17:44
TED2011

Janna Levin: The sound the universe makes

ジャナ・レヴィン:宇宙が奏でる音

Filmed:

私たちは、宇宙が静かなものだと考えがちです。しかし物理学者のジャナは、宇宙にはサウンドトラックがあると言います。それは(ブラックホールが空間をドラムのように叩くように)宇宙で起きる劇的なイベントの記録による協奏曲で、私たちの意識を広げてくれる音の体験です

- Physicist
Janna Levin is a professor of physics and astronomy at Barnard, where she studies the early universe, chaos, and black holes. She's the author of “How the Universe Got Its Spots" and the novel “A Madman Dreams of Turing Machines.” Full bio

I want to ask you all to consider for a second
改めて振り返れば 現在に至るまで
00:15
the very simple fact
この宇宙について私たちが
00:18
that, by far,
知っていることの多くは
00:20
most of what we know about the universe
宇宙からの光を観測することで
00:22
comes to us from light.
確かめられてきました
00:24
We can stand on the Earth and look up at the night sky
夜空を見上げれば肉眼でも
00:26
and see stars with our bare eyes.
沢山の星を観ることができますし
00:29
The Sun burns our peripheral vision.
昼間に太陽を観れば目を痛めてしまいます
00:32
We see light reflected off the Moon.
月が見えるのも反射光のおかげです
00:34
And in the time since Galileo pointed that rudimentary telescope
ガリレオが初歩的な望遠鏡を天体へと向けて以来
00:37
at the celestial bodies,
我々の頭の中にある宇宙は
00:41
the known universe has come to us through light,
悠久の時をかけて地球まで届いた
00:44
across vast eras in cosmic history.
光によって作られてきたのです
00:47
And with all of our modern telescopes,
今や 現代の望遠鏡を使うことで
00:50
we've been able to collect
私たちは 息をのむほど美しい
00:53
this stunning silent movie of the universe --
宇宙の「無音の映像」を集めてきました
00:55
these series of snapshots
こうして集められた画像は
00:58
that go all the way back to the Big Bang.
ビッグバンまでの宇宙の歴史を遡るアルバムです
01:01
And yet, the universe is not a silent movie
しかし 宇宙には実は音があり
01:04
because the universe isn't silent.
「無音の映像」などではないのです
01:07
I'd like to convince you
今から皆さんに 宇宙には
01:09
that the universe has a soundtrack
サウンドトラックがあるということを知ってもらいましょう
01:11
and that soundtrack is played on space itself,
その宇宙の音楽は 空間そのものによって奏でられます
01:13
because space can wobble like a drum.
空間はドラムの様に震え
01:17
It can ring out a kind of recording
宇宙のあちこちで起きる
01:20
throughout the universe
劇的なイベントの記録を
01:23
of some of the most dramatic events as they unfold.
音にして響かせるのです
01:25
Now we'd like to be able to add
それでは この宇宙の音を
01:28
to a kind of glorious visual composition
私たちが集めてきた
01:31
that we have of the universe --
壮大な宇宙の映像に
01:34
a sonic composition.
加えてみたいと思います
01:36
And while we've never heard the sounds from space,
これまで空間の奏でる音を聴いてこなかった私たちは
01:38
we really should, in the next few years,
これから数年のうちにもっと
01:42
start to turn up the volume on what's going on out there.
空間のボリュームを上げた方がいいと思いますよ
01:45
So in this ambition
ここで私たちは
01:47
to capture songs from the universe,
宇宙の音を聴こうという試みの中で
01:49
we turn our focus
ブラックホールと
01:52
to black holes and the promise they have,
その性質に注目しました
01:54
because black holes can bang on space-time
なぜならブラックホールはハンマーがドラムを叩くように
01:56
like mallets on a drum
時空を叩き
01:59
and have a very characteristic song,
非常に面白い音を聴かせてくれるからです
02:01
which I'd like to play for you -- some of our predictions
これから私たちが予測した
02:03
for what that song will be like.
その音を再現してみせます
02:06
Now black holes are dark against a dark sky.
ブラックホールは 暗い宇宙の中の暗い物体です
02:08
We can't see them directly.
直接目で見ることはできません
02:11
They're not brought to us with light, at least not directly.
少なくとも 光を用いて直接の観測はできません
02:13
We can see them indirectly,
あくまで間接的に観測を行います
02:16
because black holes wreak havoc on their environment.
ブラックホールは星を破壊し
02:18
They destroy stars around them.
デブリをまき散らし
02:21
They churn up debris in their surroundings.
