sponsored links
TEDxPennQuarter

Christopher McDougall: Are we born to run?

クリストファー・マクドーガル「人類は走るために生まれたのか?」

July 11, 2010

クリストファー・マクドーガルが、人類の持つ走ることに対する情熱の謎を探ります。走ることは、どのようにして人類の生存に役立ったのか?―先祖より受け継いだ、現代人の走る意欲を駆り立てるものとは一体何なのか?マクドーガルが、TEDxPennQuarterにて思いやりを持つマラソンランナーや生きる為に走るメキシコの民族の話を紹介します。

Christopher McDougall - Journalist, runner
Christopher McDougall is the author of "Born to Run: A Hidden Tribe, Super Athletes, and the Greatest Race the World Has Never Seen." Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
Running -- it's basically just right, left, right, left -- yeah?
走ること それは左右交互に足踏みすることですね?
00:15
I mean, we've been doing it for two million years,
200万年も走ってきたのですから
00:18
so it's kind of arrogant to assume
「これまで知られていなかった走りに関する
00:20
that I've got something to say
新たな知見を紹介します」
00:23
that hasn't been said and performed better a long time ago.
というのは少し厚かましいかもしれません
00:25
But the cool thing about running, as I've discovered,
さて 私の素敵な発見とは
00:28
is that something bizarre happens
走りが何か奇妙な行動を
00:30
in this activity all the time.
引き起こすということです
00:32
Case in point: A couple months ago, if you saw the New York City Marathon,
数ヶ月前のニューヨークシティマラソンを見た方はいますか?
00:34
I guarantee you, you saw something
誰も見たことのなかった
00:37
that no one has ever seen before.
すごい光景を目にしたはずです
00:39
An Ethiopian woman named Derartu Tulu
デラルツ・ツルというエチオピアの女性が
00:42
turns up at the starting line.
スタートラインに立っていました
00:44
She's 37 years old,
彼女はすでに37歳で
00:46
she hasn't won a marathon of any kind in eight years,
8年間勝利から見放されています
00:48
and a few months previously
ほんの数ヶ月前には
00:50
she almost died in childbirth.
出産で生死の境をさまよいました
00:52
Derartu Tulu was ready to hang it up and retire from the sport,
ツルはマラソンから引退するつもりでした
00:54
but she decided she'd go for broke
しかし 最後の舞台に一か八かの
00:57
and try for one last big payday
懸けにでようと決めていたのです
00:59
in the marquee event,
それが皆さんもご存知の
01:01
the New York City Marathon.
ニューヨークシティマラソンでした
01:03
Except -- bad news for Derartu Tulu -- some other people had the same idea,
ツルには災難ですが他にも同じ
01:05
including the Olympic gold medalist
思いを持つランナーがいました
01:08
and Paula Radcliffe, who is a monster,
オリンピック金メダリストのポーラ・ラドクリフです
01:10
the fastest woman marathoner in history by far.
女子マラソン史上最速の彼女の記録は男子の
01:13
Only 10 minutes off the men's world record,
世界記録と10分しか変わらず
01:17
Paula Radcliffe is essentially unbeatable.
まず彼女を倒すことはとうてい無理です
01:19
That's her competition.
ツルにとっては挑戦でした
01:22
The gun goes off, and she's not even an underdog.
スタートしたとき ツルは格下どころか
01:24
She's under the underdogs.
相手にもならない存在でした
01:27
But the under-underdog hangs tough,
それでもツルは喰らいつきました
01:29
and 22 miles into a 26-mile race,
レースの終盤 35km地点で
01:31
there is Derartu Tulu
ツルは先頭集団の中を
01:34
up there with the lead pack.
走っていました
01:36
Now this is when something really bizarre happens.
その時 まさにビックリする事件が起きたのです
01:38
Paula Radcliffe, the one person who is sure to snatch the big paycheck
優勝候補のポーラ・ラドクリフが
01:41
out of Derartu Tulu's under-underdog hands,
格下のツルの手をつかみ 自身の
01:44
suddenly grabs her leg and starts to fall back.
脚をおさえて後退し始めたのです
01:47
So we all know what to do in this situation, right?
どうすればいいかわかりますね?
01:50
You give her a quick crack in the teeth with your elbow
肘鉄を入れ ふりほどいて
01:52
and blaze for the finish line.
ゴールを目指せば良いんです
01:54
Derartu Tulu ruins the script.
