19:30
TED2011

Roger Ebert: Remaking my voice

ロジャー・イーバート:声の「リメイク」

Filmed:

批判的な映画評論で有名なロジャー・イーバートは、癌で下顎を失いました。食べる能力も話す能力も失いましたが、彼の声は健在です。TED2011では、イーバートと妻のチャズが、友人のディーン・オーミッシュ、ジョン・ハンターと共に彼の素晴らしいストーリーを伝えてくれます。

- Film critic and blogger
After losing the power to speak, legendary film critic Roger Ebert went on to write about creativity, race, politics and culture -- and film, just as brilliantly as ever. Full bio

Roger Ebert: These are my words, but this is not my voice.
これは 私の言葉ですが
私の声ではありません
00:15
This is Alex, the best computer voice
これはAlex という
00:18
I've been able to find,
私の一番気に入っている 合成音声で
00:20
which comes as standard equipment on every Macintosh.
全ての Mac に 標準搭載されています
00:22
For most of my life,
以前 は「話す」という当たり前なことが
00:25
I never gave a second thought to my ability to speak.
不可能になるなんて 考えたこともありませんでした
00:27
It was like breathing.
呼吸のようなものでしたから
00:30
In those days, I was living in a fool's paradise.
あの頃は 何も知らずに 気楽なものでした
00:32
After surgeries for cancer
癌の手術を受け
00:35
took away my ability to speak, eat or drink,
話し、食べる、飲み込むという能力を失ってから
00:37
I was forced to enter this virtual world
コンピューターに生活の世話になるという
00:40
in which a computer does some of my living for me.
バーチャルな世界に入ることを 余儀なくされました
00:42
For several days now,
ここ数日 TEDのイベントで
00:45
we have enjoyed brilliant and articulate speakers here at TED.
何人もの方が素晴らしい講演をされています
00:47
I used to be able to talk like that.
私も昔は あの様に話せました
00:50
Maybe I wasn't as smart,
頭の良さは別として
00:52
but I was at least as talkative.
喋るのなら 負けなかったと思います
00:54
I want to devote my talk today
今日は「話す」という行為について
00:56
to the act of speaking itself,
又 「話す」もしくは「話さない」という行為が
00:58
and how the act of speaking or not speaking
自分である事と 切り離せないもので
01:00
is tied so indelibly to one's identity
それが出来なくなったとき
01:02
as to force the birth of a new person
新しい人間として生まれ変わらざるを得ない
01:04
when it is taken away.
ということをお話したいのです
01:06
However, I've found that listening to a computer voice
しかし 合成音声は
01:08
for any great length of time
長く聴くと 単調です
01:10
can be monotonous.
長く聴くと 単調です
01:12
So I've decided to recruit some of my TED friends
ですから 今日は TEDの友人に
01:14
to read my words aloud for me.
私の言葉を読んでもらいます
01:17
I will start with my wife, Chaz.
最初は妻のチャズから始めます
01:19
Chaz Ebert: It was Chaz who stood by my side
話す能力を取り戻すために
01:25
through three attempts to reconstruct my jaw
3度に及ぶ顎の再建手術を支えてくれたのは
01:27
and restore my ability to speak.
チャズでした
01:31
Going into the first surgery
2006年に再発した
01:34
for a recurrence of salivary cancer
唾液腺癌の手術のとき
01:36
in 2006,
唾液腺癌の手術のとき
01:38
I expected to be out of the hospital
私の映画評論の番組
01:40
in time to return to my movie review show,
「Ebert & Roeper at the Movies」の収録に
01:43
'Ebert and Roeper at the Movies.'
間に合うよう 退院する予定でした
01:45
I had pre-taped enough shows
手術と保養に6週間を見込んで
01:48
to get me through six weeks of surgery
先に番組を十分
01:50
and recuperation.
撮り貯めていました
01:53
The doctors took a fibula bone from my leg
医者は 顎の再生のため
01:55
and some tissue from my shoulder
脚の腓骨と肩の組織を
01:58
to fashion into a new jaw.
移植しました
02:00
My tongue, larynx and vocal cords
私の舌、喉頭、声帯は
02:04
were still healthy and unaffected.
まだ健常だったんですよ
02:07
(Laughter)
(笑)
02:09
(Laughter)
(笑)
02:12
CE: I was optimistic,
私は楽観的な性格でしたし
02:23
and all was right with the world.
全て順調に事は進んでいました
02:25
The first surgery was a great success.
最初の手術は大成功し
02:27
I saw myself in the mirror
鏡で映った自分を見て
02:30
and I looked pretty good.
結構 満足していたんです
02:32
Two weeks later, I was ready to return home.
2週間後 退院の準備も整い
02:35
I was using my iPod
帰宅前に 医者や看護師と一緒に
