20:34
TEDMED 2010

Bruce Feiler: The council of dads

ブルース・ファイラー: 父親団

Filmed:

ガンと診断されたブルース・ファイラーは、幼い子供と妻のことを心配しました。そこで、親しい友人たちに「父親団」として、彼らが人生経験から得た知恵を、成長していくであろう双子の娘たちに与えてくれるよう頼んだのです。その様子を脱線をまじえて面白おかしく語っていますが、実に考えさせられる話です。

- Writer
Bruce Feiler is the author of "The Secrets of Happy Families," and the writer/presenter of the PBS miniseries "Walking the Bible." Full bio

My story actually began when I was four years old
4歳の時のことからお話しましょう
00:15
and my family moved to a new neighborhood
家族と共に引っ越しをしました
00:18
in our hometown of Savannah, Georgia.
ジョージア州サバンナです
00:20
And this was the 1960s
1960 年代のことで
00:22
when actually all the streets in this neighborhood
そのあたりの通りには どれも
00:24
were named after Confederate war generals.
南軍の将軍にちなんだ名がついていました
00:26
We lived on Robert E. Lee Boulevard.
うちはロバート・E・リー通りにありました
00:29
And when I was five,
5歳の時 オレンジ色の
00:31
my parents gave me an orange Schwinn Sting-Ray bicycle.
シュウイン・スティングレイ自転車を
買ってもらいました
00:33
It had a swooping banana seat and those ape hanger handlebars
バナナ型のサドルと
高い変形ハンドルがついていて
00:36
that made the rider look like an orangutan.
乗るとオランウータンみたいに見えたので
あのハンドルを
00:39
That's why they were called ape hangers.
エイプ・ハンガー(猿吊り)と呼ぶのです
00:42
They were actually modeled on hotrod motorcycles of the 1960s,
あれは60 年代の改造バイクを
まねていたのですが
00:44
which I'm sure my mom didn't know.
母は そんなこと知らなかったでしょう
00:47
And one day I was exploring this cul-de-sac
ある日 袋小路探検に出かけました
00:49
hidden away a few streets away.
家からそう遠くない道の奥でした
00:52
And I came back,
それから引き返してきて 向きを変え
00:54
and I wanted to turn around and get back to that street more quickly,
もっと速くあの道に戻ろうと思い
00:56
so I decided to turn around in this big street
うちの近所にあった広い通りで
00:58
that intersected our neighborhood,
Uターンしようとしたところ
01:01
and wham! I was hit by a passing sedan.
ドーン!
通りかかった乗用車にはねられました
01:03
My mangled body flew in one direction,
ぼくの壊れた体は一方に
01:06
my mangled bike flew in the other.
壊れた自転車は別の方向に飛ばされました
01:08
And I lay on the pavement stretching over that yellow line,
ぼくは道路の黄色い線の上に倒れていました
01:11
and one of my neighbors came running over.
近所の人が駆けてきて
01:14
"Andy, Andy, how are you doing?" she said, using the name of my older brother.
「アンディ、アンディ、大丈夫?」
兄の名前で呼んだんです
01:16
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:19
"I'm Bruce," I said, and promptly passed out.
「ぼくはブルースだよ」と答えて
気を失いました
01:21
I broke my left femur that day --
あれで左の大腿骨が折れました -
01:24
it's the largest bone in your body --
人間の体で一番大きい骨です -
01:26
and spent the next two months in a body cast
2ヶ月間 全身にギプスをはめていました
01:28
that went from my chin to the tip of my toe
あごからつま先まですっぽりと
01:31
to my right knee,
右は膝まで
01:33
and a steel bar went from my right knee
それから右膝から左の足首まで
01:35
to my left ankle.
スチールの棒が入りました
01:37
And for the next 38 years,
その後の 38 年間
01:39
that accident was the only medically interesting thing
健康の問題といえば
01:41
that ever happened to me.
あの事故のことだけだったのです
01:43
In fact, I made a living by walking.
実際 ぼくは歩くことを仕事にしていました
01:46
I traveled around the world, entered different cultures,
世界中を旅して
異なった文化の中に入り
01:48
wrote a series of books about my travels,
そうした旅についての本を書きました
01:50
including "Walking the Bible."
『聖書を歩く』はその一つです
01:52
I hosted a television show by that name
PBS(全米ネットの公共放送)で
01:54
on PBS.
同じタイトルの番組の案内役もしました
01:56
I was, for all the world, the "walking guy."
ぼくは「歩く男」として知られていました
01:58
Until, in May 2008,
2008年の5月までは
02:01
a routine visit to my doctor
定期健診で お決まりの
02:04
and a routine blood test
血液検査を受けたところ
02:06
produced evidence in the form of an alkaline phosphatase number
アルカリフォスファターゼの数値が異常で
02:08
that something might be wrong with my bones.
骨の何かがおかしいということになったのです
02:11
And my doctor, on a whim, sent me to get a full-body bone scan,
先生が思いついて
全身スキャンをしてみたところ
02:15
which showed that there was some growth in my left leg.
左足に腫瘍が見つかりました
02:18
That sent me to an X-ray, then to an MRI.
それからX線検査 次にMRIと続き
02:21
And one afternoon, I got a call from my doctor.
ある日の午後 先生から電話がありました
02:24
"The tumor in your leg
「左足の腫瘍は
02:28
is not consistent with a benign tumor."
良性のものではないようです」
02:30
I stopped walking,
ぼくの足はぴたっと止まりました
02:32
and it took my mind a second to convert that double negative
「良性のものではない」という否定形が
ずっと恐ろしいことを
02:34
into a much more horrifying negative.
意味するのだと すぐにわかりました
02:37
I have cancer.