ツルはそうはしませんでした
01:57
Instead of taking off,
ポーラを振り払わずに
01:59
she falls back, and she grabs Paula Radcliffe,
手を握り返して鼓舞しました
02:01
says, "Come on. Come with us. You can do it."
「がんばりましょう あなたならできる!」
02:03
So Paula Radcliffe, unfortunately, does it.
なんとか立ち上がったポーラは
02:05
She catches up with the lead pack
先頭集団に追いつき
02:07
and is pushing toward the finish line.
ゴールを目指しました
02:09
But then she falls back again.
しかしポーラは再度遅れ始めました
02:11
And the second time Derartu Tulu grabs her and tries to pull her.
ツルは今度もポーラをひきあげようとしました
02:13
And Paula Radcliffe at that point says,
ポーラは言いました
02:15
"I'm done. Go."
「私はいいから 行きなさい」
02:17
So that's a fantastic story, and we all know how it ends.
この感動的な話の予想される結末はこうです
02:19
She loses the check,
ツルは勝利の代わりに
02:22
but she goes home with something bigger and more important.
もっと大切なものを手に入れるのです
02:24
Except Derartu Tulu ruins the script again --
しかしツルはここでも台本を裏切ります
02:26
instead of losing, she blazes past the lead pack and wins,
負けるどころか 先頭集団に追いつき
02:29
wins the New York City Marathon,
追い抜いて1着でゴール
02:32
goes home with a big fat check.
多額の賞金も手にしました
02:34
It's a heartwarming story,
実に心温まる話ですね
02:36
but if you drill a little bit deeper,
しかし もう少し掘り下げて考えると
02:38
you've got to sort of wonder about what exactly was going on there.
そこで何が起きたのか不思議に思われますね
02:40
When you have two outliers in one organism,
例外的事象が2つも一度に
02:43
it's not a coincidence.
起こるのは単なる偶然ではありません
02:45
When you have someone who is more competitive and more compassionate
最大の競争心と思いやりを併せ持つランナー
02:47
than anybody else in the race, again, it's not a coincidence.
これは偶然ではありません
02:50
You show me a creature with webbed feet and gills;
水かきと えらを持つ生物には
02:53
somehow water's involved.
水との関連性をうかがえます
02:56
Someone with that kind of heart, there's some kind of connection there.
ツルのようなハートには なにか関連性が潜んでいるんです
02:58
And the answer to it, I think,
その答えはメキシコの
03:01
can be found down in the Copper Canyons of Mexico,
カッパーキャニオンにあると思います
03:03
where there's a tribe, a reclusive tribe,
ここにはタラフマラという
03:06
called the Tarahumara Indians.
原住民が暮らしています
03:08
Now the Tarahumara are remarkable for three things.
タラフマラ族には3つの驚くべき秘密があります
03:10
Number one is,
1つ目は
03:13
they have been living essentially unchanged
彼らの生活様式です
03:15
for the past 400 years.
400年前とほとんど同じです
03:17
When the conquistadors arrived in North America you had two choices:
北米大陸に侵略者が来た時に選択を迫られました
03:19
you either fight back and engage or you could take off.
1. 戦う 2. 逃げる
03:22
The Mayans and Aztecs engaged,
戦いを選んだマヤ族と
03:25
which is why there are very few Mayans and Aztecs.
アステカ族はほとんど生き残っていません
03:27
The Tarahumara had a different strategy.
タラフマラ族には別の作戦がありました
03:30
They took off and hid
故郷を捨ててクモの巣のように
03:32
in this labyrinthine, networking,
細分化した迷宮のような渓谷―
03:34
spiderwebbing system of canyons
カッパーキャニオンに隠れたんです
03:36
called the Copper Canyons,
これが17世紀の話なんですが
03:38
and there they remained since the 1600s --
当時から現在に至るまで
03:40
essentially the same way they've always been.
彼らの生活様式はほとんど変っていません
03:43
The second thing remarkable about the Tarahumara
2つめの秘密は
03:47
is, deep into old age -- 70 to 80 years old --
70 - 80代の高齢者の方が
03:50
these guys aren't running marathons;
長距離マラソンではなく
03:53
they're running mega-marathons.
超長距離マラソンを走ることです
03:55
They're not doing 26 miles;
42.195kmどころか
03:57
they're doing 100, 150 miles at a time,
一度に160kmも240kmも走るのです
03:59
and apparently without injury, without problems.
