34:07
TED2003

Evelyn Glennie: How to truly listen

エヴェリン・グレニーが「聴き方」について語る

Filmed:

聴覚障害を持つパーカッショニストのエヴェリン・グレニーが、音楽を聴くことは単に鼓膜を振動させる以上に、いかに多くの機能を使うものであるかを、素晴らしい実演を交えて解説します。

- Musician
Percussionist and composer Dame Evelyn Glennie lost nearly all of her hearing by age 12. Rather than isolating her, it has given her a unique connection to her music. Full bio

I'm not quite sure whether I really want to see
朝の9時からスネアドラムに
00:25
a snare drum at nine o'clock or so in the morning.
お目にかかりたいかは 悩むところですが…
00:29
But anyway, it's just great to see such a full theater,
会場が満員なのは光栄です
00:33
and really I must thank Herbie Hancock
ハービー ハンコックと
00:37
and his colleagues for such a great presentation. (Applause)
メンバーの演奏も見事でしたね
00:39
One of the interesting things,
興味深かったのは
00:43
of course, is the combination of that raw hand on the instrument
楽器を弾く手とテクノロジーとの競演と
00:47
and technology, and of course what he said about listening to our young people.
"若い人たちに耳を傾けよう" という彼の話でした
00:53
Of course, my job is all about listening,
私の仕事も 聴くことが全てで
01:00
and my aim, really, is to teach the world to listen.
世界の人々に聴くことを教えるのが目的です
01:05
That's my only real aim in life.
人生の唯一の目的と言えます
01:11
And it sounds quite simple, but actually it's quite a big, big job.
簡単に聞こえますが 実際はかなりの大仕事
01:15
Because you know, when you look at a piece of music -- for example,
なぜなら楽譜を見ると 例えば
01:21
if I just open my little motorbike bag -- we have here, hopefully,
このバッグの中にある
01:27
a piece of music that is full of little black dots on the page.
楽譜は小さな黒い点だらけです
01:35
And, you know, we open it up and I read the music.
広げて… 楽譜を読みます
01:41
So technically, I can actually read this.
楽譜は もちろん読めます
01:49
I will follow the instructions, the tempo markings, the dynamics.
速度や強弱など 指示に従い
01:54
I will do exactly as I'm told.
書かれたとおりに演奏します
01:58
And so therefore, because time is short,
それで… 時間が限られているので
02:03
if I just play you literally the first maybe two lines or so. It's very straightforward.
仮に弾いたら…冒頭だけでも複雑な曲ではないと分かります
02:06
There's nothing too difficult about the piece.
難しくはないけど
02:15
But here I'm being told that the piece of music is very quick.
とても速い曲のようです
02:16
I'm being told where to play on the drum.
叩く場所も 指示されてます
02:20
I'm being told which part of the stick to use.
スティックのどこを使うかも 書かれています
02:24
And I'm being told the dynamic.
強弱も…
02:29
And I'm also being told that the drum is without snares.
スネアをオフにしておくことも…
02:31
Snares on, snares off.
これがオンで… これがオフ
02:36
So therefore, if I translate this piece of music, we have this idea. (Music)
譜面通りに弾けば どんな曲か分かります
02:39
And so on. My career would probably last about five years.
こんな感じ… 5年もせずに職をなくすでしょう
03:18
However, what I have to do as a musician is do everything that is not on the music.
しかし譜面にないことをするのが 音楽家の仕事です
03:24
Everything that there isn't time to learn from a teacher,
先生とのレッスンや
03:32
or to talk about, even, from a teacher.
話し合いでは得られないことを…
03:38
But it's the things that you notice when you're not actually with your instrument
楽器から離れている時に 気付いたことを
03:41
that in fact become so interesting, and that you want to explore
この小さなドラムの表面を使って
03:46
through this tiny, tiny surface of a drum.
試していくんです
03:51
So there, we experience the translation. Now we'll experience the interpretation. (Music) (Applause)
譜面通りに弾いたので 今度は解釈をしてみます
03:55
Now my career may last a little longer!
これなら仕事として 少し長く続きそうです
04:50
But in a way, you know, it's the same if I look at you and I see
ある意味 人をみる時と同じことなんです
04:58
a nice bright young lady with a pink top on.
ピンクの服を着た素敵な女性が
05:03
I see that you're clutching a teddy bear, etc., etc.
テディベアを抱えている…とか
05:06
So I get a basic idea as to what you might be about, what you might like,
どんな人かという基本的なことを知るんです
05:10
what you might do as a profession, etc., etc.
何をする人だろう…とか
05:15
