea of the "where:"
地図を見てみましょう
00:32
So here's North Carolina, and if we zoom in,
ここがノースキャロライナ、拡大すると
00:34
Bertie County is in the eastern part of the state.
州の東部にバーティ郡があります
00:36
It's about two hours east
州都ローリーからは
00:39
driving-time from Raleigh.
車で約2時間
00:41
And it's very flat. It's very swampy.
平地で、沼の多いところです
00:43
It's mostly farmland.
ほとんどが農地です
00:45
The entire county
郡の人口はわずか2万人で
00:47
is home to just 20,000 people, and they're very sparsely distributed.
家はあちこちに散らばっています
00:49
So there's only 27 people per square mile,
人口密度は1平方マイルあたり27人
00:52
which comes down to about 10 people
つまり1平方キロあたり——
00:54
per square kilometer.
10人です
00:56
Bertie County is kind of a prime example
バーティ郡は、アメリカの農村地域における
00:58
in the demise of rural America.
「末期状態」の典型的な一例です
01:01
We've seen this story all over the country
同じような地域は米国全土に
01:03
and even in places beyond the American borders.
また国外にも見受けられます
01:06
We know the symptoms.
症状としては…
01:09
It's the hollowing out of small towns.
市街地の空洞化
01:11
It's downtowns becoming ghost towns.
中心部のゴーストタウン化
01:13
The brain drain --
頭脳流出。すなわち教育を受けた人間の
01:15
where all of the most educated and qualified leave and never come back.
ほとんどが街を離れ、二度と戻りません
01:17
It's the dependence on farm subsidies
農業補助金への依存
01:20
and under-performing schools
平均より質の低い学校
01:22
and higher poverty rates in rural areas
農村部の貧困率は
01:24
than in urban.
都会よりも高いのです
01:26
And Bertie County is no exception to this.
バーティ郡も例外ではありません
01:28
Perhaps the biggest thing it struggles with,
似たようなコミュニティと同じく
01:30
like many communities similar to it,
最も苦しんでいるのは
01:32
is that there's no
農村地域の未来のために
01:34
shared, collective investment
集団投資が分配されないことかもしれません
01:36
in the future of rural communities.
全米で行われている慈善寄付のうち
01:38
Only 6.8 percent of all our philanthropic giving in the U.S. right now
農村部の益となるものは6.8%しかありません
01:40
benefits rural communities,
しかし、全人口の20%は
01:43
and yet 20 percent of our population lives there.
農村部で暮らしているのです
01:45
So Bertie County is not only very rural; it's incredibly poor.
そして、バーティ郡は単なる農村地域ではなく、極度に貧しい地域です
01:48
It is the poorest county in the state.
州の中で最も貧しい郡なのです
01:51
It has one in three of its children living in poverty,
子どもの3人に1人は貧困状態にあります
01:53
and it's what is referred to as a "rural ghetto."
いわゆる「農村ゲットー」として紹介される地域です
01:56
The economy is mostly agricultural.
経済はほぼ農業で成り立っています
01:59
The biggest crops are cotton and tobacco,
主要産品は綿花とタバコ
02:02
and we're very proud of our Bertie County peanut.
そして名産のバーティ・ピーナッツです
02:04
The biggest employer is the Purdue chicken processing plant.
地域最大の雇用主は、パデュー社の鶏肉処理工場です
02:07
The county seat is Windsor.
郡の中心はウィンザー市
02:10
This is like Times Square of Windsor that you're looking at right now.
この写真はウィンザーの「タイムズスクエア」的な一角です
02:12
It's home to only 2,000 people,
ウィンザーの住人は2000人
02:15
and like a lot of other small towns
他の小さな街と同じく
02:17
it has been hollowed out over the years.
年々人口が減っています
02:19
There are more buildings that are empty or in disrepair
空き家や壊れたままの家の方が
02:21
than occupied and in use.
使用中の建物よりも多いのです
02:24
You can count the number of restaurants in the county
レストランの数は
02:26
on one hand --
片手で数えられるほど
02:28
Bunn's Barbecue being my absolute favorite.
バン・バーベキューは私の行きつけのお店です
02:30
But in the whole county there is no coffee shop,
しかしウィンザーには、コーヒーショップも
02:32
there's no Internet cafe,
インターネットカフェも
02:34
there's no movie theater, there's no bookstore.
