sponsored links
TEDPrize@UN

Krista Tippett: Reconnecting with compassion

クリスタ・ティペット: 今ひとたび「思いやり」と繋がる

November 18, 2010

「思いやり」という言葉は―聖人、もしくは感傷的な人のものであるのが常となってしまい―現実との接点を失っています。国連でのTEDPrize@UNにおいて、ジャーナリストのクリスタ・ティペットは幾つかの感動的な物語を通して、そんな「思いやり」の意味を解体し、より達成可能な新しい定義を提案します。

Krista Tippett - Journalist
Krista Tippett hosts the national public radio program "On Being" (formerly "Speaking of Faith"), which takes up the great animating questions of human life: What does it mean to be human? And how do we want to live? Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
We're here to celebrate compassion.
思いやりを称えるために
私たちはここに居ます
00:15
But compassion, from my vantage point,
でも 私から見れば 思いやりには
00:17
has a problem.
問題があるのです
00:19
As essential as it is across our traditions,
それはどんな伝統を持つ文化にも
欠かせないもので
00:21
as real as so many of us know it to be
また一人一人の生活の中に
実在するものだと
00:24
in particular lives,
私たちの多くは知っているのですが
00:26
the word "compassion" is hollowed out in our culture,
「思いやり」という言葉は
文化の中で形骸化し
00:28
and it is suspect in my field of journalism.
ジャーナリズムという私の分野では
要注意なものなのです
00:31
It's seen as a squishy kumbaya thing,
妙な「スピリチュアル系」として
00:34
or it's seen as potentially depressing.
あるいは どこかしら憂うつなものとして
見られています
00:37
Karen Armstrong has told what I think is an iconic story
カレン・アームストロングが 
ある象徴的な話を教えてくれました
00:40
of giving a speech in Holland
オランダで講演をした際
00:43
and, after the fact, the word "compassion"
その後 「思いやり」という言葉が
00:45
was translated as "pity."
「哀れみ」と訳されてしまったそうです
00:48
Now compassion, when it enters the news,
さて 「思いやり」は 報道の世界において
00:52
too often comes in the form
幸せな気分にさせてくれる
特集記事として
00:54
of feel-good feature pieces
幸せな気分にさせてくれる
特集記事として
00:56
or sidebars about heroic people
あるいは皆さんが決してなり得ない
00:58
you could never be like
ヒーローについての補足記事として
01:01
or happy endings
またはハッピーエンディングや
01:03
or examples of self-sacrifice
殆どの場合
01:05
that would seem to be too good to be true
現実離れした善良過ぎる
01:08
most of the time.
自己犠牲の鑑として
描かれ過ぎています
01:10
Our cultural imagination about compassion
思いやりについての
私たちの文化的想像力は
01:12
has been deadened by idealistic images.
理想像によって麻痺させられているのです
01:15
And so what I'd like to do this morning
そして 今日 私が次の数分でしたい事というのは
01:18
for the next few minutes
そして 今日 私が次の数分でしたい事というのは
01:20
is perform a linguistic resurrection.
言語の復活の執行です
01:22
And I hope you'll come with me on my basic premise
その際できれば皆さんには
01:24
that words matter,
言葉は重要であり 言葉は自身を理解し
世界を解釈する方法を
01:26
that they shape the way we understand ourselves,
言葉は重要であり 言葉は自身を理解し
世界を解釈する方法を
01:28
the way we interpret the world
そして 他者と関わる方法を
形作るという
01:30
and the way we treat others.
私の基本的な前提に
賛同して頂ければと思います
01:32
When this country
1960年代に
01:34
first encountered genuine diversity
この国が本物の多様性と
相まみえた時
01:36
in the 1960s,
この国が本物の多様性と
相まみえた時
01:38
we adopted tolerance
私たちは「寛容さ」という言葉を
01:40
as the core civic virtue
多様性にアプローチする為の
01:42
with which we would approach that.
中心的な人民の美徳として
採り入れました
01:44
Now the word "tolerance," if you look at it in the dictionary,
辞書を引くと「寛容さ」という言葉は
01:46
connotes "allowing," "indulging"
「許す」とか「甘やかす」とか「我慢する」
01:49
and "enduring."
