19:29
TED2011

Morgan Spurlock: The greatest TED Talk ever sold

モーガン・スパーロック:究極のTEDトークを売る企画について

Filmed:

映画制作者のモーガン・スパーロックが、目につきにくいが影響力のあるブランドマーケティングの世界に飛び込み、粘り強さとユーモアを発揮してスポンサーシップについての映画をスポンサーの資金提供だけで制作しようと試みます。(もちろんこのトークのステージ題名のスポンサーも獲得。誰がいくら支払ってスポンサーになったかはお楽しみに。)

- Filmmaker
Morgan Spurlock makes documentary film and TV that is personal, political -- and, above all, deeply empathetic. Full bio

I have spent the past few years
ここ数年の間
00:15
putting myself into situations
非常に困難なうえ
00:18
that are usually very difficult
いくらか危険な状況に
00:20
and at the same time somewhat dangerous.
身をおいてきました
00:22
I went to prison --
刑務所―
00:26
difficult.
困難
00:28
I worked in a coal mine --
炭鉱労働―
00:30
dangerous.
危険
00:33
I filmed in war zones --
戦場での撮影―
00:35
difficult and dangerous.
困難かつ危険
00:37
And I spent 30 days eating nothing but this --
そしてこればかり30日間食べたときは
00:39
fun in the beginning,
最初は楽しかったのが
00:43
little difficult in the middle, very dangerous in the end.
途中で困難に 最後には非常に危険となりました
00:45
In fact, most of my career,
実際キャリアのほとんどを
00:49
I've been immersing myself
見たところヒドイ状況に
00:51
into seemingly horrible situations
自ら首を突っ込んできました
00:53
for the whole goal of trying
これもすべて関心を引き
00:56
to examine societal issues
興味深く見せるやり方で
00:58
in a way that make them engaging, that make them interesting,
社会問題を考察するためです
01:00
that hopefully break them down in a way
分かりやすくして 観客が
01:03
that make them entertaining and accessible to an audience.
手軽に受け入れ楽しめればと思っています
01:05
So when I knew I was coming here
そこでTEDでブランドや
01:08
to do a TED Talk that was going to look at the world of branding and sponsorship,
スポンサーシップについて話すとなったとき
01:10
I knew I would want to do something a little different.
少し違うことをしたいと思いました
01:13
So as some of you may or may not have heard,
知っている人もいるかもしれませんが
01:15
a couple weeks ago, I took out an ad on eBay.
数週間前にEbayで広告を出し
01:18
I sent out some Facebook messages,
Facebookのメッセージを発信し
01:21
some Twitter messages,
Twitterでつぶやいて
01:24
and I gave people the opportunity to buy the naming rights
この2011年TEDトークの
01:26
to my 2011 TED Talk.
命名権を競売にかけました
01:28
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:30
That's right, some lucky individual, corporation,
そうです 個人・企業・営利・非営利
01:32
for-profit or non-profit,
幸運な誰かが
01:35
was going to get the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity --
一生一度のチャンスを掴み―
01:37
because I'm sure Chris Anderson will never let it happen again --
クリスが二度と許さないと思うので―
01:39
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:41
to buy the naming rights
貴方が今観ているトークの
01:43
to the talk you're watching right now,
命名権を買うのです
01:45
that at the time didn't have a title, didn't really have a lot of content
その時点では題名もなく 内容もほとんどなく
01:47
and didn't really give much hint
実際何について話すのか
01:50
as to what the subject matter would actually be.
よく分からない状態のトークです
01:52
So what you were getting was this:
つまり購入するのは
01:55
Your name here presents:
(貴方の名前)提供:
01:57
My TED Talk that you have no idea what the subject is
主題が何か見当もつかず
01:59
and, depending on the content, could ultimately blow up in your face,
内容によっては顔に泥を塗り 特に
02:02
especially if I make you or your company look stupid for doing it.
賛同したことで恥をかくかもしれない僕のTEDトーク
02:05
But that being said,
とは言え
02:08
it's a very good media opportunity.
絶好の宣伝チャンス
02:10
(Laughter)
(笑)
02:12
You know how many people watch these TED Talks?
一体何人がTEDトークを見てると思います?
02:18
It's a lot.
かなりの人です
02:21
That's just a working title, by the way.
ちなみにこれはただの仮題名です
02:24
(Laughter)
(笑)
02:26
So even with that caveat,
だから懸念があっても 誰かが権利を
02:28
I knew that someone would buy the naming rights.
買うと分かっていました
02:31
Now if you'd have asked me that a year ago,
1年前に同じ事を聞かれたら
02:33
I wouldn't have been able to tell you that with any certainty.
自信がなかったでしょう
02:35
But in the new project that I'm working on, my new film,
でも今取り組んでいる映画で
02:37
we examine the world of marketing, advertising.
マーケティングや広告業界を検証しています
02:39
And as I said earlier,
前に言ったように ここ数年
02:42
I put myself in some pretty horrible situations over the years,
自分を悲惨な状況に置いてきていますが
02:44
but nothing could prepare me, nothing could ready me,
今までの経験など
02:47
for anything as difficult
この人たちとの困難で危険な
02:50
or as dangerous
交渉には
02:53
as going into the rooms with these guys.
