19:47
TEDWomen 2010

Jacqueline Novogratz: Inspiring a life of immersion

ジャックリーン・ノヴォグラッツ:人生に打ち込むためのインスピレーション

Filmed:

誰しもが目的のある人生を送りたいと思うものですが、どこから始めればいいのでしょう?この多彩にきらめくトークでは、ジャックリーン・ノヴォグラッツが「忍耐力のある資本(Patient Capital)」の活動の中で出会った人々について紹介します。社会的な意義を持つ活動や、コミュニティ、正義への情熱に没頭して生きる人々の話は、力強いインスピレーションをもたらします。

- Social entrepreneur
Jacqueline Novogratz founded and leads Acumen, a nonprofit that takes a businesslike approach to improving the lives of the poor. In her book "The Blue Sweater" she tells stories from the philanthropy, which emphasizes sustainable bottom-up solutions over traditional top-down aid. Full bio

I've been spending a lot of time
私はこのところ世界中を旅して
00:15
traveling around the world these days,
学生や専門家のグループに
00:17
talking to groups of students and professionals,
話をすることに多くの時間を費やしています。
00:19
and everywhere I'm finding that I hear similar themes.
そして、どこへいっても似たようなことを耳にします。
00:22
On the one hand, people say,
人々は一方で
00:25
"The time for change is now."
「今こそは変革の時だ」と言い、
00:27
They want to be part of it.
その一部になりたいと思っています。
00:29
They talk about wanting lives of purpose and greater meaning.
人々は目的のある、もっと有意義な人生を送りたいと語ります。
00:31
But on the other hand,
しかしもう一方で、
00:34
I hear people talking about fear,
同じ人々から、恐れや
00:36
a sense of risk-aversion.
リスクを避けたい気持ちも耳にします。
00:38
They say, "I really want to follow a life of purpose,
「目的のある人生を送りたいと本当に思いますが、
00:40
but I don't know where to start.
どこから始めればいいのか、わからないのです。
00:42
I don't want to disappoint my family or friends."
家族や友達をがっかりさせたくありません。」
00:44
I work in global poverty.
私は、世界の貧困問題に取り組んでいます。
00:47
And they say, "I want to work in global poverty,
人々は「貧困問題に取り組みたいですが、
00:49
but what will it mean about my career?
私のキャリアはどうなりますか?
00:51
Will I be marginalized?
社会から取り残されてしまいますか?
00:53
Will I not make enough money?
十分なお金を得ることができますか?
00:55
Will I never get married or have children?"
結婚できず、子供ももてないのではないですか?」
00:57
And as a woman who didn't get married until I was a lot older --
かなり遅くまで結婚しなかった女性として—
00:59
and I'm glad I waited --
私は待っていて良かったと思いますけど—
01:02
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:04
-- and has no children,
ー 子どもの居ない女性として
01:06
I look at these young people
私は若い人たちに向かってこう言います。
01:08
and I say, "Your job is not to be perfect.
「完璧であることは求められていません。
01:10
Your job is only to be human.
人であることだけが求められています。
01:12
And nothing important happens in life
人生で重要なことの中に
01:14
without a cost."
対価を伴わないものはありません」
01:17
These conversations really reflect what's happening
この会話は、国家や国際的なレベルで
01:20
at the national and international level.
起きていることを実によく反映しています。
01:22
Our leaders and ourselves
私達のリーダーや私達自身は
01:24
want everything,
全てが欲しいと思っていますが、
01:26
but we don't talk about the costs.
対価については語りませんし、
01:28
We don't talk about the sacrifice.
犠牲についても語りません。
01:30
One of my favorite quotes from literature
私のお気に入りの引用があります。
01:33
was written by Tillie Olsen,
アメリカ南部出身の
01:35
the great American writer from the South.
偉大な作家ティリー・オルセンの
01:37
In a short story called "Oh Yes,"
短編小説『O Yes』からの引用になります。
01:39
she talks about a white woman in the 1950s
1950年代の白人女性について書かれた話で、
01:42
who has a daughter
その女性の娘は
01:44
who befriends a little African American girl,
幼い黒人の女の子と仲良しです。
01:46
and she looks at her child with a sense of pride,
彼女は、娘をみるといつも誇りに思うのですが、
01:49
but she also wonders,
同時に、どんな対価を払うことになるのだろうと
01:52
what price will she pay?
気になるのです。
01:54
"Better immersion
『没頭したほうがいい。
01:56
than to live untouched."
何にも触れずに生きるよりは。』
01:58
But the real question is,
しかし、実際に問うべきなのは
02:00
what is the cost of not daring?
勇気がないことへの対価は何なのか、
02:02
What is the cost of not trying?
