sponsored links
TED2003

Dan Dennett: The illusion of consciousness

ダニエル デネット 我々の意識について

February 27, 2003

哲学者ダン デネットは、我々が自分の意識を理解していないどころか、我々の脳はしばしば積極的に我々を騙していると、説得力をもって議論します

Dan Dennett - Philosopher, cognitive scientist
Dan Dennett argues that human consciousness and free will are the result of physical processes. His latest book is "Intuition Pumps and Other Tools for Thinking," Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
So I'm going to speak about a problem that I have
さて 私が抱えている問題を話しましょう
00:26
and that's that I'm a philosopher.
それは 私が哲学者だということです
00:29
(Laughter)
(笑)
00:32
When I go to a party and people ask me what do I do
パーティーに行くと 私は職業を聞かれます
00:34
and I say, "I'm a professor," their eyes glaze over.
「教授です」と答えると 彼らの目は曇ります
00:37
When I go to an academic cocktail party
学会のカクテルパーティに行くと
00:42
and there are all the professors around, they ask me what field I'm in
まわりは教授だらけなので 私は専門分野を聞かれます
00:44
and I say, "philosophy" -- their eyes glaze over.
私が"哲学"と言うと-彼らの目は曇ります
00:48
(Laughter)
(笑)
00:51
When I go to a philosopher's party
哲学者のパーティーに行くと
00:53
(Laughter)
(笑)
00:56
and they ask me what I work on and I say, "consciousness,"
私の研究分野を尋ねられ 私が"意識"と答えると
00:59
their eyes don't glaze over -- their lips curl into a snarl.
彼らの目は曇りませんが-彼らの唇はへの字に曲がります
01:03
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:08
And I get hoots of derision and cackles and growls
そして、私は冷笑や高笑い うなり声の野次をうけます
01:09
because they think, "That's impossible! You can't explain consciousness."
彼らはこう考えるのです「それは不可能だ!意識を説明することなんて出来やしない」
01:15
The very chutzpah of somebody thinking
意識を説明することが出来ると思うとは
01:20
that you could explain consciousness is just out of the question.
なんて図々しい まったく問題外だ
01:22
My late, lamented friend Bob Nozick, a fine philosopher,
惜しまれる故人で私の友人のロバート・ノージックは 立派な哲学者でした
01:26
in one of his books, "Philosophical Explanations,"
彼は著書の一つ「考えることを考える」で
01:30
is commenting on the ethos of philosophy --
哲学の特質についてコメントしています-
01:34
the way philosophers go about their business.
哲学者が 仕事をする方法についてです
01:39
And he says, you know, "Philosophers love rational argument."
そこで彼はこう言います「"哲学者は 合理的な議論が好き" なのをあなたは知っている」
01:41
And he says, "It seems as if the ideal argument
彼はこう続けます「大部分の哲学者にとって
01:45
for most philosophers is you give your audience the premises
理想的な議論とは まるで 観衆に前提を与え
01:47
and then you give them the inferences and the conclusion,
それから推論と結論を与える
01:53
and if they don't accept the conclusion, they die.
それを受け入れなければ 観衆は死ぬ
01:58
Their heads explode." The idea is to have an argument
彼らの頭は吹っ飛ぶ というものだ」 これは
02:02
that is so powerful that it knocks out your opponents.
反対論者を打ち負かす 強い議論を持つことを意図します
02:05
But in fact that doesn't change people's minds at all.
しかし実際 それで人の気持ちを変えることは全く出来ません
02:09
It's very hard to change people's minds
意識というようなものについて
02:12
about something like consciousness,
人の気持ちを変えることは非常に難しいのです
02:13
and I finally figured out the reason for that.
そして 私はついにその理由を理解しました
02:15
The reason for that is that everybody's an expert on consciousness.
その理由は 誰もが意識の専門家だからです
02:20
We heard the other day that everybody's got a strong opinion about video games.
我々は先日 誰もがテレビゲームに対して 断固たる意見を持っていると耳にしました
02:24
They all have an idea for a video game, even if they're not experts.
専門家ではなくても 皆 テレビゲームについて意見を持っています
02:28
But they don't consider themselves experts on video games;
しかし彼らは 自分をテレビゲームの専門家とは思いません
02:31
they've just got strong opinions.
ただ 断固たる意見を持っているだけです
02:34
I'm sure that people here who work on, say, climate change
ここにいる人で例えば 気候変動や地球温暖化
02:35
and global warming, or on the future of the Internet,
またはインターネットの将来に取り組んでいる人なら
02:40
encounter people who have very strong opinions
次に起こることについて 断固たる
02:45
about what's going to happen next.