ガンなんだ
02:39
And to think that the tumor was in the same bone,
ガンは 38 年前の事故のときの
02:41
in the same place in my body
同じ部分
02:44
as the accident 38 years earlier --
あの骨にあったのです
02:46
it seemed like too much of a coincidence.
とうてい偶然とは思えませんでした
02:49
So that afternoon, I went back to my house,
さて その日の午後 家に帰ると
02:52
and my three year-old identical twin daughters, Eden and Tybee Feiler,
一卵性双子の娘たち
エデンとタイビー・ファイラーが
02:54
came running to meet me.
迎えに駆けてきました
02:57
They'd just turned three,
二人はちょうど3歳になったところで
02:59
and they were into all things pink and purple.
ピンクと紫のものなら何でも大好きでした
03:01
In fact, we called them Pinkalicious and Purplicious --
ピンクちゃん、パープルちゃんと
呼んでいましたしね
03:03
although I must say, our favorite nickname
でも ぼくのお気に入りのあだ名は
03:06
occurred on their birthday, April 15th.
二人の生まれた4月15日についたものです
03:08
When they were born at 6:14 and 6:46
2005 年4月15日の6時14分と46分に
03:10
on April 15, 2005,
二人が生まれてきたとき
いつもはにこりともしない
03:13
our otherwise grim, humorless doctor looked at his watch,
真面目な先生が腕時計を見て
03:16
and was like, "Hmm, April 15th -- tax day.
「ふむ 4月15日 税金の書類提出期限か
03:18
Early filer and late filer."
早期提出者と遅延提出者だな」
03:21
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:24
The next day I came to see him. I was like, "Doctor, that was a really good joke."
「先生 あれはいいジョークでしたね」
翌日 そう言うと
03:29
And he was like, "You're the writer, kid."
「筋書きを書いたのは そっちだろう」と言うんです
03:32
Anyway -- so they had just turned three,
ともかく 双子は3歳になったところでした
03:34
and they came and they were doing this dance they had just made up
二人はやって来ると 即興で踊るんです
03:36
where they were twirling faster and faster until they tumbled to the ground,
ぐるぐる回り どんどん速度を上げて
03:38
laughing with all the glee in the world.
とうとう転んでしまって 笑っていました
03:41
I crumbled.
ぼくは泣きました
03:44
I kept imagining all the walks I might not take with them,
この子たちと一緒に経験出来ない事が
次々と頭に浮かびました
03:46
the art projects I might not mess up,
この子達の工作を台無しにし
03:49
the boyfriends I might not scowl at,
ボーイフレンドをにらみつけ
03:51
the aisles I might not walk down.
花嫁姿の娘と腕を組み
バージンロードを歩くことはないんだ
03:53
Would they wonder who I was, I thought.
娘たちは考えるだろうか
03:56
Would they yearn for my approval,
ぼくがどんな人間だったか
ぼくの承認
03:58
my love, my voice?
ぼくの愛 ぼくの声を
いつか求めるだろうか
04:00
A few days later, I woke with an idea
数日後の朝 目覚めたとき
ある考えが浮かびました
04:03
of how I might give them that voice.
娘たちにぼくの声を届ける方法です
04:05
I would reach out to six men
ぼくは人生で出会った
04:07
from all parts of my life
6人の男たちに声をかけ
04:09
and ask them to be present
娘たちの人生の節目に
04:11
in the passages of my daughters' lives.
立ち会ってくれるよう頼むんです
04:13
"I believe my girls will have plenty of opportunities in their lives,"
「娘たちには様々なチャンスが訪れるだろう」
04:16
I wrote these men.
ぼくは彼らに書きました
04:18
"They'll have loving families and welcoming homes,
「愛する家族や温かい家庭をもつだろう
04:20
but they may not have me.
でも ぼくはその場にはいない
04:22
They may not have their dad.
娘たちには父親がいないだろう
04:24
Will you help be their dad?"
父親代わりになってくれないだろうか?」
04:26
And I said to myself
そうして この男たちを
04:28
I would call this group of men "the Council of Dads."
『父親団』と呼ぶことに決めたのです
04:30
Now as soon as I had this idea,
この考えが浮かぶとすぐ
04:34
I decided I wouldn't tell my wife. Okay.
妻には言わずにおくことにしました
それがいい
04:36
She's a very upbeat,
妻はとても前向きで
04:39
naturally excited person.
生まれつき元気いっぱいです
04:41
There's this idea in this culture -- I don't have to tell you --
この国の文化には-言うまでもないことでしょうが-
厄介事をある意味で
04:43
that you sort of "happy" your way through a problem.
明るく受け止めていくところがあります
04:46
We should focus on the positive.
良いことにだけ目を向けようとします
04:48
My wife, as I said, she grew up outside of Boston.
妻はボストン郊外で育ちました
04:50
She's got a big smile. She's got a big personality.
明るい笑顔で おおらかな性格です
04:52
She's got big hair --
髪はボリュームたっぷり
04:54
although, she told me recently, I can't say she has big hair,
妻が最近言うには
「髪にボリュームがあると言ってはダメ
04:56
because if I say she has big hair,
髪がふくらんでいるなんて言ったら
04:59
people will think she's from Texas.
テキサス出身だと思われるわ」
05:01
And it's apparently okay to marry a boy from Georgia,
どうも ジョージアの男と結婚するのは良くても
05:03
but not to have hair from Texas.
テキサス風の髪型はいけないらしいのです
05:05
And actually, in her defense, if she were here right now,
妻の名誉の為に言っておきますが
05:08
she would point out that, when we got married in Georgia,
ぼくたちがジョージアで結婚した時
05:10
there were three questions
結婚証明書の書類には
05:13
on the marriage certificate license,
質問が三つあって
05:15
the third of which was, "Are you related?"