映画館も、書店も
02:36
There isn't even a Walmart.
ウォルマートさえ、ありません
02:38
Racially, the county
人種的には、人口の60%が
02:40
is about 60 percent African-American,
アフリカ系アメリカ人です
02:42
but what happens in the public schools
しかし、経済的に恵まれている
02:44
is most of the privileged white kids
白人の子どもたちは、大半が
02:46
go to the private Lawrence Academy.
私立のローレンス・アカデミーに通うため
02:48
So the public school students
公立学校の生徒は
02:50
are about 86 percent African-American.
86%が黒人です
02:52
And this is a spread from the local newspaper of the recent graduating class,
地元の新聞に掲載された卒業生の一覧です
02:54
and you can see the difference is pretty stark.
違いは明白でしょう
02:57
So to say that the public education system
バーティ郡の公教育が
03:00
in Bertie County is struggling
「苦闘している」という表現は
03:02
would be a huge understatement.
控えめな言い方かもしれません
03:04
There's basically no pool
基本的に、免許を持った
03:06
of qualified teachers to pull from,
教員の余剰人員はゼロです
03:08
and only eight percent of the people in the county
郡の人口のたった8%しか
03:10
have a bachelor's degree or higher.
大学を出ていないので
03:12
So there isn't a big legacy
誇れるような教育の伝統も
03:14
in the pride of education.
大してありません
03:16
In fact, two years ago,
事実、2年前の全米標準学力テストで
03:18
only 27 percent of all the third- through eighth-graders
英語と数学の両方で基準点を満たした子は
03:20
were passing the state standard
3年生から8年生全体で
03:22
in both English and math.
27%しかいませんでした
03:24
So it sounds like I'm painting a really bleak picture of this place,
さて、この地域の悪い面ばかりお話ししてきましたが
03:27
but I promise there is good news.
もちろん、良いニュースもあります
03:30
The biggest asset, in my opinion,
私が思うに、バーティ郡のいま最も大きな資産は
03:33
one of the biggest assets in Bertie County right now is this man:
この人物です
03:35
This is Dr. Chip Zullinger,
チップ・ザリンジャー博士
03:37
fondly known as Dr. Z.
「ドクター・Z」の愛称で親しまれています
03:39
He was brought in in October 2007
彼は2007年の10月に、
03:42
as the new superintendent
崩壊した教育制度を建て直すため
03:44
to basically fix this broken school system.
教育長として赴任してきました
03:46
And he previously was a superintendent
以前は、サウスカロライナ州チャールストン
03:48
in Charleston, South Carolina
およびコロラド州デンバーの
03:50
and then in Denver, Colorado.
教育長を務めていました
03:52
He started some of the country's first charter schools
彼は80年代後半に、米国でも先駆的な
03:54
in the late '80s in the U.S.
チャータースクールを立ち上げました
03:56
And he is an absolute renegade and a visionary,
反骨精神に溢れ、先見の明のある人です
03:59
and he is the reason that I now live and work there.
私がいまここで暮らし、仕事をしている理由は、彼がいるからです
04:01
So in February of 2009,
2009年の2月、ザリンジャー博士は
04:06
Dr. Zullinger invited us, Project H Design --
私が立ち上げた非営利デザイン集団である
04:08
which is a non-profit design firm that I founded --
「プロジェクト・H・デザイン」を
04:11
to come to Bertie and to partner with him
バーティ郡に招きました
04:13
on the repair of this school district
彼とともに学区の再建にあたり
04:15
and to bring a design perspective to the repair of the school district.
そこにデザインの視点を導入してほしい、という依頼でした
04:17
And he invited us in particular
彼が特に私たちを選んだのは
04:20
because we have a very specific
独特のデザインプロセスを
04:22
type of design process --
有しているからでした
04:24
one that results in appropriate design solutions
デザインのサービスや創造的資本を
04:26
in places that don't usually have access
通常得がたい地域においては、
04:29
to design services or creative capital.
適切なデザイン的解決を生み出せるプロセスです
04:31
Specifically, we use these six design directives,
具体的には、6つのデザイン原則を使っていました
04:33
probably the most important being number two:
おそらく最も重要なのは2番目の原則です
04:36
we design with, not for --
「その人のためにつくるのではなく、その人と一緒につくること」
04:38
in that, when we're doing humanitarian-focused design,
私たちが人間中心のデザインを行うとき
04:40
it's not about designing for clients anymore.