怪我もせず なんの問題もありません
04:02
The last thing that's remarkable about the Tarahumara
3つ目の秘密はこれから
04:05
is that all the things that we're going to be talking about today,
お話することに関連しています
04:07
all the things that we're trying to come up with
心臓病・コレステロール・ガン―
04:09
using all of our technology and brain power to solve --
犯罪・戦争・暴力・鬱病といった
04:11
things like heart disease and cholesterol and cancer
私たちが技術と知識を
04:14
and crime and warfare and violence and clinical depression --
総動員して解決を試みる現代の
04:16
all this stuff, the Tarahumara don't know what you're talking about.
問題はタラフマラ族には理解できないでしょう
04:19
They are free
文明社会の抱える
04:22
from all of these modern ailments.
今日の問題とは無縁なのです
04:24
So what's the connection?
ではどういった関係があるのでしょう
04:26
Again, we're talking about outliers --
いいですか 例外について話をしているんです
04:28
there's got to be some kind of cause and effect there.
なにかしら 因果関係があるはずです
04:30
Well, there are teams of scientists
ハーバード大学とユタ大学の
04:32
at Harvard and the University of Utah
研究チームはタラフマラ族の
04:34
that are bending their brains to try to figure out
英知を解き明かすために
04:36
what the Tarahumara have known forever.
知恵をだし調査をしてきました
04:38
They're trying to solve those same kinds of mysteries.
この謎解きと先ほどの例外には通ずるところがあります
04:41
And once again, a mystery wrapped inside of a mystery --
ツルとタラフマラの謎を解き明かす鍵が
04:44
perhaps the key to Derartu Tulu and the Tarahumara
この謎の中に潜む謎なのですが
04:47
is wrapped in three other mysteries, which go like this:
更に別の3つの謎に包まれています
04:50
three things -- if you have the answer, come up and take the microphone,
これは誰にも分かりません
04:53
because nobody else knows the answer.
ご存じの方はぜひとも前に来て下さい
04:55
And if you know it, then you are smarter than anybody else on planet Earth.
知っていれば地球上の誰よりも賢いことになります
04:57
Mystery number one is this:
一つ目の謎:
05:00
Two million years ago the human brain exploded in size.
200万年前 人類の脳は飛躍的に拡大しました
05:02
Australopithecus had a tiny little pea brain.
アウステラロピテクスの脳は豆粒大でした
05:05
Suddenly humans show up -- Homo erectus --
ホモ・エレクトスの時代には
05:07
big, old melon-head.
頭はメロンほどになっていました
05:09
To have a brain of that size,
この大きさの脳を機能させるには
05:11
you need to have a source of condensed caloric energy.
濃密なエネルギー資源が必要となります
05:13
In other words, early humans are eating dead animals --
原始人が動物の屍肉を食べていたことは
05:16
no argument, that's a fact.
紛れもない事実ですね
05:18
The only problem is,
唯一の問題は
05:20
the first edged weapons only appeared about 200,000 years ago.
最古の石器誕生がわずか20万年前ということです
05:22
So, somehow, for nearly two million years,
要はそれ以前の約200万年間は
05:25
we are killing animals without any weapons.
武器なしで狩猟をしていたということです
05:28
Now we're not using our strength
図体はでかいがひ弱な
05:31
because we are the biggest sissies in the jungle.
人類は自力で何かを殺したりはしません
05:33
Every other animal is stronger than we are --
他の動物の方がよほど強いですよね
05:35
they have fangs, they have claws, they have nimbleness, they have speed.
牙や爪もあるし 機敏で走るのも速い
05:37
We think Usain Bolt is fast. Usain Bolt can get his ass kicked by a squirrel.
ウサイン・ボルトは速いですが リスでも追いつけます
05:40
We're not fast.
私たちはのろまなのです
05:43
That would be an Olympic event: turn a squirrel loose --
リス捕獲 はオリンピック競技になりますね
05:45
whoever catches the squirrel, you get a gold medal.
放したリスを捕まえれば金メダルです
05:47
So no weapons, no speed, no strength, no fangs, no claws --
武器・スピード・強さ 全てを欠いています
05:50
how were we killing these animals? Mystery number one.