という意味を含んでいます
01:52
In the medical context that it comes from,
この言葉の出所である
医学のコンテキストでは
01:54
it is about testing the limits of thriving
「耐性」 ―
つまり不利な状況下での繁栄の限界を
01:56
in an unfavorable environment.
検証するという意味です
01:59
Tolerance is not really a lived virtue;
寛容さは命ある美徳というよりは
02:02
it's more of a cerebral ascent.
頭でっかちなものなのです
02:04
And it's too cerebral
頭でっかち過ぎるあまり
02:07
to animate guts and hearts
事態が厳しくなって来た時
02:09
and behavior
性根や心や行動が
02:11
when the going gets rough.
それに伴わないのです
02:13
And the going is pretty rough right now.
そして今 事態は
かなり厳しくなっています
02:15
I think that without perhaps being able to name it,
思うに
それが何なのかよく分からないままに
02:17
we are collectively experiencing
私たちは皆で 寛容さを
唯一の美徳の手引きとして
02:20
that we've come as far as we can
出来るだけのことをしてきました
02:22
with tolerance as our only guiding virtue.
出来るだけのことをしてきました
02:24
Compassion is a worthy successor.
思いやりは相応しい後継者です
02:28
It is organic,
それは本質的で
02:30
across our religious, spiritual and ethical traditions,
宗教的 精神的 倫理的な
伝統にまたがり
02:32
and yet it transcends them.
さらにそれらを
超越するものです
02:35
Compassion is a piece of vocabulary
思いやりという言葉は
語彙の1つにすぎませんが
02:38
that could change us if we truly let it sink into
もし私たちが本当に
それを浸透させ
02:41
the standards to which we hold ourselves and others,
プライベートや公の場における
自他の拠りどころにまでできれば
02:44
both in our private and in our civic spaces.
私たちを変えてくれるかもしれません
02:47
So what is it, three-dimensionally?
様々な観点から見て
思いやりとは一体何なのでしょうか?
02:51
What are its kindred and component parts?
類似語や意味を構成しているものは
何でしょうか?
02:54
What's in its universe of attendant virtues?
それが内包する美徳とは
どんなものでしょうか?
02:57
To start simply,
まず単純に
02:59
I want to say that compassion is kind.
私は思いやりとは「親切」であると
言いたいのです
03:01
Now "kindness" might sound like a very mild word,
「親切」は非常に穏やかな言葉のように
聞こえかねませんし
03:04
and it's prone to its own abundant cliche.
また特有の陳腐な表現に
しばしば陥りやすいものです
03:08
But kindness is an everyday byproduct
しかし親切は 全ての偉大な美徳の
03:12
of all the great virtues.
日常生活における副産物です
03:14
And it is a most edifying form
そして最も有益な形で
03:16
of instant gratification.
たちまち満足感を与えてくれます
03:18
Compassion is also curious.
思いやりとは「好奇心」でもあります
03:21
Compassion cultivates and practices curiosity.
好奇心を育み 実践させるものです
03:24
I love a phrase that was offered me
私はロサンゼルスで
異教徒間の理解を促すための
03:27
by two young women
革新的活動をしている
2人の女性―
03:29
who are interfaith innovators in Los Angeles,
アジザ・ハッサンと
マルカ・フェンイェベジが提案した
03:31
Aziza Hasan and Malka Fenyvesi.
あるフレーズが大好きです
03:33
They are working to create a new imagination
彼女たちは 若いユダヤ教徒と
イスラム教徒による
03:36
about shared life among young Jews and Muslims,
共同生活の新しい構想を創造しており
03:38
and as they do that, they cultivate what they call
そうすることで
彼女らが言うところの
03:41
"curiosity without assumptions."
「憶測のない好奇心」を
育んでいるのです
03:44
Well that's going to be a breeding ground for compassion.
それは思いやりの土壌となります
03:46
Compassion can be synonymous with empathy.