三番目は「あなたたちは親族ですか」だったんです
05:17
(Laughter)
(笑)
05:20
I said, "Look, in Georgia at least we want to know.
「ジョージアでは はっきりさせるんだ
05:23
In Arkansas they don't even ask."
アーカンソーじゃあ 訊きもしないのにな」
05:25
What I didn't tell her is, if she said, "Yes," you could jump.
黙ってましたが「はい」と答えていたら
すぐ結婚できたんですよ
05:28
You don't need the 30-day waiting period.
30日間の待機期間なしに
05:30
Because you don't need the get-to-know-you session at that point.
それ以上 お互いを知り合う必要は
ないんですからね
05:32
So I wasn't going to tell her about this idea,
父親団のことは内緒のつもりでしたが
05:35
but the next day I couldn't control myself, I told her.
次の日 我慢できなくて打ち明けました
05:37
And she loved the idea,
妻は 良い考えだ と言いましたが
05:39
but she quickly started rejecting my nominees.
すぐに ぼくの選んだ候補者が だめだと言うのです
05:41
She was like, "Well, I love him, but I would never ask him for advice."
「いい人だけど
あの人の助言は欲しくないわ」なんてね
05:45
So it turned out that starting a council of dads
結局 父親団を始めたおかげで
05:48
was a very efficient way to find out
妻がぼくの友人達をどう評価しているかを
05:50
what my wife really thought of my friends.
手っ取り早く知ることができたのです
05:52
(Laughter)
(笑)
05:54
So we decided that we needed a set of rules,
それで一定の基準を設けることにしました
05:56
and we came up with a number.
いくつかのルールを作ったのです
05:58
And the first one was no family, only friends.
まず 身内はだめ 友人だけ
06:00
We thought our family would already be there.
身内はいつだってそばにいるんだから
06:02
Second, men only.
第二には男だけ
06:04
We were trying to fill the dad-space in the girls' lives.
娘たちの人生で父親の抜けた穴を
埋めようとしているんだから
06:06
And then third, sort of a dad for every side.
第三は あらゆる面をカバーできるような父親
06:08
We kind of went through my personality
ぼくという人間について話し合い
06:11
and tried to get a dad who represented each different thing.
それぞれの面を担う父親を選ぼうとしました
06:13
So what happened was I wrote a letter to each of these men.
そこで 一人一人に手紙を書いたんです
06:15
And rather than send it,
それも郵送ではなく
06:17
I decided to read it to them in person.
相手の前で読み上げることにしました
06:19
Linda, my wife, joked that it was like having six different marriage proposals.
妻のリンダは 6人にプロポーズしているようだと笑いました
06:22
I sort of friend-married each of these guys.
つまり 6人の友人と縁を結んだわけです
06:25
And the first of these guys was Jeff Schumlin.
最初の1人はジェフ・シュムリンでした
06:28
Now Jeff led this trip I took to Europe
ジェフは80 年代の初め 高校卒業後
06:30
when I graduated from high school in the early 1980s.
ヨーロッパ旅行をした時のリーダーでした
06:32
And on that first day we were in this youth hostel in a castle.
初日に お城にあるユースホステルに
泊まりました
06:35
And I snuck out behind,
こっそり裏に行くと
06:38
and there was a moat, a fence and a field of cows.
堀とフェンスがあり 牛のいる草原が見えました
06:40
And Jeff came up beside me and said,
ジェフはそばにやって来て言いました
06:43
"So, have you ever been cow tipping?"
「牛を転がしたことあるかい?」
06:45
I was like, "Cow tipping?
「牛を転がすって?」とぼく
06:47
He was like, "Yeah. Cows sleep standing up.
「ああ 牛は立ったまま眠るんだ
06:49
So if you approach them from behind, down wind,
だから 後ろの風下から近づいて
ぐいと押したら
06:51
you can push them over and they go thud in the mud."
牛は泥の中にどさっと倒れるんだ」
06:54
So before I had a chance to determine whether this was right or not,
それが良いことか悪いことか考える間もなく
06:56
we had jumped the moat, we had climbed the fence,
堀を飛び越え
フェンスをよじ登り
06:59
we were tiptoeing through the dung
糞の間をこっそりと進み
07:01
and approaching some poor, dozing cow.
何も知らずに眠っている牝牛に近づきました -
07:03
So a few weeks after my diagnosis,
さて ガンの診断が出てから数週間後
07:07
we went up to Vermont,
ぼくたちはバーモント州に行き
07:09
and I decided to put Jeff as the first person in the Council of Dads.
ジェフを父親団の最初のメンバーに
することにしました
07:11
And we went to this apple orchard, and I read him this letter.
りんご園に行き
手紙を読み上げました
07:14
"Will you help be their dad?"
「娘たちの父親役をしてくれないか」
07:17
And I got to the end -- he was crying and I was crying --
読み終えて--
ジェフも ぼくも泣いてました
07:19
and then he looked at me, and he said, "Yes."
ジェフは「いいよ」と言いました
07:21
I was like, "Yes?"
「いいよ」だって?
07:23
I kind of had forgotten there was a question at the heart of my letter.
手紙の大事な部分が問いだったことを
忘れていたのです
07:25
And frankly, although I keep getting asked this,
正直 これはよく訊かれることですが
07:27
it never occurred to me that anybody would turn me down
断られるかもしれないなんて
07:29
under the circumstances.
一切考えていませんでした
事情が事情ですから
07:31
And then I asked him a question, which I ended up asking to all the dads
次に ある質問をしました
他の「父親」みんなにも同じことを尋ね
07:34
and ended up really encouraging me to write this story down in a book.
このことから この体験を本にすることに
なったのですが
07:37
And that was, "What's the one piece of advice
その質問とは「君はぼくの娘たちに
07:40
you would give to my girls?"