見解を持つ人に遭遇するでしょう
02:47
But they probably don't think of these opinions as expertise.
しかし多分彼らは これらの見解を専門知識とは思っていないでしょう
02:50
They're just strongly held opinions.
それらは ただ強い見解にすぎません
02:54
But with regard to consciousness, people seem to think,
しかし意識に関しては 人は
02:56
each of us seems to think, "I am an expert.
我々は皆 こう思うようです 「私が専門家だ
03:00
Simply by being conscious, I know all about this."
意識があるだけで 私は意識についてすべてを知っている」
03:03
And so, you tell them your theory and they say,
そして彼らにあなたの理論を話すと 彼らは言います
03:06
"No, no, that's not the way consciousness is!
「違う違う それは意識じゃない!
03:08
No, you've got it all wrong."
あんたは全く間違ってる」
03:09
And they say this with an amazing confidence.
と 彼らは驚くべき自信をもって言うのです
03:11
And so what I'm going to try to do today
ですから 私が今日やろうとしていることは
03:15
is to shake your confidence. Because I know the feeling --
あなた方の自信をぐらつかせることです
03:17
I can feel it myself.
私自身そう思っているので 気持ちはわかります
03:20
I want to shake your confidence that you know your own innermost minds --
自分が自分の心の一番奥を知っていて 自分こそが
03:22
that you are, yourselves, authoritative about your own consciousness.
自分の意識において権威があるという その確信をぐらつかせようと思います
03:28
That's the order of the day here.
それが ここでの私の今日の議事です
03:33
Now, this nice picture shows a thought-balloon, a thought-bubble.
さて この素晴らしい絵には 吹き出しがあります 思考のバブルです
03:36
I think everybody understands what that means.
皆さんこれが何を意味するかわかりますね
03:39
That's supposed to exhibit the stream of consciousness.
これは意識の流れを示しています
03:41
This is my favorite picture of consciousness that's ever been done.
これは これまでの意識の絵の中でも私のお気に入りです
03:44
It's a Saul Steinberg of course -- it was a New Yorker cover.
ソウル・スタインバーグです ご存知ですね ニューヨーカーの表紙です
03:46
And this fellow here is looking at the painting by Braque.
ここにいる男性は ブラックの絵を見ています
03:49
That reminds him of the word baroque, barrack, bark, poodle,
その絵は彼から言葉の連想を引き出します バロック バラック バーク(吠える) プードル
03:54
Suzanne R. -- he's off to the races.
スーザンR. -- 彼はすばやく思考を廻らせます
03:58
There's a wonderful stream of consciousness here
ここに素晴らしい意識の流れがあります
04:00
and if you follow it along, you learn a lot about this man.
それをずっと見ていくと この男性について多くのことがわかります
04:04
What I particularly like about this picture, too,
この絵の特に気に入っているところは
04:08
is that Steinberg has rendered the guy
スタインバーグがこの種類の点描画家スタイルで
04:10
in this sort of pointillist style.
人を表したところです
04:12
Which reminds us, as Rod Brooks was saying yesterday:
昨日 ロドニー・ブルックスが言いましたが これは我々に思い出させます
04:15
what we are, what each of us is -- what you are, what I am --
あなたや 私 我々が皆それぞれ 何かというと
04:18
is approximately 100 trillion little cellular robots.
およそ100兆の小さな細胞から出来たロボットです
04:22
That's what we're made of.
それで我々は出来ています
04:28
No other ingredients at all. We're just made of cells, about 100 trillion of them.
他の成分など何もなく 100兆の小さな細胞から出来ているに過ぎません
04:30
Not a single one of those cells is conscious;
意識のある細胞なんて一つもない
04:34
not a single one of those cells knows who you are, or cares.
それらの細胞 一つとして、あなたが誰であるかを知らないし 気にもかけません
04:36
Somehow, we have to explain
どうやって説明できるでしょう
04:41
how when you put together teams, armies, battalions
どうやって何百もの意識のない小さな細胞を チームや
04:43
of hundreds of millions of little robotic unconscious cells --
軍隊 大隊にまとめると --
04:47
not so different really from a bacterium, each one of them --
それら各自はバクテリアとあまり違いません --
04:51
the result is this. I mean, just look at it.
結果はこれです これを見てください
04:55
The content -- there's color, there's ideas, there's memories,
この中には 色があり アイデアがあり 記憶や 歴史もあります
04:59
there's history. And somehow all that content of consciousness
そしてその意識の内容はすべて
05:03
is accomplished by the busy activity of those hoards of neurons.
ニューロンの活発な活動によって達成されます
05:07
How is that possible? Many people just think it isn't possible at all.