それはクライアントのためのものづくりではなく
04:43
It's about designing with people,
人々と一緒につくっていくこと。その過程の中から
04:46
and letting appropriate solutions emerge from within.
最適解が立ち上がってくるようにすることです
04:48
So at the time of being invited down there,
招かれた時、私たちは
04:51
we were based in San Francisco,
サンフランシスコを拠点としていました
04:53
and so we were going back and forth
そのため、2009年の間は
04:55
for basically the rest of 2009,
2拠点を行ったり来たりしながら
04:57
spending about half our time in Bertie County.
ほぼ半分の時間をバーティ郡で過ごしました
04:59
And when I say we, I mean Project H,
「私たち」つまりプロジェクトHは
05:01
but more specifically, I mean myself and my partner, Matthew Miller,
私と、パートナーのマシュー・ミラーによるユニットです
05:03
who's an architect and a sort of MacGyver-type builder.
マシューは「冒険野郎マクガイバー」のようなタイプの建築家です
05:06
So fast-forward to today, and we now live there.
そして現在は、バーティ郡に居を移しています
05:10
I have strategically cut Matt's head out of this photo,
この写真ではマットの顔から上をわざと切り取っています
05:13
because he would kill me if he knew I was using it
スウェットを着ている写真を公開したら
05:15
because of the sweatsuits.
すごく怒られるので…
05:17
But this is our front porch. We live there.
さて、ここは我が家の玄関です
05:19
We now call this place home.
この地を、今私たちは「地元」と言っています
05:21
Over the course of this year that we spent flying back and forth,
1年かけて行ったり来たりしているうちに
05:23
we realized we had fallen in love with the place.
私たちはこの地を大好きになってしまいました
05:26
We had fallen in love with the place and the people
土地も、人も
05:28
and the work that we're able to do
そして仕事も大好きです
05:31
in a rural place like Bertie County,
バーティ郡のような農村地域で
05:33
that, as designers and builders,
デザイナーと建築家が働けることなど
05:35
you can't do everywhere.
そうめったにありません
05:37
There's space to experiment
そこには実験したり試行錯誤する
05:39
and to weld and to test things.
十分な余地がありました
05:41
We have an amazing advocate in Dr. Zullinger.
ザリンジャー博士の素晴らしいご支援もありました
05:43
There's a nobility of real, hands-on,
リアルかつ実践的で、手を真っ黒にする
05:46
dirt-under-your-fingernails work.
この仕事に、誇りを感じています
05:49
But beyond our personal reasons for wanting to be there,
ただ、私たちの個人的な関心以上に
05:51
there is a huge need.
現地には膨大なニーズがあります
05:53
There is a total vacuum of creative capital in Bertie County.
バーティ郡における創造的資本は、完全な空白状態です
05:55
There isn't a single licensed architect in the whole county.
郡のどこにも、資格を持っている建築士は一人もいません
05:58
And so we saw an opportunity
デザインは手つかずだったので
06:01
to bring design as this untouched tool,
持ち込むチャンスだと考えました
06:03
something that Bertie County didn't otherwise have,
このチャンスがなければ、バーティ郡が手にしないような
06:06
and to be sort of the -- to usher that in
全く新しい道具を
06:09
as a new type of tool in their tool kit.
道具箱に加えたのです
06:11
The initial goal became using design
当初の目標は、ザリンジャー博士と協力して
06:14
within the public education system in partnership with Dr. Zullinger --
公教育システムの枠組みの中で
06:16
that was why we were there.
デザインを活用していくことでした
06:19
But beyond that, we recognized
しかしそれ以上に
06:21
that Bertie County, as a community,
バーティ郡のコミュニティ自体が
06:23
was in dire need of a fresh perspective
新しい視点や
06:25
of pride and connectedness
地域の誇り、つながりの形成
06:28
and of the creative capital
そして欠乏している創造的資本を
06:30
that they were so much lacking.
切実に求めていました
06:32
So the goal became, yes, to apply design within education,
そのため、目標を当初のものから変更し
06:34
but then to figure out how to make education
教育にデザインを導入するだけでなく
06:37
a great vehicle for community development.
コミュニティを発展させる手段として
06:39
So in order to do this, we've taken three different approaches
教育を利用する方法を考えることにしました
06:42
to the intersection of design and education.