どのように狩猟したのでしょう? これが一つ目の謎です
05:53
Mystery number two:
二つ目の謎:
05:56
Women have been in the Olympics for quite some time now,
女性がオリンピックに参加してからもうずいぶん経ちますが
05:58
but one thing that's remarkable about all women sprinters --
全女性走者に共通のことですが
06:01
they all suck; they're terrible.
走るのが底抜けに下手です
06:03
There's not a fast woman on the planet
足の速い女性はいません
06:05
and there never has been.
これからも出てこないでしょう
06:07
The fastest woman to ever run a mile did it in 4:15.
1マイル走(約1.6km)の女子世界記録は4分15秒を下回るだけで
06:09
I could throw a rock and hit a high school boy
高校生でも男子なら
06:12
who can run faster than 4:15.
このタイムはすぐに出ます
06:14
For some reason you guys are just really slow.
会場の皆さんは走るのがなぜか遅いですけどね
06:16
(Laughter)
(笑)
06:18
But you get to the marathon we were just talking about --
しかし先ほど話をしたマラソンなら誰にでもできます
06:20
you guys have only been allowed to run the marathon for 20 years.
マラソンが解禁され まだ20年しか経っていません
06:23
Because, prior to the 1980s,
1980年代以前は
06:25
medical science said that if a woman tried to run 26 miles --
女性がフルマラソンを
06:27
does anyone know what would happen if you tried to run 26 miles,
走ることは医学的観点から禁止されていました
06:30
why you were banned from the marathon before the 1980s?
その理由をご存じの方はいますか? なんと言いました?
06:32
(Audience Member: Her uterus would be torn.) Her uterus would be torn.
(観衆の一人: 子宮が裂けるから) 子宮が裂けるから
06:36
Yes. You would have torn reproductive organs.
そうです 生殖器が破壊されるからですね
06:39
The uterus would fall out, literally fall out of the body.
子宮が実際に体外へ出てしまうそうです
06:41
Now I've been to a lot of marathons,
マラソンはたくさん見てきましたが
06:44
and I've yet to see any ...
そんな光景は見たことがありません
06:46
(Laughter)
(笑)
06:48
So it's only been 20 years that women have been allowed to run the marathon.
女性のマラソンの歴史はわずか20年です しかし
06:51
In that very short learning curve,
この短期間に
06:54
you guys have gone from broken organs
生殖器が壊れると言われていたところから
06:56
up to the fact that you're only 10 minutes off
男子世界記録まで
06:59
the male world record.
あと10分のところまできました
07:01
Then you go beyond 26 miles,
フルマラソンを完走した
07:03
into the distance that medical science also told us would be fatal to humans --
フェイディピデスは死亡しましたし
07:05
remember Pheidippides died when he ran 26 miles --
フルマラソンを超える80kmや
07:08
you get to 50 and 100 miles,
160km走は医学的にも危険な
07:10
and suddenly it's a different game.
全く異なる競技になってしまいます
07:12
You can take a runner like Ann Trason, or Nikki Kimball, or Jenn Shelton,
アン・トレーソン ニッキ・キンバル ジェン・シェラトンに
07:14
you put them in a race of 50 or 100 miles against anybody in the world
80kmとか160kmのレースに参加させるんです
07:17
and it's a coin toss who's going to win.
誰が勝つのかは予想も出来ません
07:20
I'll give you an example.
例を紹介しましょう
07:22
A couple years ago, Emily Baer signed up for a race
数年前 エミリー・ベアは
07:24
called the Hardrock 100,
ハードロック100というレースに出場しました
07:26
which tells you all you need to know about the race.
そのレースについて知っておくべきことはこうです
07:28
They give you 48 hours to finish this race.
レース時間は48時間です
07:31
Well Emily Baer -- 500 runners --
さて エミリーは赤ん坊に
07:33
she finishes in eighth place, in the top 10,
授乳するために全ての
07:35
even though she stopped at all the aid stations
エイドステーションに寄りましたが
07:37
to breastfeed her baby during the race --
500人中のトップ10に入り
07:39
and yet, beat 492 other people.
8位でゴールしました
07:42
So why is it that women get stronger
最後の謎: ベアがこの長距離を
07:44
as distances get longer?
走り抜いた原動力とは
07:46
The third mystery is this:
なんなのか?
07:48
At the University of Utah, they started tracking finishing times
ユタ大学はランナーのゴールタイムの
07:50
for people running the marathon.