周囲をめちゃくちゃにするのでその存在がわかるのです
02:23
But they won't come to us directly through light.
しかし 光で直接観測することはできません
02:26
We might one day see a shadow
いつか明るく輝く背景の中で
02:28
a black hole can cast on a very bright background,
ブラックホールの影を見ることができるかもしれませんが
02:30
but we haven't yet.
それもまだです
02:33
And yet black holes may be heard
とは言え 見えないブラックホールも
02:35
even if they're not seen,
聴くことなら可能かもしれません
02:37
and that's because they bang on space-time like a drum.
空間をドラムのように叩いているんですからね
02:39
Now we owe the idea that space can ring like a drum
そもそも空間がドラムのように鳴るというアイデアは
02:43
to Albert Einstein -- to whom we owe so much.
我らがアルバート・アインシュタインに負っています
02:46
Einstein realized that if space were empty,
アインシュタインは もし空間が空っぽだったなら
02:49
if the universe were empty,
もし宇宙が空っぽだったなら
02:51
it would be like this picture,
その構造はこの様になると考えました
02:53
except for maybe without the helpful grid drawn on it.
格子線はもちろん実際にはありませんよ
02:56
But if we were freely falling through the space,
しかし もし私たちが空間を自由落下しているとしたら
02:59
even without this helpful grid,
こんな格子が描かれていなくても
03:02
we might be able to paint it ourselves,
自分で簡単に描くことができるでしょう
03:04
because we would notice that we traveled along straight lines,
なぜなら 落下運動は宇宙の中を
03:06
undeflected straight paths
歪みの無い直線に沿って進む
03:09
through the universe.
運動だからです
03:11
Einstein also realized --
ここからが要点ですよ
03:13
and this is the real meat of the matter --
アインシュタインはまた
03:15
that if you put energy or mass in the universe,
宇宙空間にエネルギーや質量が置かれた時
03:17
it would curve space,
空間は曲げられると考えました
03:20
and a freely falling object
何かが そうですね例えば太陽の
03:22
would pass by, let's say, the Sun
すぐそばを自由落下していたとすると
03:24
and it would be deflected
その何かは
03:26
along the natural curves in the space.
宇宙の湾曲に沿って運動することになります
03:28
It was Einstein's great general theory of relativity.
これがアインシュタインの偉大なる一般相対性理論です
03:30
Now even light will be bent by those paths.
光すらこの歪みによって曲げられます
03:34
And you can be bent so much
そして 地球の運動が太陽に曲げられ
03:37
that you're caught in orbit around the Sun,
ついに太陽の周りに捉えられる
03:39
as the Earth is, or the Moon around the Earth.
あるいは月が地球の周りに捉えられる
03:41
These are the natural curves in space.
これも空間の湾曲です
03:43
What Einstein did not realize
ただアインシュタインが気付かなかったのは
03:46
was that, if you took our Sun
もし太陽を
03:48
and you crushed it down to six kilometers --
直径6kmの小ささまで押しつぶしたとしたら
03:50
so you took a million times the mass of the Earth
つまり 地球の100万倍の質量を
03:53
and you crushed it to six kilometers across,
6kmの小ささまで押しつぶしたとしたら
03:56
you would make a black hole,
ブラックホールができるということです
03:59
an object so dense
あまりにも密度が高く
04:01
that if light veered too close, it would never escape --
光さえ近づきすぎれば二度と逃げることはできない
04:03
a dark shadow against the universe.
宇宙の中の 暗い影です
04:06
It wasn't Einstein who realized this,
このことに気付いたのはアインシュタインではなく
04:09
it was Karl Schwarzschild
カール・シュヴァルツシルトでした
04:11
who was a German Jew in World War I --
彼はユダヤ系ドイツ人で第一次大戦時には
04:13
joined the German army already an accomplished scientist,
ドイツ軍に加わりロシアとの戦線で活動していた
04:15
working on the Russian front.
既に周囲に認められた科学者でした
04:18
I like to imagine Schwarzschild in the war in the trenches
私はよく シュヴァルツシルトが塹壕で
04:21
calculating ballistic trajectories for cannon fire,
大砲の弾道軌道を計算しながら
04:24
and then, in between,
その合間に
04:28
calculating Einstein's equations --
アインシュタインの方程式を計算しているという絵を
04:30
as you do in the trenches.
想像することがあります
04:32
And he was reading Einstein's recently published
アインシュタインが発表した一般相対性理論に
04:34
general theory of relativity,
素早く目を通し
04:36
and he was thrilled by this theory.