However, that's just, you know, the initial idea I may have that we all get
これは第一印象を基にしたことでしかありません
05:20
when we actually look, and we try to interpret,
それを解釈するんですが
05:26
but actually it's so unbelievably shallow.
深い洞察ではない
05:29
In the same way, I look at the music; I get a basic idea;
音楽も 楽譜から基本を理解し
05:31
I wonder what technically might be hard, or, you know, what I want to do.
技術的に難しい点や 弾き方を考えます
05:34
Just the basic feeling.
基本的なことですが
05:39
However, that is simply not enough.
それでは不十分
05:41
And I think what Herbie said -- please listen, listen.
ハービーの言っていた "聴くこと" です
05:43
We have to listen to ourselves, first of all.
まず自分自身に耳を傾けること
05:47
If I play, for example, holding the stick -- where literally I do not let go of the stick --
もしスティックを握ったら… 力強く握りしめたら
05:51
you'll experience quite a lot of shock coming up through the arm.
腕から かなりの衝撃が感じられます
06:01
And you feel really quite -- believe it or not --
しかし 意外にも
06:05
detached from the instrument and from the stick,
楽器やスティックとの一体感がない
06:07
even though I'm actually holding the stick quite tightly.
ギュッと握っているにも関わらずです
06:10
By holding it tightly, I feel strangely more detached.
強く握るほど 距離が感じられるんです
06:16
If I just simply let go and allow my hand, my arm, to be more of a support system,
力を抜いと 手や腕を支えとして使うと
06:20
suddenly I have more dynamic with less effort. Much more.
苦労せず もっと大きな音が出せるし
06:27
And I just feel, at last, one with the stick and one with the drum.
スティックやドラムと一体に感じられます
06:36
And I'm doing far, far less.
ずっと小さな力で
06:41
So in the same way that I need time with this instrument,
楽器を知るのに時間が必要なように
06:43
I need time with people in order to interpret them.
人を知るためにも時間が必要です
06:46
Not just translate them, but interpret them.
表面上の理解を深めるために
06:52
If, for example, I play just a few bars of a piece of music
曲を数小節 弾いてみましょう
06:54
for which I think of myself as a technician --
技術者として…
07:02
that is, someone who is basically a percussion player ... (Music)
つまりパーカッション プレイヤーとして…
07:07
And so on. If I think of myself as a musician ... (Music)
音楽家として弾くと…
07:24
And so on. There is a little bit of a difference there that is worth just -- (Applause)
両者には 考えるに値する (会場: 拍手)
07:50
-- thinking about.
若干の違いがあります
07:57
And I remember when I was 12 years old,
私は12歳の時
07:59
and I started playing tympani and percussion, and my teacher said,
打楽器を始めましたが 先生に言われました
08:02
"Well, how are we going to do this? You know, music is about listening."
"どうしたものかな… 音楽は聴くことだからね"
08:08
And I said, "Yes, I agree with that. So what's the problem?"
私は "そうですけど?" と聞き返しました
08:14
And he said, "Well, how are you going to hear this? How are you going to hear that?"
"どうやってこれを聞くんだい? これは?"
08:18
And I said, "Well, how do you hear it?"
私は "先生は?" と尋ねました
08:23
He said, "Well, I think I hear it through here."
"耳を通して聞くよ" と言うので
08:25
And I said, "Well, I think I do too -- but I also hear it through my hands,
"私もそうですけど…それ以外に手や"
08:29
through my arms, cheekbones, my scalp, my tummy, my chest, my legs and so on."
"腕 頬骨 頭 おなか 胸 脚でも聞きます" と答えました
08:34
And so we began our lessons every single time tuning drums --
…毎回レッスンはドラムのチューニングからでした
08:41
in particular, the kettle drums, or tympani --
特にティンパニのチューニングから
08:47
to such a narrow pitch interval, so something like ...
このぐらいの狭い音程からです
08:50
that of a difference. Then gradually ... and gradually ...
それから少しずつ 少しずつ…
08:59
and it's amazing that when you do open your body up,
身体を開き 手を開いて
09:06
and open your hand up to allow the vibration to come through,
振動が伝わってくるようにすると
09:11
that in fact the tiny, tiny difference ...
ごくわずかな違いを
09:15
can be felt with just the tiniest part of your finger, there.
指の小さな部分で 感じ取ることができます
09:19
And so what we would do is that I would put my hands on the wall
そこでレッスン室の壁に手を置いて
09:25
of the music room, and together we would "listen" to the sounds of the instruments,
