sponsored links
TEDSalon London 2010

Noreena Hertz: How to use experts -- and when not to

ノリーナ・ハーツ「どのように専門家を使うか」

November 4, 2010

私たちは重大な決断を毎日行い、その多くを専門家に頼って決定します。しかし、経済学者のノリーナ・ハーツは、専門家に頼りすぎることには限界があり、危険ですらあると言います。彼女は私達に専門性の民主化を始めようと、つまり"外科医やCEO"だけでなく、店頭スタッフにも耳を傾けるよう呼びかけます。

Noreena Hertz - Economist
Noreena Hertz looks at global culture -- financial and otherwise -- using an approach that combines traditional economic analysis with foreign policy trends, psychology, behavioural economics, anthropology, history and sociology. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
It's Monday morning.
月曜日のある朝のことです
00:15
In Washington,
ワシントンでは
00:18
the president of the United States
アメリカの大統領が
00:20
is sitting in the Oval Office,
大統領執務室に座っており
00:22
assessing whether or not
イエメンにいるアルカイダを
00:24
to strike Al Qaeda
攻撃すべきか否か
00:26
in Yemen.
判断しようとしています
00:28
At Number 10 Downing Street,
ダウニング街10番地では
00:30
David Cameron is trying to work out
デイビッド・キャメロンが思案しています
00:32
whether to cut more public sector jobs
景気の二番底をくい止めるために
00:35
in order to stave off a double-dip recession.
公共部門の仕事をもっと減らすべきかと...
00:38
In Madrid, Maria Gonzalez
マドリードでは、マリア・ゴンザレスが
00:41
is standing at the door,
ドアの前に立ち
00:44
listening to her baby crying and crying,
赤ちゃんが泣きわめくのを聞きながら
00:46
trying to work out whether she should let it cry
眠りにつくまで泣かせておくか
00:49
until it falls asleep
抱き上げてあげるべきか
00:52
or pick it up and hold it.
考えています
00:54
And I am sitting by my father's bedside in hospital,
そして私は病院で父のベッドの側に座り
00:57
trying to work out
先ほど医者に言われたままに
01:01
whether I should let him drink
父に1.5リットルの水を
01:03
the one-and-a-half-liter bottle of water
飲ませるべきか悩んでいます
01:05
that his doctors just came in and said,
彼の主治医が先ほど来て言いました
01:08
"You must make him drink today," --
「今日中に飲ませるように」
01:11
my father's been nil by mouth for a week --
父は一週間何も口にしていません
01:13
or whether, by giving him this bottle,
もしこの水を飲ませてしまったら
01:16
I might actually kill him.
私は父を死なせてしまうかもしれません
01:20
We face momentous decisions
私たちは人生において
01:23
with important consequences
重大な結果をもたらす
01:26
throughout our lives,
様々な選択に直面します
01:28
and we have strategies for dealing with these decisions.
決断を下すには様々な戦略があります
01:30
We talk things over with our friends,
友達に相談したり
01:33
we scour the Internet,
インターネットで検索したり
01:36
we search through books.
本から探したり...
01:39
But still,
しかし未だに
01:42
even in this age
グーグルやトリップアドバイザー
01:44
of Google and TripAdvisor
アマゾンレコメンド
01:46
and Amazon Recommends,
などがある現代においても
01:48
it's still experts
それでも専門家に
01:51
that we rely upon most --
私たちは最も信頼を寄せています
01:53
especially when the stakes are high
特にリスクが高く
01:56
and the decision really matters.
重要な選択であるほど頼ります
01:58
Because in a world of data deluge
なぜなら情報が氾濫し
02:01
and extreme complexity,
極度に複雑化された社会においては
02:03
we believe that experts
専門家は私たちよりも
02:06
are more able to process information than we can --
情報処理能力が高いと信じているからです
02:08
that they are able to come to better conclusions
つまり、専門家の方が自分たちよりも
02:11
than we could come to on our own.
