sponsored links
TEDxRainier

Rob Harmon: How the market can keep streams flowing

ロブ・ハーモン「どのように市場作用が水流を維持できるのか」

November 4, 2010

過剰摂取により水源や河川が枯渇してしまっていることに対して、ロブ.ハーモンは市場機能を奇抜に活用することで水流を取り戻しました。農家やビール工場は、Prickly Pear Creekの数百年前の興味ある話をもとに彼らの運命をを見出すのです。

Rob Harmon - Natural resources expert
Rob Harmon is an expert on energy and natural resources policy -- looking at smart ways to manage carbon, water and the energy we use every day. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
This is a river.
これは川です
00:18
This is a stream.
これは小川です
00:20
This is a river.
これも川です
00:23
This is happening all over the country.
こんな状況が国中のいたるところで見られます
00:25
There are tens of thousands of miles
何千マイルも干上がってしまった
00:28
of dewatered streams in the United States.
川が米国にはたくさん存在します
00:30
On this map,
この地図上で
00:33
the colored areas represent water conflicts.
色のついた場所は水問題を抱えています
00:35
Similar problems are emerging in the east as well.
類似の問題が東側でも発生しています
00:39
The reasons vary state to state,
州ごとに原因は違いますが
00:42
but mostly in the details.
大体は細かな点です
00:44
There are 4,000 miles of dewatered streams
モンタナだけでも約6400kmもの川が
00:46
in Montana alone.
干上がってしまっています
00:49
They would ordinarily support fish and other wildlife.
通常であれば魚やその他の野生動物のためになるでしょう
00:52
They're the veins of the ecosystem,
川は生態系の静脈部ですが
00:56
and they're often empty veins.
それが今はしばしば空の状態なのです
00:58
I want to tell you the story
私はこのような小川の
01:02
of just one of these streams
話の一つをしたいと思います
01:04
because it's an archetype for the larger story.
なぜならそれが大きな物語の原型だからです
01:06
This is Prickly Pear Creek.
これはプリクリー・ペア川です
01:09
It runs through a populated area
イースト・ヘレナから人口密度の
01:11
from East Helena to Lake Helena.
高い地域を抜けヘレナ湖へと流れてます
01:13
It supports wild fish
カットスロートトラウト―
01:16
including cutthroat, brown
ブラウントラウトやレインボートラウトの
01:18
and rainbow trout.
生息地域です
01:20
Nearly every year
100年以上もの間
01:22
for more than a hundred years,
ほぼ毎年 夏になると
01:24
it's looked like this in the summer.
こんな状態になってしまいます
01:27
How did we get here?
どうやってこうなったのでしょうか?
01:30
Well, it started back in the late 1800s
さて もとは1800年代後半の
01:32
when people started settling in places like Montana.
人々がモンタナのような場所に移住した頃です
01:35
In short, there was a lot of water
つまり 水はたくさんあったが
01:39
and there weren't very many people.
人間はは多くはいませんでした
01:41
But as more people showed up wanting water,
しかし人口と水資源需要の
01:44
the folks who were there first got a little concerned,
増加に伴い 地元住民はちょっと心配になりました。
01:46
and in 1865, Montana passed its first water law.
そして1865年モンタナで初めての水に関する法律が採択されました
01:49
It basically said, everybody near the stream
基本的には小川周辺住民は小川の
01:53
can share in the stream.
水を共有できるというものです
01:56
Oddly, a lot of people showed up wanting to share the stream,
しかしがら、数多くの人が現れ、水資源の共用を
01:58
and the folks who were there first
望んだので、もともとの地元住民は
02:01
got concerned enough to bring out their lawyers.
困惑して、弁護士に相談が必要になりました
02:03
There were precedent-setting suits
1870年と1872年に
02:05
in 1870 and 1872,
判例となる裁判がありました
02:07
both involving Prickly Pear Creek.
双方ともプリクリー・ペア川関連です
02:09
And in 1921,
そして1921年 モンタナの
02:11
the Montana Supreme Court
最高裁は
02:13
ruled in a case involving Prickly Pear
プリクリー・ペア川の裁判において、
02:15
that the folks who were there first
最初に住んでいた地元住民が
02:18
had the first, or "senior water rights."
第一の もしくは 高位の水利権を有すると判決を下しました
02:20
These senior water rights are key.
この高位水利権が重要となってきます
02:24