どんな助言をしてくれるのか」です
07:42
And Jeff's advice was,
ジェフの助言は こうです
07:44
"Be a traveller, not a tourist.
「観光客ではなく 旅人になりなさい
07:46
Get off the bus. Seek out what's different.
バスから降りて 新しいことを探しなさい
07:48
Approach the cow."
牝牛に近づいてごらん」
07:51
"So it's 10 years from now," I said,
ぼくは言いました
「じゃあ 10年後
07:53
"and my daughters are about to take their first trip abroad, and I'm not here.
娘たちが初めて海外旅行に行くことになったとする
07:55
What would you tell them?"
ぼくはもういない
君は何て言うんだい?」
07:58
He said, "I would approach this journey
ジェフは言いました
「ぼくなら この旅を
08:00
as a young child might approach a mud puddle.
子どもが水たまりに近づくみたいにするね
08:02
You can bend over and look at your reflection in the mirror
身をかがめて
自分の姿が映っているのを見る
08:04
and maybe run your finger and make a small ripple,
たぶん 指を水の中で動かして
さざなみを立ててみるよ
08:07
or you can jump in and thrash around
飛び込んで
ばしゃばしゃ歩くのもいい
08:10
and see what it feels like, what it smells like."
その感触や匂いを確かめるんだ」
08:12
And as he talked he had that glint in his eye
彼の眼には
あの時と同じ輝きがありました
08:15
that I first saw back in Holland --
昔 オランダで初めて見た
08:17
the glint that says, "Let's go cow tipping,"
「牛を転ばせに行こう」と
言った時の目
08:19
even though we never did tip the cow,
ぼくたちは結局 牛を転ばせなかったし
08:21
even though no one tips the cow,
誰も牛を転ばせなくても
08:24
even though cows don't sleep standing up.
牛は立ったまま眠っていなくても
08:26
He said, "I want to see you back here girls, at the end of this experience,
それでも「君たちが泥んこになって
帰るのを楽しみにしているよ」と
08:30
covered in mud."
ジェフは言うつもりなのです
08:33
Two weeks after my diagnosis, a biopsy confirmed
診断の二週間後
組織検査の結果が出て
08:38
I had a seven-inch osteosarcoma
18 センチの骨肉腫が
08:40
in my left femur.
左の大腿骨で見つかりました
08:42
Six hundred Americans a year get an osteosarcoma.
アメリカでは年間 600人が骨肉腫と宣告されます
08:44
Eighty-five percent are under 21.
その85 %は21 歳以下
08:47
Only a hundred adults a year
成人で骨肉腫になるのは
08:49
get one of these diseases.
100人だけ
08:51
Twenty years ago, doctors would have cut off my leg and hoped,
20年前なら医者はぼくの脚を切断し
再発しないことを
08:53
and there was a 15 percent survival rate.
祈ったでしょう
生存率は15 %でした
08:56
And then in the 1980's, they determined
それが 1980 年代になって
08:59
that one particular cocktail of chemo could be effective,
ある薬の組み合わせがよく効く
ということがわかりました
09:01
and within weeks I had started that regimen.
数週間のうちにその治療法を始めました
09:04
And since we are in a medical room,
入院してから 4ヶ月半
09:07
I went through four and a half months of chemo.
化学療法を受けました
09:09
Actually I had Cisplatin, Doxorubicin
シスプラチン ドキソルビシン
09:11
and very high-dose Methotrexate.
それに大量のメトトレキサート
09:13
And then I had a 15-hour surgery
その後 15 時間に及ぶ手術で
09:16
in which my surgeon, Dr. John Healey
NYのスローン・ケタリング記念病院の
09:18
at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Hospital in New York,
ジョン・ヒーリー先生が
09:20
took out my left femur
ぼくの左大腿骨を取り除き
09:22
and replaced it with titanium.
チタニウムと交換しました
09:24
And if you did see the Sanjay special,
CNNのサンジェイの特別番組を見た方なら
09:27
you saw these enormous screws
ぼくの骨盤に取り付けた
09:29
that they screwed into my pelvis.
特大のネジを見ているでしょう
09:31
Then he took my fibula from my calf,
次に ふくらはぎから腓骨を取り出し
09:33
cut it out and then relocated it to my thigh,
切って 大腿骨に移植しました
09:36
where it now lives.
今もありますよ
09:39
And what he actually did was he de-vascularized it from my calf
さらに
ふくらはぎから血管組織を取りだし
09:41
and re-vascularized it in my thigh
大腿骨に血管組織を移し
09:44
and then connected it
それを膝と腰の
09:46
to the good parts of my knee and my hip.
健康な部分につないだのです
09:48
And then he took out a third of my quadriceps muscle.
それから大腿四頭筋を1/3 取り除いた
09:51
This is a surgery so rare
これは非常に珍しい手術で
09:54
only two human beings have survived it before me.
ぼくの前にこれを受けて生き残ったのは
二人しかいませんでした
09:56
And my reward for surviving it
大手術を生き延びたご褒美は
09:59
was to go back for four more months of chemo.
さらに4ヶ月間の化学療法でした
10:01
It was, as we said in my house,
うちの家族の間では
10:04
a lost year.
「失われた1年」と呼んでいます
10:06
Because in those opening weeks, we all had nightmares.
最初の何週間か
ぼくたちは 悪い夢を見ました
10:08
And one night I had a nightmare that I was walking through my house,
ある晩の悪夢で ぼくは
10:11
sat at my desk and saw photographs of someone else's children
家の中を歩き回り
自分の机に向かって座ると
10:13
sitting on my desk.