良い判断ができると信じているのです
02:14
And in an age
そして今のような
02:17
that is sometimes nowadays frightening
不安になったり
02:19
or confusing,
混乱するような時代では
02:22
we feel reassured
私たちに可能、不可能を
02:24
by the almost parental-like authority
明確に伝える
02:26
of experts
専門家の
02:29
who tell us so clearly what it is
まるで親のような威信によって
02:31
we can and cannot do.
私たちは安心するのです
02:34
But I believe
しかし私は、これは
02:38
that this is a big problem,
大きな問題だと感じています
02:40
a problem with potentially dangerous consequences
危険な結果を招きかねない問題です
02:42
for us as a society,
社会にとって
02:46
as a culture
文化にとって
02:49
and as individuals.
そして個人にとって
02:51
It's not that experts
もちろん専門家が社会に
02:53
have not massively contributed to the world --
多く貢献していないわけではありません
02:55
of course they have.
当然、貢献しています
02:57
The problem lies with us:
問題は私たちにあります
02:59
we've become addicted to experts.
つまり専門家に依存しすぎているのです
03:02
We've become addicted to their certainty,
彼らの自信にあふれ
03:05
their assuredness,
確信を持った
03:08
their definitiveness,
決定的な答えに依存しています
03:10
and in the process,
そしてその過程で
03:12
we have ceded our responsibility,
私たちは考える責任を放棄して
03:14
substituting our intellect
自分の知性や思考力の代わりに
03:16
and our intelligence
専門家の「賢明な言葉」とやらを
03:18
for their supposed words of wisdom.
鵜呑みにします
03:21
We've surrendered our power,
私たちは自分の力を投げ出し
03:24
trading off our discomfort
自分が抱える不確実性による不安を
03:27
with uncertainty
彼らが与えてくれる
03:29
for the illusion of certainty
確実性という幻想に
03:31
that they provide.
置き換えるのです
03:33
This is no exaggeration.
これはけっして大げさではありません
03:36
In a recent experiment,
最近の実験で
03:39
a group of adults
ある成人のグループが
03:41
had their brains scanned in an MRI machine
専門家の話を聞いているところを
03:43
as they were listening to experts speak.
MRIでスキャンしてみたところ
03:46
The results were quite extraordinary.
とても驚くべき結果が出ました
03:50
As they listened to the experts' voices,
彼らが専門家の声を聞き始めると
03:53
the independent decision-making parts of their brains
脳の自己意思決定領域は
03:56
switched off.
オフになったのです
04:01
It literally flat-lined.
文字通りフラット状態でした
04:03
And they listened to whatever the experts said
彼らは専門家の言葉を聞き
04:06
and took their advice, however right or wrong.
正誤を問わず、助言を受け入れました
04:08
But experts do get things wrong.
しかし専門家でも間違いは犯します
04:12
Did you know that studies show
研究によると医者は
04:16
that doctors misdiagnose
10回のうち4回も誤診をすることを
04:19
four times out of 10?
ご存知ですか?
04:22
Did you know
自分で所得申告をすると
04:25
that if you file your tax returns yourself,
統計的に
04:27
you're statistically more likely
より正確に申告できると
04:30
to be filing them correctly
ご存知ですか
04:32
than if you get a tax adviser
あなたの代わりに
04:34
to do it for you?
税理士に頼むよりもです
04:36
And then there's, of course, the example
そして、もちろん私たちが
04:38
that we're all too aware of:
よく知っている事例があります
04:40
financial experts
経済の専門家達があまりにも
04:42
getting it so wrong
大幅な見当違いをしたために
04:44
that we're living through the worst recession
私たちは今
04:46
since the 1930s.
1930年代以来の大恐慌におかれています
04:48
For the sake of our health,
自分達の健康
04:52
our wealth
財産
04:54
and our collective security,
そして安全保障のために
04:56
it's imperative that we keep
自己意思決定する脳の領域を
04:58
the independent decision-making parts of our brains
常に活性化させておくことは
05:01
switched on.