先生と一緒に 楽器の音を聴きました
09:29
and really try to connect with those sounds
単に耳で聴くよりも
09:36
far, far more broadly than simply depending on the ear.
音とより広く一体になろうとしたのです
09:39
Because of course, the ear is, I mean, subject to all sorts of things.
耳は いろんなものに影響されますから
09:44
The room we happen to be in, the amplification, the quality of the instrument,
その時の部屋や音の増幅 楽器の質
09:48
the type of sticks ... etc., etc.
スティックの種類などに…
09:53
They're all different.
すべて違うんです
10:03
Same amount of weight, but different sound colors.
重さは同じですが 音の"色"が違います
10:11
And that's basically what we are. We're just human beings,
人間と同じです 私たちも
10:16
but we all have our own little sound colors, as it were,
それぞれが自分の色を持っています
10:18
that make up these extraordinary personalities
それが その人独自の個性や
10:21
and characters and interests and things.
性格や魅力を作り出します
10:24
And as I grew older, I then auditioned for the Royal Academy of Music in London,
その後私は ロンドンの王立音楽院を受験しました
10:27
and they said, "Well, no, we won't accept you, because we haven't a clue,
学校側は "将来性が不透明だ" と拒みました
10:33
you know, of the future of a so-called 'deaf' musician."
いわゆる"聴覚障害ミュージシャン"の将来性が
10:37
And I just couldn't quite accept that.
これは…納得しかねましたね
10:42
And so therefore, I said to them, "Well, look, if you refuse --
そこで言いました "もし…"
10:46
if you refuse me through those reasons,
"断る理由がそれだけで"
10:53
as opposed to the ability to perform and to understand and love
"演奏技術や音を紡ぎ出すことへの"
10:56
the art of creating sound --
"情熱を評価しないなら"
11:05
then we have to think very, very hard about the people you do actually accept."
"そもそもの合格の意味を考える必要がありますね"
11:08
And as a result -- once we got over a little hurdle, and having to audition twice --
その結果… ハードルを越え 試験を2回受け
11:14
they accepted me. And not only that --
合格しました しかも
11:20
what had happened was that it changed the whole role
これをうけて 全英の音楽院での
11:24
of the music institutions throughout the United Kingdom.
その後の方針が変わりました
11:28
Under no circumstances were they to refuse any application whatsoever on the basis of
どんな事情があっても 願書を受理するようになったんです
11:32
whether someone had no arms, no legs --
腕や脚がなくてもです
11:41
they could still perhaps play a wind instrument if it was supported on a stand.
支えがあれば 楽器が吹けるかもしれない
11:43
No circumstances at all were used to refuse any entry.
どんな場合も 入学拒否の理由にならなくなった
11:47
And every single entry had to be listened to, experienced and then
受験者の演奏を聴き 実際に見て
11:54
based on the musical ability -- then that person could either enter or not.
実力に基づいて 合否を決めるようになったんです
11:59
So therefore, this in turn meant that there was an extremely interesting
その結果 とても興味深い学生たちが
12:07
bunch of students who arrived in these various music institutions.
音楽院に入るようになりました
12:13
And I have to say, many of them now
彼らの多くは今
12:17
in the professional orchestras throughout the world.
プロとして世界中のオーケストラで活躍しています
12:20
The interesting thing about this as well, though --
ここでも興味深いのは
12:24
(Applause) --
(拍手)
12:26
is quite simply that not only were people connected with sound --
人は誰でも 音と通じ合えるというだけでなく
12:31
which is basically all of us, and we well know that music really is our daily medicine.
音楽は 私たちを日々癒してくれる薬なのです
12:37
I say "music," but actually I mean "sound."
音楽が というより音が ですね
12:44
Because you know, some of the extraordinary things I've experienced
音楽家として貴重な経験をしてきました
12:47
as a musician, when you may have a 15-year-old lad
15歳ぐらいの生徒たちがいました
12:50
who has got the most incredible challenges,
とてつもない障害を抱えていて
12:55
who may not be able to control his movements,
身体を動かすのも ままならず
13:00
who may be deaf, who may be blind, etc., etc. --
目や耳が不自由だったり…
13:03
suddenly, if that young lad sits close to this instrument,
彼が 楽器のそばに座ったり
13:06
and perhaps even lies underneath the marimba,
マリンバの下に横たわる
13:12
and you play something that's so incredibly organ-like, almost --
そこで パイプオルガンのように弾きます
13:15