全く役に立ちませんでした
02:55
(Laughter)
(笑)(広告・PR代理店などのロゴ)
02:59
You see, I had this idea for a movie.
僕には映画のアイデアがありました
03:02
(Video) Morgan Spurlock: What I want to do is make a film
(ビデオ)M・スパーロック:マーケティングと
03:05
all about product placement, marketing and advertising,
プロダクトプレイスメントと広告に関する映画を
03:07
where the entire film is funded
マーケティングとプロダクト・プレイスメントと
03:10
by product placement, marketing and advertising.
広告だけの資金で作りたいんです
03:12
So the movie will be called "The Greatest Movie Ever Sold."
映画の題名は「The Greatest Movie Ever Sold」
03:14
So what happens in "The Greatest Movie Ever Sold,"
この「究極の映画企画」には
03:17
is that everything from top to bottom, from start to finish,
上から下まで 最初から最後まで
03:19
is branded from beginning to end --
ブランド名が入っていて
03:22
from the above-the-title sponsor that you'll see in the movie,
映画のアバンタイトルの提供も
03:24
which is brand X.
なんらかのブランドで
03:26
Now this brand, the Qualcomm Stadium,
例えばクアルコム・スタジアムや
03:28
the Staples Center ...
ステイプルズ・センターのブランドは
03:30
these people will be married to the film in perpetuity -- forever.
ずっと永遠に映画に残るわけです
03:32
And so the film explores this whole idea -- (Michael Kassan: It's redundant.)
映画でこの概念の検討を― (M・カッサン:重複)
03:35
It's what? (MK: It's redundant.) In perpetuity, forever?
は? (MK:重複) 「ずっと永遠に」が?
03:37
I'm a redundant person. (MK: I'm just saying.)
しつこい人間なんで (MK:言っただけ)
03:40
That was more for emphasis.
あれは強調するつもりで
03:42
It was, "In perpetuity. Forever."
「ずっと残る 永遠に」でした
03:44
But not only are we going to have the brand X title sponsor,
タイトルに提供をつけるだけでなく
03:46
but we're going to make sure we sell out every category we can in the film.
映画に出てくるもの全て売ります
03:48
So maybe we sell a shoe and it becomes the greatest shoe you ever wore ...
例えば靴に提供をつけて「究極の靴」にしたり
03:50
the greatest car you ever drove from "The Greatest Movie Ever Sold,"
「究極の映画」に出てくる「究極の車」
03:53
the greatest drink you've ever had, courtesy of "The Greatest Movie Ever Sold."
「究極の映画」提供の「究極のドリンク」
03:56
Xavier Kochhar: So the idea is,
X・コーチャー:つまりブランドは
03:59
beyond just showing that brands are a part of your life,
生活の一部だと伝えるだけでなく
04:01
but actually get them to finance the film? (MS: Get them to finance the film.)
映画自体も提供してると? (MS:映画も提供させます)
04:03
MS: And actually we show the whole process of how does it work.
MS:実際にそのしくみも見せます
04:06
The goal of this whole film is transparency.
この映画のテーマは透明性です
04:08
You're going to see the whole thing take place in this movie.
全過程を映画の中で見るわけです
04:10
So that's the whole concept,
それが最初から最後までの
04:12
the whole film, start to finish.
映画全体の構想です
04:14
And I would love for CEG to help make it happen.
是非CEGに実現して頂きたいです
04:16
Robert Friedman: You know it's funny,
R・フリードマン:面白いのは
04:18
because when I first hear it,
ぱっと聞いた感じでは
04:20
it is the ultimate respect
これは観客に対する
04:22
for an audience.
最高の敬意だってことだ
04:24
Guy: I don't know how receptive
男:大衆が受け入れるかどうか
04:26
people are going to be to it, though.
分かりませんがね
04:28
XK: Do you have a perspective --
XK:これに対する見解は―
04:30
I don't want to use "angle" because that has a negative connotation --
「切り口」は聞こえが悪いが―
04:32
but do you know how this is going to play out? (MS: No idea.)
展開の見当はついてるの? (MS:全然)
04:34
David Cohn: How much money does it take to do this?
D・コーン:いくらかかる?
04:37
MS: 1.5 million. (DC: Okay.)
MS:150万ドル (DC:オッケー)
04:40
John Kamen: I think that you're going to have a hard time meeting with them,
J・カメン:会ってもらうのが大変だが
04:43
but I think it's certainly worth pursuing
いくつか目立つブランドに
04:45
a couple big, really obvious brands.
あたってみる価値はあると思うね
04:47
XK: Who knows, maybe by the time your film comes out,
XK:映画が出る頃に
04:50
we look like a bunch of blithering idiots.
馬鹿を見るのはこちらかも
04:52
MS: What do you think the response is going to be?
MS:どんな返答がもらえると思います?
04:54
Stuart Ruderfer: The responses mostly will be "no."