試してみないことへの対価は何なのかということです。
02:04
I've been so privileged in my life
突出して優れたリーダーたちと知り合えて
02:07
to know extraordinary leaders
私は大変恵まれていました。
02:09
who have chosen to live lives of immersion.
人生に没頭することを選んだリーダーです
02:11
One woman I knew who was a fellow
そんな一人が、ロックフェラー基金で
02:14
at a program that I ran at the Rockefeller Foundation
実施したプログラムのフェローで、
02:16
was named Ingrid Washinawatok.
イングリッド・ワシナワトックです。
02:18
She was a leader of the Menominee tribe,
アメリカンインディアンの部族である
02:20
a Native American peoples.
メノミニー族のリーダーです。
02:23
And when we would gather as fellows,
フェローの集まりがあると
02:25
she would push us to think about
インディアンの文化で年長者が
02:27
how the elders in Native American culture
どんなふうに決定を下すのか
02:30
make decisions.
考えるように促されたのでした。
02:33
And she said they would literally visualize
彼女によれば、インディアンの長老達は
02:35
the faces of children
今後七世代にわたる
02:37
for seven generations into the future,
子供達が大地から自分たちを見つめているさまを
02:39
looking at them from the Earth,
思い浮かべるのだと言います。
02:41
and they would look at them, holding them as stewards
子どもたちの顔が長老たちを見つめることで
02:44
for that future.
長老たちは将来のための執事役になるのです。
02:46
Ingrid understood that we are connected to each other,
彼女は、私達皆が一体であると考えていました。
02:48
not only as human beings,
人間同士が、というだけではなく
02:50
but to every living thing on the planet.
地球上の生きとし生けるもの、すべてが繋がっているのです。
02:52
And tragically, in 1999,
1999年に悲劇が起こります。
02:55
when she was in Colombia
コロンビアでウワ族たちと
02:57
working with the U'wa people,
働いている時のことです。
02:59
focused on preserving their culture and language,
文化と言語の保護活動に関わっていたのですが、
03:01
she and two colleagues were abducted
FARC(コロンビア革命軍)がイングリッドと
03:04
and tortured and killed by the FARC.
同僚2人を誘拐し、拷問して殺害しました。
03:06
And whenever we would gather the fellows after that,
その後、いつでも当時のフェローが集まる時には、
03:10
we would leave a chair empty for her spirit.
彼女のために、椅子をひとつ空けておきます。
03:13
And more than a decade later,
それから10年以上たっても、
03:16
when I talk to NGO fellows,
私がNGO のフェローに話す機会があれば、
03:19
whether in Trenton, New Jersey or the office of the White House,
ニュージャージーのトレントンであっても、ホワイトハウスであっても
03:21
and we talk about Ingrid,
イングリッドの話をして
03:24
they all say that they're trying to integrate her wisdom
誰もが、イングリッドの
03:27
and her spirit
英知や精神と融合したいと、
03:29
and really build on the unfulfilled work
そして彼女の遣り残した人生のミッションを
03:31
of her life's mission.
いしずえにしたい、と言います。
03:34
And when we think about legacy,
イングリッドの人生は短いものでしたが、
03:36
I can think of no more powerful one,
後に残したものを考えると
03:38
despite how short her life was.
これよりも力強い人生は思い浮かびません。
03:40
And I've been touched by Cambodian women --
それから私は、カンボジアの女性達に
03:44
beautiful women,
感動しました。美しい女性達で、
03:46
women who held the tradition of the classical dance in Cambodia.
カンボジアの伝統舞踊を受け継ぐ人達です。
03:48
And I met them in the early '90s.
お会いしたのは、90年代の初めの頃です。
03:51
In the 1970s, under the Pol Pot regime,
1970年代のポルポト政権下で
03:54
the Khmer Rouge killed over a million people,
クメールルージュは百万人以上の人を殺戮しました。
03:56
and they focused and targeted the elites and the intellectuals,
彼らのターゲットは、エリートや知識人、
03:59
the artists, the dancers.
芸術家や舞踏家たちでした。
04:02
And at the end of the war,
戦争が終わったとき、
04:04
there were only 30 of these classical dancers still living.
生き残った伝統舞踊の踊り手は30人しかいませんでした。
04:06
And the women, who I was so privileged to meet
光栄なことに、お目にかかったときには
04:09
when there were three survivors,
3人の方がご存命で
04:12
told these stories about lying in their cots
難民キャンプで簡易ベッドに眠る
04:14
in the refugee camps.
日々の話をしてくれたのです。
04:16
They said they would try so hard
踊りを少しも忘れないように
04:18
to remember the fragments of the dance,
たいへん苦労をしたけれど、他の踊り手も
04:20
hoping that others were alive and doing the same.