I don't really have the right sticks, perhaps --
ピッタリのスティックがないんですが…
13:21
but something like this. Let me change. (Music)
こんな感じです
13:24
Something that's so unbelievably simple --
シンプルですが
14:18
but he would be experiencing something that I wouldn't be,
彼は私とは全く異なる体験をするでしょう
14:19
because I'm on top of the sound.
私は音の真上なので
14:25
I have the sound coming this way.
音は 上がってきます
14:27
He would have the sound coming through the resonators.
彼は共鳴管から音を感じるでしょう
14:30
If there were no resonators on here, we would have ... (Music)
共鳴管がなければ 音はこんなです
14:33
So he would have a fullness of sound that those of you in the front few rows
下なら音に包まれます 会場の最前列や
14:43
wouldn't experience, those of you in the back few rows wouldn't experience either.
後ろの何列かでも感じられません
14:47
Every single one of us, depending on where we're sitting,
座っている場所に応じ
14:51
will experience this sound quite, quite differently.
まったく違う音を経験するんです
14:54
And of course, being the participator of the sound,
もちろん 音を出す人間としては
14:58
and that is starting from the idea of what type of sound I want to produce --
まず どんな音を出したいか考えます
15:01
for example, this sound.
例えば この音…
15:07
Can you hear anything?
聞こえます?
15:16
Exactly. Because I'm not even touching it.
その通り 触っていませんから
15:19
But yet, we get the sensation of something happening.
それでも何かが起こるのを感じ取ります
15:22
In the same way that when I see tree moves,
木の揺れるのを見て
15:28
then I imagine that tree making a rustling sound.
葉擦れの音を想像するのと一緒です
15:30
Do you see what I mean?
分かります?
15:34
Whatever the eye sees, then there's always sound happening.
何かを見る時 そこには音がある
15:36
So there's always, always that huge --
いつもいつも 大きな
15:40
I mean, just this kaleidoscope of things to draw from.
万華鏡の中にいるかのような…
15:44
So all of my performances are based on entirely what I experience,
私の演奏は 自分の経験が基になってます
15:49
and not by learning a piece of music, putting on someone else's interpretation of it,
楽譜から学ぶのでも 誰かの解釈に従うのでも
15:55
buying all the CDs possible of that particular piece of music, and so on and so forth.
弾く曲のCDを買い集めるのでもありません
15:59
Because that isn't giving me enough of something that is so raw and so basic,
それらは素のままの根源的なものを与えず
16:04
and something that I can fully experience the journey of.
作り上げる過程を 堪能するには不十分なのです
16:10
So it may be that, in certain halls, this dynamic may well work. (Music)
ホールによっては この強さでも十分でしょう
16:16
It may be that in other halls, they're simply not going to experience that
別のホールでは全然聞こえないかも…
16:34
at all and so therefore, my level of soft,
だから 条件に合わせて弾き方も
16:38
gentle playing may have to be ... (Music)
変えるんです
16:41
Do you see what I mean? So, because of this explosion in access to sound,
分かります? 現代では 音は体全体で感じるものになりました
17:08
especially through the deaf community,
特に聴覚障害者の間では…
17:15
this has not only affected how music institutions,
この音の扱いの変化は 音楽院や
17:17
how schools for the deaf treat sound -- and not just as a means of therapy --
養護学校に影響を与えました 治療の手段以外でも…
17:22
although of course, being a participator of music,
音楽の関係者からすると
17:28
that definitely is the case as well.
もちろん治療目的もありますが…
17:31
But it's meant that acousticians have had to really think about the types of halls
この変化で 音響技師はホールの音響設計を考える必要が出てきました
17:34
they put together. There are so few halls in this world
本当に良い音響の会場は
17:41
that actually have very good acoustics,
世界でも少ないんですよ
17:46
dare I say. But by that I mean where you can absolutely do anything you imagine.
本当に良い会場なら何でもできます
17:50
The tiniest, softest, softest sound to something that is so broad,
とても小さい柔らかい音から 厚みのある
17:56
so huge, so incredible! There's always something --
大きい音まで…素晴らしいです 普通は
18:01
it may sound good up there, may not be so good there.
ここは良くても あっちはイマイチ…
18:06
May be great there, but terrible up there.
あっちは良くても こっちは最悪…
18:08
Maybe terrible over there, but not too bad there, etc., etc.
こっちはヒドくても あっちは…という具合