S・ルダファー:大抵は「ダメ」だな
04:57
MS: But is it a tough sell because of the film
MS:映画がマズいから?
04:59
or a tough sell because of me?
それとも僕だというのがマズい?
05:01
JK: Both.
JK:両方
05:03
MS: ... Meaning not so optimistic.
MS:…楽観的でないということですか
05:05
So, sir, can you help me? I need help.
では支援いただけますか?
05:08
MK: I can help you.
MK:支援できるよ
05:10
MS: Okay. (MK: Good.)
MS:オッケー (MK:よかった)
05:12
Awesome.
素晴らしい
05:14
MK: We've gotta figure out which brands.
MK:どのブランドがいいか検討する
05:16
MS: Yeah. (MK: That's the challenge.)
MS:ええ (MK:それが問題だな)
05:18
When you look at the people you deal with ..
取引のある相手を見ると―
05:21
MK: We've got some places we can go. (MS: Okay.)
MK:心当たりはいくつかある (MS:オッケー)
05:23
Turn the camera off.
カメラ止めて
05:25
MS: I thought "Turn the camera off"
MS:「カメラ止めて」は
05:27
meant, "Let's have an off-the-record conversation."
「オフレコの話を」という意味だと
05:29
Turns out it really means,
思ったのですが 実は
05:31
"We want nothing to do with your movie."
「君の映画には関わりたくないね」でした
05:33
MS: And just like that, one by one,
MS:こうして気付いたときには1つずつ
05:36
all of these companies suddenly disappeared.
これらの会社の全部が消えていました
05:39
None of them wanted anything to do with this movie.
誰も関わりたくなかったのです
05:42
I was amazed.
驚きでした
05:44
They wanted absolutely nothing to do with this project.
全く参加したくなかったのです
05:46
And I was blown away, because I thought the whole concept, the idea of advertising,
広告とはできる限り何度も
05:48
was to get your product out in front of as many people as possible,
商品を出して多くの人に見てもらうことだと
05:50
to get as many people to see it as possible.
思っていたのでびっくりでした
05:53
Especially in today's world,
特に最近は
05:55
this intersection of new media and old media
新旧メディアの分岐点にいて
05:57
and the fractured media landscape,
媒体も雑然としています
05:59
isn't the idea to get
大衆にメッセージを伝える
06:01
that new buzz-worthy delivery vehicle
評判に値する新しい情報配信媒体は
06:03
that's going to get that message to the masses?
願ってもないのでは?
06:06
No, that's what I thought.
いや 僕はそう思ったんですが
06:08
But the problem was, you see,
問題は
06:11
my idea had one fatal flaw,
僕のアイデアには1つこのような
06:13
and that flaw was this.
致命的欠陥があったということでした
06:16
Actually no, that was not the flaw whatsoever.
いや これは全く欠陥でないです
06:20
That wouldn't have been a problem at all.
これは全然問題じゃないです
06:22
This would have been fine.
これはよかったんですが
06:24
But what this image represents was the problem.
この画像が意味するものが問題でした
06:26
See, when you do a Google image search for transparency,
Googleで「透明性」の画像検索をすると
06:28
this is ---
これが―
06:30
(Laughter)
(笑)
06:32
(Applause)
(拍手)
06:34
This is one of the first images that comes up.
上の方に出てくるんです
06:37
So I like the way you roll, Sergey Brin. No.
やるじゃんサーゲイ・ブリン いやそうじゃなく
06:40
(Laughter)
(笑)
06:43
This is was the problem: transparency --
問題はこれでした 透明性とは―
06:47
free from pretense or deceit;
見せかけやごまかしがない
06:50
easily detected or seen through;
簡単に見抜いたり見通せる
06:52
readily understood;
容易に理解できる
06:54
characterized by visibility or accessibility of information,
特にビジネスの実践に関しては 情報の可視化や
06:56
especially concerning business practices --
アクセスのしやすさに特徴がある
06:59
that last line being probably the biggest problem.
この最後の文がたぶん一番の問題です
07:01
You see, we hear a lot about transparency these days.
透明性については最近よく聞きます
07:04
Our politicians say it, our president says it,
政治家や大統領も言ってます
07:07
even our CEO's say it.
CEO達さえ言っています
07:09
But suddenly when it comes down to becoming a reality,
でも実践するとなると
07:11
something suddenly changes.
何か突然変わります
07:13
But why? Well, transparency is scary --
なぜか?まず透明性は恐ろしく―
07:15
(Roar)
(吠え声)
07:18
like that odd, still-screaming bear.
この変な吠え叫ぶ熊の写真のよう
07:20
(Laughter)
(笑)
07:23
It's unpredictable --
予想がつかず―
07:25
(Music)
(音楽)
07:27
(Laughter)
(笑)
07:29
like this odd country road.
この変な田舎道のよう
07:31
And it's also very risky.
そして非常にリスクが高い
07:34
(Laughter)
(笑)
07:38
What else is risky?
他にリスクが高いと言えば?
07:41
Eating an entire bowl of Cool Whip.
容器に入った生クリームを全部食べること
07:43
(Laughter)
(笑)
07:46
That's very risky.