机の上に知らない子の写真が
飾られてあるのです
10:16
And I remember a particular one night that, when you told that story of --
また ある夜 ヌーランド先生が -
10:18
I don't know where you are Dr. Nuland --
今どこにおられるのか -
その先生が
10:21
of William Sloane Coffin --
ウィリアム・スローン・コフィンのことを
10:23
it made me think of it.
話してくれて
ぼくは考え込みました
10:25
Because I was in the hospital after, I think it was my fourth round of chemo
あれは4回目の化学療法の後だと思いますが
10:27
when my numbers went to zero, and I had basically no immune system.
数値がゼロ つまり
事実上免疫力がなくなったのです
10:30
And they put me in an infectious disease ward at the hospital.
そこで病院の感染症病棟に移されました
10:33
And anybody who came to see me had to cover themselves in a mask
面会に来る人は 皆マスクをつけ
10:36
and cover all of the extraneous parts of their body.
全身をカバーしていなければなりません
10:39
And one night I got a call from my mother-in-law
ある夜 義母から電話があって
10:43
that my daughters, at that time three and a half,
当時3歳半だった娘たちが
10:45
were missing me and feeling my absence.
ぼくのいないのを寂しがっていると言うのです
10:47
And I hung up the phone,
通話が終わると
10:50
and I put my face in my hands,
ぼくは両手に顔を埋め
10:52
and I screamed this silent scream.
声にならない悲鳴を上げました
10:54
And what you said, Dr. Nuland -- I don't know where you are --
ヌーランド先生がおっしゃったことを
10:58
made me think of this today.
思い出しました
11:00
Because the thought that came to my mind
なぜって 頭に浮かんだのは
11:02
was that the feeling that I had
あのときの気持ちは
11:04
was like a primal scream.
原初の叫びのようだったからです
11:06
And what was so striking --
何がそんなに印象的だったのかというと -
11:08
and one of the messages I want to leave you here with today --
そして今日 ここでみなさんに
お伝えしたいことの一つは -
11:10
is the experience.
あの経験なのです
11:13
As I became less and less human --
ぼくがどんどん人間らしくなくなっていき -
11:15
and at this moment in my life, I was probably 30 pounds less than I am right now.
あの時点でおそらく今より
15 キロほど軽かったでしょう
11:18
Of course, I had no hair and no immune system.
もちろん毛は抜け落ち 免疫機能もなし
11:21
They were actually putting blood inside my body.
実際 輸血も行われていました
11:24
At that moment I was less and less human,
どんどん人間らしさが失われていき
11:27
I was also, at the same time,
しかし同時に
11:29
maybe the most human I've ever been.
最も人間的であったのかもしれません
11:31
And what was so striking about that time
あの頃 一番驚いたのは
11:34
was, instead of repulsing people,
人々がぼくを嫌がるどころか
11:37
I was actually proving to be a magnet for people.
引き寄せられるように やって来たことです
11:39
People were incredibly drawn.
驚くほど 来ましたよ
11:41
When my wife and I had kids, we thought it would be all-hands-on-deck.
娘たちが生まれた時
みんなが集まって来るだろうと思ったのですが
11:43
Instead, it was everybody running the other way.
実際は 皆逃げて行きました
11:46
And when I had cancer, we thought it'd be everybody running the other way.
それが ガンになって
疎遠になるだろうと思っていたのに
11:48
Instead, it was all-hands-on-deck.
皆が駆けつけて来たんです
11:51
And when people came to me,
そうして やって来ると
11:53
rather than being incredibly turned off by what they saw --
ぼくの様子に気分を悪くするどころかー
11:55
I was like a living ghost --
ぼくは幽霊みたいだったのですよ -
11:57
they were incredibly moved
逆にひどく心を動かされ
11:59
to talk about what was going on in their own lives.
自分たちの人生について話してくれるんです
12:01
Cancer, I found, is a passport to intimacy.
つまり ガンは人の心へのパスポートだったんです
12:04
It is an invitation, maybe even a mandate,
招待状 いや委任状かも知れません
12:07
to enter the most vital arenas of human life,
人間にとって最も重要な場所
12:09
the most sensitive and the most frightening,
最もデリケートで恐ろしい場所
12:12
the ones that we never want to go to,
けっして行きたくない場所へのね
12:14
but when we do go there,
しかし そこへ行くと
12:16
we feel incredibly transformed when we do.
大きな変化が起こったことに気づきます
12:18
And this also happened to my girls as they began to see,
娘たちにも起こりました
あの子達も理解するようになり
12:21
and, we thought, maybe became an ounce more compassionate.
ほんの少し 今までより
思いやりの心を持つようになりました
12:24
One day, my daughter Tybee,
ある日 娘のタイビーがやって来て
12:27
Tybee came to me, and she said, "I have so much love for you in my body, daddy,
「パパ、大好きだって気持ちがいっぱいで
12:29
I can't stop giving you hugs and kisses.
パパをぎゅーって抱っこしてキスしたいの
12:32
And when I have no more love left, I just drink milk,
その気持ちがなくなったら ミルクを飲むの
12:34
because that's where love comes from."
『大好き』はミルクで出来てるんだから」
12:37
(Laughter)
(笑)
12:39
And one night my daughter Eden came to me.
ある晩 娘のエデンがやって来ました
12:41
And as I lifted my leg out of bed,
ぼくがベッドの外に脚を出すと
12:43
she reached for my crutches and handed them to me.
エデンは松葉杖を取って渡してくれたんです
12:45
In fact, if I cling to one memory of this year,
あの年の記憶を一つだけ留めるとしたら
12:48
it would be walking down a darkened hallway
明かりの消えた廊下を松歩いたことでしょう
12:50
with five spongy fingers
娘の柔らかい指がつかんだ
12:52
grasping the handle underneath my hand.
杖の横木をそっと握って歩いたのです
12:54
I didn't need the crutch anymore,
松葉杖は もう要りませんでした
12:56
I was walking on air.