The problem is that all over the west now
今日の西部中での問題は
02:27
it looks like this.
こんな感じです
02:29
Some of these creeks
これらの小川の中には
02:31
have claims for 50 to 100 times more water
実際の流水量のの50倍から100倍の
02:33
than is actually in the stream.
需要があるものもあります
02:35
And the senior water rights holders,
そして高位水利権者は
02:38
if they don't use their water right,
もしその水利権を利用しなければ それに付随する
02:40
they risk losing their water right,
経済的な価値と共に
02:43
along with the economic value that goes with it.
水利権自体が失われる危険性があります
02:45
So they have no incentive to conserve.
したがって、彼らは節水することにはインセンティブを持たないのです
02:48
So it's not just about the number of people;
つまり単に人口的な問題ではなくて
02:52
the system itself creates a disincentive to conserve
利用しなければ、水利権自体を失ってしまうので
02:55
because you can lose your water right if you don't use it.
システム自体が節水への阻害要因となっているのです
02:58
So after decades of lawsuits
140年間の現実と
03:03
and 140 years, now, of experience,
何十年もの訴訟の後に
03:05
we still have this.
未だこの状態は続いています
03:07
It's a broken system.
このシステムには欠陥があるのです
03:10
There's a disincentive to conserve,
水源保全への阻害要因があります
03:12
because, if you don't use your water right,
水利権を行使してなければ
03:14
you can lose your water right.
水利権は失われてしまうからです
03:16
And I'm sure you all know, this has created significant conflicts
そしてご存知の通り 環境コミュニティーと
03:18
between the agricultural and environmental communities.
農業産業との間で重大な衝突を生み出しました
03:21
Okay. Now I'm going to change gears here.
オッケー それではここでギアを変えましょう
03:25
Most of you will be happy to know
みなさんは残りのプレゼンが
03:28
that the rest of the presentation's free,
無料と知ればうれしいでしょう
03:30
and some of you'll be happy to know that it involves beer.
ビールが登場すれば喜ぶ方もいるでしょう
03:33
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:36
There's another thing happening around the country,
もう一つ国中で起こっていることがあります
03:39
which is that companies are starting to get concerned
企業が水の足跡について
03:41
about their water footprint.
配慮するようになってきたことです
03:43
They're concerned about securing an adequate supply of water,
十分な水資源供給の確保に配慮し
03:46
they're trying to be really efficient with their water use,
水資源の真に効率的な利用に努め
03:49
and they're concerned about how their water use
企業の水使用がブランドに
03:52
affects the image of their brand.
どのよう影響するか興味を示しています
03:54
Well, it's a national problem,
まぁ これは一国の問題ですが
03:57
but I'm going to tell you another story from Montana,
モンタナの別の話をしましょう
03:59
and it involves beer.
これはビールにまつわるものです
04:01
I bet you didn't know, it takes about 5 pints of water
ビール約500mlを生産するのに水は2.5リットル
04:03
to make a pint of beer.
必要です 知らなかったでしょう
04:06
If you include all the drain,
排水も含めると ビールを
04:08
it takes more than a hundred pints of water to make a pint of beer.
約500ml作るのに水47リットル以上が必要です
04:10
Now the brewers in Montana
モンタナのビール製造業者は
04:13
have already done a lot
水の消費量削減の為に
04:15
to reduce their water consumption,
すでにいろいろな手段をを行っていますが
04:17
but they still use millions of gallons of water.
すれでも膨大な水を使用しています
04:19
I mean, there's water in beer.
もちろん ビールには水が使われています
04:21
So what can they do
そこで生態系に重大な影響を
04:25
about this remaining water footprint
及ぼす残りの水の足跡に
04:28
that can have serious effects
ついて製造業者側は
04:31
on the ecosystem?
何ができるでしょうか?
04:33
These ecosystems are really important
生態系はモンタナの業者にも
04:35
to the Montana brewers and their customers.
消費者にも非常に重要です
04:37
After all, there's a strong correlation
結局 水と釣りの間には
04:39
between water and fishing,
強力な相関関係があるのです
04:41
and for some, there's a strong correlation