これは非常にリスクが大きいです
07:51
Now when I started talking to companies
企業と交渉し始めて
07:55
and telling them that we wanted to tell this story,
このストーリーを伝えたいと言ったとき
07:57
and they said, "No, we want you to tell a story.
「ストーリーを伝えるのは
07:59
We want you to tell a story,
もちろんいいんだが 伝えるのは
08:01
but we just want to tell our story."
こちら側のストーリーを」と言われました
08:03
See, when I was a kid
僕が子供の頃
08:06
and my father would catch me in some sort of a lie --
ウソが父にばれると―
08:08
and there he is giving me the look he often gave me --
こういう目でよく僕を見ていたんですが―
08:10
he would say, "Son, there's three sides to every story.
父は「どんなストーリーにも3つの側面があるもんだ
08:13
There's your story,
お前の言い分
08:17
there's my story
お父さんの言い分
08:20
and there's the real story."
そして真実だ」と言っていました
08:22
Now you see, with this film, we wanted to tell the real story.
この映画では真実のストーリーを伝えたかったのです
08:24
But with only one company, one agency willing to help me --
でも1社だけの支援では―
08:27
and that's only because I knew John Bond and Richard Kirshenbaum for years --
しかもジョンとリチャードとは長い付き合いがあるからというだけで―
08:29
I realized that I would have to go on my own,
自分でやるしかないと悟りました
08:33
I'd have to cut out the middleman
中間業者なしで自分と
08:35
and go to the companies myself with all of my team.
自分のスタッフで直接企業にあたるしかないと
08:37
So what you suddenly started to realize --
そこで突然見えてくるのは―
08:40
or what I started to realize --
僕が何に気付いたかと言うと―
08:42
is that when you started having conversations with these companies,
これらの企業と話してみると
08:44
the idea of understanding your brand is a universal problem.
自分のブランドに対する理解は共通の問題なんです
08:46
(Video) MS: I have friends who make great big, giant Hollywood films,
(ビデオ)MS:ハリウッド映画を作る友人と
08:49
and I have friends who make little independent films like I make.
僕のように小さな自主映画を作る友人がいますが
08:51
And the friends of mine who make big, giant Hollywood movies
ハリウッド映画を作る友人は
08:54
say the reason their films are so successful
映画が成功するのは
08:56
is because of the brand partners that they have.
ブランド提携者のおかげと言います
08:58
And then my friends who make small independent films
小さい自主映画を制作する友人は
09:00
say, "Well, how are we supposed to compete
「どうやってハリウッドの大作と
09:02
with these big, giant Hollywood movies?"
競争しろって?」と言います
09:04
And the movie is called
そしてこの映画の題は
09:06
"The Greatest Movie Ever Sold."
「The Greatest Movie Ever Sold」です
09:08
So how specifically will we see Ban in the film?
ではBanが具体的にどう映画に登場するのか?
09:10
Any time I'm ready to go, any time I open up my medicine cabinet,
僕が出かける前や薬棚を開けるたびに
09:13
you will see Ban deodorant.
Banのデオドラントが出てきます
09:16
While anytime I do an interview with someone,
誰かとインタビューするたびに僕は
09:18
I can say, "Are you fresh enough for this interview?
「インタビューを前にしてさっぱりしてる?
09:21
Are you ready? You look a little nervous.
準備できた?緊張してる?
09:24
I want to help you calm down.
落ち着くには インタビュー前に
09:26
So maybe you should put some one before the interview."
これをつけるといいよ」と言い
09:28
So we'll offer one of these fabulous scents.
素敵な香りを1つ勧めるわけです
09:30
Whether it's a "Floral Fusion" or a "Paradise Winds,"
「フローラルブーケ」でも
09:32
they'll have their chance.
「パラダイスの風」でも
09:34
We will have them geared for both male or female --
男性用も女性用も
09:36
solid, roll-on or stick, whatever it may be.
固形やロールオン式 スティック型でも
09:39
That's the two-cent tour.
これが概要です
09:42
So now I can answer any of your questions
では質問があればお答えして
09:44
and give you the five-cent tour.
もう少し詳しく話しますが
09:46
Karen Frank: We are a smaller brand.
K・フランク:私たちのブランドは大きくなく
09:48
Much like you talked about being a smaller movie,
お話にあった小さい映画と同じです
09:50
we're very much a challenger brand.
私たちはチャレンジャーです
09:52
So we don't have the budgets that other brands have.
競合他社のような予算はありません
09:54
So doing things like this -- you know,
このようなやり方で
09:56
remind people about Ban --
Banを印象づけることに
09:58
is kind of why were interested in it.
関心があるのはそのためです-
10:00
MS: What are the words that you would use to describe Ban?
MS:Banを表す言葉は何ですか?
10:02
Ban is blank.
「Banは~である」
10:04
KF: That's a great question.
KF:いい質問ですね
10:07
(Laughter)
(笑)
10:10
Woman: Superior technology.
女性:優れた技術
10:15
MS: Technology's not the way you want to describe something
MS:脇の下につけるものに
10:17
somebody's putting in their armpit.