思いやりは「共感」の同義語ともいえます
03:50
It can be joined with the harder work
許しと和解という より困難な行為を
03:53
of forgiveness and reconciliation,
伴うこともあるでしょうが
03:56
but it can also express itself
思いやりは
ただそこにあるだけでも
03:59
in the simple act of presence.
それ自体を表現できるのです
04:01
It's linked to practical virtues
寛大さやおもてなしの様な
04:04
like generosity and hospitality
実践的な美徳と関連していながらも
04:06
and just being there,
思いやりは ただそこにあり
04:09
just showing up.
立ち現れているのです
04:11
I think that compassion
思うに 思いやりはまた往々にして
04:15
also is often linked to beauty --
美しさと繋がっています
04:17
and by that I mean a willingness
つまりそれは
04:19
to see beauty in the other,
進んで人の美点を見ようとするという意味ですが
04:21
not just what it is about them
単に助けが必要であろう人々だけを
04:23
that might need helping.
対象にしているのではありません
04:25
I love it that my Muslim conversation partners
私が大好きなのは
イスラム教徒の話相手がよく
04:27
often speak of beauty as a core moral value.
美を中心的な道徳的価値として
話すのを聴くことです
04:30
And in that light, for the religious,
その信心深い光明の中で
04:34
compassion also brings us
思いやりはまた 神秘の領域へ
04:37
into the territory of mystery --
私たちを連れて行き―
04:39
encouraging us not just
単に美しさを見るだけではなく
04:42
to see beauty,
苦しみの最中に
04:44
but perhaps also to look for the face of God
見知らぬ人の顔の中に
04:46
in the moment of suffering,
活き活きとした敬虔なる人の顔の中に
04:48
in the face of a stranger,
神の御顔を探すことも
04:50
in the face of the vibrant religious other.
恐らく は 促してくれているのです
04:52
I'm not sure if I can show you
皆さんに「寛容さ」がどの様なものか
04:56
what tolerance looks like,
お見せすることが出来るか分かりませんが
04:58
but I can show you what compassion looks like --
「思いやり」のほうはお見せ出来ます
05:00
because it is visible.
何故なら それは目に見えるものだからです
05:02
When we see it, we recognize it
それを見て 認識することができれば
05:04
and it changes the way we think about what is doable,
何が可能で 何が出来るかについての
05:06
what is possible.
私たちの考え方は変わるのです
05:08
It is so important
特に 思いやりのように
05:10
when we're communicating big ideas --
偉大な精神的アイデアを伝える際には
05:12
but especially a big spiritual idea like compassion --
他の人に対して
05:14
to root it as we present it to others
それを時空あるいは血肉に
根付いたものとして―
05:18
in space and time and flesh and blood --
つまり人生の彩りや複雑さと結び付けて
05:20
the color and complexity of life.
提示することが非常に重要です
05:23
And compassion does seek physicality.
思いやりは具体性を
追い求めているのです
05:26
I first started to learn this most vividly
私は最初に マシュー ・ サンフォードから
05:31
from Matthew Sanford.
最も強烈にこれを学びました
05:33
And I don't imagine that you will realize this
この彼の写真を見て
05:35
when you look at this photograph of him,
皆さん お気づきにならないでしょうが
05:37
but he's paraplegic.
彼は下半身不随なのです
05:39
He's been paralyzed from the waist down since he was 13,
自動車事故に遭った彼は
お父さんとお姉さんを亡くし
05:41
in a car crash that killed his father and his sister.
13歳以来 腰から下が麻痺しています
05:44
Matthew's legs don't work, and he'll never walk again,
マシューの足は機能せず
もう二度と歩けません
05:47
and -- and he does experience this as an "and"
そして―
彼はこの経験を断念としてではなく
05:50
rather than a "but" --
前進として捉え
05:52
and he experiences himself
そして自分自身が癒され
調和的で統一的な
05:54
to be healed and whole.
存在になったと経験しているのです
05:56
And as a teacher of yoga,
そしてヨガの先生として
05:58
he brings that experience to others
障害の有無や 健康か否か
06:00
across the spectrum of ability and disability,
あるいは年齢にかかわらず
06:02
health, illness and aging.