その理論に興奮したシュヴァルツシルトは
04:38
And he quickly surmised
すぐにその方程式のとんでもない解を
04:40
an exact mathematical solution
見つけました
04:42
that described something very extraordinary:
その解が示すものは 異常なものでした
04:44
curves so strong
空間そのものが
04:46
that space would rain down into them,
深い穴の淵に向かって
04:48
space itself would curve like a waterfall
滝のように吸い込まれていき
04:51
flowing down the throat of a hole.
光さえも逃げることのできない
04:53
And even light could not escape this current.
空間の湾曲です
04:55
Light would be dragged down the hole
光も他のあらゆるものと同様
04:58
as everything else would be,
穴へと引きずり込まれ
05:00
and all that would be left would be a shadow.
後には影しか残りません
05:02
Now he wrote to Einstein,
彼はアインシュタインへ向けて
05:04
and he said, "As you will see,
「ご覧の通り 戦争が
05:06
the war has been kind to me enough.
銃撃戦を除けばとてもよくしてくれたおかげで
05:08
Despite the heavy gunfire,
日常の煩わしさから逃れ あなたの着想を
05:11
I've been able to get away from it all
深く考える時間がとれました」
05:14
and walk through the land of your ideas."
と手紙を書き アインシュタインは
05:16
And Einstein was very impressed with his exact solution,
彼の算出した正確な解に感銘を受けました
05:19
and I should hope also the dedication of the scientist.
科学者としての熱心さにも感銘を受けたのでしょう
05:22
This is the hardworking scientist under harsh conditions.
アインシュタインは翌週には
05:25
And he took Schwarzschild's idea
シュヴァルツシルトの着想を
05:28
to the Prussian Academy of Sciences the next week.
プロイセン科学アカデミーに持って行きました
05:30
But Einstein always thought black holes were a mathematical oddity.
しかしアインシュタインは ブラックホールは数学的な特異解でしかなく
05:33
He did not believe they existed in nature.
自然界に実際に存在するものではないと考えていました
05:36
He thought nature would protect us from their formation.
彼は自然が我々を守ってくれると信じていたのです
05:39
It was decades
それが実際に存在する天体だとわかるまでは
05:42
before the term "black hole" was coined
ブラックホールという言葉が
05:44
and people realized
提唱されてから
05:46
that black holes are real astrophysical objects --
何十年もかかりました
05:48
in fact they're the death state
ブラックホールは
05:50
of very massive stars
非常に質量の大きな星が
05:52
that collapse catastrophically
その寿命を迎える最後の段階で
05:54
at the end of their lifetime.
潰れて死んだ状態なのです
05:56
Now our Sun will not collapse to a black hole.
太陽はブラックホールにはなりません
05:58
It's actually not massive enough.
質量が足りませんから
06:00
But if we did a little thought experiment --
しかし アインシュタインが好んでそうしたように
06:02
as Einstein was very fond of doing --
私たちも思考実験を
06:04
we could imagine
行うことはできます
06:06
putting the Sun crushed down to six kilometers,
太陽が直径6kmまで潰れたとしましょう
06:08
and putting a tiny little Earth around it in orbit,
そして小さな地球がその周りを回っています
06:11
maybe 30 kilometers
ブラックホール化した太陽から
06:14
outside of the black-hole sun.
30kmほど離れた所でしょうか
06:16
And it would be self-illuminated,
この地球は自ら光りを放っています
06:19
because now the Sun's gone, we have no other source of light --
太陽はもう光を放たず 他に光源がないと困りますから
06:21
so let's make our little Earth self-illuminated.
地球は光を放つ恒星だとしましょう
06:23
And you would realize you could put the Earth in a happy orbit
すると このぺしゃんこのブラックホールから
06:26
even 30 km
30kmしか離れていない
06:28
outside of this crushed black hole.
軌道でも 地球は公転を続けます
06:30
This crushed black hole
この潰れたブラックホールは
06:33
actually would fit inside Manhattan, more or less.
マンハッタンにすっぽり入る程の大きさです
06:35
It might spill off into the Hudson a little bit
地球を飲み込む時にはハドソン川に
06:37
before it destroyed the Earth.
はみでることもあるかもしれませんが
06:39
But basically that's what we're talking about.
とにかくそのような
06:41
We're talking about an object that you could crush down
マンハッタンの半分の大きさに収まる程の
06:43
to half the square area of Manhattan.
物体についての思考実験です
06:45
So we move this Earth very close --
ではここに地球を近づけてみましょう
06:47
30 kilometers outside --
30kmまで近づけます
06:49
and we notice it's perfectly fine orbiting around the black hole.