「技術」はないでしょう
10:19
Man: We talk about bold, fresh.
男性:「しっかり爽やか」です
10:21
I think "fresh" is a great word that really spins this category into the positive,
「爽やか」は「臭いや汗を抑える」とは違って
10:23
versus "fights odor and wetness."
この手の商品を魅力的に見せます
10:26
It keeps you fresh.
いつも爽やか
10:28
How do we keep you fresher longer -- better freshness,
長時間爽やか 素晴らしい爽やかさ
10:30
more freshness, three times fresher.
もっと爽やかに 3倍爽やか
10:32
Things like that that are more of that positive benefit.
このような前向きな面をもっと出す感じです
10:34
MS: And that's a multi-million dollar corporation.
MS:これが数百万ドルの企業です
10:38
What about me? What about a regular guy?
でも自分は?普通の人は?
10:41
I need to go talk to the man on the street,
僕のような普通の
10:43
the people who are like me, the regular Joes.
一般人に尋ねて
10:45
They need to tell me about my brand.
自分のブランドについて学ばなくては
10:47
(Video) MS: How would you guys describe your brand?
(ビデオ)MS:自分のブランドをどう説明する?
10:49
Man: Um, my brand?
男性:うーん 自分のブランド?
10:53
I don't know.
分からないなあ
10:56
I like really nice clothes.
仕立てのいい服が好きだけど
10:58
Woman: 80's revival
女性:80年代スタイルに
11:00
meets skater-punk,
スケボーパンクを足したもの
11:02
unless it's laundry day.
洗濯の日はダメだけど
11:04
MS: All right, what is brand Gerry?
MS:ジェリーのブランドは何?
11:06
Gerry: Unique. (MS: Unique.)
ジェリー:個性的 (MS:個性的)
11:08
Man: I guess what kind of genre, style I am
男性:スタイルのジャンルで言ったら
11:10
would be like dark glamor.
「陰の魅惑」って感じ
11:12
I like a lot of black colors,
たくさんの黒に
11:15
a lot of grays and stuff like that.
たくさんのグレー そんな感じが好き
11:17
But usually I have an accessory,
でもアクセサリーも着けるけど
11:19
like sunglasses,
サングラスとか
11:21
or I like crystal and things like that too.
クリスタルとかも好きだし
11:23
Woman: If Dan were a brand,
女性:ダンがブランドだとしたら
11:25
he might be a classic convertible
クラシックなベンツの
11:27
Mercedes Benz.
オープンカーかしら
11:31
Man 2: The brand that I am
男性2:僕のブランドは
11:33
is, I would call it casual fly.
「粋なカジュアル」と言う感じかな
11:35
Woman 2: Part hippie, part yogi,
女性2:ヒッピーとヨガが混じった
11:37
part Brooklyn girl -- I don't know.
ブルックリンギャル―分かんない
11:39
Man 3: I'm the pet guy.
男性3:ペット業者
11:41
I sell pet toys all over the country, all over the world.
世界中でペットのおもちゃを売ってる
11:43
So I guess that's my brand.
だからこれが僕のブランドかな
11:45
In my warped little industry, that's my brand.
僕の偏った小さな業界での僕のブランド
11:47
Man 4: My brand is FedEx because I deliver the goods.
男性4:FedExが俺のブランド 期待を裏切らない
11:50
Man 5: Failed writer-alcoholic brand.
男性5:アル中の駄目作家
11:53
Is that something?
すごいだろ?
11:55
Lawyer: I'm a lawyer brand.
弁護士:私のブランドは弁護士
11:57
Tom: I'm Tom.
トム:俺 トム
12:03
MS: Well we can't all be brand Tom, but I do often find myself
MS:トムのブランドにはなれませんが 僕は
12:06
at the intersection of dark glamor and casual fly.
「陰の魅惑」と「粋なカジュアル」の中間が多いです
12:09
(Laughter)
(笑)
12:12
And what I realized is I needed an expert.
そして専門家が必要と分かりました
12:14
I needed somebody who could get inside my head,
僕のことを理解して
12:16
somebody who could really help me understand
僕が自分の「ブランドの人格」を
12:18
what they call your "brand personality."
理解する手助けをしてくれる人です
12:20
And so I found a company called Olson Zaltman in Pittsburg.
ピッツバーグのOlson Zaltman社に行きました
12:22
They've helped companies like Nestle, Febreze, Hallmark
ネスレやファブリーズやホールマークなどの企業の
12:24
discover that brand personality.
ブランド人格を定義してきています
12:27
If they could do it for them, surely they could do it for me.
これらの企業を助けられるなら僕のことも大丈夫なはず
12:29
(Video) Abigail: You brought your pictures, right?
(ビデオ)アビゲール:写真ありますよね?
12:32
MS: I did. The very first picture
MS:持ってきました 最初のは
12:34
is a picture of my family.
僕の家族の写真です
12:36
A: So tell me a little bit how it relates to your thoughts and feelings about who you are.
A:自分に対する考えや感情にどう関係していますか?
12:38
MS: These are the people who shape the way I look at the world.