様々な人々に
その経験を伝えています
06:05
He says that he's just at an extreme end
彼は自分が
人間の営みの中の
06:07
of the spectrum we're all on.
いちばん外れにいるのだと言います
06:09
He's doing some amazing work now
彼は現在
イラクやアフガニスタンからの帰還兵と
06:12
with veterans coming back from Iraq and Afghanistan.
素晴らしい仕事をしています
06:15
And Matthew has made this remarkable observation
そしてマシューは
注目すべきことに気づきました
06:18
that I'm just going to offer you and let it sit.
私も彼もそれを上手く説明できませんが
06:21
I can't quite explain it, and he can't either.
取りあえずお聞きください
06:24
But he says that he has yet to experience someone
彼曰く 
自身の身体の脆さとその優美さを
06:27
who became more aware of their body,
彼曰く 
自身の身体の脆さとその優美さを
06:30
in all its frailty and its grace,
よりよく認識できるようになるためには
06:33
without, at the same time,
人生のあらゆることに
06:36
becoming more compassionate towards all of life.
もっと思いやり深くある
必要があるのです
06:38
Compassion also looks like this.
思いやりは この様な現れ方もします
06:41
This is Jean Vanier.
これはジャン・バニエです
06:44
Jean Vanier helped found the L'Arche communities,
ジャン・バニエは ラルシュという
06:47
which you can now find all over the world,
知的障害者ー
大方はダウン症の人々との
06:49
communities centered around life
生活を中心においた
コミュニティの
06:51
with people with mental disabilities --
創設を手伝いました
06:53
mostly Down syndrome.
現在これは世界中にあります
06:55
The communities that Jean Vanier founded,
ジャン・バニエが創設し
06:57
like Jean Vanier himself,
まるで彼自身のような
06:59
exude tenderness.
優しさが滲みでるコミュニティです
07:01
"Tender" is another word
「優しい」という語にも
07:03
I would love to spend some time resurrecting.
復活のために
また時間を取りたいものです
07:05
We spend so much time in this culture
私たちはこの文化の中で
非常に多くの時間を
07:07
being driven and aggressive,
衝動に駆られ けんか腰で
過ごしています
07:09
and I spend a lot of time being those things too.
私もそうです
07:12
And compassion can also have those qualities.
そして思いやりも
そんな性質を持ちかねないものの
07:14
But again and again, lived compassion
生きた思いやりは
何度も何度も
07:17
brings us back to the wisdom of tenderness.
私たちを優しさという知恵に
連れ戻してくれるのです
07:20
Jean Vanier says
ジャン・バニエは言います
07:24
that his work,
彼のしていることは
07:26
like the work of other people --
他の人―
彼の偉大で愛すべき亡友の
07:28
his great, beloved, late friend Mother Teresa --
マザー・テレサのしたことのように
07:30
is never in the first instance about changing the world;
いきなり世界を変えることではなく
07:33
it's in the first instance about changing ourselves.
まずは私たち自身を変えることだと
07:35
He's says that what they do with L'Arche
ラルシュで彼らがしていることは
解決策そのものではなく
07:38
is not a solution, but a sign.
その「しるし」だと
彼は言います
07:41
Compassion is rarely a solution,
思いやりが直ちに解決策になることは
ほとんどありません
07:44
but it is always a sign of a deeper reality,
しかし それは常により深い現実の
07:47
of deeper human possibilities.
つまり 人間のもつより深い可能性を
うかがわせるものなのです
07:49
And compassion is unleashed
そして思いやりは
決して統計や戦略によってではなく
07:52
in wider and wider circles
さまざまな「しるし」と物語によって
07:55
by signs and stories,
もっと広い輪の中で
07:58
never by statistics and strategies.
解き放たれるのです
08:00
We need those things too,
私たちにもそういう事が必要ですが
08:03
but we're also bumping up against their limits.
限界にぶちあたっているところです
08:05
And at the same time that we are doing that,
しかし それと同時に私たちは
08:08
I think we are rediscovering the power of story --
物語の力を
再発見しているのだと思います
08:11
that as human beings, we need stories
私たちが人間として
08:14
to survive, to flourish,
生き残り 繁栄し 変化するためには
08:16
to change.