地球は異常なくブラックホールの周りを公転しています
06:51
There's a sort of myth
「ブラックホールは
06:54
that black holes devour everything in the universe,
宇宙の全てを吸い込んでしまう」という俗説がありますが
06:56
but you actually have to get very close to fall in.
実際に吸い込まれるにはかなり近づく必要があります
06:58
But what's very impressive is that, from our vantage point,
ここで面白いのは 宇宙に浮かぶ観察者の目には
07:01
we can always see the Earth.
常に地球が映るということです
07:04
It cannot hide behind the black hole.
地球はブラックホールの裏に隠れることはできません
07:06
The light from the Earth, some of it falls in,
光の一部は吸い込まれますが
07:08
but some of it gets lensed around and brought back to us.
一部は屈折し 回り込むからです
07:10
So you can't hide anything behind a black hole.
ブラックホールの裏に隠れることはできません
07:13
If this were Battlestar Galactica
もし「宇宙空母ギャラクティカ」で
07:15
and you're fighting the Cylons,
サイロンと戦っているシーンだとしたら
07:17
don't hide behind the black hole.
「ブラックホールに隠れるな!
07:19
They can see you.
奴らに見つかるぞ!」といったところでしょうか
07:21
Now, our Sun will not collapse to a black hole --
改めて 太陽はブラックホールにはなりません
07:24
it's not massive enough --
質量が足りないのです
07:26
but there are tens of thousands of black holes in our galaxy.
しかし この銀河には何万ものブラックホールがあります
07:28
And if one were to eclipse the Milky Way,
もしそのひとつが天の川にかかれば
07:32
this is what it would look like.
このように見えることでしょう
07:35
We would see a shadow of that black hole
天の川の数千億という星と
07:37
against the hundred billion stars
輝く塵の川の中に
07:40
in the Milky Way Galaxy and its luminous dust lanes.
ブラックホールの影を見ることができます
07:42
And if we were to fall towards this black hole,
もしそのブラックホールに近づいていくとすれば
07:45
we would see all of that light lensed around it,
その背後から曲げられた全ての光を見ることができます
07:48
and we could even start to cross into that shadow
しかし ひとたび影の領域に入ると
07:51
and really not notice that anything dramatic had happened.
もう何も観察することはできなくなります
07:54
It would be bad if we tried to fire our rockets and get out of there
そこからは どう逃げようと頑張っても
07:57
because we couldn't,
無駄な抵抗でしかありません
08:00
anymore than light can escape.
もはや光ですら逃れることはできないのです
08:02
But even though the black hole is dark from the outside,
しかし ブラックホールは外から見て暗いと言っても
08:04
it's not dark on the inside,
その中は暗くありません
08:07
because all of the light from the galaxy can fall in behind us.
銀河からのあらゆる光がブラックホールへと吸い込まれるからです
08:09
And even though, due to a relativistic effect known as time dilation,
そして 相対論の効果として知られる時間遅延によって
08:12
our clocks would seem to slow down
ブラックホールに吸い込まれる私たちの
08:16
relative to galactic time,
時計の進みは遅くなりますが
08:19
it would look as though the evolution of the galaxy
私たちの目には 銀河の展開は
08:22
had been sped up and shot at us,
早送りで飛び込んでくるようになります
08:25
right before we were crushed to death by the black hole.
それも観察者が潰される瞬間までですが
08:27
It would be like a near-death experience
こんな風にトンネルを抜けると光が見えるなんて
08:30
where you see the light at the end of the tunnel,
臨死体験みたいですね
08:32
but it's a total death experience.
まあこれは完全な死の体験なのですが
08:34
(Laughter)
(笑)
08:36
And there's no way of telling anybody
そしてこのトンネルを抜けた先の光がどんなものか
08:38
about the light at the end of the tunnel.
伝えられる人は存在しません
08:40
Now we've never seen a shadow like this of a black hole,
私たちはブラックホールの影を見た事がありません
08:42
but black holes can be heard,
しかし その姿は見えなくても
08:45
even if they're not seen.
聴く事はできる筈です
08:47
Imagine now taking an astrophysically realistic situation --
ふたつのブラックホールが長い間一緒に過ごしているという
08:49
imagine two black holes that have lived a long life together.
物理的には十分可能性のある状況を想像してみてください
08:53
Maybe they started as stars
そのとちらもが
08:56
and collapsed to two black holes --
ブラックホールになってしまったかつての星です
08:58
each one 10 times the mass of the Sun.
両方とも太陽の10倍の質量と考えてください
09:00
So now we're going to crush them down to 60 kilometers across.