どうやって そんなことが出来るんだ? 多くの人はそれは全く不可能だと思います
05:12
They think, "No, there can't be any
彼らは こう思います
05:16
sort of naturalistic explanation of consciousness."
「意識を自然主義的に説明することなんて出来やしない」
05:18
This is a lovely book by a friend of mine named Lee Siegel,
この素晴らしい本は 私の友人で ハワイ大学で
05:22
who's a professor of religion, actually, at the University of Hawaii,
宗教分野の教授をしている リー シーゲルの本です
05:25
and he's an expert magician, and an expert
彼は魔術の専門家で インドのストリートマジックの
05:28
on the street magic of India, which is what this book is about,
専門家です これはマジックについての本です
05:30
"Net of Magic."
「Net of Magic」
05:34
And there's a passage in it which I would love to share with you.
あなた方に紹介したいお気に入りの一節があります
05:36
It speaks so eloquently to the problem.
それは この問題をとても雄弁に語ります
05:39
"'I'm writing a book on magic,' I explain, and I'm asked, 'Real magic?'
「「私は マジックに関する本を書いています」と言うと  「本当のマジックか?」 と聞かれます
05:45
By 'real magic,' people mean miracles,
彼らの言う本当のマジックとは奇跡のことです
05:50
thaumaturgical acts, and supernatural powers.
魔術師のような行為と神通力
05:52
'No,' I answer. 'Conjuring tricks, not real magic.'
私は「いいえ」と答えます 「本当のマジックでなく 手品です」
05:54
'Real magic,' in other words, refers to the magic that is not real;
言いかえると 本当のマジックは実在しないマジックのことです
05:58
while the magic that is real, that can actually be done, is not real magic."
また実在するマジックー実際に行われるマジックは 本当のマジックではないのです」
06:02
(Laughter)
(笑)
06:07
Now, that's the way a lot of people feel about consciousness.
これが多くの人々が意識について考える方法です
06:11
(Laughter)
(笑)
06:15
Real consciousness is not a bag of tricks.
本当の意識は 知恵袋ではありません
06:16
If you're going to explain this as a bag of tricks,
もし あなたが"それ"を 知恵袋と説明するなら
06:18
then it's not real consciousness, whatever it is.
"それ"がなんであろうと 本当の意識ではありません
06:20
And, as Marvin said, and as other people have said,
マービンや その他の人が
06:23
"Consciousness is a bag of tricks."
「意識とは 知恵袋だ」と言えば
06:29
This means that a lot of people are just left completely dissatisfied
私が意識を説明しようとするとき 多くの人々が
06:32
and incredulous when I attempt to explain consciousness.
不満と疑念を抱くことになります
06:37
So this is the problem. So I have to
これは問題です ですから私は あなた方の多くが
06:40
do a little bit of the sort of work
マジックの種明かしを
06:43
that a lot of you won't like,
好まないのと同じ理由で
06:46
for the same reason that you don't like to see
あまり 快く思わない類のことを
06:50
a magic trick explained to you.
少し試さなければなりません
06:52
How many of you here, if somebody -- some smart aleck --
あなた方の中に もしあるうぬぼれ屋が
06:54
starts telling you how a particular magic trick is done,
マジックのトリックの種明かしをはじめたら
06:58
you sort of want to block your ears and say, "No, no, I don't want to know!
耳を塞ぎたい欲求にかられ「やめろ そんなこと知りたくない
07:01
Don't take the thrill of it away. I'd rather be mystified.
せっかくのスリルを取らないでくれ 私は煙に巻かれていたいんだ
07:04
Don't tell me the answer."
答えは言うな」と言う人はいますか?
07:07
A lot of people feel that way about consciousness, I've discovered.
おおくの人は意識について同じ様に感じるようです
07:10
And I'm sorry if I impose some clarity, some understanding on you.
もし私が厚かましくも すこしの明瞭さや理解を押し付けることになるなら 残念です
07:13
You'd better leave now if you don't want to know some of these tricks.
もしこれらのトリックについて 知りたくないならば 今ここを出て行ったほうが良いでしょう
07:19
But I'm not going to explain it all to you.
しかし 私はそれのすべてを説明するつもりはありません
07:24
I'm going to do what philosophers do.
哲学者のやり方で説明するつもりです
07:28
Here's how a philosopher explains the sawing-the-lady-in-half trick.
哲学者が女性をノコギリで半分に切るトリックを説明する方法は こうです
07:31
You know the sawing-the-lady-in-half trick?
女性をノコギリで半分に切るトリックはご存知ですね?
07:37
The philosopher says, "I'm going to explain to you how that's done.
哲学者は言います「これがどうなっているか説明しよう
07:39
You see, the magician doesn't really saw the lady in half."