推移を研究しています
07:53
And what they found
そしてこの研究で
07:55
is that, if you start running the marathon at age 19,
19歳からマラソンを始めた場合
07:57
you will get progressively faster, year by year,
歳を重ねるごとに速くなり
07:59
until you reach your peak at age 27.
27歳がピークだと判明しました
08:01
And then after that, you succumb
それ以降はタイムが
08:03
to the rigors of time.
伸び悩むそうです
08:05
And you'll get slower and slower,
加齢に従ってタイムは落ちて
08:07
until eventually you're back to running the same speed you were at age 19.
最終的に19歳の頃のタイムに戻ります
08:09
So about seven years, eight years to reach your peak,
ベストタイムまでは7、8年かかり
08:12
and then gradually you fall off your peak,
それから始めた頃の速さに
08:14
until you go back to the starting point.
徐々に戻っていくのです
08:16
You would think it might take eight years to go back to the same speed,
すると8年とか10年で元に戻るとお考えでしょうが
08:19
maybe 10 years -- no, it's 45 years.
正解は45年です
08:22
64-year-old men and women
60歳の男女が
08:25
are running as fast as they were at age 19.
彼らが19歳の頃と同じ速さで走っているのです
08:27
Now I defy you to come up with any other physical activity --
さて 皆さん 他の運動でいいやなんて言わせませんよ
08:30
and please don't say golf -- something that actually is hard --
ゴルフはダメですよ お年寄りが10代の頃のように
08:33
where geriatrics are performing
頻繁に損傷を負うほど
08:37
as well as they did as teenagers.
ハードなスポーツですからね
08:39
So you have these three mysteries.
さて3つの謎を見てきたわけですが
08:42
Is there one piece in the puzzle
これらのまとめとなる
08:44
which might wrap all these things up?
パズルのピースはありましたか?
08:46
You've got to be really careful any time
先史のことなど知るかと
08:48
someone looks back in prehistory and tries to give you some sort of global answer,
怠慢になりがちなので 歴史を
08:50
because, it being prehistory,
振り返り世界規模の解答を
08:53
you can say whatever the hell you want and get away with it.
探る時には常に注意を払って下さい
08:55
But I'll submit this to you:
しかし 私の主張はこうです
08:57
If you put one piece in the middle of this jigsaw puzzle,
最後のピースを真ん中にはめれば
08:59
suddenly it all starts to form a coherent picture.
突然 一貫したイメージが見えてくるんです
09:01
If you wonder, why it is the Tarahumara don't fight
「なぜタラフマラ族は戦わないの?」
09:04
and don't die of heart disease,
「なぜタラフマラ族に心臓病がないの?」
09:06
why a poor Ethiopian woman named Derartu Tulu
「なぜエチオピア出身の貧しいツルが
09:08
can be the most compassionate and yet the most competitive,
競争心と思いやりを持ち合わせていたの?」
09:11
and why we somehow were able
「武器なしでどうやって
09:14
to find food without weapons,
原始人は食料にありついたの?」
09:16
perhaps it's because humans,
このように不思議に思うのは
09:18
as much as we like to think of ourselves as masters of the universe,
人類は自身を宇宙の支配者と
09:20
actually evolved as nothing more
考えるが 実のところ狩猟犬と
09:23
than a pack of hunting dogs.
なんら変わりないからなのです
09:25
Maybe we evolved
人類は集団狩猟動物として
09:27
as a hunting pack animal.
進化してきたのかもしれません
09:29
Because the one advantage we have in the wilderness --
自然の中の私たちが持っている長所は
09:31
again, it's not our fangs and our claws and our speed --
牙でも爪でも俊敏性でもありません
09:33
the only thing we do really, really well is sweat.
これは発汗作用なんです
09:35
We're really good at being sweaty and smelly.
私たちは発汗し臭いを出すことに長けています
09:38
Better than any other mammal on Earth, we can sweat really well.
発汗では地球上の全哺乳類に勝っています
09:41
But the advantage
公の場では少し不快ですが
09:44
of that little bit of social discomfort
これは炎天下で長距離を
09:46
is the fact that, when it comes to running
走る際には大変
09:48
under hot heat for long distances,
好都合なのです
09:50
we're superb, we're the best on the planet.
これこそが人類の誇れる長所です
09:53
You take a horse on a hot day,
暑い日に馬に乗るとします
09:56
and after about five or six miles, that horse has a choice.