この目標を達成するために、私たちは3つのアプローチで
06:44
And I should say that these are three things that we've done in Bertie County,
デザインと教育に接点を持たせました
06:47
but I feel pretty confident that they could work
私たちがバーティ郡で行った3つのアプローチは
06:50
in a lot of other rural communities
おそらく国内外のさまざまな農村地域でも
06:52
around the U.S. and maybe even beyond.
効果的であると考えています
06:54
So the first of the three is design for education.
1つ目は、「教育のためのデザイン」です
06:57
This is the most kind of direct, obvious
これが最も直接的でわかりやすい
07:00
intersection of the two things.
教育とデザインの接点です
07:03
It's the physical construction
つまり、空間や素材のあり方を
07:05
of improved spaces and materials and experiences
見直すことで、教師・生徒の体験を
07:07
for teachers and students.
改善しようということです
07:10
This is in response to the awful mobile trailers
このアプローチは、ひどい移動式トレーラーや
07:12
and the outdated textbooks
時代遅れの教科書や、劣悪な建設資材が
07:15
and the terrible materials that we're building schools out of these days.
昨今の学校で使われていることに対するものでした
07:17
And so this played out for us in a couple different ways.
2つの違う方法で取り組みました
07:21
The first was a series of renovations of computer labs.
一つ目は、コンピュータールームのリノベーションです
07:23
So traditionally, the computer labs,
伝統的にコンピュータールームは
07:26
particularly in an under-performing school like Bertie County,
特にバーティ郡のような低レベルの学校においては
07:28
where they have to benchmark test every other week,
隔週で進捗テストを行わなければならないこともあり
07:31
the computer lab is a kill-and-drill
非常に表層的で機械的な
07:34
testing facility.
テスト教室と化していました
07:36
You come in, you face the wall, you take your test and you leave.
教室に入り、壁に向き合って、テストを受け、出て行く
07:38
So we wanted to change the way that students approach technology,
私たちは、生徒のテクノロジーへの接し方を変えたいと思いました
07:41
to create a more convivial and social space
もっと明るく、交流のできる場で
07:44
that was more engaging, more accessible,
魅力的で身近な場所にしたかったのです
07:47
and also to increase the ability for teachers
それと同時に、教師がもっとテクノロジーを利用した教育を
07:49
to use these spaces for technology-based instruction.
やりやすくするという意図もありました
07:51
So this is the lab at the high school,
この写真が、高校のコンピュータールームです
07:54
and the principal there is in love with this room.
ここの校長先生も非常に気に入ってくれました
07:56
Every time he has visitors, it's the first place that he takes them.
来客があると、いつもここを最初に見せるのです
07:58
And this also meant the co-creation with some teachers
これもまた、教師と一緒になって創り上げた
08:02
of this educational playground system
教育のための遊具
08:04
called the learning landscape.
「学びの庭」と名付けたものです
08:06
It allows elementary-level students to learn core subjects
小学生たちはここで、遊びや運動を通じて
08:08
through game play and activity
童心に帰ってはしゃぎ回りながら
08:11
and running around and screaming and being a kid.
必修科目の学習ができるのです
08:13
So this game that the kids are playing here --
この写真で子どもたちが遊んでいるのは
08:15
in this case they were learning basic multiplication
基礎的な掛け算を学ぶための遊び
08:17
through a game called Match Me.
「マッチミー」です。
08:19
And in Match Me, you take the class, divide it into two teams,
マッチミーという遊びは、クラスを二つのチームに分け
08:21
one team on each side of the playground,
各チームがグランドの両側に陣取ります
08:24
and the teacher will take a piece of chalk
教師がチョークを持って
08:26
and just write a number on each of the tires.
一つ一つのタイヤに数字を書いて回ります
08:28
And then she'll call out a math problem --
そして、先生が掛け算の式を言います
08:30
so let's say four times four --
例えば4×4としましょう
08:32
and then one student from each team has to compete
そこで両チームから生徒1名ずつが出て、相手よりも早く
08:34
to figure out that four times four is 16
4×4=16の数字が書かれた
08:37
and find the tire with the 16 on it and sit on it.
タイヤを見つけて、そこに座ります
08:39
So the goal is to have all of your teammates sitting on the tires
最終的に、チーム全員が
08:42
and then your team wins.
正しいタイヤに座れた方が勝ちです
08:44
And the impact of the learning landscape
「学びの庭」は、驚くべき
08:46
has been pretty surprising and amazing.