それと 見方によっては
04:43
between fishing and beer.
釣りとビールの間にもです
04:45
(Laughter)
(笑)
04:47
So the Montana brewers and their customers are concerned,
そこで心配するモンタナの業者と消費者は
04:49
and they're looking for some way to address the problem.
問題解決への道を求めています
04:52
So how can they address this remaining water footprint?
さて 残りの水の足跡にどう対処できるでしょう?
04:55
Remember Prickly Pear.
プリクリー・ペア川を思い出してください
04:58
Up until now,
今の今まで
05:00
business water stewardship
ビジネス上の水管理は
05:02
has been limited to measuring and reducing,
測定と削減に限定されていました そこで
05:04
and we're suggesting that the next step
我々は次のステップとして
05:08
is to restore.
復元を提案しています
05:10
Remember Prickly Pear.
プリクリー・ペア川を思い出してください
05:12
It's a broken system.
欠陥のあるシステムです
05:14
You've got a disincentive to conserve,
行使しないと失効してしまう権利は
05:16
because if you don't use your water right, you risk losing your water right.
自然保護への阻害要因を生みました
05:18
Well, we decided to connect these two worlds --
そこで二つの世界を繋ぐことにしました
05:21
the world of the companies
水の足跡がある
05:23
with their water footprints
企業側の世界と
05:25
and the world of the farmers
上級流水権のある
05:27
with their senior water rights on these creeks.
農民たちの世界です
05:29
In some states,
いくつかの州では
05:31
senior water rights holders
上級流水権保持者は
05:33
can leave their water in-stream
権利と水を法的に
05:35
while legally protecting it from others
保持したまま水を小川に
05:38
and maintaining their water right.
流すことができます
05:41
After all,
つまりは
05:44
it is their water right,
流水権は彼らのもので
05:46
and if they want to use that water right
小川に暮す魚を助けるために
05:48
to help the fish grow in the stream,
流水権を使いたいとあらば
05:50
it's their right to do so.
そうする権利を有するということです
05:52
But they have no incentive to do so.
しかしこんなことをする誘因はありません
05:55
So, working with local water trusts,
そこで地元の水処理事業者と連携し
05:59
we created an incentive to do so.
そうさせる誘因を作り出しました
06:02
We pay them to leave their water in-stream.
お金を払い彼らに水を排出してもらいました
06:05
That's what's happening here.
それがここで起こっていることです
06:08
This individual has made the choice
この人は選択をして水の流用を
06:10
and is closing this water diversion,
止めることで小川の水を
06:13
leaving the water in the stream.
そのままにしています
06:15
He doesn't lose the water right,
彼が流水権を失うことはないし
06:17
he just chooses to apply that right,
陸の代わりに小川に対して
06:19
or some portion of it,
権利の全て または
06:22
to the stream, instead of to the land.
一部を行使する選択をするのです
06:24
Because he's the senior water rights holder,
彼は上級流水権保持者で
06:27
he can protect the water from other users in the stream.
小川の他の利用者から水を守ることができるのです
06:29
Okay?
いいですか?
06:33
He gets paid to leave the water in the stream.
川の水を放置することで報酬を得られます
06:35
This guy's measuring the water
この男性は小川に
06:38
that this leaves in the stream.
残された水を測定しています
06:40
We then take the measured water,
次に計測されて水をくみ上げ
06:43
we divide it into thousand-gallon increments.
増加を1000分の1ガロン単位で分割します
06:46
Each increment gets a serial number and a certificate,
各増分にシリアル番号と証明書が出され
06:49
and then the brewers and others
醸造側や他の利用者が
06:52
buy those certificates
荒廃した生態系に
06:54
as a way to return water
水を戻すために
06:56
to these degraded ecosystems.
これらを購入します
06:58
The brewers pay
醸造側は小川に水を
07:00
to restore water to the stream.
復元するために代金を支払うのです
07:02
It provides a simple, inexpensive
荒れた生態系に水を
07:05
and measurable way
取り戻す安価で簡単な
07:07
to return water to these degraded ecosystems,
そして測定可能な方法を提供する一方
07:09
while giving farmers an economic choice
農民たちには経済的選択肢を与え
07:12