生きていたら同じようにしたはずだと。
04:23
And one woman stood there with this perfect carriage,
中の一人は、両手を体の脇にした
04:26
her hands at her side,
完璧な姿勢で立ち
04:29
and she talked about
戦後、30人が再会した時のこと
04:31
the reunion of the 30 after the war
それが、どんな奇跡的だったかについて
04:33
and how extraordinary it was.
話しました。
04:35
And these big tears fell down her face,
大粒の涙が彼女の頬を伝いました。
04:37
but she never lifted her hands to move them.
でも、その涙を拭おうともしませんでした。
04:39
And the women decided that they would train
彼女たちは、既に大きくなってしまった
04:42
not the next generation of girls, because they had grown too old already,
子どもの世代を訓練するのではなく、
04:45
but the next generation.
孫の世代を訓練することに決めました
04:48
And I sat there in the studio
私はスタジオに座って
04:50
watching these women clapping their hands --
その女性たちが手をたたき、--
04:52
beautiful rhythms --
それは美しいリズムでした--
04:54
as these little fairy pixies
その周りで、妖精のような
04:56
were dancing around them,
踊り子たちが美しいシルクをまとって
04:58
wearing these beautiful silk colors.
踊るのを見ていました。
05:00
And I thought, after all this atrocity,
そして、あの残虐行為を経て、これが
05:02
this is how human beings really pray.
人が本当に祈るということなんだ、と思いました。
05:05
Because they're focused on honoring
自分たちの過去のもっとも美しい所に
05:08
what is most beautiful about our past
敬意を払うことに力を注ぎ
05:11
and building it into
そこから将来への展望を
05:14
the promise of our future.
築き上げているのですから。
05:16
And what these women understood
私たちの行うこと、時間を費やすことの中で
05:18
is sometimes the most important things that we do
もっとも大切な事は、
05:20
and that we spend our time on
物差しでは計れないこともあると
05:22
are those things that we cannot measure.
彼女たちはわかっています。
05:24
I also have been touched
また、力とリーダーシップの
05:28
by the dark side of power and leadership.
ダークサイドとも接してきました
05:30
And I have learned that power,
極限的な暗黒の力には
05:33
particularly in its absolute form,
同じように誰もが
05:35
is an equal opportunity provider.
襲われてしまうと学びました
05:37
In 1986, I moved to Rwanda,
1986年に、ルワンダに引っ越して
05:40
and I worked with a very small group of Rwandan women
ごく少数のルワンダ人女性のグループと
05:42
to start that country's first microfinance bank.
マイクロファイナンス銀行を作る活動を始めました。
05:45
And one of the women was Agnes --
その中の一人 アニェスは --
05:47
there on your extreme left --
左端にいますが --
05:50
she was one of the first three
ルワンダで最初に国会議員になった
05:52
women parliamentarians in Rwanda,
3人の女性のうちの一人です。
05:54
and her legacy should have been
彼女は後に遺したものによって
05:56
to be one of the mothers of Rwanda.
ルワンダの母と呼ばれても良かったはずでした。
05:58
We built this institution based on social justice,
私達は、社会的な公平さや
06:01
gender equity,
ジェンダーの公平さなど、女性を
06:03
this idea of empowering women.
助力するアイディアに基づいて組織を作りました。
06:05
But Agnes cared more about the trappings of power
やがて、アニェスは肝心のことよりも
06:09
than she did principle at the end.
権力の掌握に重きを置いてしまいました。
06:12
And though she had been part of building a liberal party,
リベラル政党の創設者の一員で、
06:14
a political party
その党は多様性と寛容を
06:17
that was focused on diversity and tolerance,
掲げていたのに、
06:19
about three months before the genocide, she switched parties
集団虐殺の 3ヶ月前に、彼女は党を移り
06:22
and joined the extremist party, Hutu Power,
過激派であるフツ・パワーに加わり
06:24
and she became the Minister of Justice
集団虐殺をした政権で
06:27
under the genocide regime
法務大臣を務めました。
06:29
and was known for inciting men to kill faster
「さっさと殺せ、女みたいに振舞うな」と
06:31
and stop behaving like women.
男たちを扇動したことで有名になりました。
06:34
She was convicted
アニェスは集団虐殺に対し第一級の
06:36
of category one crimes of genocide.