物語が必要なのです
08:18
Our traditions have always known this,
私たちの伝統は常にこれを知っていて
08:20
and that is why they have always cultivated stories at their heart
だから真心で物語を育み
08:22
and carried them forward in time for us.
私たちのために
それらを語り継いでくれたのです
08:25
There is, of course, a story
もちろん
08:28
behind the key moral longing
ユダヤ教の要となる
倫理的篤志と戒律である
08:31
and commandment of Judaism
「tikkun olam(世界の修復)」の裏にも
ある物語があります
08:33
to repair the world -- tikkun olam.
「tikkun olam(世界の修復)」の裏にも
ある物語があります
08:35
And I'll never forget hearing that story
そして レイチェル・ナオミ・リーメン博士が
08:38
from Dr. Rachel Naomi Remen,
彼女がお祖父さんにしてもらったように
08:40
who told it to me as her grandfather told it to her,
私に語ってくれたその物語を
決して忘れることはないでしょう
08:42
that in the beginning of the Creation
それは天地創造の序章です
08:45
something happened
何かが起こり
08:47
and the original light of the universe
そして宇宙の光の源が
08:49
was shattered into countless pieces.
数えきれない程の
バラバラの破片になりました
08:51
It lodged as shards
そのカケラは
08:53
inside every aspect of the Creation.
神のあらゆる創造物に宿ったのです
08:55
And that the highest human calling
そして最も高尚な人類の使命は
08:57
is to look for this light, to point at it when we see it,
この光を探し 見つけ
09:00
to gather it up,
集めることであり
09:03
and in so doing, to repair the world.
そうやって
世界を修復することだというのです
09:05
Now this might sound like a fanciful tale.
これは夢物語に
聞こえるかも知れません
09:08
Some of my fellow journalists might interpret it that way.
私のジャーナリスト仲間には
そう捉えた人も居るかも知れません
09:11
Rachel Naomi Remen says
レイチェル・ナオミ・リーメンは言います
09:14
this is an important and empowering story
これは私たちの世代にとって
09:16
for our time,
非常に重要で
力づけられる物語なのだと
09:18
because this story insists
何故ならこの物語は
09:20
that each and every one of us,
恐らく 脆く 欠点があり
09:22
frail and flawed as we may be,
お気づきの通り 不十分であろう
09:24
inadequate as we may feel,
私たち一人一人が
09:26
has exactly what's needed
実体のあるこの世界の一部を
09:28
to help repair the part of the world
修復するのを助けるのに
必要な何かを
09:30
that we can see and touch.
まさに持っている と力説しているのです
09:33
Stories like this,
このような物語や「しるし」は
09:36
signs like this,
このような物語や「しるし」は
09:39
are practical tools
私たちをねじ伏せ兼ねない
09:41
in a world longing to bring compassion
怒涛のように押し寄せる
苦痛のイメージを払拭するために
09:43
to abundant images of suffering
思いやりがもたらされることを
切望している世界における
09:47
that can otherwise overwhelm us.
実践的なツールです
09:50
Rachel Naomi Remen
レイチェル・ナオミ・リーメンは
09:53
is actually bringing compassion
実際に思いやりをあるべき所へ
09:55
back to its rightful place alongside science
つまり彼女の分野である
09:57
in her field of medicine
医学における
研修医のトレーニングへ
09:59
in the training of new doctors.
科学と並び立つものとして
戻しています
10:01
And this trend
そしてこの
10:04
of what Rachel Naomi Remen is doing,
レイチェル・ナオミ・リーメンの取組み
10:06
how these kinds of virtues
つまりこれらの美徳が
どの様に医学の用語内に
10:08
are finding a place in the vocabulary of medicine --
居場所を見つけることができるのか―
10:10
the work Fred Luskin is doing --
そしてフレッド・ラスキンがしている努力―
10:12
I think this is one of the most fascinating developments
これは21世紀における最も魅力的な
10:14
of the 21st century --
進展の1つだと思うのですが―
10:16
that science, in fact,
事実 科学は
10:18
is taking a virtue like compassion
唯心論の領域から
思いやりのような美徳を
10:20
definitively out of the realm of idealism.