力を持っていました
08:48
Some of the classes and teachers have reported higher test scores,
いくつかのクラスではテストの点数が上がり
08:50
a greater comfort level with the material,
算数に親しみを覚えるようになり
08:53
especially with the boys,
特に外で遊ぶのが好きな
08:55
that in going outside and playing,
男子生徒たちが
08:57
they aren't afraid to take on
二桁の掛け算も
08:59
a double-digit multiplication problem --
恐れなくなりました
09:01
and also that the teachers are able
同時に、教師にとっては
09:03
to use these as assessment tools
評価の道具にもなり
09:05
to better gauge how their students
生徒が新しい事柄をどれだけ理解しているかを
09:07
are understanding new material.
より正確に測ることができます
09:09
So with design for education, I think the most important thing
教育のためのデザインにおいて最も重要なのは
09:11
is to have a shared ownership of the solutions with the teachers,
現場の教師が、製作物に愛着をもって
09:14
so that they have the incentive and the desire to use them.
意欲的に活用することだと思います
09:17
So this is Mr. Perry. He's the assistant superintendent.
こちらは、校長補佐のペリー氏が
09:20
He came out for one of our teacher-training days
教師の育成プログラムに参加したときの写真です
09:23
and won like five rounds of Match Me in a row and was very proud of himself.
マッチミーに5連勝して、大喜びしているところです
09:26
(Laughter)
(笑)
09:29
So the second approach is redesigning education itself.
さて、二つ目のアプローチは、教育自体のリデザインです
09:32
This is the most complex.
これが最も複雑です
09:35
It's a systems-level look
教育がどのように管理され
09:37
at how education is administered
何が、誰に対して提供されているのか
09:39
and what is being offered and to whom.
システム全体を俯瞰します
09:41
So in many cases this is not so much about making change
多くの場合は、変化を生み出すというより
09:43
as it is creating the conditions
変化が起き得る状態を整えたり
09:46
under which change is possible
変化を誘発する動機付けを行うことでした
09:48
and the incentive to want to make change,
そしてそれは、農村地域や
09:50
which is easier said than done in rural communities
閉鎖的な教育システムの中では
09:52
and in inside-the-box education systems
「言うは易く行うは難し」
09:55
in rural communities.
と言えるものでした
09:57
So for us, this was a graphic public campaign
さて、こちらは「コネクトバーティ」という
10:00
called Connect Bertie.
グラフィックを用いた公共キャンペーンです
10:02
There are thousands of these blue dots all over the county.
このシンボルをバーティ郡全体の数千箇所に掲示しました
10:04
And this was for a fund that the school district had
また、これらは学区内の生徒の全家庭に
10:07
to put a desktop computer and a broadband Internet connection
デスクトップコンピュータとブロードバンド・インターネットを
10:09
in every home
提供するための資金源になります
10:12
with a child in the public school system.
ただ、現時点では
10:14
Right now I should say,
実際に家庭内でのインターネット接続を
10:16
there are only 10 percent of the houses
確保できているのは
10:18
that actually have an in-home Internet connection.
10%にとどまっています
10:20
And the only places to get WiFi
WiFi接続ができる場所は、校舎内と
10:22
are in the school buildings, or at the Bojangles Fried Chicken joint,
ボジャングルス・フライドチキンの店舗しかありません
10:24
which I find myself squatting outside of a lot.
よくお店の外で電波を拝借していました
10:27
Aside from, you know, getting people excited
それから、人々が
10:30
and wondering what the heck these blue dots were all over the place,
「この青いシンボルはなんだろう」とわくわくすることで
10:32
it asked the school system
学校というシステムが
10:36
to envision how it might become a catalyst
コミュニティ内のつながりを強化する
10:38
for a more connected community.
存在になると、思い描くことになります
10:40
It asked them to reach outside of the school walls
学校の壁を越えて
10:42
and to think about how they could play a role
コミュニティの発展のために
10:45
in the community's development.
どんな役割を担えるのかを考えさせるのです
10:47
So the first batch of computers
最初に導入される一式のコンピュータは
10:49
are being installed later this summer,
今夏の下旬から導入が進んでいます
10:51
and we're helping Dr. Zullinger develop some strategies
私たちはザリンジャー博士を支援して
10:53
around how we might connect the classroom and the home
教室と家庭のつながりを強め、学校にいる時間以外にも
10:56
to extend learning beyond the school day.