MS:僕の世界観に影響を与えました
12:41
A: Tell me about this world.
A:その「世界」とは?
12:43
MS: This world? I think your world is the world that you live in --
MS:この世界?自分が住んでる世界で
12:45
like people who are around you, your friends, your family,
周囲の人や友達や家族がいて
12:48
the way you live your life, the job you do.
生き方とかやってる仕事
12:51
All those things stemmed and started from one place,
それら全てが1つの場所からきてる
12:53
and for me they stemmed and started with my family in West Virginia.
僕の場合はウエスト・バージニアの家族からきてる
12:55
A: What's the next one you want to talk about?
A:次に話したいことは何ですか?
12:58
MS: The next one: This was the best day ever.
MS:次は「最高だった日」
13:00
A: How does this relate to your thoughts and feelings about who you are?
A:自分に対する考えや感情への関連は?
13:02
MS: It's like, who do I want to be?
MS:なりたい自分と言う感じ
13:04
I like things that are different.
変わったものが好きなんです
13:06
I like things that are weird. I like weird things.
変なもの 奇妙なものが好きです
13:08
A: Tell me about the "why" phase -- what does that do for us?
A:その「なぜ」の段階の説明を―意義は?
13:10
What is the machete? What pupa stage are you in now?
その「なた」とは?今はどの段階?
13:12
Why is it important to reboot? What does the red represent?
やり直しが重要な理由は?赤が象徴するのは何?
13:14
Tell me a little bit about that part.
その部分について話してみて
13:17
... A little more about you that is not who you are.
…自分のこうでないという点は?
13:19
What are some other metamorphoses that you've had?
その他あった自身の変化は?
13:22
... Doesn't have to be fear. What kind of roller coaster are you on?
…恐怖に限らず 直面している変化は?
13:24
MS: EEEEEE! (A: Thank you.) No, thank you.
MS:わあああ!(A:ありがとう) こちらこそ
13:26
A: Thanks for you patience. (MS: Great job.)
A:最後までどうも (MS:お疲れ様)
13:28
A: Yeah. (MS: Thanks a lot.) All right.
A:はい (MS:ありがとう) では
13:30
MS: Yeah, I don't know what's going to come of this.
MS:一体どんな結果が出るのか
13:32
There was a whole lot of crazy going on in there.
わけの分からんことだらけでした
13:34
Lindsay Zaltman: The first thing we saw was this idea
L・ザルトマン:まず気付いたのは
13:37
that you had two distinct, but complementary
2つの別々ながらも補完的な面が
13:39
sides to your brand personality --
あなたのブランド人格にはあるということでした
13:41
the Morgan Spurlock brand is a mindful/play brand.
モーガン・スパーロックのブランドは「思慮と遊び心」
13:44
Those are juxtaposed very nicely together.
2つが非常にうまく同居しています
13:47
And I think there's almost a paradox with those.
矛盾に近いものがあります
13:49
And I think some companies
企業によっては
13:51
will just focus on one of their strengths or the other
両方の強みを活かそうとしないで
13:53
instead of focusing on both.
片方だけに専念すると思います
13:56
Most companies tend to -- and it's human nature --
ほとんどの企業は―人間は本質的にそうなのですが
13:58
to avoid things that they're not sure of,
自信がないものを避け
14:01
avoid fear, those elements,
恐怖なども避けようとします
14:03
and you really embrace those,
でもあなたはしっかり受け入れている
14:05
and you actually turn them into positives for you, and it's a neat thing to see.
実際にそれらを前向きな力にしていて興味深いです
14:07
What other brands are like that?
他のブランドで似ているのは?
14:10
The first on here is the classic, Apple.
まず定評のApple
14:12
And you can see here too, Target, Wii,
TargetとWiiもそう
14:14
Mini from the Mini Coopers, and JetBlue.
そしてミニクーパーのMiniとJetBlue
14:17
Now there's playful brands and mindful brands,
遊び心のあるブランドや思慮深いブランドは
14:20
those things that have come and gone,
ありますが長続きしません
14:22
but a playful, mindful brand is a pretty powerful thing.
でも遊び心が溢れ思慮深いブランドは強いのです
14:24
MS: A playful, mindful brand. What is your brand?
MS:遊び心と思慮のブランド あなたは?
14:27
If somebody asked you to describe your brand identity, your brand personality,
誰かに自分のブランド人格を述べてと言われたら
14:29
what would you be?
あなたのブランドはどうですか?
14:32
Are you an up attribute? Are you something that gets the blood flowing?
外向的な人?ワクワクさせる人ですか?
14:34
Or are you more of a down attribute?
それとも内向的な人?
14:37
Are you something that's a little more calm, reserved, conservative?
どちらかと言うと冷静で控えめで保守的?
14:39
Up attributes are things like being playful,
外向的な人は遊び心いっぱいで
14:42
being fresh like the Fresh Prince,
フレッシュ・プリンスのように勝手気まま
14:45
contemporary, adventurous,
近代的で冒険好き
14:48
edgy or daring like Errol Flynn,
斬新でエロール・フリンのように大胆
14:50
nimble or agile, profane, domineering,
器用 機敏 世俗的 高圧的
14:52
magical or mystical like Gandalf.