奇術師は女性を本当に半分に切るわけではないのだ 分かるかな」
07:43
(Laughter)
(笑)
07:48
"He merely makes you think that he does."
「彼は あんた方が そう思うようにするだけなんだ」
07:50
And you say, "Yes, and how does he do that?"
あなたはこう言います「そうよ でも奇術師はどうやってそれをするの?」
07:54
He says, "Oh, that's not my department, I'm sorry."
哲学者は言います「ああ それは私の分野じゃなんだ 悪いね」
07:55
(Laughter)
(笑)
07:57
So now I'm going to illustrate how philosophers explain consciousness.
それでは 哲学者がどのように意識を説明するかについてご紹介しましょう
08:02
But I'm going to try to also show you
それと一緒に 意識というものが
08:05
that consciousness isn't quite as marvelous --
あなたが思っているほどには、素晴らしいものでもなければ
08:08
your own consciousness isn't quite as wonderful --
不思議なものでもないということを
08:11
as you may have thought it is.
お見せするつもりです
08:13
This is something, by the way, that Lee Siegel talks about in his book.
これは リー・シーゲルが彼の著書で言っていることですが
08:15
He marvels at how he'll do a magic show, and afterwards
彼は 見事なマジックショーを行い ショーの後 観客は彼がX Y そして
08:19
people will swear they saw him do X, Y, and Z. He never did those things.
Zをしているのを見たと断言します 彼はそれらを全くやっていないのにです
08:23
He didn't even try to do those things.
彼はそれらをやろうとしたことすらありません
08:27
People's memories inflate what they think they saw.
人々の記憶が 彼らが見たと思うことを創りあげるのです
08:29
And the same is true of consciousness.
そして 意識にも同じことが言えます
08:33
Now, let's see if this will work. All right. Let's just watch this.
さて これが働くかどうか見ましょう これを見てください
08:36
Watch it carefully.
注意して見てください
08:43
I'm working with a young computer-animator documentarian
私は ニック・ディーマーという若いコンピューター・アニメーター・ドキュメンタリー作家と
08:56
named Nick Deamer, and this is a little demo that he's done for me,
大きなプロジェクトに取り組んでいて その一部として彼が作ってくれた小さなデモです
08:59
part of a larger project some of you may be interested in.
皆さんの中にも興味を抱く人がいると思います
09:04
We're looking for a backer.
我々は 後援者を探しています
09:07
It's a feature-length documentary on consciousness.
それは 意識の長編のドキュメンタリーです
09:10
OK, now, you all saw what changed, right?
さて あなた方全員 何が変わったか見ましたね?
09:14
How many of you noticed that every one of those squares changed color?
あなた方のうち それらの正方形すべての色が変化したことに気付いた人はいますか?
09:20
Every one. I'll just show you by running it again.
全員ですね もう一度作動して見ていきましょう
09:25
Even when you know that they're all going to change color,
あなたが これら全ての色が変わると知っていても
09:34
it's very hard to notice. You have to really concentrate
それに気付くのは難しいです それらの変化を見つけるには
09:39
to pick up any of the changes at all.
かなりの集中力を要します
09:43
Now, this is an example -- one of many --
さて これは現在かなり調査されている
09:46
of a phenomenon that's now being studied quite a bit.
多くの現象例のうちの一例です
09:51
It's one that I predicted in the last page or two of my
これは 私が1991年に出版された著書「説明される意識」
09:53
1991 book, "Consciousness Explained,"
の最後の1~2ページで予測したものです
09:57
where I said if you did experiments of this sort,
そこで私は あなた方がこの類の実験をすれば
09:59
you'd find that people were unable to pick up really large changes.
人が本当に大きな変化にさえ気付くことは出来なかったことが わかるだろうと言いました
10:02
If there's time at the end,
最後にもし時間があれば
10:05
I'll show you the much more dramatic case.
もっと 劇的な例を見せましょう
10:07
Now, how can it be that there are all those changes going on,
さて そこにはいろんな変化が起こっているのに
10:10
and that we're not aware of them?
我々がそれに気付かないなんてことがありえるのでしょうか?
10:15
Well, earlier today, Jeff Hawkins mentioned the way your eye saccades,
今日 ジェフ・ホーキンスが目の速い動きについて言及しました
10:18
the way your eye moves around three or four times a second.
目が一秒内にどうやって3~4回動き回るかです
10:23
He didn't mention the speed. Your eye is constantly in motion,
彼は速度には言及しませんでした 目は絶えず動いています
10:26
moving around, looking at eyes, noses, elbows,
動き回って 目や鼻 肘を見たり
10:29
looking at interesting things in the world.
そして世界中の面白いものを見ます
10:32
And where your eye isn't looking,
目が見ていないところは
10:34
you're remarkably impoverished in your vision.