18:10
So to find an actual hall is incredible
思い通りに弾ける会場に
18:14
-- for which you can play exactly what you imagine,
出合えたら最高です
18:19
without it being cosmetically enhanced.
何も細工のない会場に…
18:23
And so therefore, acousticians are actually in conversation with people who are
聴覚障害者たちや音楽家の意見を
18:26
hearing impaired, and who are participators of sound.
音響技師は取り入れています
18:33
And this is quite interesting.
興味深いですよ
18:39
I cannot, you know, give you any detail as far as what is actually happening
ここでは詳細に触れませんが
18:41
with those halls, but it's just the fact that they are going to a group of people
音響技師たちは意見を聞くんです
18:47
for whom so many years we've been saying,
長年 こう言われてきた人々に
18:53
"Well, how on Earth can they experience music? You know, they're deaf."
"音楽がどう分かるの? 聞こえずに?"
18:57
We just -- we go like that, and we imagine that that's what deafness is about.
聴覚障害に対する固定観念があります
19:00
Or we go like that, and we imagine that's what blindness is about.
視覚障害に対しても
19:04
If we see someone in a wheelchair, we assume they cannot walk.
車椅子に乗っている人は 歩けないと思いがちです
19:06
It may be that they can walk three, four, five steps. That, to them, means they can walk.
でも 数歩でも歩ければ 彼らにとっては歩けるということ
19:11
In a year's time, it could be two extra steps.
一年後にはもう2歩
19:18
In another year's time, three extra steps.
その次の年には もう3歩
19:22
Those are hugely important aspects to think about.
これはとても大事な考え方です
19:25
So when we do listen to each other,
だから 聴く時は
19:30
it's unbelievably important for us to really test our listening skills,
どれだけ聴く力があるか試されます
19:34
to really use our bodies as a resonating chamber, to stop the judgment.
身体全体に反響させて 即断はしない
19:42
For me, as a musician who deals with 99 percent of new music,
私は扱う曲の99%が新曲なので
19:47
it's very easy for me to say, "Oh yes, I like that piece.
簡単に言い切れます "この曲は好き"
19:51
Oh no, I don't like that piece." And so on.
"これは好きじゃない" と…
19:54
And you know, I just find that I have to give those pieces of music real time.
でも こうした曲にも時間をかけるべきだと気付きました
19:56
It may be that the chemistry isn't quite right between myself and that particular piece of music,
曲との相性が良くなかったのかも知れない
20:02
but that doesn't mean I have the right to say it's a bad piece of music.
だからといって悪い作品だと言う権利はない
20:07
And you know, it's just one of the great things about being a musician,
それに 音楽家であることの利点は
20:12
is that it is so unbelievably fluid.
とても自由なことです
20:17
So there are no rules, no right, no wrong, this way, that way.
これが正しいという決まりもない
20:21
If I asked you to clap -- maybe I can do this.
ちょっと… 手を叩いてもらえますか?
20:25
If I can just say, "Please clap and create the sound of thunder."
手を叩いて雷の音を作って下さい
20:30
I'm assuming we've all experienced thunder.
雷は分かりますよね?
20:36
Now, I don't mean just the sound;
音だけじゃありませんよ
20:39
I mean really listen to that thunder within yourselves.
自分の内で雷を聴いて下さい
20:41
And please try to create that through your clapping. Try. Just -- please try.
それを拍手で表すんです さあどうぞ
20:46
(Applause)
(拍手)
20:51
Very good! Snow. Snow. Have you ever heard snow?
いいですね! 今度は雪です… 雪を聞いた事は?
20:58
Audience: No.
(会場 "ないです")
21:08
Evelyn Glennie: Well then, stop clapping. (Laughter) Try again.
じゃあ叩かないで (会場 笑) もう一度…
21:09
Try again. Snow.
もう一度 雪です
21:15
See, you're awake.
ね? 意識したでしょう?
21:21
Rain. Not bad. Not bad.
では雨を… 悪くないですね
21:23
You know, the interesting thing here, though, is that I asked a group of kids
興味深いのは… 子供たちに
21:32
not so long ago exactly the same question.
最近同じ質問をしたんです
21:36
Now -- great imagination, thank you very much.
皆さんも見事でした 有難うございます
21:40
However, not one of you got out of your seats to think,
でも誰も席を立って
21:44
"Right! How can I clap? OK, maybe ... (Claps)
"じゃあ どう叩こう? "と
21:47
Maybe I can use my jewelry to create extra sounds.
アクセサリーを使ったり
21:52
Maybe I can use the other parts of my body to create extra sounds."
体の他の部分を使わなかった
21:55