有罪判決を受けました。
06:38
And I would visit her in the prisons,
彼女に会いに刑務所に行ったとしたら
06:41
sitting side-by-side, knees touching,
隣に座って、ひざを寄せたとしても、
06:44
and I would have to admit to myself
怪物は私たち皆の中にいることを
06:47
that monsters exist in all of us,
認めざるをえないでしょう。
06:49
but that maybe it's not monsters so much,
たぶん、強力な怪物ではないにしても
06:52
but the broken parts of ourselves,
悲しみや秘めた恥などの
06:54
sadnesses, secret shame,
私たちの壊れた部品は
06:57
and that ultimately it's easy for demagogues
最終的には、民衆煽動家が
07:00
to prey on those parts,
容易につけ込むスキやきっかけを与え、
07:03
those fragments, if you will,
その気があれば、
07:05
and to make us look at other beings, human beings,
他者を、他人を自分たちよりも下に
07:07
as lesser than ourselves --
見るように仕向けます。
07:10
and in the extreme, to do terrible things.
極端な場合、残虐なことをさせるのです。
07:13
And there is no group
若い男性の集団ほど
07:16
more vulnerable to those kinds of manipulations
この種の操作に弱い
07:18
than young men.
集団はありません。
07:21
I've heard it said that the most dangerous animal on the planet
私は、地球上で最も危険な動物は青年期の男性だというのを
07:23
is the adolescent male.
聞いたことがあります。
07:26
And so in a gathering
ですから、
07:28
where we're focused on women,
女性に焦点をあてたこの集まりで
07:30
while it is so critical that we invest in our girls
少女たちにお金を投資する事や
07:32
and we even the playing field
彼女たちの居場所を確保したり
07:35
and we find ways to honor them,
きちんと評価する事は大事ですが
07:37
we have to remember that the girls and the women
忘れてはならない事は少女や女性が
07:40
are most isolated and violated
孤立し、侵害され、
07:43
and victimized and made invisible
犠牲者となり、存在すら消されていることです。
07:45
in those very societies
それは特に
07:47
where our men and our boys
男性や少年たちが
07:49
feel disempowered,
無力感を味わい、暮らして行けないと—
07:51
unable to provide.
感じている社会で著しいのです。
07:53
And that, when they sit on those street corners
だからこそ、街角にたむろして、
07:55
and all they can think of in the future
将来のことを考えてみても、
07:58
is no job, no education,
仕事も、教育もなく
08:00
no possibility,
可能性もないような状況で
08:02
well then it's easy to understand
地位を確保する可能性を
08:04
how the greatest source of status
制服と銃の中に
08:06
can come from a uniform
見いだしてしまう事は
08:08
and a gun.
想像に難くありません。
08:10
Sometimes very small investments
時には、ほんの小額の投資が、
08:12
can release enormous, infinite potential
私たち全員が秘めた
08:14
that exists in all of us.
実に大きな無限の可能性を解き放つこともあります。
08:16
One of the Acumen Fund fellows at my organization,
私の組織、アキュメンファンドのフェロー
08:18
Suraj Sudhakar,
スラジ・スドハカールは
08:20
has what we call moral imagination --
私たちが「モラル・イマジネーション」と呼んでいる
08:22
the ability to put yourself in another person's shoes
他人の立場に立って考えられる能力を持ち
08:25
and lead from that perspective.
その視点から物事を推進できる人です。
08:27
And he's been working with this young group of men
彼は、世界で最も大きなスラム、キベラ出身の
08:29
who come from the largest slum in the world, Kibera.
若い男性達のグループと働いています。
08:33
And they're incredible guys.
素晴らしい人達です。
08:36
And together they started a book club
スラムの百人のための
08:38
for a hundred people in the slums,
ブッククラブを始めて
08:40
and they're reading many TED authors and liking it.
TED の作家の作品を多く読み、気に入っています。
08:42
And then they created a business plan competition.
そして、彼らは、ビジネス・プラン・コンペティションを開始しました。
08:45
Then they decided that they would do TEDx's.
彼らは、TEDx のイベントをやると決めました。
08:48
And I have learned so much
私はクリスとケビンから
08:51
from Chris and Kevin
アレックスとハーバーとから
08:53
and Alex and Herbert
全ての青年から
08:55
and all of these young men.
実に多くを学びました。
08:57
Alex, in some ways, said it best.
アレックスがうまいことを言いました。
08:59
He said, "We used to feel like nobodies,
「かつては、自分が何者でもないと感じていましたが
09:01
but now we feel like somebodies."
今は、なにがしかの人だと感じています。」
09:03
And I think we have it all wrong
収入がそうさせていると考えるのは
09:05
when we think that income is the link.
完全に間違っていると思います。
09:07
What we really yearn for as human beings
人として真に望むのは
09:09
is to be visible to each other.