学びを深めていけるような戦略を練っています
10:59
And then the third approach, which is what I'm most excited about,
そして、第三のアプローチは、私たちが最もわくわくしている
11:01
which is where we are now,
現在も進行中の
11:03
is: design as education.
「教育としてのデザイン」です
11:05
So "design as education" means
教育としてのデザインとは
11:07
that we could actually teach design within public schools,
デザインを公教育の中で実際に教えるということです
11:09
and not design-based learning --
物理を学ぶためのロケットづくりのような
11:12
not like "let's learn physics by building a rocket,"
何かを学ぶためのデザイン実習ではなく
11:14
but actually learning design-thinking
デザイン思考そのものを学び
11:17
coupled with real construction and fabrication skills
また実際に組み立て、構築する技術を
11:20
put towards a local community purpose.
地域コミュニティの目的に合わせて学ぶということです
11:23
It also means that designers are no longer consultants,
言い換えれば、私たちデザイナーはもはや
11:26
but we're teachers,
コンサルタントではなく、教師であり
11:28
and we are charged with growing creative capital
次世代を担う創造的資本の成長に
11:30
within the next generation.
責任を負っています
11:32
And what design offers as an educational framework
教育フレームワークとしてのデザインは
11:34
is an antidote
退屈で硬直した、言葉だけの授業に
11:37
to all of the boring, rigid, verbal instruction
苦しんできた多くの学区で
11:39
that so many of these school districts are plagued by.
解毒剤のように働きます
11:41
It's hands-on, it's in-your-face,
それは実践的で、挑戦的で
11:43
it requires an active engagement,
積極的な参加を必要としますが
11:45
and it allows kids to apply all the core subject learning
子どもたちは必修科目を
11:47
in real ways.
真に学ぶべき方法で学べます
11:50
So we started thinking
私たちはこう思っています
11:52
about the legacy of shop class
これまでの工作クラス
11:54
and how shop class -- wood and metal shop class in particular --
とくに木工と金工の授業は
11:56
historically, has been something
そもそもは、大学にいくつもりのない
11:59
intended for kids who aren't going to go to college.
生徒たちのためのものだったのです
12:01
It's a vocational training path.
まるで職業訓練なのです
12:03
It's working-class; it's blue-collar.
労働者階級、ブルーカラー的
12:05
The projects are things like,
例えば、母親へのクリスマスプレゼントに
12:07
let's make a birdhouse for your mom for Christmas.
巣箱を作ろうという課題です
12:09
And in recent decades, a lot of the funding for shop class
ここ十数年にわたり、工作クラスの予算は
12:12
has gone away entirely.
ほとんどゼロまで削減されました
12:14
So we thought, what if you could bring back shop class,
そこで私たちは、工作クラスの再建を試みました
12:16
but this time orient the projects
ただ今回は、コミュニティで求められる
12:19
around things that the community needed,
ニーズに沿ったものを目指し
12:21
and to infuse shop class
工作クラスに、より重大で創造的な
12:24
with a more critical and creative-design-thinking studio process.
デザイン思考プロセスを組み込むことを考えました
12:26
So we took this kind of nebulous idea
この漠然としたアイデアをもとに
12:29
and have worked really closely with Dr. Zullinger for the past year
ザリンジャー博士と密に連携をとりながら
12:31
on writing this as a one-year curriculum
これまでの1年間で、中学と高校の
12:34
offered at the high school level to the junior class.
通年のカリキュラムに取り入れていきました
12:37
And so this starts in four weeks,
この取り組みは、夏の終わりの4週間から
12:39
at the end of the summer,
始まりました
12:41
and my partner and I, Matthew and I,
パートナーであるマシューと私は
12:43
just went through the arduous and totally convoluted process
困難で複雑な過程を乗り越えて
12:45
of getting certified as high school teachers to actually run it.
高校の教師たちに認められ
12:48
And this is what it looks like.
実践するところまで持っていきました
12:50
So over the course of two semesters,
秋学期と春学期の
12:52
the Fall and the Spring,
2つの学期の間
12:54
the students spend three hours a day every single day
生徒たちは毎日3時間を
12:56
in our 4,500 square foot
約400平米の
12:58
studio/shop space.