ガンダルフように不思議で超常的
14:55
Or are you more of a down attribute?
それともあなたは内向的な人?
14:57
Are you mindful, sophisticated like 007?
思慮深く007のように洗練されてる?
14:59
Are you established, traditional, nurturing, protective,
実績があって慣習的 母性的で保護的
15:01
empathetic like the Oprah?
オプラのように親身になれる人?
15:04
Are you reliable, stable, familiar,
信頼があり 動じない親しみのある人
15:06
safe, secure, sacred,
無難で確実で献身的
15:08
contemplative or wise
ダライラマやヨーダのように
15:10
like the Dalai Lama or Yoda?
熟考的で賢明?
15:12
Over the course of this film,
この映画の制作過程で
15:14
we had 500-plus companies
外向的かつ内向的である
15:17
who were up and down companies
500以上の企業が
15:19
saying, "no," they didn't want any part of this project.
「ダメ」と言い 参加を拒みました
15:21
They wanted nothing to do with this film, mainly because they would have no control,
主な理由はコントロールできず最終的に
15:23
they would have no control over the final product.
映画がどうなるか分からないからでした
15:26
But we did get 17 brand partners
でも17社が賛同しました
15:28
who were willing to relinquish that control,
コントロールを譲って
15:30
who wanted to be in business
僕のような思慮と遊び心のある人間と
15:32
with someone as mindful and as playful as myself
仕事したいと言ってくれたのです
15:34
and who ultimately empowered us to tell stories
そして最終的には普通は
15:37
that normally we wouldn't be able to tell --
公開できないストーリーを見せる支援をしてくれました
15:39
stories that an advertiser would normally never get behind.
普通なら広告会社が決して許さないストーリーです
15:42
They enabled us to tell the story about neuromarketing,
おかげで映画のストーリーを見せる中で
15:45
as we got into telling the story in this film
ニューロマーケティングという
15:48
about how now they're using MRI's
MRIを使って脳の欲望中枢に働きかける
15:50
to target the desire centers of your brain
コマーシャルや映画宣伝が
15:52
for both commercials as well as movie marketing.
最近はあることを見せることができました
15:54
We went to San Paulo where they have banned outdoor advertising.
野外広告を禁止してしまったサンパウロにも行きました
15:57
In the entire city for the past five years,
5年前から街中どこにも
16:00
there's no billboards, there's no posters, there's no flyers, nothing.
ビルボード ポスター 広告が一切ありません
16:02
(Applause)
(拍手)
16:05
And we went to school districts
学区にも行きました
16:07
where now companies are making their way
アメリカ中の財政難の学校に
16:09
into cash-strapped schools all across America.
企業たちは進出しています
16:11
What's incredible for me is the projects that I've gotten the most feedback out of,
驚くのは今までのプロジェクトで反響が多かったり
16:14
or I've had the most success in,
成功したものは 自分が直接
16:17
are ones where I've interacted with things directly.
やり取りしたものだったことですが
16:19
And that's what these brands did.
これらのブランドがしたのもそうです
16:21
They cut out the middleman, they cut out their agencies
自分たちの利益を
16:23
and said, "Maybe these agencies
最優先にしていないかもと考え
16:25
don't have my best interest in mind.
中間業者や代理店と手を切りました
16:27
I'm going to deal directly with the artist.
アーティストと直接一緒に
16:29
I'm going to work with him to create something different,
何か今までと違う 人に考えさせ
16:31
something that's going to get people thinking,
世の中の見方に疑問を
16:33
that's going to challenge the way we look at the world."
投げかけるものを作ろうとしました
16:35
And how has that been for them? Has it been successful?
その結果は?この時点ではどうか?
16:37
Well, since the film premiered at the Sundance Film Festival, let's take a look.
サンダンス映画祭での公開後どうか見てみましょう
16:39
According to Burrelles, the movie premiered in January,
Burrellesによると1月に封切して以来―
16:42
and since then -- and this isn't even the whole thing --
この数字は全て含んでいませんが―
16:45
we've had 900 million media impressions for this film.
この映画の媒体インプレッション数は90億でした
16:47
That's literally covering just like a two and a half-week period.
たったの2週間半の間でです
16:50
That's only online -- no print, no TV.
ネットだけで印刷物やテレビはなし
16:52
The film hasn't even been distributed yet.
まだ映画は配給さえされていません
16:54
It's not even online. It's not even streaming.
ネットでもストリームしていません
16:56
It's not even been out into other foreign countries yet.
海外にもリリースされていません
16:58
So ultimately,
結果としては
17:01
this film has already started to gain a lot of momentum.
この映画はすでに評判を集めてきているわけです
17:03
And not bad for a project that almost every ad agency we talked to
交渉した広告会社のほとんどがクライアントに
17:06
advised their clients not to take part.
参加を見送るよう勧めたのにです
17:09
What I always believe
僕がいつも思っているのは
17:11
is that if you take chances, if you take risks,
リスクを負ってチャンスを活かすと
17:13
that in those risks will come opportunity.