つまり 今度は60kmの直径まで潰されているという状況です
09:03
They can be spinning
それらはお互いの周りを
09:06
hundreds of times a second.
毎秒数百回というスピードで周り
09:08
At the end of their lives,
最後にはほとんど光の早さで
09:10
they're going around each other very near the speed of light.
互いに回り合うようになります
09:12
So they're crossing thousands of kilometers
つまり ほんの一瞬で数千キロも
09:15
in a fraction of a second,
運動することになります
09:17
and as they do so, they not only curve space,
その間 周りの空間を歪ませるだけでなく
09:19
but they leave behind in their wake
通る道筋の空間を鳴り響かせるのです
09:21
a ringing of space,
文字通り
09:23
an actual wave on space-time.
時空の波です
09:25
Space squeezes and stretches
空間は ブラックホールから
09:27
as it emanates out from these black holes
拡散しながら 同時に伸び縮みし
09:29
banging on the universe.
宇宙を激しく叩きます
09:31
And they travel out into the cosmos
そして その波は
09:33
at the speed of light.
光の速さで伝わっていきます
09:35
This computer simulation
こちらのシミュレーションは
09:37
is due to a relativity group at NASA Goddard.
NASAのゴッダード宇宙研究所のグループのものです
09:39
It took almost 30 years for anyone in the world to crack this problem.
30年程かけてこの問題を解いたグループの
09:42
This was one of the groups.
ひとつがここのグループです
09:45
It shows two black holes in orbit around each other,
ご覧頂いているのは お互いの周りを回るブラックホールです
09:47
again, with these helpfully painted curves.
図示されているのは空間の歪みです
09:49
And if you can see -- it's kind of faint --
そして 見えるでしょうか
09:51
but if you can see the red waves emanating out,
かなり薄いのですが 発散する赤い波が見えるなら
09:54
those are the gravitational waves.
それが重力波です
09:57
They're literally the sounds of space ringing,
これは文字通り空間の響きのことで
09:59
and they will travel out from these black holes at the speed of light
光の速さでブラックホールから発散し
10:02
as they ring down and coalesce
鳴り響きながら
10:04
to one spinning, quiet black hole
結局は回転するブラックホールと
10:07
at the end of the day.
融合します
10:09
If you were standing near enough,
もし近づくことができたなら
10:11
your ear would resonate
みなさんの耳も空間の
10:13
with the squeezing and stretching of space.
伸び縮みに共鳴するはずですよ
10:15
You would literally hear the sound.
まあ もちろんその時には
10:17
Now of course, your head would be squeezed and stretched unhelpfully,
みなさんの頭も伸び縮みしている訳ですから
10:19
so you might have trouble understanding what's going on.
何が起こっているのかはわからないだろうと思いますが
10:23
But I'd like to play for you
では その音はどんなものなのか
10:26
the sound that we predict.
私たちの予測はこの様なものです
10:28
This is from my group --
これは私たちのグループのものです
10:30
a slightly less glamorous computer modeling.
ちょっと豪華さの劣るモデルですが
10:32
Imagine a lighter black hole
比較的軽いブラックホールが
10:35
falling into a very heavy black hole.
非常に重いブラックホールに吸い込まれる場面です
10:37
The sound you're hearing
この音は
10:39
is the light black hole banging on space
軽い方のブラックホールが重い方に近づくにつれ
10:41
each time it gets close.
空間を激しく叩く音です
10:44
If it gets far away, it's a little too quiet.
遠く離れたところにある時は
10:46
But it comes in like a mallet,
とても静かです
10:49
and it literally cracks space,
しかしだんだんと空間を叩き始め
10:51
wobbling it like a drum.
ドラムのように震わせていきます
10:53
And we can predict what the sound will be.
その音は予測することができます
10:55
We know that, as it falls in,
吸い込まれるにつれ
10:58
it gets faster and it gets louder.
だんだんと速く そして大きな音になるでしょう
11:00
And eventually,
そして最後には
11:02
we're going to hear the little guy just fall into the bigger guy.
小さい方が大きい方に飲み込まれる音が聴こえます
11:04
(Thumping)
(音)
11:07
Then it's gone.
これが最後です
11:24
Now I've never heard it that loud -- it's actually more dramatic.
私もこんなに大音量で聴くのは初めてで感動しました
11:26
At home it sounds kind of anticlimactic.
家で聴く時は拍子抜けするようなものなんですよ
11:28
It's sort of like ding, ding, ding.
ding, ding, dingという感じで
11:30
This is another sound from my group.