最高の気分でした
12:58
And one of the profound things that happened
最も意義深い出来事の一つは
13:01
was this act of actually connecting to all these people.
そうした人々と実際につながるということでした
13:03
And it made me think -- and I'll just note for the record --
ぼくは考えました
念のため言うと -
13:06
one word that I've only heard once actually
昨日 皆で一緒に
13:08
was when we were all doing Tony Robbins yoga yesterday --
トニー・ロビンズのヨガをしていた時
一度だけ出た言葉
13:10
the one word that has not been mentioned in this seminar actually
このセミナーでは使わなかった言葉
13:13
is the word "friend."
それは「友」です
13:15
And yet from everything we've been talking about --
でも話題に上る
13:17
compliance, or addiction, or weight loss --
親切 中毒 減量 といったことには
13:19
we now know that community is important,
コミュニティーが大事だと わかっています
13:21
and yet it's one thing we don't actually bring in.
それなのにそのことについては話さない
13:23
And there was something incredibly profound
親しい友人達と一緒に座り
13:26
about sitting down with my closest friends
彼らがどんなに大切な存在であるかを話すのは
13:28
and telling them what they meant to me.
とても大事なことだったのです
13:30
And one of the things that I learned is that over time,
長い間に ぼくが学んだことの一つは
13:32
particularly men, who used to be non-communicative,
特に男たちが
以前はなかなか口を開かなかったのに
13:34
are becoming more and more communicative.
どんどん話をするようになっている事です
13:37
And that particularly happened -- there was one in my life --
そして特にぼくの人生では
13:39
is this Council of Dads
それが父親団なんです
13:41
that Linda said, what we were talking about,
リンダは ぼくたちの話す内容は
13:43
it's like what the moms talk about at school drop-off.
母親たちが子供を送り学校の外で
話すのと同じだと言うんです
13:45
And no one captures this modern manhood to me
この現代的男性の典型は ぼくにとっては
13:48
more than David Black.
ディヴィッド・ブラックです
13:50
Now David is my literary agent.
ぼくの出版エージェントです
13:52
He's about five-foot three and a half on a good day,
身長は カウボーイブーツをはいて立っても
13:54
standing fully upright in cowboy boots.
せいぜい 160 センチ
13:56
And on kind of the manly-male front, he answers the phone --
電話に出るときには いかにも男っぽく -
13:58
I can say this I guess because you've done it here --
皆さんも経験があるかと思いますが -
14:01
he answers the phone, "Yo, motherfucker."
「おう なんだよ」と言うんです
14:03
He gives boring speeches about obscure bottles of wine,
有名でないワインについて
退屈な講釈をし
14:06
and on his 50th birthday he bought a convertible sports car --
50歳の誕生日に
オープンスポーツカーを買いました
14:09
although, like a lot of men, he's impatient; he bought it on his 49th.
男はせっかちですから 49 歳の誕生日に買ったのですがね
14:12
But like a lot of modern men, he hugs, he bakes,
でも 今どきの男らしく
抱き合い パンを焼き
14:15
he leaves work early to coach Little League.
少年野球のコーチで早退したりもします
14:18
Someone asked me if he cried when I asked him to be in the council of dads.
父親団に誘った時
彼が泣いたか訊かれたことがあります
14:20
I was like, "David cries when you invite him to take a walk."
こう答えました
「あいつは散歩に誘われても泣くよ」
14:23
(Laughter)
(笑)
14:25
But he's a literary agent,
でも 彼は出版エージェントです
14:27
which means he's a broker of dreams in a world where most dreams don't come true.
夢がほぼ実現しない世界で
夢を売る仕事なのです
14:29
And this is what we wanted him to capture --
ディヴィッドに示してもらいたかったのは
14:32
what it means to have setbacks and then aspirations.
挫折し 再び努力するとは
どういうことか です
14:34
And I said, "What's the most valuable thing you can give to a dreamer?"
「夢見る者に与えられる
最も価値あるものは何だろう」と訊くと
14:37
And he said, "A belief in themselves."
「自分を信じることだ」と答えます
14:40
"But when I came to see you," I said, "I didn't believe in myself.
「でも ぼくは最初 自分を信じていなかったんだぜ
14:43
I was at a wall."
壁にぶちあたっていたんだ」と言うと
彼は
14:45
He said, "I don't see the wall," and I'm telling you the same,
「壁なんか見えないね」と言うんです
その通りです
14:47
Don't see the wall.
壁を見るんじゃない
14:49
You may encounter one from time to time,
壁にぶつかることは あるでしょう
14:51
but you've got to find a way to get over it, around it, or through it.
それを乗り越え 迂回し
通り抜ける方法を探すんです
14:53
But whatever you do, don't succumb to it.
ともかく負けるんじゃない
14:55
Don't give in to the wall.
壁に道をふさがせるんじゃない
14:58
My home is not far from the Brooklyn Bridge,
うちはブルックリン橋から遠くないところにあり
15:02
and during the year and a half I was on crutches,
松葉杖をついていた1年半の間
15:05
it became a sort of symbol to me.
あれが一種のシンボルになりました
15:07
So one day near the end of my journey,
ぼくの旅路の終わり近くのある日
15:09
I said, "Come on girls, let's take a walk across the Brooklyn Bridge."
「おいで ブルックリン橋を渡ろう」と
15:11
We set out on crutches.
娘たちに言ったのです
15:14
I was on crutches, my wife was next to me,
ぼくは松葉杖をついていました
15:16
my girls were doing these rockstar poses up ahead.
妻が横にいて
娘たちは前の方でロックスターのようなポーズ
15:18
And because walking was one of the first things I lost,
ぼくが最初に失ったのは歩く能力だったので
15:21
I spent most of that year
その年の間中 考えていたのは
15:24
thinking about this most elemental of human acts.