お互いに見える存在になることなのです。
09:11
And the reason these young guys
この青年たちが TEDx イベントを
09:14
told me that they're doing these TEDx's
やろうとしたのは、こんなわけでした。
09:16
is because they were sick and tired
スラムに来るワークショップといえば
09:18
of the only workshops coming to the slums
HIV に焦点をしぼったもので
09:20
being those workshops focused on HIV,
良くてもマイクロ・ファイナンス。
09:23
or at best, microfinance.
もう、うんざりしていました
09:26
And they wanted to celebrate
彼らは、キベラやマサレの
09:28
what's beautiful about Kibera and Mathare --
美しさを祝福したかったのです--
09:30
the photojournalists and the creatives,
フォトジャーナリズムやその他の作品、
09:33
the graffiti artists, the teachers and the entrepreneurs.
落書きアーティスト、教師や起業家とともに。
09:35
And they're doing it.
そして、彼らはまさにそれをやっています。
09:38
And my hat's off to you in Kibera.
キベラの皆さんに敬意を表します。
09:40
My own work focuses
私自身は、慈善事業をより効率的にすることと、
09:43
on making philanthropy more effective
資本主義をより包括的にすることに
09:45
and capitalism more inclusive.
集中しています。
09:48
At Acumen Fund, we take philanthropic resources
アキュメンファンドでは、慈善の資金を得て
09:51
and we invest what we call patient capital --
「忍耐力のある資本(Patient Capital)」と呼ぶ投資をします。
09:54
money that will invest in entrepreneurs who see the poor
貧しい人たちも受け身で施しを受け取るだけではなく
09:56
not as passive recipients of charity,
自分達の問題を自分で解決して
09:59
but as full-bodied agents of change
決定していきたいと願う
10:01
who want to solve their own problems
完全な変化の主人公だと認めるような
10:03
and make their own decisions.
起業家へ投資して行きます。
10:05
We leave our money for 10 to 15 years,
資金は10から15年貸し付けたままにして、
10:07
and when we get it back, we invest in other innovations
返済されたら、また変化にフォーカスした
10:09
that focus on change.
イノベーションに投資します。
10:11
I know it works.
これがうまくいくのです。
10:13
We've invested more than 50 million dollars in 50 companies,
これまでに、5千万ドルを50の会社に投資してきました。
10:15
and those companies have brought another 200 million dollars
これらの会社は、さらに2億ドルを
10:18
into these forgotten markets.
見過ごされたマーケットから創出しました。
10:21
This year alone, they've delivered 40 million services
今年だけでも、マタニティヘルスケア、不動産、
10:23
like maternal health care and housing,
救急サービス、ソーラーエネルギーなど
10:26
emergency services, solar energy,
4000万ドルのサービスを生み出しました。
10:28
so that people can have more dignity
それは、人々がもっと尊厳をもって自分の
10:31
in solving their problems.
問題に対処できるようにするためです。
10:33
Patient capital is uncomfortable
「忍耐力のある資本(Patient Capital)」は
10:36
for people searching for simple solutions,
単純な解決や気楽なカテゴリーを
10:38
easy categories,
求める人には合わないものです。
10:40
because we don't see profit as a blunt instrument.
私達は利益を単なる手段とは考えないからです。
10:42
But we find those entrepreneurs
これらの起業家たちは、
10:45
who put people and the planet
利益よりも人類や地球のことを
10:47
before profit.
重視します。
10:49
And ultimately, we want to be part of a movement
私達はムーブメントの一部になりたいと望んでいます。
10:51
that is about measuring impact,
それは、つまり影響を考えること、
10:54
measuring what is most important to us.
もっといえば、私達にとって最も大切なものを考えることです。
10:56
And my dream is we'll have a world one day
私の夢はいつか、
10:59
where we don't just honor those who take money
お金を元手にもっと儲ける人だけではなく、
11:02
and make more money from it,
我々のリソースを使って
11:04
but we find those individuals who take our resources
一番ポジティブな方法で
11:06
and convert it into changing the world
世界を変えることができる人たちを
11:09
in the most positive ways.
見いだして認めるようになることです。
11:11
And it's only when we honor them
そんな人を称賛し、祝福し、
11:13
and celebrate them and give them status
きちんと地位を与えるようになって初めて
11:15
that the world will really change.
世界は本当に変わるでしょう。
11:17
Last May I had this extraordinary 24-hour period
昨年の5月、特別な24時間の間に
11:20
where I saw two visions of the world
世界の2つの姿を立て続けに
11:23
living side-by-side --
目にしました。
11:25
one based on violence
ひとつは暴力に基づき
11:27
and the other on transcendence.
もうひとつは、超越に基づいています。
11:29
I happened to be in Lahore, Pakistan
パキスタンのラホールで
11:31
on the day that two mosques were attacked
自殺テロが2つのモスクを攻撃した日に
11:33
by suicide bombers.