大切です
05:05
And I'm saying this as an economist
これは私が経済学者として
05:07
who, over the past few years,
ここ数年間 人は何を考え
05:09
has focused my research
誰を信頼し、なぜ信頼するか
05:11
on what it is we think
ということに注目し
05:13
and who it is we trust and why,
研究を行った結果です
05:15
but also --
しかし
05:18
and I'm aware of the irony here --
皮肉なのは承知しています
05:20
as an expert myself,
私自身、専門家として
05:22
as a professor,
そして教授、
05:25
as somebody who advises prime ministers,
首相や大企業の首脳陣、
05:27
heads of big companies,
国際機関に
05:30
international organizations,
助言する立場だからです
05:32
but an expert who believes
私は専門家の役割が変わらなければ
05:34
that the role of experts needs to change,
いけないと信じる一人の専門家として
05:36
that we need to become more open-minded,
私達はよりオープンマインドになり、
05:39
more democratic
民主的になるべきで
05:42
and be more open
私たち専門家の見解に
05:44
to people rebelling against
人々が反抗することを
05:46
our points of view.
受け入れるべきだと思うのです
05:48
So in order to help you understand
では皆さんに私の立場を
05:51
where I'm coming from,
理解してもらうため
05:54
let me bring you into my world,
専門家の世界に
05:56
the world of experts.
案内しましょう
05:59
Now there are, of course, exceptions,
もちろんそこには例外があります
06:01
wonderful, civilization-enhancing exceptions.
素晴らしい、文明に貢献するような例外です
06:05
But what my research has shown me
しかし私の研究によると
06:11
is that experts tend on the whole
専門家らは全体的に
06:14
to form very rigid camps,
非常に融通の利かないいくつかの
06:17
that within these camps,
立場に別れ、その中から
06:20
a dominant perspective emerges
有力な説が現れると
06:22
that often silences opposition,
反対説は黙殺されるのです
06:25
that experts move with the prevailing winds,
専門家達はその時主流な流行に沿い
06:28
often hero-worshipping
自分達の仲間内で権威者を
06:31
their own gurus.
英雄扱いするのです
06:34
Alan Greenspan's proclamations
アラン・グリーンスパンの
06:36
that the years of economic growth
経済成長はこの先どんどん
06:38
would go on and on,
続くであろうという見通しは
06:41
not challenged by his peers,
経済危機の後になって初めて
06:44
until after the crisis, of course.
異議を唱える人が出たのです
06:47
You see,
調べると
06:51
we also learn
専門家はその時代の
06:54
that experts are located,
社会的、文化的な
06:56
are governed,
常識によって
06:58
by the social and cultural norms
支配され影響を受ける
07:00
of their times --
ことが分かります
07:03
whether it be the doctors
ビクトリア時代の医者は
07:05
in Victorian England, say,
女性が性的欲望を
07:07
who sent women to asylums
表現すると彼女らを
07:09
for expressing sexual desire,
精神病院へ送り込んだのです
07:12
or the psychiatrists in the United States
また1973年までアメリカの
07:15
who, up until 1973,
精神科医らは同性愛を
07:18
were still categorizing homosexuality
精神疾患として
07:21
as a mental illness.
分類していました
07:25
And what all this means
これらが意味するところは
07:27
is that paradigms
パラダイムシフトが起こるまで
07:29
take far too long to shift,
時間がかかりすぎること
07:31
that complexity and nuance are ignored
そして複雑さや細かいニュアンスは無視され
07:34
and also that money talks --
結局は金が物を言うこと
07:38
because we've all seen the evidence
製薬会社が研究資金を出した
07:41
of pharmaceutical companies
臨床試験で
07:44
funding studies of drugs
一番酷い副作用が
07:46
that conveniently leave out
好都合にも抜けている
07:49
their worst side effects,
という証拠を見てきました
07:51
or studies funded by food companies
食品会社が研究資金を出した研究では
07:54
of their new products,
新製品を発売する際、
07:57
massively exaggerating the health benefits
健康に良いという点をかなり
08:00
of the products they're about to bring by market.
