07:06
TEDxToronto 2010

Dave Meslin: The antidote to apathy

デイブ・メスリン:無関心への特効薬

Filmed:

学校、建物の用途、市議会選挙などなどローカルな政治は私たちの生活に直接影響を与えます。なのに、なぜ私たちはもっと積極的に関わろうとしないのでしょうか?無関心だから?デイブ・メスリンは「違う」と言います。私たちが実際に関心があるにもかかわらず、私たちをコミュニティーへの参加から妨げる7つの障害を彼はこのスピーチで明らかにします。

- Artist and organizer
Dave Meslin is a "professional rabble-rouser." Based in Toronto, he works to make local issues engaging and even fun to get involved in. Full bio

How often do we hear
「関係ない」
00:15
that people just don't care?
何度耳にしたでしょう
00:17
How many times have you been told
「みんなわがままで
00:19
that real, substantial change isn't possible
バカで 怠け者だから
00:21
because most people are too selfish,
世の中が変わるわけない」
00:24
too stupid or too lazy
一体何度
00:26
to try to make a difference in their community?
聞いたセリフでしょう?
00:28
I propose to you today that apathy as we think we know it
私がお伝えしたいのは
00:31
doesn't actually exist,
いわゆる無関心というのは
00:34
but rather, that people do care,
本当は存在せず
00:36
but that we live in a world
私たちは関心がある一方で
00:38
that actively discourages engagement
私たちの参加を妨げる
00:40
by constantly putting obstacles and barriers in our way.
多くの障害があるだけだということです
00:42
And I'll give you some examples of what I mean.
いくつか例をご紹介します
00:45
Let's start with city hall.
まずは市役所から
00:47
You ever see one of these before?
これ見たことあります?
00:49
This is a newspaper ad.
新聞のお知らせで
00:51
It's a notice of a zoning application change for a new office building
建物の用途変更届けについてで
00:53
so the neighborhood knows what's happening.
住民もプロセスに参加できます
00:56
As you can see, it's impossible to read.
ご覧の通り読みにくい
00:58
You need to get halfway down
途中でようやく
01:00
to even find out which address they're talking about,
どこのことかでてきます
01:02
and then farther down, in tiny 10-point font,
さらに進んで 小さな文字で
01:04
to find out how to actually get involved.
参加方法がやっとあります
01:06
Imagine if the private sector advertised in the same way --
もし民間企業が同じことをすると
01:09
if Nike wanted to sell a pair of shoes
例えばナイキの広告では
01:12
and put an ad in the paper like that.
こんなふうになります
01:15
(Applause)
(拍手)
01:18
Now that would never happen.
ありえないでしょ
01:21
You'll never see an ad like that
目にすることはないです
01:23
because Nike actually wants you to buy their shoes.
ナイキは靴を売りたいのですから
01:25
Whereas the city of Toronto
一方トロント市は明らかに
01:28
clearly doesn't want you involved with the planning process,
市民の参加を望んでいません
01:30
otherwise their ads would look something like this --
でなければ こんなふうに
01:32
with all the information basically laid out clearly.
わかりやすく情報を公開するはずです
01:34
As long as the city's putting out notices like this
役所がこんな広告を出しているうちは
01:36
to try to get people engaged,
市民が市政に関わりを
01:38
then of course people aren't going to be engaged.
持とうとするわけありません
01:40
But that's not apathy;
これは無関心ではなく
01:42
that's intentional exclusion.
意図的な排斥です
01:44
Public space.
公共の空間
01:47
(Applause)
(拍手)
01:49
The manner in which we mistreat our public spaces
大きな政治的変化を起こすのに
01:51
is a huge obstacle
大きな障害なのが
01:53
towards any type of progressive political change
公共の場に関する考え方です
01:55
because we've essentially put a price tag on freedom of expression.
表現の自由に値札を付けてます
01:58
Whoever has the most money gets the loudest voice,
お金を持った人が視覚的にも思想的にも
02:01
dominating the visual and mental environment.
より大きな宣伝ができます
02:04
The problem with this model
問題なのは
02:06
is that there are some amazing messages that need to be said
大切なメッセージがあっても
02:08
that aren't profitable to say.
お金にならなければ
02:10
So you're never going to see them on a billboard.
決して日の目を見ないということです
02:12
The media plays an important role
メディアは セレブネタや
02:15
in developing our relationship with political change,
スキャンダルを報じるばかりで
02:17
mainly by ignoring politics
私たちと政治の関わりを
02:20
and focusing on celebrities and scandals,
断ってしまっています
02:22
but even when they do talk about important political issues,
重要な政治の記事を扱う時でさえ
02:24
they do it in a way that I feel discourages engagement.
関わりを促すようになっていません
02:27
And I'll give you an example: the Now magazine from last week --
例えば 先週の「ナウ」マガジン
02:30
progressive, downtown weekly in Toronto.
トロントの週間情報誌です
02:32