この最も基本的な人間の能力のことでした
15:26
Walking upright, we are told,
ぼくたちが教わったのは 直立歩行が
15:28
is the threshold of what made us human.
人間を人間たらしめたものだということです
15:30
And yet, for the four million years humans have been walking upright,
それなのに 人類は
400万年も直立歩行をしてきて
15:33
the act is essentially unchanged.
基本的にまだ同じことをしているのです
15:36
As my physical therapist likes to say,
理学療法士がよくいうことですが
15:38
"Every step is a tragedy waiting to happen."
「どの一歩も 事故につながる可能性がある」
15:40
You nearly fall with one leg,
片方の足で転びそうになり
15:43
then you catch yourself with the other.
もう一方で踏みとどまろうとする
15:45
And the biggest consequence of walking on crutches --
松葉杖を使うようになると何が違うかというと--
15:48
as I did for a year and a half --
ぼくはそれを1年半しましたが-
15:50
is that you walk slower.
歩く速度が遅くなるということです
15:52
You hurry,
急ぐと
15:54
you get where you're going, but you get there alone.
目的地には着きますが
ひとりで到着するのです
15:56
You go slow, you get where you're going,
ゆっくり歩いても 目的地に着きます
15:59
but you get there with this community
でも 途中で関わりを持った人々と
16:01
you built along the way.
一緒に行き着くのです
16:03
At the risk of admission, I was never nicer
正直言うと 松葉杖をついていた頃のぼくは
16:05
than the year I was on crutches.
それ以前よりもずっと良い人間でした
16:07
200 years ago,
200年前
16:09
a new type of pedestrian appeared in Paris.
パリに新しいタイプの歩行者が登場しました
16:11
He was called a "flaneur," one who wanders the arcades.
のらくら者 アーケードをうろつきまわる人です
16:14
And it was the custom of those flaneurs
そうしたのらくら者は通常
16:17
to show they were men of leisure
有閑階級であることを誇示するために
16:20
by taking turtles for walks
亀を連れ 亀の速度に
16:22
and letting the reptile set the pace.
合わせて歩いたのです
16:24
And I just love this ode to slow moving.
この ゆったりとした移動を称える言葉が好きで
16:27
And it's become my own motto for my girls.
娘たちへの教訓にしているのです
16:29
Take a walk with a turtle.
亀と散歩しなさい
16:32
Behold the world in pause.
立ち止まり見よ世界を
16:34
And this idea of pausing
この立ち止まるということが
16:37
may be the single biggest lesson I took from my journey.
ぼくの経験から得た
最高の教訓なのだと思います
16:39
There's a quote from Moses
自由の鐘の側面には
16:42
on the side of the Liberty Bell,
モーセの言葉が刻まれています
16:44
and it comes from a passage in the book of Leviticus,
これはレビ記からの引用なのですが
16:46
that every seven years you should let the land lay fallow.
7年目には土地に安息を与えなければならない
16:49
And every seven sets of seven years,
そして 7年を7つ数えた時には
16:52
the land gets an extra year of rest
1年余分に土地に安息を与える
16:54
during which time all families are reunited
その時 一族がみな再会し
16:57
and people surrounded with the ones they love.
家族の集いをするのです
16:59
That 50th year is called the jubilee year,
この50年目の年はヨベルの年と呼ばれ
17:02
and it's the origin of that term.
50年祭の起源なのです
17:05
And though I'm shy of 50,
ぼくはまだ50歳になっていませんが
17:07
it captures my own experience.
これはまさにぼくの経験そのままです
17:09
My lost year was my jubilee year.
失われた1年は
ぼくにとってはヨベルの年でした
17:11
By laying fallow,
1年間の休みをとることによって
17:14
I planted the seeds for a healthier future
よりよい未来のための種をまき
17:16
and was reunited with the ones I love.
愛する者たちと再会したのです
17:18
Come the one year anniversary of my journey,
旅の1周年を記念する日
外科医の
17:21
I went to see my surgeon, Dr. John Healey --
ジョン・ヒーリー先生を訪ねました
17:23
and by the way, Healey, great name for a doctor.
ヒーリーって
お医者さんにぴったりな名前ですね
17:25
He's the president of the International Society of Limb Salvage,
先生は 国際四肢救済協会の会長ですが
17:29
which is the least euphemistic term I've ever heard.
これは なんともあけすけな団体名ですねえ
17:32
And I said, "Dr. Healey, if my daughters come to you one day
ぼくは言いました
「先生 ぼくの娘がある日やって来て
17:35
and say, 'What should I learn from my daddy's story?'
『父のことから何を学ぶべきでしょう』と
17:38
what would you tell them?"
尋ねたら なんとおっしゃいますか」
17:40
He said, "I would tell them what I know,
先生は
「知っていることを話します
17:42
and that is everybody dies,
つまり 人間はみな死ぬ
17:44
but not everybody lives.
でも みんなが『生きる』わけではない
17:48
I want you to live."
存分に生きなさい」
17:51
I wrote a letter to my girls
ぼくは娘たちに手紙を書きました
17:53
that appears at the end of my book, "The Council of Dads,"
それは『父親団』の巻末に載せ
17:55
and I listed these lessons,
『父親』たちからの教えも列挙しています
17:57
a few of which you've heard here today:
その幾つかはここでお話しした通りです
17:59
Approach the cow, pack your flipflops,
牛に近づきなさい
ゴムぞうりを持って行きなさい
18:01
don't see the wall,
壁を見るんじゃない
18:03
live the questions,
問を生きなさい
18:05
harvest miracles.