あなたの視界の中で著しく精彩を欠きます
10:36
That's because the foveal part of your eye,
それは 目の高解像度部分である
10:39
which is the high-resolution part,
目の中心部のサイズは
10:42
is only about the size of your thumbnail held at arms length.
腕を伸ばした距離にある親指の爪のぐらいしかないからです
10:44
That's the detail part.
これは 詳細部分です
10:47
It doesn't seem that way, does it?
そんな風には思えませんよね?
10:49
It doesn't seem that way, but that's the way it is.
そんな風に見えませんが そういうものなのです
10:52
You're getting in a lot less information than you think.
あなたは 思ったよりもっと少ない情報しか得ていません
10:54
Here's a completely different effect. This is a painting by Bellotto.
全く違った影響はここです これはベロットの絵です
10:58
It's in the museum in North Carolina.
ノースカロライナの博物館にあります
11:04
Bellotto was a student of Canaletto's.
ベロットは カナレットの弟子でした
11:06
And I love paintings like that --
私はこのような絵が大好きです-
11:09
the painting is actually about as big as it is right here.
絵は実際 ここにあるものとだいたい同じくらいの大きさです
11:10
And I love Canalettos, because Canaletto has this fantastic detail,
カナレットの絵にある素晴らしい細かい描写が私は大好きです
11:14
and you can get right up
絵画上のすべての描写を
11:17
and see all the details on the painting.
一目で見ることができます
11:20
And I started across the hall in North Carolina,
私はノースカロライナの館内を歩き始めました
11:23
because I thought it was probably a Canaletto,
カナレットだったら多分すべての細かい描写が
11:28
and would have all that in detail.
描かれていると思ったからです
11:30
And I noticed that on the bridge there, there's a lot of people --
そして私はそこの橋に多くの人がいることに気がつきました-
11:32
you can just barely see them walking across the bridge.
彼らが橋を渡っているのがかろうじて見えますね
11:35
And I thought as I got closer
私は近づくにつれて
11:38
I would be able to see all the detail of most people,
それらの人々の服装やいろいろな描写が
11:39
see their clothes, and so forth.
見えると思っていました
11:42
And as I got closer and closer, I actually screamed.
そして どんどん近づいていって 実際叫び声をあげました
11:44
I yelled out because when I got closer,
どんなに間近によっても
11:48
I found the detail wasn't there at all.
そこには描写などないからです
11:50
There were just little artfully placed blobs of paint.
ただの巧みに置かれた小さなペンキの点のみでした
11:54
And as I walked towards the picture,
私は 絵に向かって歩きながら
11:58
I was expecting detail that wasn't there.
そこにはない 描写を予期していたのです
12:01
The artist had very cleverly suggested people and clothes
画家は 人々や服装 車
12:04
and wagons and all sorts of things,
その他いろんなものを巧みに連想させて
12:09
and my brain had taken the suggestion.
私の脳はその暗示にかかったのです
12:12
You're familiar with a more recent technology, which is -- There,
そこにある 最新のテクノロジーをご存知ですね
12:15
you can get a better view of the blobs.
この点をはっきり見ることができます
12:21
See, when you get close
近づくと
12:23
they're really just blobs of paint.
それは ただのぼんやりした絵です
12:25
You will have seen something like this -- this is the reverse effect.
このようなものは見たことがあるでしょう -- これは逆影響です
12:30
I'll just give that to you one more time.
もういちどやってみましょう
12:44
Now, what does your brain do when it takes the suggestion?
脳が暗示にかかるとどうなるでしょう?
12:47
When an artful blob of paint or two, by an artist,
芸術家による巧妙な絵の具の塊の一つや二つが
12:54
suggests a person -- say, one of
人を暗示にかけます --
12:59
Marvin Minsky's little society of mind --
マービン・ミンスキーの小さな「心の社会」が
13:05
do they send little painters out to fill in all the details in your brain somewhere?
あなたの脳のどこかに 小さな画家を送り込んで詳細を描かせたのでしょうか?
13:07
I don't think so. Not a chance. But then, how on Earth is it done?
そうは思えません ありえない だったらいったいどうなってんだ?
13:12
Well, remember the philosopher's explanation of the lady?
哲学者の女性への説明を覚えてますね?
13:17
It's the same thing.
同じ事です
13:22
The brain just makes you think that it's got the detail there.
脳は あなたに詳細がそこにあるように思い込ませるのです
13:25
You think the detail's there, but it isn't there.
詳細はそこにあると思いますが、そこにはありません
13:28
The brain isn't actually putting the detail in your head at all.
脳はあなたの頭に詳細を送りこんでなぞいません
13:31
It's just making you expect the detail.