This is the cover story.
これが一面
02:34
It's an article about a theater performance,
演劇についての記事です
02:36
and it starts with basic information about where it is,
実際に見たくなった人のために
02:39
in case you actually want to go and see it after you've read the article --
公演についての基本情報が載ってます
02:42
where, the time, the website.
どこで いつ そしてウェブサイト
02:45
Same with this -- it's a movie review,
同じように映画のレビューも
02:47
an art review,
アートレビュー
02:49
a book review -- where the reading is in case you want to go.
本のレビュー 読書会の情報が載ってます
02:51
A restaurant -- you might not want to just read about it,
レストラン情報 読むだけでは
02:54
maybe you want to go to the restaurant.
満足できない人のために
02:56
So they tell you where it is, what the prices are,
住所や予算や
02:58
the address, the phone number, etc.
電話番号などが掲載されています
03:00
Then you get to their political articles.
政治面はどうでしょう?
03:02
Here's a great article about an important election race that's happening.
進行中の重要な選挙についての記事です
03:04
It talks about the candidates -- written very well --
候補者についてのなかなか良い記事です
03:07
but no information, no follow-up,
でも補足情報や
03:09
no websites for the campaigns,
ウェブサイトがありません
03:11
no information about when the debates are, where the campaign offices are.
討論会や選挙事務所の情報もありません
03:13
Here's another good article
同様に交通機関の
03:16
about a new campaign opposing privatization of transit
民営化反対活動に関する記事ですが
03:18
without any contact information for the campaign.
問い合わせ先など載ってません
03:21
The message seems to be
こうして見て行くと
03:24
that the readers are most likely to want to eat,
読者は食事や読書には興味があっても
03:26
maybe read a book, maybe see a movie, but not be engaged in their community.
コミュニティーには関心がないようです
03:28
And you might think this is a small thing,
些細な事だと思ってますか?
03:31
but I think it's important because it sets a tone
私はそうは思いません
03:33
and it reinforces the dangerous idea
これらが政治は傍から見物するもの
03:36
that politics is a spectator sport.
という危険な前提を作っているからです
03:40
Heroes: How do we view leadership?
ヒーロー リーダーシップってどう思います?
03:43
Look at these 10 movies. What do they have in common?
これらの映画の共通点はなんでしょう?
03:45
Anyone?
わかります?
03:48
They all have heroes who were chosen.
ヒーローが選ばれし者という点です
03:50
Someone came up to them and said, "You're the chosen one.
「おまえが選ばれし者だ」
03:52
There's a prophesy. You have to save the world."
「世界を救うのじゃ」と預言者が言い
03:55
And then someone goes off and saves the world because they've been told to,
お供とともに言われたとおり
03:57
with a few people tagging along.
世界を救うわけです
04:00
This helps me understand
なぜ多くの人が自分が
04:02
why a lot of people have trouble seeing themselves as leaders
リーダーでないと思うか明らかです
04:04
because it sends all the wrong messages about what leadership is about.
リーダーシップについての間違ったメッセージを送っています
04:07
A heroic effort is a collective effort,
英雄的行為は
04:10
number one.
みんなでするものです それが一つ
04:12
Number two, it's imperfect; it's not very glamorous,
それにかっこいいことばかりでも
04:14
and it doesn't suddenly start and suddenly end.
パパッと終わるものでもなく
04:17
It's an ongoing process your whole life.
一生続くものです
04:19
But most importantly, it's voluntary.
一番大事なのは自分から
04:21
It's voluntary.
はじめるということです
04:23
As long as we're teaching our kids
子供たちに立派な行為は
04:25
that heroism starts when someone scratches a mark on your forehead,
人に言われてやるものだよと
04:28
or someone tells you that you're part of a prophecy,
教えている限り リーダーシップは自分で
04:31
they're missing the most important characteristic of leadership,
始めるものだという本質を
04:33
which is that it comes from within.
教えることはできません
04:36
It's about following your own dreams --
拒否されても
04:38
uninvited, uninvited --
仲間とともに
04:40
and then working with others to make those dreams come true.
夢を追い求めるのです
04:42
Political parties: oh boy.
政党 やれやれ
04:45
Political parties could and should be
政党は本来 政治への
04:47
one of the basic entry points
参加の窓口に
04:50
for people to get engaged in politics.
なるべきものです
04:52
Instead, they've become, sadly,
現実は政党は
04:54
uninspiring and uncreative organizations
退屈で凝り固まった団体に
04:56
that rely so heavily on market research
成り下がり 街頭調査や
04:59
and polling and focus groups
フォーカスグループの
05:01
that they end up all saying the same thing,
調査に頼りっきりで その結果も