確実に採り入れつつあります
10:23
This is going to change science, I believe,
これは科学を変化させ
10:26
and it will change religion.
やがては宗教を変えるでしょう
10:29
But here's a face
しかしここにいる
10:31
from 20th century science
20世紀の科学で名を馳せたある人物は
10:33
that might surprise you
思いやりの議論の中で
10:35
in a discussion about compassion.
皆さんを
驚かせるかもしれません
10:37
We all know about the Albert Einstein
特殊相対性理論を考えついた
アルバート・アインシュタインのことは
10:39
who came up with E = mc2.
私たち全員が知っていますが
10:42
We don't hear so much about the Einstein
アフリカ系アメリカ人オペラ歌手
マリアン ・ アンダーソンが
10:45
who invited the African American opera singer, Marian Anderson,
プリンストンで公演する際
彼の家に泊まるよう勧めたことは
10:48
to stay in his home when she came to sing in Princeton
あまり聞きません
10:51
because the best hotel there
現地で最高のホテルは
分離政策下にあり
10:54
was segregated and wouldn't have her.
彼女を泊めようとしなかったからです
10:56
We don't hear about the Einstein who used his celebrity
私たちはアインシュタインが自身の名声を
10:58
to advocate for political prisoners in Europe
ヨーロッパの政治犯の権利擁護や
アメリカ南部スコッツボロで
11:01
or the Scottsboro boys
人種差別問題に遭遇した
少年たちのために使った
11:04
in the American South.
ということは余り耳にしません
11:06
Einstein believed deeply
アインシュタインは
11:08
that science should transcend
科学は 国家や民族の区別を
超えるべきだと
11:11
national and ethnic divisions.
深く信じていました
11:13
But he watched physicists and chemists
しかし 彼は20世紀初頭に
11:15
become the purveyors of weapons of mass destruction
物理学者と化学者が
11:18
in the early 20th century.
大量殺戮兵器の調達人になったのを見ました
11:21
He once said that science in his generation
かつて彼は
その時代の科学は
11:23
had become like a razor blade
3歳児が握る剃刀の刃の様になったと
言いました
11:26
in the hands of a three-year-old.
3歳児が握る剃刀の刃の様になったと
言いました
11:28
And Einstein foresaw
そしてアインシュタインは
11:30
that as we grow more modern
私たちがより近代的に成長し
11:32
and technologically advanced,
技術的に進歩すればするほど
11:34
we need the virtues
伝統が伝え進める美徳を
11:36
our traditions carry forward in time
これまでになく必要とすると
11:38
more, not less.
予見しました
11:41
He liked to talk about the spiritual geniuses of the ages.
彼は往年の精神界の
重鎮について語るのが好きでした
11:43
Some of his favorites were Moses,
お気に入りはモーセ
11:47
Jesus, Buddha, St. Francis of Assisi,
イエス ブッダ アシジの聖フランシスコ
11:49
Gandhi -- he adored his contemporary, Gandhi.
そしてガンジー ―
同時代の彼を敬愛していました
11:52
And Einstein said --
アインシュタインが言うには―
11:55
and I think this is a quote,
彼の言葉だと思うのですが
11:57
again, that has not been passed down in his legacy --
これも言い継がれていないもので―
11:59
that "these kinds of people
「これらの人々は
12:01
are geniuses in the art of living,
生きる技術の天才である
12:03
more necessary
それは人としての尊厳や安全
また歓びの為には
12:05
to the dignity, security and joy of humanity
客観的知識の発見よりも
12:07
than the discoverers of objective knowledge."
無くてはならないものである」
12:10
Now invoking Einstein
さて アインシュタインにすがることは
12:15
might not seem the best way to bring compassion down to earth
思いやりを現実的な存在にし
12:17
and make it seem accessible to all the rest of us,
さらに皆がアクセス可能なものにするには
12:20
but actually it is.