Not a single one of you thought about clapping in a slightly different way
誰も違う叩き方をしなかったですね
21:59
other than sitting in your seats there and using two hands.
座って両手を使う以外には?
22:04
In the same way that when we listen to music,
音楽を聴く時も
22:08
we assume that it's all being fed through here.
全て耳を通すと思いがちです
22:10
This is how we experience music. Of course it's not.
これが音楽の感じ方だと… 違うんです
22:14
We experience thunder -- thunder, thunder. Think, think, think.
雷を感じる時は… 考えるんです
22:18
Listen, listen, listen. Now -- what can we do with thunder?
聴いて聴いて聴くんです さあどうします?
22:22
I remember my teacher. When I first started, my very first lesson,
私の最初のレッスンはこうでした
22:29
I was all prepared with sticks, ready to go.
スティックを用意し準備万端でした
22:34
And instead of him saying, "OK, Evelyn, please, feet slightly apart,
こうは言われませんでした "両足を開いて"
22:38
arms at a more-or-less 90 degree angle, sticks in a more-or-less V shape,
"腕は約90度 スティックはV字で"
22:43
keep this amount of space here, etc.
"脇を充分開いて"
22:49
Please keep your back straight, etc., etc., etc." --
"背筋も伸ばす" とは…
22:52
where I was probably just going to end up absolutely rigid, frozen,
きっと様々なことを考えてしまい
22:54
and I would not be able to strike the drum,
身体が硬直し
22:58
because I was thinking of so many other things -- he said,
上手く叩けなかったでしょう
23:00
"Evelyn, take this drum away for seven days, and I'll see you next week."
代わりにドラムを一週間持ち帰るよう言われました
23:02
So, heavens! What was I to do? I no longer required the sticks;
"どうしよう? スティックもなしで? "
23:07
I wasn't allowed to have these sticks.
スティックは禁止です
23:12
I had to basically look at this particular drum,
そこで このドラムをじっくり眺め
23:14
see how it was made, what these little lugs did, what the snares did.
つまみやスネアなど 構造を調べました
23:18
Turned it upside down, experimented with the shell, experimented with the head.
裏返したり ドラムの上や周りを叩いたり
23:23
Experimented with my body, experimented with jewelry,
身体もアクセサリーも使いました
23:30
experimented with all sorts of things.
使えるもの全て
23:36
And of course, I returned with all sorts of bruises and things like that --
アザだらけになりましたが
23:48
but nevertheless, it was such an unbelievable experience,
信じ難いほど素晴らしい経験をしました
23:51
because then, where on Earth are you going to experience that in a piece of music?
どうやったら こんな経験が楽譜から得られます?
23:56
Where on Earth are you going to experience that in a study book?
どうやったら教本から得られます?
24:01
So we never, ever dealt with actual study books.
結局 教本は使いませんでした
24:05
So for example, one of the things that we learn
レッスンでは たとえば
24:08
when we are dealing with being a percussion player, as opposed to a musician,
音楽家ではなくプレイヤーになるための基礎として
24:11
is basically straightforward single stroke rolls.
シングルストロークを学ぶものです
24:17
Like that. And then we get a little faster and a little faster and a little faster.
こんな… 少しずつ早くしていきます
24:24
And so on and so forth. What does this piece require?
この曲を弾くには?
24:31
Single stroke rolls. So why can't I then do that whilst learning a piece of music?
…シングルストローク 当時私にこの技術がなかったのは
24:34
And that's exactly what he did.
まさに先生の意図でした
24:42
And interestingly, the older I became, and when I became a full-time student
成長して正規の学生になって
24:45
at a so called "music institution," all of that went out of the window.
いわゆる音大生になると レッスンも変わりました
24:50
We had to study from study books.
教本に沿うようになった
24:56
And constantly, the question, "Well, why? Why? What is this relating to?
いつも疑問でした "何と関係あるの?"
24:58
I need to play a piece of music." "Oh, well, this will help your control!"
"曲を弾きたい" と言うと "そのために必要だ"と
25:02
"Well, how? Why do I need to learn that? I need to relate it to a piece of music.
曲と通い合うのに なぜそれが必要なのか?
25:06
You know. I need to say something.
私は表現したかったのに
25:11
"Why am I practicing paradiddles?
なぜパラディドルの練習?
25:14
Is it just literally for control, for hand-stick control? Why am I doing that?
スティックを操る目的なんて?
25:20