あなたが詳細を期待するように仕向けるのです
13:34
Let's just do this experiment very quickly.
この実験を短くやります
13:37
Is the shape on the left the same as the shape on the right, rotated?
左の形は、右の回転した形と同じですか?
13:40
Yes.
同じです
13:45
How many of you did it by rotating the one on the left
左側を心の目で回転させて
13:47
in your mind's eye, to see if it matched up with the one on the right?
右側に合わせてみた人はいますか?
13:49
How many of you rotated the one on the right? OK.
右側を回転させた人は? わかりました
13:52
How do you know that's what you did?
どうして 自分がどちらを回転させたかわかったのですか?
13:56
(Laughter)
(笑)
13:58
There's in fact been a very interesting debate
事実 認知科学において 20年以上も
14:01
raging for over 20 years in cognitive science --
盛んに議論されている非常に面白い議論があります
14:03
various experiments started by Roger Shepherd,
いろいろな実験がロジャー・シェパードによって始められ
14:06
who measured the angular velocity of rotation of mental images.
彼は心に浮かぶイメージが回転する角速度を計りました
14:08
Yes, it's possible to do that.
そうです それは可能なのです
14:13
But the details of the process are still in significant controversy.
しかし プロセスの詳細は まだ激しい論争下にあります
14:15
And if you read that literature, one of the things
あなたが その論文を読むとき
14:22
that you really have to come to terms with is
受け入れなければならないことの一つは
14:25
even when you're the subject in the experiment, you don't know.
あなたは実験の被験者とは言え
14:28
You don't know how you do it.
それをどう行うのか知らないということです
14:30
You just know that you have certain beliefs.
あなたが知っているのは あなたには特定の信条があるということだけです
14:32
And they come in a certain order, at a certain time.
それらは特定のタイミングに 特定の順序で来ます
14:35
And what explains the fact that that's what you think?
それこそ あなたが考えていることだ という事実はどう説明できますか?
14:38
Well, that's where you have to go backstage and ask the magician.
舞台裏に行って 魔術師に尋ねなければいけませんね
14:40
This is a figure that I love: Bradley, Petrie, and Dumais.
これは私が大好きな図形です:ブラッドリー ピートリーとデュマ
14:44
You may think that I've cheated,
私がずるしたと思うかもしれません
14:48
that I've put a little whiter-than-white boundary there.
私が少しそこの白い境界線をより白くしたので
14:50
How many of you see that sort of boundary,
円の前に浮かぶネッカー立方体の
14:55
with the Necker cube floating in front of the circles?
境界線のようなものが見える人はいますか?
14:57
Can you see it?
見えますか?
15:00
Well, you know, in effect, the boundary's really there, in a certain sense.
ある意味 効果として境界線は本当にそこにあります
15:02
Your brain is actually computing that boundary,
あなた方の脳が境界線を算出しているのです
15:07
the boundary that goes right there.
境界線はちょうどここにあります
15:10
But now, notice there are two ways of seeing the cube, right?
立方体を見るには二通りの方法があるのことに気付いてください いいですね?
15:15
It's a Necker cube.
これはネッカーの立法体です
15:17
Everybody can see the two ways of seeing the cube? OK.
皆さん二通りの見方ができますね? いいですね
15:19
Can you see the four ways of seeing the cube?
四通りの見方ができますか?
15:23
Because there's another way of seeing it.
なぜなら別の見方があるからです
15:27
If you're seeing it as a cube floating in front of some circles,
もしあなたが 正方体が円の前
15:29
some black circles, there's another way of seeing it.
黒い円の前に浮いているのが見えるなら 他の見方があります
15:32
As a cube, on a black background,
正方体が黒い背景の上
15:35
as seen through a piece of Swiss cheese.
向こうが見える一個のスイスチーズのように
15:37
(Laughter)
(笑)
15:39
Can you get it? How many of you can't get it? That'll help.
見えますか?見えない人はいますか?これでわかりますか
15:42
(Laughter)
(笑)
15:48
Now you can get it. These are two very different phenomena.
さて見えましたね これらは2つの全く違った現象です
15:50
When you see the cube one way, behind the screen,
あなたが1つの方法で立方体を見るときスクリーンの後で
15:55
those boundaries go away.
それらの境界線は消え去ります
16:01
But there's still a sort of filling in, as we can tell if we look at this.
しかし我々がこれを見て言えるように まだ追加するものがあります
16:03
We don't have any trouble seeing the cube, but where does the color change?
我々には問題なく立方体が見えます しかしどこで色は変わるのでしょう?
16:08
Does your brain have to send little painters in there?
あなたの脳が ここに小さな画家達を送り込んだのでしょうか?