私もラホールにいました。
11:35
And the reason these mosques were attacked
その2つのモスクが攻撃された理由は
11:37
is because the people praying inside
中で祈っていた人たちが、ある特定の
11:39
were from a particular sect of Islam
宗派に属する人々で、原理主義者からは、
11:41
who fundamentalists don't believe are fully Muslim.
本当のムスリムとは認められていないからです。
11:43
And not only did those suicide bombers
この自爆テロで 100 名の命が
11:46
take a hundred lives,
奪われただけでなく、
11:48
but they did more,
それ以上に悪いこともあります。
11:50
because they created more hatred, more rage, more fear
嫌悪や怒り、恐怖や
11:52
and certainly despair.
そして言うまでもなく絶望ももたらしました。
11:55
But less than 24 hours,
それから24時間もしないうち、
11:58
I was 13 miles away from those mosques,
そのモスクから13マイル離れた場所で
12:00
visiting one of our Acumen investees,
私は投資先の一つを訪れていました。
12:03
an incredible man, Jawad Aslam,
ジャワド・アスラムは、没頭する人生を
12:05
who dares to live a life of immersion.
あえて選びとる素晴らしい人です。
12:07
Born and raised in Baltimore,
バルティモアで生まれ育ち、
12:10
he studied real estate, worked in commercial real estate,
不動産を学び、不動産業界で働いていました。
12:12
and after 9/11 decided he was going to Pakistan to make a difference.
9・11の後、変化を起こすために、パキスタンに行くと決めました。
12:15
For two years, he hardly made any money, a tiny stipend,
2年間、ごくわずかな賃金以外、無収入でしたが
12:18
but he apprenticed with this incredible housing developer
驚くべき住宅開発を進める タスニーム・サジキに
12:21
named Tasneem Saddiqui.
弟子入りしました。
12:24
And he had a dream that he would build a housing community
サジキには「忍耐力のある資本」を使って
12:27
on this barren piece of land
この荒れ地にコミュニティー住宅を
12:29
using patient capital,
作るという夢がありました
12:31
but he continued to pay a price.
しかし、お金がかかるばかりでした。
12:33
He stood on moral ground
彼はモラルの観点から考えて、
12:35
and refused to pay bribes.
賄賂を提供することを拒んだのです。
12:37
It took almost two years just to register the land.
土地を登録するだけに2年がかかりました。
12:39
But I saw how the level of moral standard can rise
でも、一人の行動が元になって
12:42
from one person's action.
どんなにモラルが向上したことでしょう。
12:45
Today, 2,000 people live in 300 houses
今では、この美しいコミュニティに
12:48
in this beautiful community.
2000人が300軒の家に住んでいます。
12:51
And there's schools and clinics and shops.
そして、学校や医院、商店もあります。
12:53
But there's only one mosque.
でも、モスクは一つしかありません。
12:56
And so I asked Jawad,
私は、ジャワッドに聞きました。
12:58
"How do you guys navigate? This is a really diverse community.
「この多様なコミュニティーを、どうやって運営していますか?
13:00
Who gets to use the mosque on Fridays?"
金曜日にモスクを使うのは誰ですか?」
13:03
He said, "Long story.
「長い話になります。
13:05
It was hard, it was a difficult road,
たいへん厳しく、困難な道のりを経て
13:07
but ultimately the leaders of the community came together,
でも、突き詰めると、お互い同士しかいないと
13:10
realizing we only have each other.
気付いたコミュニティーのリーダーが集まり、
13:13
And we decided that we would elect
最も尊敬されるイマムを3人
13:16
the three most respected imams,
選出することに決めました。
13:18
and those imams would take turns,
3 人は順番に
13:20
they would rotate who would say Friday prayer.
金曜礼拝で話をします。
13:22
But the whole community,
しかし、コミュニティのすべて、
13:24
all the different sects, including Shi'a and Sunni,
シーア派、スンニ派を含む全ての宗派が
13:26
would sit together and pray."
同時に集まって祈るのです。」
13:29
We need that kind of moral leadership and courage
私達の世界には、こんな道徳的リーダーシップや
13:32
in our worlds.
勇気が必要なのです。
13:34
We face huge issues as a world --
世界的には、大きな問題もあります--
13:36
the financial crisis,
金融危機、
13:39
global warming
地球温暖化、
13:41
and this growing sense of fear and otherness.
増幅する恐怖や異質感。
13:43
And every day we have a choice.
そして、私達は、毎日毎日選択できるのです。
13:46
We can take the easier road,
容易な道を選ぶか、
13:49
the more cynical road,
それとも、本当はそうではなくても、
13:51
which is a road based on
過去に想像されたお互い同士の
13:53
sometimes dreams of a past that never really was,
恐怖のままに距離を置いて、
13:55
a fear of each other,
非難をし合う
13:58
distancing and blame.