誇張するとようなことも見てきました
08:03
The study showed that food companies exaggerated
食品会社による研究では
08:06
typically seven times more
独立した研究に比べ平均して
08:08
than an independent study.
7倍も効果を誇張するという結果があります
08:11
And we've also got to be aware
そして私達は専門家であれど
08:15
that experts, of course,
間違いを犯すということを
08:17
also make mistakes.
自覚しなければなりません
08:19
They make mistakes every single day --
彼らは毎日のように
08:21
mistakes born out of carelessness.
不注意による間違いを犯します
08:24
A recent study in the Archives of Surgery
最近の外科手術医学文書の研究では
08:27
reported surgeons
外科医が健康な
08:30
removing healthy ovaries,
卵巣を摘出したり、
08:32
operating on the wrong side of the brain,
脳の反対側を手術してしまったり、
08:35
carrying out procedures on the wrong hand,
間違った方の手、肘、目、足
08:38
elbow, eye, foot,
などを手術した例がみつかりました
08:41
and also mistakes born out of thinking errors.
また思考の間違いも起こります
08:44
A common thinking error
例えば放射線科医に
08:47
of radiologists, for example --
よく起こる思考の間違いは
08:49
when they look at CT scans --
CTスキャンを見る時
08:52
is that they're overly influenced
照会した医師が何と言ったか
08:55
by whatever it is
すなわち
08:57
that the referring physician has said
委託した医師が何と
08:59
that he suspects
言ったのかに対し
09:01
the patient's problem to be.
左右されすぎるということです
09:03
So if a radiologist
放射線科医が
09:06
is looking at the scan
肺炎の可能性がある
09:08
of a patient with suspected pneumonia, say,
患者のスキャンを見ているとしましょう
09:10
what happens is that,
何がおこるかというと
09:13
if they see evidence
スキャン上に肺炎の証拠を
09:15
of pneumonia on the scan,
見つけた時点で
09:17
they literally stop looking at it --
見るのを止めてしまうのです
09:20
thereby missing the tumor
そのため3インチ下にある
09:23
sitting three inches below
肺の腫瘍を
09:25
on the patient's lungs.
見逃してしまうのです
09:27
I've shared with you so far
ここまでで私は専門家の
09:31
some insights into the world of experts.
世界についての洞察を紹介しました
09:34
These are, of course,
勿論これらの洞察以外にも
09:37
not the only insights I could share,
様々な事があるけれども
09:39
but I hope they give you a clear sense at least
これらの事例はあなたがたに
09:41
of why we need to stop kowtowing to them,
専門家の意見を盲目的に信じず
09:44
why we need to rebel
疑いを持つ必要性
09:47
and why we need to switch
自己の意志決定能力を
09:49
our independent decision-making capabilities on.
活性化させておく必要性を感じさせるでしょう
09:51
But how can we do this?
それにはどうすればいいのでしょう?
09:55
Well for the sake of time,
時間がないので3つの
09:58
I want to focus on just three strategies.
戦略だけに集中したいと思います
10:01
First, we've got to be ready and willing
まず、私達は専門家に対し
10:06
to take experts on
挑戦をし
10:08
and dispense with this notion of them
同時に彼らを現代の伝道者として
10:11
as modern-day apostles.
扱うのをやめることです
10:14
This doesn't mean having to get a Ph.D.
このために全ての科目で
10:16
in every single subject,
Ph.D.を取得する必要はありません
10:19
you'll be relieved to hear.
ご安心ください
10:21
But it does mean persisting
でも彼らが苛立ちをあらわにしようとも
10:23
in the face of their inevitable annoyance
主張を貫いてください
10:26
when, for example,
例えば
10:29
we want them to explain things to us
私たちは理解できる言葉での
10:31
in language that we can actually understand.