製図室・工房で過ごします
13:00
And during that time, they're doing everything
その時間、生徒たちはさまざまなことを行いました
13:03
from going out and doing ethnographic research and doing the need-finding,
外に出てエスノグラフィー調査をし、ニーズ発掘をする
13:06
coming back into the studio,
製図室に戻って
13:08
doing the brainstorming and design visualization
ブレーンストーミングしてデザインを描き
13:10
to come up with concepts that might work,
機能しそうなコンセプトを練る
13:12
and then moving into the shop and actually testing them,
そして工房に移動し、実際に作ってみます
13:14
building them, prototyping them,
組み立て、プロトタイプを作り
13:16
figuring out if they are going to work and refining that.
機能するかどうかを確かめ、修正する
13:18
And then over the summer, they're offered a summer job.
夏の間は、彼らはインターンシップを行いました
13:21
They're paid as employees of Project H
プロジェクトHの従業員として給与を得ながら
13:24
to be the construction crew with us
建築チームの一員として
13:26
to build these projects in the community.
コミュニティにおけるプロジェクトに携わりました
13:28
So the first project, which will be built next summer,
最初のプロジェクトは来夏に完成する
13:30
is an open-air farmers' market downtown,
ダウンタウンの青空市場です
13:33
followed by bus shelters for the school bus system in the second year
続いて2年目にはスクールバス用の屋根付きのバス停
13:37
and home improvements for the elderly in the third year.
3年目には高齢者向けの住居を改装します
13:40
So these are real visible projects
これらは本当に目に見えるプロジェクトで
13:43
that hopefully the students can point to and say,
生徒が指さしながら
13:45
"I built that, and I'm proud of it."
「これは僕が作ったんだ、いいでしょう!」と言うことができます
13:47
So I want you to meet three of our students.
私たちの生徒を3人紹介します
13:49
This is Ryan.
一人目はライアン
13:51
She is 15 years old.
15歳の女の子です
13:53
She loves agriculture and wants to be a high school teacher.
彼女は農業が大好きで、高校教師を目指しています
13:55
She wants to go to college, but she wants to come back to Bertie County,
大学進学を希望しているのですが、バーティ郡に戻ってきたいと言います
13:58
because that's where her family is from, where she calls home,
なぜなら、バーティ群が家族の出身地であり、「ホーム」と呼ぶ場所であり
14:00
and she feels very strongly about giving back
恩恵を受けたこの場所に対して
14:03
to this place that she's been fairly fortunate in.
恩返しをしたいと強く思っているからです
14:05
So what Studio H might offer her
スタジオHによって
14:08
is a way to develop skills
彼女は能力を高め
14:10
so that she might give back in the most meaningful way.
最も有意義なかたちで恩返しができるようになるでしょう
14:12
This is Eric. He plays for the football team.
2人目はエリックです。エリックはフットボールチームに所属しています
14:14
He is really into dirtbike racing,
彼はオフロードバイクのレースに夢中で
14:17
and he wants to be an architect.
建築家を目指しています
14:20
So for him, Studio H offers him
彼はスタジオHを通じて
14:22
a way to develop the skills he will need as an architect,
建築家として必要な技能、図面を描いたり
14:24
everything from drafting to wood and metal construction
木や金属を組み立てたり、クライアントに対して
14:27
to how to do research for a client.
リサーチを行ったりする能力を身に付けることができます
14:30
And then this is Anthony.
3人目はアンソニーです
14:32
He is 16 years old, loves hunting and fishing and being outside
彼は16歳で、狩りや魚釣りが好きで
14:34
and doing anything with his hands,
野外で手を動かしていろいろなことをするのが大好きです
14:37
and so for him, Studio H means
彼にとっては、スタジオHがあることで
14:39
that he can stay interested in his education
実践的な参加を通じ、公教育に
14:41
through that hands-on engagement.
興味を持ち続けることができるのです
14:43
He's interested in forestry, but he isn't sure,
彼は林業に興味がありますが、まだ迷っています
14:45
so if he ends up not going to college,
もし大学に進学しないとしても
14:47
he will have developed some industry-relevant skills.
仕事に密接したスキルを獲得できることでしょう
14:49
What design and building really offers to public education
実際に、デザインと建築は、公教育に対して、
14:52
is a different kind of classroom.
異質な種類の教室を提供しているのです
14:54
So this building downtown,
ダウンタウンにあるこの建物は
14:56
which may very well become the site of our future farmers' market,
将来青空市場になるところですが
14:58
is now the classroom.