最善の方法とは思えないかもしれませんが
実はそうなのです
12:22
I want to show you
この写真の残りの部分を
12:25
the rest of this photograph,
皆さんにお見せしたいのです
12:27
because this photograph
何故ならこの写真は
私たちの文化で
12:30
is analogous to what we do to the word "compassion" in our culture --
「思いやり」という言葉に対してする事に
類似しているからです
12:32
we clean it up
私たちはそれをきれいに整えてしまい
12:35
and we diminish its depths and its grounding
本来なら
とっ散らかっているはずの人生から
12:37
in life, which is messy.
その深みと生活上の跡形を減らしています
12:40
So in this photograph
さて 皆さんはこの写真を
12:42
you see a mind looking out a window
大聖堂らしきものを窓から見て
12:44
at what might be a cathedral -- it's not.
物思いにふけるさまと解釈します―
でも違います
12:46
This is the full photograph,
これが全体の写真で
12:48
and you see a middle-aged man wearing a leather jacket,
革のジャケットを着た中年男性が
12:50
smoking a cigar.
葉巻を味わっているのをご覧になるでしょう
12:52
And by the look of that paunch,
そしてあの太鼓腹を見るに
12:54
he hasn't been doing enough yoga.
十分にヨガをやっては
こなかったようです
12:56
We put these two photographs side-by-side on our website,
これらの2つの写真を
ウェブサイトに並べて載せたところ
12:58
and someone said, "When I look at the first photo,
誰かが言いました
13:01
I ask myself, what was he thinking?
「最初の写真では
彼は何を考えているのかと思い
13:03
And when I look at the second, I ask,
2番目の写真では
いったいこの男性は
13:05
what kind of person was he? What kind of man is this?"
どんな人なのかと思いました」
13:07
Well, he was complicated.
彼は複雑な人物でした
13:10
He was incredibly compassionate
彼は幾つかの人間関係において
13:12
in some of his relationships
信じがたいほどに思いやりにあふれ
13:14
and terribly inadequate in others.
それ以外においては
恐ろしく不適当でした
13:16
And it is much harder, often,
そして最も身近な人に
思いやり深くあることは
13:19
to be compassionate towards those closest to us,
しばしば より大変なことであり
13:22
which is another quality in the universe of compassion,
それは思いやりの世界においては
13:26
on its dark side,
別の暗い側面の1つであり
13:29
that also deserves our serious attention and illumination.
私たちの真摯な注目と
啓蒙に値するものでもあります
13:31
Gandhi, too, was a real flawed human being.
ガンジーも 実際に欠陥のある人間でした
13:36
So was Martin Luther King, Jr. So was Dorothy Day.
マーティン・ルーサー・キングや
ドロシー・デイ
13:39
So was Mother Teresa.
マザー ・ テレサもでした
13:42
So are we all.
私たちも皆そうです
13:44
And I want to say
そして申し上げたいのですが
13:46
that it is a liberating thing
思いやりを妨げるものは
何もないと気づくことは
13:48
to realize that that is no obstacle to compassion --
解放的なことです
13:50
following on what Fred Luskin says --
フレッド・ラスキンが言うことに従うなら
13:52
that these flaws just make us human.
これらの欠点こそが私たちを
人間たらしめるのです
13:55
Our culture is obsessed with perfection
私たちの文化は完璧主義と
13:58
and with hiding problems.
問題の隠ぺいに必死になっています
14:01
But what a liberating thing to realize
しかし私たちの問題こそが 実は
14:03
that our problems, in fact,
喜びや苦しみの只中にいる人達に
思いやりをもたらすという
14:05
are probably our richest sources
喜びや苦しみの只中にいる人達に
思いやりをもたらすという
14:07
for rising to this ultimate virtue of compassion,
この究極の美徳を育む為の
14:10
towards bringing compassion
おそらく最も豊饒な源だと気付くのは
14:14
towards the suffering and joys of others.
なんと爽快なことでしょうか
14:16
Rachel Naomi Remen is a better doctor
レイチェル・ナオミ・リーメンが
より良い医師になったのは
14:20
because of her life-long struggle with Crohn's disease.