説明を望んでいます
10:33
Why was it that, when I had an operation,
私が手術を受けた後
10:38
my doctor said to me,
医師はなぜ、
10:41
"Beware, Ms. Hertz,
「ハーツさん、ハイパーパイレキシアに
10:43
of hyperpyrexia,"
気をつけてください」と言ったのでしょうか
10:45
when he could have just as easily said,
単に、高い熱に気をつけてください
10:47
"Watch out for a high fever."
と言えばよかったのに?
10:49
You see, being ready to take experts on
専門家に対して
10:53
is about also being willing
挑戦をするということは
10:57
to dig behind their graphs,
彼らのグラフや、方程式、
10:59
their equations, their forecasts,
予報や予言の背後に
11:02
their prophecies,
隠された本意を探し出し
11:04
and being armed with the questions to do that --
そのための質問を用意すること
11:06
questions like:
例えばこのような質問です:
11:09
What are the assumptions that underpin this?
専門家の意見の前提となっているのは何か?
11:11
What is the evidence upon which this is based?
どのような証拠に基づいているのか
11:14
What has your investigation focused on?
何に焦点を置いて調査が進められたのか
11:17
And what has it ignored?
そして何が無視されたのか
11:21
It recently came out
最近の研究では
11:24
that experts trialing drugs
専門家による薬の臨床試験では
11:26
before they come to market
売り出される前に
11:29
typically trial drugs
大抵まず、オスの動物で
11:31
first, primarily on male animals
試され、そして次に
11:34
and then, primarily on men.
男性で試されることが分かりました
11:38
It seems that they've somehow overlooked the fact
まるで世界の半分の人口が
11:41
that over half the world's population are women.
女性であることが忘れられているようです
11:44
And women have drawn the short medical straw
そして女性は医学のハズレくじをひいたのです
11:49
because it now turns out that many of these drugs
なぜならこれらの薬の多くが
11:52
don't work nearly as well on women
女性に対してはあまりよく効かない
11:55
as they do on men --
ことが分かったのです
11:58
and the drugs that do work well work so well
効く薬はといえばあまりにも
12:00
that they're actively harmful for women to take.
よく効きすぎて、女性に害を与えるのです
12:03
Being a rebel is about recognizing
反抗者であるということは
12:06
that experts' assumptions
専門家の作った前提や手法が
12:09
and their methodologies
間違っている可能性が
12:12
can easily be flawed.
あることを認識することです
12:14
Second,
次に、私が「管理された意見の
12:17
we need to create the space
相違」と呼ぶもののための場を
12:19
for what I call "managed dissent."
作る必要があります
12:22
If we are to shift paradigms,
パラダイムシフトを起こすためには
12:25
if we are to make breakthroughs,
打開策を打ち出すためには
12:27
if we are to destroy myths,
そして神話を崩壊させるには
12:29
we need to create an environment
専門家の知識を
12:32
in which expert ideas are battling it out,
戦わせる環境を創ることが必要です
12:34
in which we're bringing in
そこには新しく、多様で、
12:37
new, diverse, discordant, heretical views
対立し、異端的な意見を
12:39
into the discussion,
臆することなく議論に
12:42
fearlessly,
取り込み
12:44
in the knowledge that progress comes about,
人類の進展は
12:46
not only from the creation of ideas,
アイデアの創造のみでなく
12:49
but also from their destruction --
破壊からも起こることを念頭に置きながら
12:53
and also from the knowledge
そしてこのように
12:56
that, by surrounding ourselves
多様で、対立した、
12:59
by divergent, discordant,
異端的な意見で
13:01
heretical views.
自分達を取り囲むと
13:04
All the research now shows us
私達はいっそう賢くなれる
13:06
that this actually makes us smarter.