10kmほど行くと馬は
09:58
It's either going to breathe or it's going to cool off,
1. 呼吸 か 2. 体の冷却 という選択を迫られます
10:00
but it ain't doing both -- we can.
人間と違って これを同時にはできないのです
10:03
So what if we evolved as hunting pack animals?
私たちが集団狩猟動物として進化したという説はどうですか?
10:05
What if the only natural advantage we had in the world
人類の生まれ持った長所とは
10:08
was the fact that we could get together as a group,
アフリカのサバンナで
10:12
go out there on that African Savannah, pick out an antelope
獲物が倒れるまで集団で追い回す
10:14
and go out as a pack and run that thing to death?
力ということはあり得ますかね?
10:17
That's all we could do.
私たちには炎天下での
10:20
We could run really far on a hot day.
長距離走 これしか出来ません
10:22
Well if that's true, a couple other things had to be true as well.
これが本当ならば 他の二つも真実のはずです
10:24
The key to being part of a hunting pack is the word "pack."
狩猟集団という言葉のカギは「集団」にあります
10:27
If you go out by yourself, and you try to chase an antelope,
一人で獲物を追い回しても
10:30
I guarantee you there's going to be two cadavers out there in the Savannah.
朽ち果てて食料になってしまいます
10:32
You need a pack to pull together.
狩猟は集団でする必要があります
10:35
You need to have those 64-, 65-year-olds
獲物を見失わないためには
10:37
who have been doing this for a long time
経験を積んだ高齢者と
10:39
to understand which antelope you're actually trying to catch.
集団で狩りをしなくてはダメです
10:41
The herd explodes and it gathers back again.
散発的に追い回し 最終的に再結集します
10:43
Those expert trackers have got to be part of the pack.
集団には追跡の担当も必要です
10:46
They can't be 10 miles behind.
集団が遠く離れてはダメです
10:48
You need to have the women and the adolescents there
集団には女性や子供たちも連れて行きます
10:50
because the two times in your life you most benefit from animal protein
授乳期の母親と思春期の子供たちには
10:52
is when you are a nursing mother and a developing adolescent.
動物性タンパク質が必要不可欠だからです
10:55
It makes no sense to have the antelope over there dead
いくら食料といっても80kmも
10:58
and the people who want to eat it 50 miles away.
離れていては行く気になれませんね
11:00
They need to be part of the pack.
皆 まとまって行動する必要があります
11:02
You need to have those 27-year-old studs at the peak of their powers
狩りには最高のパフォーマンスを
11:04
ready to drop the kill,
発揮する27歳が必要ですが
11:06
and you need to have those teenagers there
体験型学習を通じて未来の
11:08
who are learning the whole thing all involved.
エースとなる10代の若者も必要です
11:10
The pack stays together.
全人員が集団で行動します
11:12
Another thing that has to be true about this pack: this pack cannot be really materialistic.
最後に この集団は物質主義ではないはずです
11:14
You can't be hauling all your crap around, trying to chase the antelope.
狩りをする際はくだらないことを考えてはいられません
11:17
You can't be a pissed-off pack. You can't be bearing grudges,
「あいつにはうんざりしてるんだ 協力はできない
11:20
like, "I'm not chasing that guy's antelope.
一人で行けばいいさ」といった
11:23
He pissed me off. Let him go chase his own antelope."
個人的な確執があってはいけません
11:25
The pack has got to be able to swallow its ego,
協力して狩猟をする為には
11:27
be cooperative and pull together.
エゴは捨てなくてはいけません
11:30
What you end up with, in other words,
換言すると石器時代と
11:32
is a culture remarkably similar
タラフマラの文化は
11:35
to the Tarahumara --
驚くほどに似ている
11:37
a tribe that has remained unchanged
つまり大きな変化は
11:39
since the Stone Age.
起こっていないんです
11:41
It's a really compelling argument
非常に興味深い話です
11:43
that maybe the Tarahumara are doing
200万年間も変らずしてきたことを
11:45
exactly what all of us had done for two million years,
タラフマラ族もしているかもしれないんですよ
11:47
that it's us in modern times who have sort of gone off the path.
この道から逸れたのは現代になってからです
11:50
You know, we look at running as this kind of alien, foreign thing,
現代では走ることは 夜間のピザへの罰とか
11:53
this punishment you've got to do because you ate pizza the night before.
奇妙な捉え方がされています
11:56
But maybe it's something different.
少し間違っているのでは?