持病であるクローン病が故です
14:23
Einstein became a humanitarian,
アインシュタインが
人道主義者となったのは
14:25
not because of his exquisite knowledge
空間や時間や物質に関する
14:27
of space and time and matter,
傑出した知識が故ではなく
14:29
but because he was a Jew as Germany grew fascist.
ファシストを生んだドイツ育ちの
ユダヤ人だったが故です
14:31
And Karen Armstrong, I think you would also say
そしてカレン ・ アームストロングの場合は―
14:34
that it was some of your very wounding experiences
皆さんも同感だと思いますが―
14:37
in a religious life that,
宗教生活における
14:40
with a zigzag,
非常に傷ついた経験の1つが
14:42
have led to the Charter for Compassion.
紆余曲折をへて
「思いやりの憲章」に導いたのです
14:44
Compassion can't be reduced to sainthood
「思いやり」を「哀れみ」と
見くびるべきでもないように
14:48
any more than it can be reduced to pity.
「聖なるもの」とすべきでもありません
14:51
So I want to propose
ではここで 思いやりの最終的な定義を
14:55
a final definition of compassion --
提案したいと思います―
14:57
this is Einstein with Paul Robeson by the way --
ちなみにこれはアインシュタインと
ポール・ロブスンです―
15:00
and that would be for us
この思いやりのことを
15:03
to call compassion a spiritual technology.
「精神面でのテクノロジー」と呼ぶのは
どうでしょう
15:05
Now our traditions contain
今や 私たちの伝統はこれについての
15:09
vast wisdom about this,
広大な知恵を包含しており
そして私たちは
15:11
and we need them to mine it for us now.
自分たちのために今
それを発掘する必要があるのです
15:13
But compassion is also equally at home
思いやりは 宗教にだけでなく
15:16
in the secular as in the religious.
俗世にも また存在するのです
15:19
So I will paraphrase Einstein in closing
さて 最後にアインシュタイン流の言葉で
締めくくりたいと思います
15:22
and say that humanity,
人類は
15:25
the future of humanity,
そして人類の未来は
15:27
needs this technology
このテクノロジーを必要としています
15:29
as much as it needs all the others
人類が1つにまとまるために
15:31
that have now connected us
テクノロジーは現在 私たちをつなげ
15:33
and set before us
また未来への驚くべき可能性を
与えてくれていますが
15:36
the terrifying and wondrous possibility
それらと同様
15:38
of actually becoming one human race.
「思いやり」というテクノロジーは
必要なものなのです
15:40
Thank you.
ありがとう
15:43
(Applause)
(拍手)
15:45
Translator:Masami Hisai
Reviewer:Naoko Fujii

sponsored links

Krista Tippett - Journalist
Krista Tippett hosts the national public radio program "On Being" (formerly "Speaking of Faith"), which takes up the great animating questions of human life: What does it mean to be human? And how do we want to live?

Why you should listen

Krista Tippett grew up in Oklahoma, the granddaughter of a Southern Baptist preacher. She studied history at Brown University and went to Bonn, West Germany in 1983 on a Fulbright Scholarship to study politics in Cold War Europe. In her 20s, she ended up in divided Berlin for most of the 1980s, first as The New York Times stringer and a freelance correspondent for Newsweek, The International Herald Tribune, the BBC, and Die Zeit. She later became a special assistant to the U.S. Ambassador to West Germany.

When Tippett graduated with a M.Div. from Yale, she saw a black hole where intelligent coverage of religion should be. As she conducted a far-flung oral history project for the Benedictines of St. John's Abbey, she began to imagine radio conversations about the spiritual and intellectual content of faith that could open minds and enrich public life. These imagined conversations became reality when she created "Speaking of Faith" (now "On Being"), which is broadcast on over 200 US pubic radio stations and globally by NPR. From ecology to autism to torture, Tippett and her guests reach beyond the headlines to explore meaning, faith and ethics amidst the political, economic, cultural and technological shifts that define 21st century life. Tippett is the author of Speaking of Faith and Einstein's God.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.