現在は教室です
15:01
And going out into the community and interviewing your neighbors
また、地域に出ていって住民にインタビューし
15:03
about what kind of food they buy
どんな種類の食べ物を買っているかや
15:05
and from where and why --
どの店で買うのか、その理由も
15:07
that's a homework assignment.
調べることが、宿題になります
15:09
And the ribbon-cutting ceremony at the end of the summer
夏の終わりには、テープカットの式が行われ
15:11
when they have built the farmers' market and it's open to the public --
青空市場の完成と、市民への公開を祝いますが
15:14
that's the final exam.
それが最終試験です
15:16
And for the community, what design and building offers
デザインと建築は、地域のコミュニティに
15:18
is real, visible, built progress.
形のある改善をもたらします
15:21
It's one project per year,
プロジェクトは1年に1本
15:23
and it makes the youth the biggest asset
そしてそれは、若者という最大の
15:25
and the biggest untapped resource
未開拓な資源を掘り起こして
15:27
in imagining a new future.
新しい未来を描かせてくれます
15:29
So we recognize that Studio H, especially in its first year,
スタジオHは小さな物語です
15:32
is a small story --
特に最初の1年間は小規模でした
15:35
13 students, it's two teachers,
13人の生徒と2人の教師
15:37
it's one project in one place.
1ヶ所で1つのプロジェクト
15:40
But we feel like this could work in other places.
しかし、これが他の場所でも通用するという手応えはあります
15:42
And I really, strongly believe in the power of the small story,
この小さな物語が秘めている力を、心から信じています
15:44
because it is so difficult
グローバルな規模で、人間中心の
15:47
to do humanitarian work at a global scale.
プロジェクトを行うことは非常に困難です
15:49
Because, when you zoom out that far,
視野を拡げすぎると、等身大の人間を
15:52
you lose the ability to view people as humans.
見つめることができなくなってしまいますから
15:54
Ultimately, design itself is a process
最終的には、デザインそのものが
15:58
of constant education
私たちの仲間やクライアント、そして
16:00
for the people that we work with and for
デザイナーである私たち自身にとって
16:02
and for us as designers.
やむことのない教育課程なのです
16:04
And let's face it, designers, we need to reinvent ourselves.
デザイナーは、それに向き合って、自分自身を再発見する必要があるのです
16:06
We need to re-educate ourselves around the things that matter,
重要な物事を自ら学び直し
16:09
we need to work outside of our comfort zones more,
「快適な空間」にとどまらず挑戦し
16:12
and we need to be better citizens in our own backyard.
それぞれが専門性を持った、よりよい市民としてあるべきなのです
16:15
So while this is a very small story,
これは本当に小さな物語ですが
16:18
we hope that it represents a step in the right direction
未来を目指すひとつのステップとして
16:20
for the future of rural communities
農村地域の未来や
16:23
and for the future of public education
公教育や、さらにはデザインの未来をも
16:25
and hopefully also for the future of design.
つくっていくことを願ってやみません
16:27
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
16:29
(Applause)
(拍手)
16:31
Translator:Satoshi Iritani
Reviewer:Natsuhiko Mizutani

sponsored links

Emily Pilloton - Humanitarian design activist
Emily Pilloton wrote Design Revolution, a book about 100-plus objects and systems designed to make people's lives better. In 2010, her design nonprofit began an immersive residency in Bertie County, North Carolina, the poorest and most rural county in the state.

Why you should listen

As a young designer, Emily Pilloton was frustrated by the design world's scarcity of meaningful work. Even environmentally conscious design was not enough. "At graduate school, people were starting to talk more about sustainability, but I felt it lacked a human factor," she said. "Can we really call $5,000 bamboo coffee tables sustainable?" Convinced of the power of design to change the world, at age 26 Pilloton founded Project H to help develop effective design solutions for people who need it most.

Her book Design Revolution features products like the Hippo Water Roller, a rolling barrel with handle that eases water transport; AdSpecs, adjustable liquid-filled eyeglasses; and Learning Landscapes, low-cost playgrounds that mesh math skills and physical activity.

In February 2009, Pilloton and her Project H partner Matthew Miller began working in Bertie County, North Carolina, the poorest and most rural county in the state, to develop a design-build curriculum for high-school kids, called Studio H. In August 2010 they began teaching their first class of 13 students. Read about their experiences in Design Mind.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.