これはまた私たちのグループの予測した音です
11:32
No, I'm not showing you any images,
あ 画像はありません
11:36
because black holes don't leave behind
ブラックホールは目に見える形の
11:38
helpful trails of ink,
痕跡を残しませんからね
11:40
and space is not painted,
そして空間も塗られていません
11:42
showing you the curves.
歪みもわからないですね
11:44
But if you were to float by in space on a space holiday
ですが宇宙の休日にその辺りを漂っていたら
11:46
and you heard this,
こんな音が聴こえるはずです
11:48
you want to get moving.
遠くへ逃げたくなりますね
11:50
(Laughter)
(笑)
11:52
Want to get away from the sound.
この騒音から離れたいところです
11:54
Both black holes are moving.
ブラックホールは運動を続け
11:56
Both black holes are getting closer together.
ふたつのブラックホールは互いに近づいていきます
11:58
In this case, they're both wobbling quite a lot.
ずいぶん震えています
12:01
And then they're going to merge.
そして遂に融合します
12:04
(Thumping)
(音)
12:06
Now it's gone.
お終いです
12:14
Now that chirp is very characteristic of black holes merging --
この細かな振動が ブラックホールが融合する時の
12:16
that it chirps up at the end.
特徴的な音です
12:19
Now that's our prediction
これが 私たちが宇宙の映像から
12:22
for what we'll see.
予測した音になります
12:24
Luckily we're at this safe distance in Long Beach, California.
幸運にも私たちは遠く離れたカリフォルニアのロング・ビーチで
12:26
And surely, somewhere in the universe
安穏としていますが こうしている間にも
12:28
two black holes have merged.
この宇宙でふたつのブラックホールが
12:30
And surely, the space around us
融合したことでしょう
12:32
is ringing
その「音」は
12:34
after traveling maybe a million light years, or a million years,
100万光年の距離を旅し 100万年の時を経て
12:36
at the speed of light to get to us.
私たちのすぐ側の空間にも届くでしょう
12:39
But the sound is too quiet for any of us to ever hear.
しかしその音は本当にかすかで 未だに聴いた人はいません
12:42
There are very industrious experiments being built on Earth --
そこで人類は地球の表面に
12:45
one called LIGO --
観測装置を作りました
12:48
which will detect deviations
そのうちひとつは「LIGO」と呼ばれ
12:50
in the squeezing and stretching of space
4kmに渡る空間の伸び縮みを
12:52
at less than the fraction of a nucleus of an atom
原子核のサイズ以下の正確さで
12:55
over four kilometers.
探知できます
12:58
It's a remarkably ambitious experiment,
非常に野心的な実験装置です
13:00
and it's going to be at advanced sensitivity
この正確さも数年のうちにさらに向上するでしょう
13:02
within the next few years -- to pick this up.
この他にも 空間の挙動を調べる「LISA」という
13:04
There's also a mission proposed for space,
ミッションが提唱されており 10年以内には
13:07
which hopefully will launch in the next ten years,
スタートする見込みです
13:09
called LISA.
LISAは 太陽の何百万倍の
13:11
And LISA will be able to see super-massive black holes --
さらに何十億倍という大きな質量を持った
13:13
black holes millions or billions of times
ブラックホールを観測できると
13:16
the mass of the Sun.
考えられています
13:19
In this Hubble image, we see two galaxies.
このハッブル望遠鏡の映像の中に ふたつの銀河が見えます
13:21
They look like they're frozen in some embrace.
このふたつの銀河は 互いに抱き合ったまま止まっているように見えます
13:24
And each one probably harbors
そして そのどちらもの中心に
13:27
a super-massive black hole at its core.
非常に質量の大きなブラックホールがあると考えられています
13:29
But they're not frozen;
しかし この銀河は止まってはいません
13:32
they're actually merging.
合体しようとしているのです
13:34
These two black holes are colliding,
ふたつのブラックホールは衝突し
13:36
and they will merge over a billion-year time scale.
何十億年という時間スケールで合体しようとしているのです
13:38
It's beyond our human perception
これは人間が音を聴く時の時間感覚を
13:41
to pick up a song of that duration.
遥かに超えています
13:43
But LISA could see the final stages
しかし LISAはこのふたつのブラックホールの
13:46
of two super-massive black holes
最期の音を 歴史を先回りして計算し
13:48
earlier in the universe's history,
予測することができます
13:50
the last 15 minutes before they fall together.
ブラックホールがひとつになる最期の15分を予測できるのです
13:52
And it's not just black holes,
さらに この装置で観測できるのは
13:55
but it's also any big disturbance in the universe --
大きな空間の歪みであればブラックホールに限りません
13:57
and the biggest of them all is the Big Bang.