and giving businesses concerned about their water footprints
水の足跡を気に掛ける企業には
07:15
an easy way to deal with them.
簡単な対応策を提供できます
07:18
After 140 years of conflict
140年の衝突と100年の
07:20
and 100 years of dry streams,
小川の枯渇 訴訟や規制が
07:23
a circumstance that litigation and regulation
解決できなかった
07:27
has not solved,
状況を経験した我々は市場を通じ
07:29
we put together a market-based,
意識的な買い手と売り手を
07:32
willing buyer, willing seller solution --
束ねることで訴訟を
07:34
a solution that does not require litigation.
必要としない解決方法を実現しています
07:36
It's about giving
農村部で水の足跡に
07:41
folks concerned about their water footprints
配慮する人々に荒廃した生態系 つまり
07:43
a real opportunity
深刻に水を必要とする
07:46
to put water where it's critically needed,
地域に水を復元可能な
07:48
into these degraded ecosystems,
本物の機会を提供することであり
07:50
while at the same time
それと同時に
07:53
providing farmers
農民たちに水資源の
07:55
a meaningful economic choice
消費方法に関する意義ある
07:57
about how their water is used.
経済的選択権を与えているのです
07:59
These transactions create allies, not enemies.
この取引は敵対心でなく同盟関係を生みます
08:01
They connect people rather than dividing them.
人々を分断せず結束させるのです
08:04
And they provide needed economic support for rural communities.
そして農村部に必要な経済的援助を提供します
08:06
And most importantly, it's working.
もっとも重要なことは 機能していることです
08:09
We've returned more than four billion gallons of water
荒廃した生態系に今までに
08:12
to degraded ecosystems.
約15000m3の水を復元しています
08:14
We've connected senior water rights holders
上級流水権保持者とモンタナの
08:16
with brewers in Montana,
醸造業者をはじめ ホテルや
08:18
with hotels and tea companies in Oregon
オレゴンの紅茶専門店 加えて南西部で
08:20
and with high-tech companies that use a lot of water in the Southwest.
水を大量消費するハイテク企業をまとめてきました
08:23
And when we make these connections,
そして こういった関連を築き上げれば
08:26
we can and we do
この干上がった川を
08:29
turn this into this.
この水で潤う川に戻すことができます
08:31
Thank you very much.
ご清聴ありがとうございました
08:35
(Applause)
(拍手)
08:37
Translator:Takahiro Shimpo
Reviewer:Takehisa Yoshikawa

sponsored links

Rob Harmon - Natural resources expert
Rob Harmon is an expert on energy and natural resources policy -- looking at smart ways to manage carbon, water and the energy we use every day.

Why you should listen

Taking the true measure of our environmental footprint is something that Rob Harmon has been doing for years. Starting as an energy auditor in Massachusetts, Harmon went on to manage an international marketing effort in the wind energy industry and, in 2000, develop and launch the first carbon calculator on the Internet.

Harmon joined Bonneville Environmental Foundation (BEF) in 1999, and is credited with developing their Green Tag program. In 2004, he was awarded the national Green Power Pioneer Award for his introduction of the retail Green Tag (Renewable Energy Certificates) and his ongoing efforts to build a thriving and credible Green Tag market in the United States. He also conceptualized and directed the development of BEF's national Solar 4R Schools program. His latest venture is the creation of BEF's Water Restoration Certificate business line, which utilizes voluntary markets to restore critically de-watered ecosystems. He recently contributed chapters to the book Voluntary Carbon Markets: A Business Guide to What They Are and How They Work. Rob left BEF in November 2010 to explore his next venture, ConvenientOpportunities.com.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.