16:12
The purple-painters and the green-painters
紫の画家達と緑の画家達が
16:15
fight over who's going to paint that bit behind the curtain? No.
どっちがこのカーテンの後ろを塗るかで争うのでしょうか? 違います
16:17
Your brain just lets it go. The brain doesn't need to fill that in.
あなたの脳がそうするのです 脳はそれに記入する必要はありません
16:20
When I first started talking about
私が最初に あなた方が見たブラッドリーや
16:29
the Bradley, Petrie, Dumais example that you just saw --
ピートリー デュマの例について話し始めたとき
16:32
I'll go back to it, this one --
もう一度おみせしましょう これです
16:36
I said that there was no filling-in behind there.
私は この後ろにはなにも追加するものはないと言いました
16:40
And I supposed that that was just a flat truth, always true.
そして私はそれが 平らな真実 常に本当の真実であると思いました
16:47
But Rob Van Lier has recently shown that it isn't.
しかし ロブ・ヴァン・リエルは そうではないことを最近示しました
16:50
Now, if you think you see some pale yellow --
あなたが何か淡黄色を見たと思うなら-
16:55
I'll run this a few more times.
もう一度やってみましょう
17:00
Look in the gray areas,
灰色の領域をみてください
17:02
and see if you seem to see something sort of shadowy moving in there --
そこに なにか動く影のようなものが見えるか試してください
17:06
yeah, it's amazing. There's nothing there. It's no trick.
そうです!驚きますねそこには何もないのです トリックじゃありません
17:11
["Failure to Detect Changes in Scenes" slide]
(画面の変化がみえません)
17:18
This is Ron Rensink's work, which was in some degree
これは ロン・レンシンクの研究です
17:24
inspired by that suggestion right at the end of the book.
それはこの本の最後の提案に多少の影響を受けました
17:26
Let me just pause this for a second if I can.
ちょっと一瞬 止めてください
17:30
This is change-blindness.
これは目くらましです
17:32
What you're going to see is two pictures,
2つの絵を見ていただきます
17:34
one of which is slightly different from the other.
二つは少々違います
17:36
You see here the red roof and the gray roof,
ここに赤い屋根と灰色の屋根が見えますね
17:38
and in between them there will be a mask,
その間にはマスクがあります
17:41
which is just a blank screen, for about a quarter of a second.
4分の1秒間の空白のスクリーンです
17:43
So you'll see the first picture, then a mask,
最初の絵を見て それからマスク
17:47
then the second picture, then a mask.
それから2番目の絵 そしてマスク
17:49
And this will just continue, and your job as the subject
これが続きます そして被験者としてのあなた方のタスクは
17:51
is to press the button when you see the change.
変化を見たときにボタンを押すことです
17:55
So, show the original picture for 240 milliseconds. Blank.
それでは240ミリ秒の間 原画を映します 空白
17:58
Show the next picture for 240 milliseconds. Blank.
次の絵を240ミリ秒の間映します 空白
18:06
And keep going, until the subject presses the button, saying,
被験者がボタンを押して「変化を見つけた」と言うまで
18:12
"I see the change."
このまま続けます
18:16
So now we're going to be subjects in the experiment.
さてこれから我々は実験の被験者になります
18:18
We're going to start easy. Some examples.
簡単なものから始めましょう いくつかの例です
18:21
No trouble there.
問題ないですね
18:30
Can everybody see? All right.
皆さん見えますか? 良いですね
18:32
Indeed, Rensink's subjects took only a little bit more
たしかに レンシンクの被験者はボタンを押すのに
18:35
than a second to press the button.
1秒ちょっとしかかかっていません
18:39
Can you see that one?
これが見えますか?
18:46
2.9 seconds.
2.9秒です
18:55
How many don't see it still?
まだ見えない人はいますか?
19:04
What's on the roof of that barn?
その納屋の屋根の上にあるのは何ですか?
19:07
(Laughter)
(笑)
19:09
It's easy.
簡単ですね
19:20
Is it a bridge or a dock?
それは橋ですか それとも桟橋ですか?
19:46
There are a few more really dramatic ones, and then I'll close.
あともう少し劇的なものをやってから 終わりにしましょう
19:52
I want you to see a few that are particularly striking.
特に印象的なものを少し見て頂きましょう
19:56
This one because it's so large and yet it's pretty hard to see.
これです とても大きいのですが わかり難いからです
20:00
Can you see it?
見えますか?
20:07
Audience: Yes.
聴衆: はい
20:10
Dan Dennett: See the shadows going back and forth? Pretty big.
影が前に行ったり後ろに行ったりしていますね? 結構大きいです
20:12
So 15.5 seconds is the median time
彼の実験での被験者の
20:23
for subjects in his experiment there.