そこから好機が到来するということです
17:15
I believe that when you push people away from that,
人をリスクから引き離すのは
17:18
you're pushing them more towards failure.
失敗に近づけることだと思います
17:20
I believe that when you train your employees to be risk averse,
リスクを回避する社員教育をするのは
17:22
then you're preparing your whole company
会社全体を働きがいのない
17:25
to be reward challenged.
場所にしてしまうことだと思います
17:27
I feel like that what has to happen moving forward
これからはリスクを冒せるよう
17:29
is we need to encourage people to take risks.
人々を勇気づけていく必要があると思います
17:31
We need to encourage people to not be afraid
危険そうな条件でも
17:34
of opportunities that may scare them.
恐れないよう応援すべきです
17:36
Ultimately, moving forward,
結局これからは 恐れを
17:38
I think we have to embrace fear.
受け入れなくてはならないのです
17:40
We've got to put that bear in a cage.
あの熊を檻に入れるんです
17:42
(Laughter)
(笑)
17:44
Embrace fear. Embrace risk.
恐れを受け入れる リスクを受け入れる
17:51
One big spoonful at a time, we have to embrace risk.
少しずつリスクを取り入れていかなくてはダメです
17:54
And ultimately, we have to embrace transparency.
そして最終的には透明性にも取り組まなくてはなりません
17:57
Today, more than ever,
これまでにも増して 少しの誠実さが
18:01
a little honesty is going to go a long way.
大きな効果をもたらす時代です
18:03
And that being said, through honesty and transparency,
というわけで 誠実さと透明性にのっとって
18:05
my entire talk, "Embrace Transparency,"
僕のトーク「透明性を受け入れる」は
18:08
has been brought to you
Ebayで命名権に
18:11
by my good friends at EMC,
7,100ドル支払ってくれた
18:13
who for $7,100
素晴らしいEMCの皆さんの提供で
18:16
bought the naming rights on eBay.
お届けいたしました
18:18
(Applause)
(拍手)
18:20
EMC: Turning big data
EMC:世界中の組織の
18:29
into big opportunity
大量な情報を
18:32
for organizations all over the world.
大きなチャンスに転換
18:34
EMC presents: "Embrace Transparency."
EMC提供:「透明性を受け入れる」
18:36
Thank you very much, guys.
みなさんありがとう
18:39
(Applause)
(拍手)
18:41
June Cohen: So, Morgan,
J・コーヘン:モーガン それで
18:54
in the name of transparency,
透明性ってことで聞くけど
18:57
what exactly happened to that $7,100?
あの7,100ドルはどうなったの?
18:59
MS: That is a fantastic question.
MS:素晴らしい質問です
19:01
I have in my pocket a check
ポケットに小切手を入れて来ました
19:04
made out to the parent organization to the TED organization,
TEDの母体である
19:07
the Sapling Foundation --
Sapling Foundation宛てに書いた
19:09
a check for $7,100
7,100ドルの小切手です
19:11
to be applied toward my attendance for next year's TED.
僕の来年のTED参加費に充ててください
19:13
(Laughter)
(笑)
19:16
(Applause)
(拍手)
19:18
Translated by Sawa Horibe
Reviewed by Yuki Okada

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About the Speaker:

Morgan Spurlock - Filmmaker
Morgan Spurlock makes documentary film and TV that is personal, political -- and, above all, deeply empathetic.

Why you should listen

Though it was as high-concept as any reality-TV show, Morgan Spurlock's 2004 film Super Size Me was something else entirely: a critique of modern fast-feeding, wrapped in the personal story of a charming, curious host. And "host" can be taken literally: eating only McDonald's for 30 days straight, Spurlock went into a shocking physical and emotional decline, showing via his own body the truth about junk food. After this Oscar-nominated doc came Spurlock's three-seasons-long unscripted TV show, 30 Days, based on another lifehack: Send a person to live, for 30 days, inside another worldview. Stories from 30 Days are human, engaging, surprising: An anti-immigrant activist warms to a tight-knit family of border-crossers; an outsourced US engineer meets the Indian engineer who holds his old job; a former pro football player spends 30 days navigating the world in a wheelchair.

In 2008, Spurlock released Where in the World Is Osama Bin Laden?, about his months-long trek through Afghanistan, Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Israel, Palestine ... following leads and interviewing people along the way. (In an interview, he guessed he got within 50 miles of Osama before winding up the hunt.) He was also part of a group-filmed version of Freakonomics. He wrote a book about his fast-food odyssey, called Don't Eat This Book -- while his wife, vegan chef Alex Jamieson, wrote a bestseller about the eight-week cleansing diet she put Spurlock on after he got supersized.

His latest film, The Greatest Movie Ever Sold, dives into the mysterious world of brand sponsorship, a major influence on how pop culture is developed and shared. Almost totally sponsored itself, the film was the first to be sold at Sundance 2011, and, it's said, made a profit before it even opened. The film debuts in US theaters on April 22, 2011.

 

More profile about the speaker
Morgan Spurlock | Speaker | TED.com