という研究結果がでています
13:08
Encouraging dissent is a rebellious notion
意見の相違を促すのは反逆的なことです
13:13
because it goes against our very instincts,
なぜなら それはすでに
13:16
which are to surround ourselves
自分が正しいと信じることに沿う
13:19
with opinions and advice
意見やアドバイスで自分を
13:22
that we already believe
取り囲もうとする私達の
13:24
or want to be true.
本能に逆らうことだからです
13:27
And that's why I talk about the need
積極的に意見の相違を
13:29
to actively manage dissent.
管理する必要があるのはそのためです
13:31
Google CEO Eric Schmidt
グーグル社CEOのエリック•シュミッドは
13:35
is a practical practitioner
この考えを実際に日々
13:37
of this philosophy.
実行している人です
13:40
In meetings, he looks out for the person in the room --
会議では腕を組み、困惑した
13:42
arms crossed, looking a bit bemused --
表情の人を見つけ出し
13:45
and draws them into the discussion,
実際にその人が異なる
13:48
trying to see if they indeed are
意見の持ち主かどうか
13:51
the person with a different opinion,
議論に引っ張り込み
13:54
so that they have dissent within the room.
意見の相違を促すのです
13:57
Managing dissent
意見の相違を管理する
14:00
is about recognizing the value
ということは不一致、不和、
14:02
of disagreement, discord
差異の価値を認識
14:05
and difference.
することです
14:08
But we need to go even further.
しかし更に一歩踏み出し
14:10
We need to fundamentally redefine
専門家とは何かを新たに
14:13
who it is that experts are.
定義し直す必要があります
14:16
The conventional notion
従来専門家とは
14:20
is that experts are people
高度な学位や
14:22
with advanced degrees,
派手な肩書き、
14:25
fancy titles, diplomas,
ディプロマなどを持ったり
14:27
best-selling books --
ベストセラー本を書いた
14:30
high-status individuals.
地位の高い人々のことです
14:32
But just imagine
もしこのような
14:34
if we were to junk
専門性の定義を
14:36
this notion of expertise
エリート主義集団として
14:38
as some sort of elite cadre
切り捨て、代わりに
14:42
and instead embrace the notion
民主的な専門性を
14:46
of democratized expertise --
受け入れることをご想像ください
14:49
whereby expertise was not just the preserve
そこでは専門性は外科医やCEOだけの
14:52
of surgeons and CEO's,
領域ではなく、
14:55
but also shop-girls -- yeah.
店頭販売員のものでもあるーそう、
14:57
Best Buy,
例えば家電量販店
15:01
the consumer electronics company,
ベスト・バイでは
15:03
gets all its employees --
従業員全員にー
15:05
the cleaners, the shop assistants,
掃除人、販売員、
15:08
the people in the back office,
バックオフィスの人達、
15:10
not just its forecasting team --
予測チームだけではなく
15:13
to place bets, yes bets,
全員に掛けをさせます
15:15
on things like whether or not
そう、掛けです
15:18
a product is going to sell well before Christmas,
ある商品がクリスマス前に売れるかどうか
15:20
on whether customers' new ideas
客の新しいアイデアを
15:23
are going to be or should be taken on by the company,
取り入れるべきかどうか
15:26
on whether a project
あるプロジェクトが予定通りに
15:30
will come in on time.
実現するかどうかなどにです
15:32
By leveraging
社内の専門性を
15:34
and by embracing
活用し採用することで
15:36
the expertise within the company,
ベスト・バイは
15:38
Best Buy was able to discover, for example,
これから中国に
15:40
that the store that it was going to open in China --
オープンする大型店舗の
15:43
its big, grand store --
開店が予定通り
15:47
was not going to open on time.
実現しないことを発見しました
15:49
Because when it asked its staff,
なぜならスタッフ全員に
15:52
all its staff, to place their bets
店が予定通り開くか
15:54
on whether they thought the store would open on time or not,
掛けをさせたところ
15:57
a group from the finance department
経理部門のグループが
16:01
placed all their chips
全員予定通りにいかないと
16:04
on that not happening.