ひねくれ者の道か、
14:01
Or we can take the much more difficult path
あるいはさらに困難ではあっても、
14:03
of transformation, transcendence,
変容や超越、
14:06
compassion and love,
共感、愛、信頼性、公平さを
14:08
but also accountability and justice.
探求する道です。
14:10
I had the great honor
児童心理学者のロバート・コールズ氏と
14:14
of working with the child psychologist Dr. Robert Coles,
一緒に働く機会を得たことは、大変栄誉なことでした。
14:16
who stood up for change
彼は、アメリカで市民権運動の時代に
14:19
during the Civil Rights movement in the United States.
変化を求めて立ち上がった一人です。
14:21
And he tells this incredible story
こんな素晴らしい話をしてくれました。
14:24
about working with a little six-year-old girl named Ruby Bridges,
ルビー・ブリッジという6歳の女の子は、南部で最初に
14:26
the first child to desegregate schools in the South --
人種差別を撤廃した学校に通いました。--
14:29
in this case, New Orleans.
ニュー・オリンズでのことです。
14:32
And he said that every day
毎日、この6歳の女の子は
14:34
this six-year-old, dressed in her beautiful dress,
この6歳の女の子は、きれいなドレスを着て
14:36
would walk with real grace
気品をもって通りを歩きます。
14:38
through a phalanx of white people
そこでは、白人が固まって
14:40
screaming angrily, calling her a monster,
怒鳴ったり、彼女をモンスターと呼んだり、
14:43
threatening to poison her --
毒を飲ませるぞと脅したりするのです。--
14:45
distorted faces.
ゆがんだ人々。
14:47
And every day he would watch her,
その子を毎日見ていると、
14:49
and it looked like she was talking to the people.
彼女が人々に何かを話しているみたいに見えたので
14:51
And he would say, "Ruby, what are you saying?"
「ルビー、何を話しているの?」と尋ねました。
14:53
And she'd say, "I'm not talking."
彼女は「何も話してないわよ。」と言うのです。
14:55
And finally he said, "Ruby, I see that you're talking.
やがて彼が、「僕は君が話してるのを見たんだ。
14:57
What are you saying?"
本当は何を言っているのかね?」と聞くと、
14:59
And she said, "Dr. Coles, I am not talking;
「コールズ先生、私は話してるんじゃなくて、
15:01
I'm praying."
祈っているのです。」
15:03
And he said, "Well, what are you praying?"
「じゃあ、何を祈っているのかね?」
15:05
And she said, "I'm praying, 'Father, forgive them,
ルビーは言います「主よ、彼らを許したまえ。
15:08
for they know not what they are doing.'"
自分が何をしているのかわからないだけなのです。」
15:10
At age six,
たった6歳で
15:13
this child was living a life of immersion,
この子は、没頭する人生を生きているのです。
15:15
and her family paid a price for it.
彼女の家族はそのために苦労もしましたが
15:18
But she became part of history
彼女は、歴史の一部になり
15:20
and opened up this idea
誰もが教育を受けられるように
15:22
that all of us should have access to education.
するべきだという考えを発展させました
15:24
My final story is about a young, beautiful man
最後の話は、一人のハンサムな男性についてです。
15:29
named Josephat Byaruhanga,
彼の名前は、ジョセファ・ビャルハンガといいます。
15:31
who was another Acumen Fund fellow,
彼もまた、アキュメンファンドのフェローで、
15:33
who hails from Uganda, a farming community.
ウガンダの農業集落から脱出した一人です。
15:35
And we placed him in a company in Western Kenya,
私達は、200マイル離れたケニヤ西部の
15:38
just 200 miles away.
拠点に彼を配属しました
15:41
And he said to me at the end of his year,
任期が終わる際、彼は私にこう言いました。
15:43
"Jacqueline, it was so humbling,
「ジャックリーン、私の小ささに気づきました。
15:46
because I thought as a farmer and as an African
僕は、農家として、また、アフリカ人として
15:48
I would understand how to transcend culture.
どうやって文化を超越するか理解できると思っていました。
15:51
But especially when I was talking to the African women,
でも、特にアフリカ人の女性と話していると、
15:53
I sometimes made these mistakes --
時々間違いを犯してしまうんです。--
15:56
it was so hard for me to learn how to listen."
人の話が聞けなくなることがあるのです。」
15:58
And he said, "So I conclude that, in many ways,
彼はこう続けました。「結論として、多くの意味で
16:00
leadership is like a panicle of rice.