奇跡を収穫しなさい
18:07
As I looked at this list -- to me it was sort of like a psalm book of living --
このリストを見ると -
生きるための詩篇のように見えますが -
18:09
I realized, we may have done it for our girls,
これは娘たちのためにしたことなのだけれど
18:12
but it really changed us.
実際は ぼくたちが変わったのです
18:15
And that is, the secret of the Council of Dads,
父親団の秘密はここにあります
18:17
is that my wife and I did this
つまり妻とぼくは これを
18:19
in an attempt to help our daughters,
娘たちを助けるためにしたのですが
18:21
but it really changed us.
実際はぼくたちが変わったのです
18:24
So I stand here today
それで ぼくは今日ここに立っています
18:26
as you see now, walking without crutches or a cane.
ご覧のように 松葉杖も杖もなしで歩けます
18:28
And last week I had my 18-month scans.
先週 18 ヶ月目のスキャンを受けました
18:32
And as you all know,
ご存知のように
18:34
anybody with cancer has to get follow-up scans.
ガンになった者は 定期的にスキャンを受けます
18:36
In my case it's quarterly.
ぼくの場合 年に4回です
18:38
And all the collective minds in this room, I dare say,
みなさんの知恵を全て集めても
18:40
can never find a solution for scan-xiety.
スキャンへの不安を消す方法は
見つけられないでしょう
18:42
As I was going there, I was wondering, what would I say
検査に向かう最中
どんな結果が出たら
18:45
depending on what happened here.
何と言おうか と考えていました
18:47
I got good news that day,
その日の結果は良好でした
18:51
and I stand here today cancer-free,
今は「元」ガン患者としてここにいます
18:53
walking without aid
支えなしに歩き
18:55
and hobbling forward.
ともかくも進んでいます
18:57
And I just want to mention briefly in passing -- I'm past my time limit --
ちょっとお知らせしたいのですが --
時間を過ぎてますね
19:00
but I just want to briefly mention in passing
ちょっとだけ付け加えさせて下さい
19:03
that one of the nice things that can come out of a conference like this
講演していると 良いことが起こります
19:05
is, at a similar meeting,
似たような集まりで
19:07
back in the spring,
この春に ぼくたちのことを知った
19:09
Anne Wojcicki heard about our story
アン・ウォジツキさんが
19:11
and very quickly -- in a span of three weeks --
すばやく行動して--
ほんの3週間で
19:13
put the full resources of 23andMe,
23andMe の総力を挙げ
19:15
and we announced an initiative in July
7月に計画を発表しました
19:17
to get to decode the genome
心臓組織の腫瘍や骨肉腫を
19:20
of anybody, a living person
持つ人はだれでも
19:22
with a heart tissue, bone sarcoma.
その遺伝情報を調べるというのです
19:25
And she told me last night, in the three months since we've done it,
先週 彼女から聞いたのですが
計画開始から3ヶ月で
19:28
we've gotten 300 people who've contributed to this program.
300人がこの計画に参加したということです
19:31
And the epidemiologists here will tell you,
疫学の先生方はご存知のことですが
19:34
that's half the number of people who get the disease
これはアメリカで一年にこの病気と診断される
19:36
in one year in the United States.
人の半数に当たります
19:38
So if you go to 23andMe,
ですから 23andMe か
19:40
or if you go to councilofdads.com, you can click on a link.
councilofdads.com に行ったら
リンクをクリックしてください
19:42
And we encourage anybody to join this effort.
この運動にぜひ協力してもらいたいのです
19:45
But I'll just close what I've been talking about
最後に ひとつだけお話しして
19:48
by leaving you with this message:
終わりにします
19:51
May you find an excuse to reach out to some long-lost pal,
長いこと連絡が途絶えていた友人や
19:53
or to that college roommate,
大学時代のルームメイト
19:55
or to some person you may have turned away from.
疎遠になった人達に なんとか連絡できますように
19:57
May you find a mud puddle to jump in someplace,
どこかに飛び込める水たまりが
見つかりますように
19:59
or find a way to get over, around, or through any wall
みなさんと夢とを隔てる壁を 乗り越え
20:02
that stands between you and one of your dreams.
迂回し あるいは通り抜ける方法が
見つかりますように
20:04
And every now and then,
そして たまには
20:07
find a friend, find a turtle,
友や 亀と一緒に
20:09
and take a long, slow walk.
ゆっくりと長い散歩が出来ますように
20:11
Thank you very much.
ありがとうございました
20:14
(Applause)
(拍手)
20:17
Translated by Masako Sato
Reviewed by Yuriko Hida

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Bruce Feiler - Writer
Bruce Feiler is the author of "The Secrets of Happy Families," and the writer/presenter of the PBS miniseries "Walking the Bible."

Why you should listen

Bruce Feiler is the author of nine books, including Walking the BibleAbraham, and America’s Prophet. He is also the writer/presenter of the PBS miniseries Walking the Bible. His book The Council of Dads tells the uplifting story of how friendship and community can help one survive life’s greatest challenges. Most recently Feiler published The Secrets of Happy Families, in which he calls for a new approach to family dynamics, inspired by cutting-edge techniques gathered from experts in the disciplines of science, business, sports and the military.

Feiler’s early books involve immersing himself in different cultures and bringing other worlds vividly to life. These include Learning to Bow, an account of the year he spent teaching in rural Japan; Looking for Class, about life inside Oxford and Cambridge; and Under the Big Top, which depicts the year he spent performing as a clown in the Clyde Beatty-Cole Bros. Circus.
 
Walking the Bible describes his perilous, 10,000-mile journey retracing the Five Books of Moses through the desert. The book was hailed as an “instant classic” by the Washington Post and “thoughtful, informed, and perceptive” by the New York Times.

More profile about the speaker
Bruce Feiler | Speaker | TED.com