I need to have the reason,
私には意味づけが必要でした
25:25
and the reason has to be by saying something through the music."
それが音楽で語ることに どう関わるのか?
25:28
And by saying something through music, which basically is sound,
音楽を通して語ることによって
25:33
we then can reach all sorts of things to all sorts of people.
あらゆる人に あらゆることを伝えられるんです
25:38
But I don't want to take responsibility of your emotional baggage.
皆さんの内面には立ち入りません
25:43
That's up to you, when you walk through a hall.
個人の問題ですから
25:46
Because that then determines what and how we listen to certain things.
それが個人個人の聴き方を決めるんです
25:48
I may feel sorrowful, or happy, or exhilarated, or angry when I play
演奏する時の私の感情も 様々なものですが
25:54
certain pieces of music, but I'm not necessarily
必ずしも皆さんに
26:00
wanting you to feel exactly the same thing.
同じように感じることは望みません
26:02
So please, the next time you go to a concert,
次回コンサートに行く時は
26:06
just allow your body to open up, allow your body to be this resonating chamber.
身体を開き 中で響かせてみて下さい
26:09
Be aware that you're not going to experience the same thing as the performer is.
奏者と同じ体験ではありませんよ
26:16
The performer is in the worst possible position for the actual sound,
奏者は音を聴くのに最悪の場所にいます
26:21
because they're hearing the contact of the stick on the drum,
スティックがドラムに当たる音や
26:25
or the mallet on the bit of wood, or the bow on the string, etc.,
鍵盤に当たるマレットや 弦をこする弓や
26:31
or the breath that's creating the sound from wind and brass.
吹く時の呼吸が聞こえるんです
26:35
They're experiencing that rawness there.
"素"のものなんです
26:39
But yet they're experiencing something so unbelievably pure,
とても純粋なものでもありますが
26:41
which is before the sound is actually happening.
実際の音になる前の段階なんです
26:45
Please take note of the life of the sound after the actual initial strike,
音の誕生から消滅までの過程を意識して
26:49
or breath, is being pulled. Just experience the whole journey of that sound
その全過程を感じてみて下さい
26:55
in the same way that I wished I'd experienced the whole journey
私もそのようにTEDの全てに触れたかった
27:02
of this particular conference, rather than just arriving last night.
でも着いたのが昨日の夜だったので…
27:06
But I hope maybe we can share one or two things as the day progresses.
まだ何か共有できると良いですが…
27:11
But thank you very much for having me!
それでも参加できて光栄でした
27:15
(Applause)
(拍手)
27:18
Translated by Ai Kamimoto
Reviewed by Yasushi Aoki

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About the Speaker:

Evelyn Glennie - Musician
Percussionist and composer Dame Evelyn Glennie lost nearly all of her hearing by age 12. Rather than isolating her, it has given her a unique connection to her music.

Why you should listen

Dame Evelyn Glennie's music challenges the listener to ask where music comes from: Is it more than simply a translation from score to instrument to audience?

The Grammy-winning percussionist and composer became almost completely deaf by the age of 12, but her hearing loss brought her a deeper understanding of and connection to the music she loves. She's the subject of the documentary Touch the Sound, which explores this unconventional and intriguing approach to percussion.

Along with her vibrant solo career, Glennie has collaborated with musicians ranging from classical orchestras to Björk. Her career has taken her to hundreds of concert stages around the world, and she's recorded a dozen albums, winning a Grammy for her recording of Bartók's Sonata for Two Pianos and Percussion, and another for her 2002 collaboration with Bela Fleck.

Her passion for music and musical literacy brought her to establish, in collaboration with fellow musicians Julian Lloyd Weber and Sir James Galway, the Music Education Consortium, which successfully lobbied for an investment of 332 million pounds in music education and musical resources in Britain. 

More profile about the speaker
Evelyn Glennie | Speaker | TED.com