中でも一番大きなものと言えばビッグバンです
14:00
When that expression was coined, it was derisive --
「ビッグバン」という言葉はもともと冗談で生まれました
14:02
like, "Oh, who would believe in a Big Bang?"
「宇宙が『でっかいバーン!』で始まったとでも?」が始まりです
14:05
But now it actually might be more technically accurate
ですが この表現はかなったものかもしれません
14:07
because it might bang.
実際にバーンという音が
14:09
It might make a sound.
鳴ったかもしれませんからね
14:11
This animation from my friends at Proton Studios
Proton Studiosの友人が作ったこのアニメーションは
14:13
shows looking at the Big Bang from the outside.
ビッグバンを外から観た様子を示しています
14:16
We don't ever want to do that actually. We want to be inside the universe
実際にこんな観察は無理ですよ 私たちは宇宙の中にいて
14:18
because there's no such thing as standing outside the universe.
「宇宙の外から観る」ことなんてありませんから
14:21
So imagine you're inside the Big Bang.
ではあなたがビッグバンの中にいると想像してください
14:24
It's everywhere, it's all around you,
どこもかしこも 辺り全てビッグバンです
14:26
and the space is wobbling chaotically.
空間はぐちゃぐちゃに揺れています
14:28
Fourteen billion years pass
その時以来140億年が経ちましたが
14:30
and this song is still ringing all around us.
ビッグバンの音は未だに私たちの周りに残っています
14:32
Galaxies form,
銀河が生まれ
14:35
and generations of stars form in those galaxies,
大量の星が銀河の中で生まれました
14:37
and around one star,
そのうち一つの星
14:39
at least one star,
すくなくとも一つの星は
14:41
is a habitable planet.
人類が住むことができる星です
14:43
And here we are frantically building these experiments,
その星で私たちは夢中になってこんな観察を行って
14:45
doing these calculations, writing these computer codes.
計算して コンピュータのコードを書いています
14:48
Imagine a billion years ago,
今から10臆年前に ふたつのブラックホールが
14:50
two black holes collided.
衝突したと想像してみてください
14:53
That song has been ringing through space
その音は今に至るまで空間を震わせています
14:55
for all that time.
私たちには未だに
14:57
We weren't even here.
聴こえない音です
14:59
It gets closer and closer --
時は経ち 4万年前
15:01
40,000 years ago, we're still doing cave paintings.
私たちは洞窟に絵を描いていました
15:03
It's like hurry, build your instruments.
「早く、観測装置を作ってください!」
15:05
It's getting closer and closer, and in 20 ...
さらに時は経ちます そして この先20年かそこらで
15:07
whatever year it will be
人類の作る観測装置は
15:10
when our detectors are finally at advanced sensitivity --
より高い性能を持つことでしょう
15:12
we'll build them, we'll turn on the machines
そんな装置ができて 宇宙の音を観測することができた時
15:14
and, bang, we'll catch it -- the first song from space.
宇宙の最初の音を観測することができた時
15:16
If it was the Big Bang we were going to pick up,
本当にビッグバンを観測することができた時
15:19
it would sound like this.
その音はこのような音でしょう
15:21
(Static) It's a terrible sound.
不快な音です
15:23
It's literally the definition of noise.
これは文字通り「ノイズ」の定義で
15:26
It's white noise; it's such a chaotic ringing.
ホワイトノイズとも呼ばれる不規則な振動です
15:28
But it's around us everywhere, presumably,
この音は 私たちの周囲に溢れていると推測されています
15:30
if it hasn't been wiped out
そして宇宙の他の作用によって
15:33
by some other process in the universe.
かき消されていないと考えられています
15:35
And if we pick it up, it will be music to our ears
そう思うと もしこの音を拾えたなら
15:37
because it will be the quiet echo
そのノイズはきっと音楽として聴こえるでしょう
15:40
of that moment of our creation,
なぜならこのノイズこそ全ての宇宙の
15:42
of our observable universe.
創造のこだまなのですから
15:44
So within the next few years,
これから数年のうちに 宇宙の
15:46
we'll be able to turn up the soundtrack a little bit,
「音量」を上げることが可能になるでしょう
15:48
render the universe in audio.
そして もし原始の宇宙の音を
15:51
But if we detect those earliest moments,
探知することができた時
15:54
it'll bring us that much closer
全ての始まりビッグバンについて
15:57
to an understanding of the Big Bang,
もっと理解が進むはずです
15:59
which brings us that much closer
人類が悩み続けてきた とらえどころのない
16:01
to asking some of the hardest, most elusive, questions.