掛けたのです
16:06
It turned out that they were aware,
彼らは会社の中で唯一
16:09
as no one else within the company was,
ある技術的な問題に
16:11
of a technological blip
気づいていたのです
16:14
that neither the forecasting experts,
予測の専門家や
16:16
nor the experts on the ground in China,
中国にいた現場の専門家さえ
16:18
were even aware of.
知らなかったことにです
16:21
The strategies
今夜お話した
16:25
that I have discussed this evening --
これらの戦略はー
16:27
embracing dissent,
意見の相違を受け入れ
16:30
taking experts on,
専門家に挑戦をし
16:32
democratizing expertise,
専門性の民主化をはかる
16:34
rebellious strategies --
といった反抗的な戦略は
16:36
are strategies that I think
混沌とし複雑で
16:39
would serve us all well to embrace
難しい時代における
16:41
as we try to deal with the challenges
様々な問題に対抗するために
16:43
of these very confusing, complex,
役に立つ戦略であると
16:46
difficult times.
私は思います
16:49
For if we keep
なぜなら私達が
16:51
our independent decision-making part
自己意思決定のための
16:53
of our brains switched on,
脳の領域を活性化させておき
16:55
if we challenge experts, if we're skeptical,
専門家に挑戦をし、疑い、
16:58
if we devolve authority,
権威を譲り、
17:01
if we are rebellious,
反抗し、
17:03
but also
なおかつ
17:05
if we become much more comfortable
ニュアンスや不確実さ、
17:07
with nuance,
疑問にもっと
17:09
uncertainty and doubt,
慣れ親しみ、
17:11
and if we allow our experts
そして専門家もこういった言葉で
17:14
to express themselves
表現をすることを
17:17
using those terms too,
容認できれば
17:19
we will set ourselves up
21世紀の
17:21
much better
様々な問題に対して
17:23
for the challenges of the 21st century.
対してよりよく準備ができます
17:25
For now, more than ever,
今は かつてないほど
17:29
is not the time
盲目的に従い
17:32
to be blindly following,
盲目的に受け入れ
17:34
blindly accepting,
盲目的に信頼する
17:36
blindly trusting.
時代ではありません
17:38
Now is the time to face the world
今こそ 目をしっかり開けて
17:41
with eyes wide open --
世間に向き合う時なのです
17:44
yes, using experts
もちろん専門家を使って
17:47
to help us figure things out, for sure --
問題解決に助けてもらいながら
17:49
I don't want to completely do myself out of a job here --
自分の仕事を完全に無くすつもりはないのでー
17:52
but being aware
しかし彼らの限界と
17:56
of their limitations
勿論、自分達の
17:58
and, of course, also our own.
限界も認識しながら
18:01
Thank you.
ありがとうございます
18:05
(Applause)
(拍手)
18:07
Translator:Madoka Suganuma
Reviewer:Kayo Mizutani

sponsored links

Noreena Hertz - Economist
Noreena Hertz looks at global culture -- financial and otherwise -- using an approach that combines traditional economic analysis with foreign policy trends, psychology, behavioural economics, anthropology, history and sociology.

Why you should listen

For more than two decades, Noreena Hertz’s economic predictions have been accurate and ahead of the curve. In her recent book The Silent Takeover, Hertz predicted that unregulated markets and massive financial institutions would have serious global consequences while her 2005 book IOU: The Debt Threat predicted the 2008 financial crisis.

An influential economist on the international stage, Hertz also played an influential role in the development of (RED), an innovative commercial model to raise money for people with AIDS in Africa, having inspired Bono (co-founder of the project) with her writings.

Her work is considered to provide a much needed blueprint for rethinking economics and corporate strategy. She is the Duisenberg Professor of Globalization, Sustainability and Finance based at Duisenberg School of Finance, RSM, Erasmus University and University of Cambridge. She is also a Fellow of University College London.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.