リーダーシップとは、稲穂のようなものです。
16:02
Because at the height of the season,
最も伸びた時期、最も力を得た時に
16:05
at the height of its powers,
それは美しく、それは緑で、
16:07
it's beautiful, it's green, it nourishes the world,
世界に滋養をいきわたらせます。
16:09
it reaches to the heavens."
そして、天まで届くのです。」
16:12
And he said, "But right before the harvest,
「でも、ちょうど収穫の直前に
16:14
it bends over
感謝と謙虚さで
16:17
with great gratitude and humility
深々とこうべを垂れて
16:19
to touch the earth from where it came."
自分が来たところ、つまり大地に触れようとするのです。」
16:21
We need leaders.
私達には、リーダーが必要です。
16:25
We ourselves need to lead
たとえ大胆と思っても、
16:27
from a place that has the audacity
地球上の男、女、子供の全てが
16:30
to believe we can, ourselves,
公平であるという
16:32
extend the fundamental assumption
基本的な前提を広めていけると
16:34
that all men are created equal
信じる立場から
16:36
to every man, woman and child on this planet.
リードして行かなければなりません。
16:39
And we need to have the humility to recognize
同時に、私達は一人でこれをできないと認識する
16:42
that we cannot do it alone.
謙虚さも持たなくてはなりません。
16:45
Robert Kennedy once said
かつて、ロバート・ケネディは言いました。
16:48
that "few of us have the greatness to bend history itself,
「歴史を書き換えるほどの力を持つ者はほとんどいないが、
16:50
but each of us can work
我々一人ひとりが
16:53
to change a small portion of events."
歴史のほんの一部を変える力をもつ。
16:56
And it is in the total of all those acts
そして、一人ひとりの行いの集積が
16:59
that the history of this generation will be written.
後日、この時代の歴史として書かれることになる。」
17:02
Our lives are so short,
私達の人生は大変短く、
17:05
and our time on this planet
この地球ですごす時間は
17:08
is so precious,
本当に貴重で、
17:10
and all we have is each other.
私達には、お互いしかいないのです。
17:12
So may each of you
だから、皆さんも
17:15
live lives of immersion.
没頭する人生を送ろうと思うかもしれません。
17:17
They won't necessarily be easy lives,
なにも、簡単な人生であるとは限りませんが
17:20
but in the end, it is all that will sustain us.
最後には、そんなことの全てが私たち私達を味方してくれます。
17:23
Thank you.
ありがとうございました。
17:27
(Applause)
(拍手)
17:29
Translated by Miho Miyazaki
Reviewed by Natsuhiko Mizutani

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Jacqueline Novogratz - Social entrepreneur
Jacqueline Novogratz founded and leads Acumen, a nonprofit that takes a businesslike approach to improving the lives of the poor. In her book "The Blue Sweater" she tells stories from the philanthropy, which emphasizes sustainable bottom-up solutions over traditional top-down aid.

Why you should listen

One of the most innovative players shaping philanthropy today, Jacqueline Novogratz is redefining the way problems of poverty can be solved around the world. Drawing on her past experience in banking, microfinance and traditional philanthropy, Novogratz has become a leading proponent for financing entrepreneurs and enterprises that can bring affordable clean water, housing and healthcare, energy, agriculture and education to poor people so that they no longer have to depend on the disappointing results and lack of accountability seen in traditional charity and old-fashioned aid.

Acumen, which she founded in 2001, has an ambitious plan: to change the way the world tackles poverty. Indeed, Acumen has more in common with a venture capital fund than a typical nonprofit. Rather than handing out grants, Acumen invests in early stage companies and organizations that bring critical -- often life-altering -- products and services to the world's poor. Like VCs, Acumen offers not just money, but also infrastructure and management expertise. From drip-irrigation systems in India to high quality solar lighting solutions in East Africa to a low-cost mortgage program in Pakistan, Acumen's portfolio offers important case studies for entrepreneurial efforts aimed at the vastly underserved market of those making less than $4/day.

It's a fascinating model that's shaken up philanthropy and investment communities alike. Acumen manages more than $80 million in investments aimed at serving the poor. And most of their projects deliver stunning, inspiring results. Their success can be traced back to Novogratz herself, who possesses that rarest combination of business savvy and cultural sensitivity. In addition to seeking out sound business models, she places great importance on identifying solutions from within communities rather than imposing them from the outside. “People don't want handouts," Novogratz said at TEDGlobal 2005. "They want to make their own decisions, to solve their own problems.”

In her book, The Blue Sweater, she tells stories from the new philanthropy, which emphasizes sustainable bottom-up solutions over traditional top-down aid.

More profile about the speaker
Jacqueline Novogratz | Speaker | TED.com