11:59
Maybe we're the ones who have taken this natural advantage we had
過去から受け継いだこの利を損ねたのは
12:01
and we spoiled it.
私たちなのかもしれません
12:04
How do we spoil it? Well how do we spoil anything?
どうやってダメにしてしまったのでしょう?
12:06
We try to cash in on it.
商業化ですね
12:09
We try to can it and package it and make it "better"
周辺器具などとまとめて
12:11
and sell it to people.
見栄えを良くして販売するのです
12:13
And what happened was we started creating
「よりよい走りのため」と謳って
12:15
these fancy cushioned things,
ランニングシューズを
12:17
which can make running "better," called running shoes.
作ったのが事の発端です
12:19
The reason I get personally pissed-off about running shoes
個人的にランニングシューズが嫌いな理由は
12:22
is because I bought a million of them and I kept getting hurt.
利用中に何度も足を痛めたからです
12:25
And I think that, if anybody in here runs --
ランニングする方はいますか?
12:28
and I just had a conversation with Carol;
先ほど裏でキャロルと
12:30
we talked for two minutes backstage, and she's talking about plantar fasciitis.
足底筋膜炎について2 分程話をしたんですが
12:32
You talk to a runner, I guarantee, within 30 seconds,
ランニングの話をすると30秒もせずに決まって
12:35
the conversation turns to injury.
怪我の話になるんです
12:38
So if humans evolved as runners, if that's our one natural advantage,
人類が走者として利を得ながら進化したなら
12:40
why are we so bad at it? Why do we keep getting hurt?
走るのが下手で こんなにも怪我をするはなぜ?
12:43
Curious thing about running and running injuries
ランニング中に起こる怪我の
12:46
is that the running injury is new to our time.
不思議な点は 現在に特有ということです
12:48
If you read folklore and mythology,
なんでもいいんですが
12:51
any kind of myths, any kind of tall tales,
伝承や神話では
12:53
running is always associated
走ることは常に開放感―
12:55
with freedom and vitality and youthfulness and eternal vigor.
活力・若さと関連づけられています
12:57
It's only in our lifetime
ランニングが恐怖や苦痛と
13:00
that running has become associated with fear and pain.
結びついたのは最近なんです
13:02
Geronimo used to say
ジェロニモは言っていました
13:04
that, "My only friends are my legs. I only trust my legs."
「私の唯一の友はこの脚 脚だけが信じるに足る」
13:06
That's because an Apache triathlon
だからアパッチ族は
13:09
used to be you'd run 50 miles across the desert,
砂漠を80kmも走り抜け
13:11
engage in hand-to-hand combat, steal a bunch of horses
白兵戦の末に奪った馬から
13:13
and slap leather for home.
革を持ち帰ることができたのです
13:15
Geronimo was never saying, "Ah, you know something,
ジェロニモは決して言いませんでした
13:17
my achilles -- I'm tapering. I got to take this week off,"
「あぁアキレス腱が痛い 弱ってるな 今週は休もう」とか
13:19
or "I need to cross-train.
「クロストレーニングが必要だ」
13:22
I didn't do yoga. I'm not ready."
「ヨガをしていなかった まだ準備不足だ」とかね
13:24
Humans ran and ran all the time.
人類は常に走ってきました
13:27
We are here today. We have our digital technology.
今はデジタルテクノロジーの時代です
13:29
All of our science comes from the fact
今日の科学では先人たちが
13:31
that our ancestors were able
日常的にすごいことを
13:33
to do something extraordinary every day,
していたことがわかっています
13:35
which was just rely on their naked feet and legs
彼らは長距離を走るさい
13:37
to run long distances.
素足を頼りにしていたのです
13:39
So how do we get back to that again?
どうすれば戻れるでしょう?
13:41
Well, I would submit to you the first thing is
まず 走りに関する商売を
13:43
get rid of all packaging, all the sales, all the marketing.
根こそぎ取り除くのはどうでしょうか
13:45
Get rid of all the stinking running shoes.
不快なランニングシューズもです
13:48
Stop focusing on urban marathons,
4時間かかったらアウト
13:50
which, if you do four hours, you suck.
1秒でも速ければ次に進む資格が
13:52
If you do 3:59:59, you're awesome,
得られる都市マラソンへの
13:55
because you qualified for another race.