非常に難しい疑問の答えにつながるかもしれません
16:04
If we run the movie of our universe backwards,
宇宙の歴史を逆再生すれば
16:07
we know that there was a Big Bang in our past,
遠い過去にビッグバンが起きたことがわかります
16:10
and we might even hear the cacophonous sound of it,
その不協和音だって いつか聴くことができると思います
16:13
but was our Big Bang the only Big Bang?
しかし それはただひとつのビッグバンだったのでしょうか?
16:17
I mean we have to ask, has it happened before?
ここで考えるのをやめてはいけません それ以前にもあったのか?
16:19
Will it happen again?
これから先もまた起きるのか?
16:22
I mean, in the spirit of rising to TED's challenge
TEDの 不思議を突き詰める精神において
16:24
to reignite wonder,
少なくともトーク最期のこの瞬間には
16:27
we can ask questions, at least for this last minute,
永遠に答えが出ないかもしれない問いかけだって
16:29
that honestly might evade us forever.
追い続けてみましょう
16:32
But we have to ask:
問いかけなくてはいけません
16:34
Is it possible that our universe
この宇宙は 壮大な歴史の
16:36
is just a plume off of some greater history?
ほんのごく一部でしかないのでしょうか?
16:38
Or, is it possible that we're just a branch off of a multiverse --
この宇宙は 沢山の宇宙のうちのひとつでしかないのでしょうか?
16:41
each branch with its own Big Bang in its past --
それぞれの宇宙にはビッグバンがあり
16:45
maybe some of them with black holes playing drums,
そのうちいくつかの宇宙ではブラックホールが
16:49
maybe some without --
鳴り響き
16:51
maybe some with sentient life, and maybe some without --
そのうちいくつかの宇宙では感覚のある生物が生まれ
16:53
not in our past, not in our future,
過去にでも 未来ででもなく
16:56
but somehow fundamentally connected to us?
今 私たちと何かをシェアしているのでしょうか?
16:58
So we have to wonder, if there is a multiverse,
考えなくてはいけません いくつもの宇宙があるとしたら
17:01
in some other patch of that multiverse,
そのたくさんの宇宙のどこかに
17:03
are there creatures?
生命が存在するでしょうか?
17:05
Here's my multiverse creatures.
ここ地球には私たち生命がいます
17:07
Are there other creatures in the multiverse,
多くの宇宙のどこかに生命がいるでしょうか?
17:09
wondering about us
私たちのことを考えているでしょうか
17:11
and wondering about their own origins?
彼ら自身の起源について考えているでしょうか
17:13
And if they are,
もしそうならば
17:16
I can imagine them as we are,
私はきっと 彼らも同じく
17:18
calculating, writing computer code,
計算をし コンピュータコードを書き
17:21
building instruments,
宇宙のかすかな音を聴くために
17:23
trying to detect that faintest sound
観測装置を作り 自分たちの起源について
17:25
of their origins
そして宇宙に存在する
17:28
and wondering who else is out there.
他の生命について考えていることと思います
17:30
Thank you. Thank you.
ありがとうございました
17:32
(Applause)
(拍手)
17:35
Translated by Tatsuaki Iriya
Reviewed by Lily Yichen Shi

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Janna Levin - Physicist
Janna Levin is a professor of physics and astronomy at Barnard, where she studies the early universe, chaos, and black holes. She's the author of “How the Universe Got Its Spots" and the novel “A Madman Dreams of Turing Machines.”

Why you should listen

Janna Levin is a Professor of Physics and Astronomy at Barnard College of Columbia University. Her scientific research concerns the early universe, chaos and black holes. Her second book – a novel, A Madman Dreams of Turing Machines – won the PEN/Bingham Fellowship for Writers and was a runner-up for the PEN/Hemingway award for "a distinguished book of first fiction." She is the author of the popular science book, How the Universe Got Its Spots: Diary of a Finite Time in a Finite Space.

She holds a BA in Physics and Astronomy from Barnard College with a concentration in Philosophy, and a PhD from MIT in Physics. She has worked at the Center for Particle Astrophysics (CfPA) at the University of California, Berkeley before moving to the UK where she worked at Cambridge University in the Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics (DAMTP). Just before returning to New York, she was the first scientist-in-residence at the Ruskin School of Fine Art and Drawing at Oxford with an award from the National Endowment for Science, Technology, and Arts (NESTA).

Listen to a Q&A with another TED speaker, Krista Tippett -- where they talk math and faith and truth and more ...

More profile about the speaker
Janna Levin | Speaker | TED.com