平均時間は15秒半です
20:27
I love this one. I'll end with this one,
私はこの実験が大好きなので これで終わりにしましょう
20:29
just because it's such an obvious and important thing.
なぜなら ただ単に それが明白かつ重要だからです
20:32
How many still don't see it? How many still don't see it?
まだ見えない人はいますか?まだわからない人?
20:37
How many engines on the wing of that Boeing?
そのボーイングの翼にはいくつエンジンがありますか?
20:43
(Laughter)
(笑)
20:46
Right in the middle of the picture!
絵の真ん中です!
20:47
Thanks very much for your attention.
ありがとう御座いました
20:53
What I wanted to show you is that scientists,
あなたに見てもらいたかったのは 科学者が
20:54
using their from-the-outside, third-person methods,
外部の 第3者の方法を使って
20:59
can tell you things about your own consciousness
あなた自信の意識について
21:03
that you would never dream of,
あなたが夢にも思わなかったことを語ることが出来るということです
21:05
and that, in fact, you're not the authority
そしてそれは事実 あなたがそうだと思っているほど
21:07
on your own consciousness that you think you are.
あなた自身の意識の権威者ではないということです
21:09
And we're really making a lot of progress
そして我々は心の理論を思いつくのに
21:11
on coming up with a theory of mind.
かなり多くの進歩を遂げています
21:13
Jeff Hawkins, this morning, was describing his attempt
ジェフ・ホーキンスは今朝 神経科学の分野で
21:16
to get theory, and a good, big theory, into the neuroscience.
理論 面白く壮大な理論を立てようと試みました
21:22
And he's right. This is a problem.
彼は正しい これは問題です
21:26
Harvard Medical School once -- I was at a talk --
ハーバードメディカルスクールで話したことがあります
21:31
director of the lab said, "In our lab, we have a saying.
研究室の責任者は言いました 「我々の研究室には、格言があります
21:33
If you work on one neuron, that's neuroscience.
あなたが1つのニューロンに取り組むならば 神経科学です
21:37
If you work on two neurons, that's psychology."
あなたが2つのニューロンに取り組むならば心理学です」
21:40
(Laughter)
(笑)
21:43
We have to have more theory, and it can come as much from the top down.
我々はより多くの理論を持つべきです その多くはトップダウンで与えられるものかもしれません
21:47
Thank you very much.
ありがとうございました
21:50
(Applause)
(拍手)
21:52
Translator:Kayo Mizutani
Reviewer:RINAKO UENISHI

sponsored links

Dan Dennett - Philosopher, cognitive scientist
Dan Dennett argues that human consciousness and free will are the result of physical processes. His latest book is "Intuition Pumps and Other Tools for Thinking,"

Why you should listen

One of our most important living philosophers, Dan Dennett is best known for his provocative and controversial arguments that human consciousness and free will are the result of physical processes in the brain. He argues that the brain's computational circuitry fools us into thinking we know more than we do, and that what we call consciousness — isn't. His 2003 book "Freedom Evolves" explores how our brains evolved to give us -- and only us -- the kind of freedom that matters, while 2006's "Breaking the Spell" examines belief through the lens of biology.

This mind-shifting perspective on the mind itself has distinguished Dennett's career as a philosopher and cognitive scientist. And while the philosophy community has never quite known what to make of Dennett (he defies easy categorization, and refuses to affiliate himself with accepted schools of thought), his computational approach to understanding the brain has made him, as Edge's John Brockman writes, “the philosopher of choice of the AI community.”

“It's tempting to say that Dennett has never met a robot he didn't like, and that what he likes most about them is that they are philosophical experiments,” Harry Blume wrote in the Atlantic Monthly in 1998. “To the question of whether machines can attain high-order intelligence, Dennett makes this provocative answer: ‘The best reason for believing that robots might some day become conscious is that we human beings are conscious, and we are a sort of robot ourselves.'"

In recent years, Dennett has become outspoken in his atheism, and his 2006 book Breaking the Spell calls for religion to be studied through the scientific lens of evolutionary biology. Dennett regards religion as a natural -- rather than supernatural -- phenomenon, and urges schools to break the taboo against empirical examination of religion. He argues that religion's influence over human behavior is precisely what makes gaining a rational understanding of it so necessary: “If we don't understand religion, we're going to miss our chance to improve the world in the 21st century.”

Dennett's landmark books include The Mind's I, co-edited with Douglas Hofstaedter, Consciousness Explained, and Darwin's Dangerous Idea. Read an excerpt from his 2013 book, Intuition Pumps, in the Guardian >>

The original video is available on TED.com
sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.