05:03
pretty much regurgitating back to us what we already want to hear
ありきたりで 創造的なアイデアもなく
05:05
at the expense of putting forward bold and creative ideas.
本当の世論とは逆行した意見です
05:08
And people can smell that, and it feeds cynicism.
それを感じた人々は政治不信に陥ります
05:11
(Applause)
(拍手)
05:14
Charitable status:
慈善団体
05:20
Groups who have charitable status in Canada aren't allowed to do advocacy.
カナダでは慈善団体に政策提言が許されていません
05:22
This is a huge problem and a huge obstacle to change
大問題で改善すべき大きな障害です
05:25
because it means that some of the most passionate and informed voices
もっとも熱心な意見がとりわけ
05:28
are completely silenced, especially during election time.
選挙中には聞かれないわけですから
05:31
Which leads us to the last one,
そして最後
05:34
which is our elections.
選挙について
05:36
As you may have noticed, our elections in Canada are a complete joke.
カナダの選挙はお笑いです
05:38
We use out-of-date systems
古臭い投票システム
05:41
that are unfair and create random results.
不公平でおかしな結果
05:43
Canada's currently led by a party
カナダの与党を
05:45
that most Canadians didn't actually want.
ほとんどのカナダ人は支持してません
05:47
How can we honestly and genuinely encourage more people to vote
投票が正しく反映されないのに
05:50
when votes don't count in Canada?
投票を促すことなどできません
05:53
You add all this up together
こうして見て行くと
05:55
and of course people are apathetic.
もちろん無関心になりますよ
05:57
It's like trying to run into a brick wall.
壁に突進するようなものですから
05:59
Now I'm not trying to be negative
いくつかの障害を紹介してますが
06:01
by throwing all these obstacles out and explaining what's in our way.
私は悲観的なわけではありません
06:03
Quite the opposite: I actually think people are amazing and smart
逆に人々はとても賢く
06:05
and that they do care.
思いやりがあると信じてます
06:08
But that, as I said, we live in this environment
一方 私たちはこうした障害の中で
06:11
where all these obstacles are being put in our way.
暮らしているのも事実です
06:14
As long as we believe that people, our own neighbors,
もし人々がわがままでバカで
06:18
are selfish, stupid or lazy,
怠けものならば
06:21
then there's no hope.
望みはありません
06:25
But we can change all those things I mentioned.
しかし変化は起こすものです
06:27
We can open up city hall.
役所をオープンにして
06:29
We can reform our electoral systems.
選挙システムを変え
06:31
We can democratize our public spaces.
公共のスペースを民主化できます
06:33
My main message is,
私が言いたいのは
06:35
if we can redefine apathy,
無関心とは
06:37
not as some kind of internal syndrome,
心の病気ではなく
06:39
but as a complex web of cultural barriers
世間に張り巡らされた参加を拒む
06:41
that reinforces disengagement,
障害の事だということです
06:43
and if we can clearly define, we can clearly identify,
もしこうした障害を
06:46
what those obstacles are,
特定して
06:49
and then if we can work together collectively to dismantle those obstacles,
力をあわせて取り除ければ
06:51
then anything is possible.
なんだってできます
06:54
Thank you.
ありがとう
06:56
(Applause)
(拍手)
06:58
Translated by SHIGERU MASUKAWA
Reviewed by Takako Sato

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About the Speaker:

Dave Meslin - Artist and organizer
Dave Meslin is a "professional rabble-rouser." Based in Toronto, he works to make local issues engaging and even fun to get involved in.

Why you should listen

Multi-partisan and fiercely optimistic, Dave Meslin embraces ideas and projects that cut across traditional boundaries between grassroots politics, electoral politics and the arts community. In his work, in Toronto and globally, he attempts to weave elements of these communities together. (His business card reads "Dave Meslin: community choreographer," which feels about right.)

Some of his projects include 2006's City Idol contest, which put a sexy new face on council elections; co-editing Local Motion, a book about civic projects in Toronto; and Dandyhorse and Spacing magazines. And he's part of the Toronto folk/indie collective Hidden Cameras, using their worldwide touring to research voting practices in the cities where they play. He recently founded the Ranked Ballot Initiative of Toronto (RaBIT)

He blogs at Mez Dispenser, or find him on Facebook and Twitter, where he's @Meslin.  
More profile about the speaker
Dave Meslin | Speaker | TED.com