執着は捨てましょう
13:57
We need to get back to that sense of playfulness and joyfulness
タラフマラ族の世界的に健康的で
13:59
and, I would say, nakedness,
安心できる文化を支えているのは
14:02
that has made the Tarahumara
裸足で走りなのです
14:05
one of the healthiest and serene cultures in our time.
走る楽しみと喜びを取り戻しましょう
14:07
So what's the benefit? So what?
ではどのような利点があるでしょう
14:10
So you burn off the Haagen-Dazs from the night before?
昨夜食べたハーゲンダッツ分のカロリー消費?
14:12
But maybe there's another benefit there as well.
他にも利点はあるでしょう
14:15
Without getting a little too extreme about this,
そんなに大それた事ではないんですが
14:18
imagine a world
こんな世界はどうでしょう
14:21
where everybody could go out their door
誰もが屋外で
14:23
and engage in the kind of exercise
エクササイズに取り組み
14:25
that's going to make them more relaxed, more serene,
穏やかにリラックスができて
14:27
more healthy,
ストレスを取り除き
14:30
burn off stress --
より健康的になれる
14:32
where you don't come back into your office a raging maniac anymore,
するとストレスを抱えてオフィスや
14:34
where you don't go back home with a lot of stress on top of you again.
家に戻ることもなくなります
14:36
Maybe there's something between what we are today
今日の私たちとタラフマラ族にも
14:38
and what the Tarahumara have always been.
何かしらの共通性はあるはずです
14:41
I don't say let's go back to the Copper Canyons
「タラフマラ族みたいに
14:44
and live on corn and maize, which is the Tarahumara's preferred diet,
カッパーキャニオンでトウモロコシを食え」とは言いません
14:46
but maybe there's somewhere in between.
しかしこの中間はどうですか?
14:49
And if we find that thing,
これが見つかれば
14:51
maybe there is a big fat Nobel Prize out there.
ノーベル賞も夢ではないでしょう
14:53
Because if somebody could find a way
人類が1970年代まで備えていた
14:56
to restore that natural ability
生来の能力を取り戻せれば
14:59
that we all enjoyed for most of our existence,
私たちは
15:01
up until the 1970s or so,
社会的・政治的―
15:03
the benefits, social and physical
肉体的・精神的に
15:05
and political and mental,
驚くべきほどの利益を
15:07
could be astounding.
享受できることでしょう
15:10
So what I've been seeing today is there is a growing subculture
今日は拡大を続ける シューズを捨てた
15:12
of barefoot runners, people who got rid of their shoes.
裸足のランナーのサブカルチャーを紹介しました
15:15
And what they have found uniformly is
彼らはシューズを脱ぐと
15:18
you get rid of the shoes, you get rid of the stress,
ストレスがなくなり 怪我や病気から
15:20
you get rid of the injuries and the ailments.
解放されることに気づきました
15:23
And what you find is something
この発見はタラフマラ族が
15:25
the Tarahumara have known for a very long time,
長い間守ってきたことで
15:27
that this can be a whole lot of fun.
走りを大いに楽しくしてくれます
15:29
I've experienced it personally myself.
個人的にも試してみました
15:31
I was injured all my life, and then in my early 40s I got rid of my shoes
長年怪我続きでしたが 40代前半にシューズを捨てると
15:33
and my running ailments have gone away too.
これは全て解消されました
15:36
So hopefully it's something we can all benefit from.
皆さんにも有益となれば幸いです
15:38
And I appreciate you guys listening to this story. Thanks very much.
ご静聴ありがとうございました
15:40
(Applause)
(拍手)
15:43
Translator:Noriyuki KOIKE
Reviewer:Takahiro Shimpo

sponsored links

Christopher McDougall - Journalist, runner
Christopher McDougall is the author of "Born to Run: A Hidden Tribe, Super Athletes, and the Greatest Race the World Has Never Seen."

Why you should listen

Longtime reporter Christopher McDougall is also a longtime runner -- and he brings his reporter's passion and eye for detail to the mysteries of running in his latest book. "Born to Run" examines humanity's inborn need to run and sweat, and it's filled with passion, odd facts, oddly pertinent digressions and deeply engaging journeys to running subcults (and cults-of-one). The book has inspired at least one fan site.

McDougall writes for Outside, Men's Health, New York and other magazines. His other, equally intriguing book, is Girl Trouble: The True Saga of Superstar Gloria Trevi and the Secret Teenage Sex Cult That Stunned the World.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.