02:38
to play the Leonard Cohen song
iPadでレナード・コーエンの
02:40
'I'm Your Man'
I'm Your Man を
02:42
for my doctors and nurses.
聴いていたとき
02:44
Suddenly, I had an episode of catastrophic bleeding.
突然 大量の出血を起こしました
02:47
My carotid artery had ruptured.
頸動脈が破裂したのです
02:51
Thank God I was still in my hospital room
まだ病室にいて すぐ側に医者がいて
02:54
and my doctors were right there.
本当によかった
02:57
Chaz told me
チャズは言いました
03:01
that if that song hadn't played for so long,
あの曲がもっと短ければ
03:03
I might have already been in the car, on the way home,
帰宅途中の車内で出血して
03:05
and would have died right there and then.
助からなかったかもしれないと
03:08
So thank you, Leonard Cohen,
命を救ってくれたレナード・コーエンに
03:11
for saving my life.
感謝します
03:13
(Applause)
(拍手)
03:16
There was a second surgery --
2度目の手術は
03:20
which held up for five or six days
5 - 6 日は もったのですが
03:22
and then it also fell apart.
それも破裂し
03:24
And then a third attempt,
3度目の試みは
03:27
which also patched me back together pretty well,
再び しっかりと
つなぎ合わせたにもかかわらず
03:29
until it failed.
やはり失敗に終わりました
03:32
A doctor from Brazil said
頚動脈が破裂した患者が
03:36
he had never seen anyone survive
生き延びた例を知らないと
03:38
a carotid artery rupture.
ブラジルから来た医者は言いました
03:41
And before I left the hospital,
その後 退院までの
03:44
after a year of being hospitalized,
1年間の入院中
03:47
I had seven ruptures
7回も頚動脈が
03:50
of my carotid artery.
破裂したのです
03:52
There was no particular day
特に 告げられなくても
03:54
when anyone told me
私が話す能力を失ったことは
03:56
I would never speak again;
誰の目にも明らかでした
03:58
it just sort of became obvious.
誰の目にも明らかでした
04:00
Human speech
人間の話す能力は
04:03
is an ingenious manipulation of our breath
私たちの呼吸器系の器官と
04:05
within the sound chamber of our mouth
口の中の空洞内で
04:08
and respiratory system.
吐く息を巧みに操ったものなのです
04:11
We need to be able to hold and manipulate that breath
音声を作るには
04:14
in order to form sounds.
息を貯め操る必要があります
04:17
Therefore, the system
ですから空気が漏れないように
04:20
must be essentially airtight
これらの一連の器官は
04:22
in order to capture air.
密閉されなければいけません
04:25
Because I had lost my jaw,
しかし 顎を失ったため
04:28
I could no longer form a seal,
密閉が不可能になり
04:30
and therefore my tongue
舌やその他の
04:32
and all of my other vocal equipment
声に必要な部位が
04:34
was rendered powerless.
役に立たなくなったのです
04:37
Dean Ornish: At first for a long time,
初めのうちは しばらく
04:41
I wrote messages in notebooks.
言いたいことは ノートに綴りました
04:43
Then I tried typing words on my laptop
それからラップトップに打ち始め
04:45
and using its built in voice.
合成音声に切り替えました
04:47
This was faster,
この方が速く
04:49
and nobody had to try to read my handwriting.
私の筆跡を解読してもらう手間も省けました
04:51
I tried out various computer voices that were available online,
ネット上にある 様々な合成音声を試し
04:53
and for several months I had a British accent,
イギリス訛りで話した頃もありました
04:56
which Chaz called Sir Lawrence."
これをチャズは
ローレンス卿と呼んでいました
04:58
(Laughter)
(笑)
05:00
"It was the clearest I could find.
この音声が一番 明快だったんです
05:02
Then Apple released the Alex voice,
その後 アップルがAlex をリリースしました
05:04
which was the best I'd heard.
当時のどの音声よりも優れていて
05:06
It knew things like the difference
感嘆符と疑問符の違いなども
05:08
between an exclamation point and a question mark.
認識してくれます
05:10
When it saw a period, it knew how to make a sentence
ピリオドがあれば きちんと文章を終わらせ
05:12
sound like it was ending instead of staying up in the air.
文の終わりが宙に浮いている様にはなりません
05:14
There are all sorts of html codes you can use
HTML コードを使えば
05:18
to control the timing and inflection of computer voices,
タイミングや抑揚もコントロールできます
05:20
and I've experimented with them.
これは いろいろ使ってみましたが
05:23
For me, they share a fundamental problem: they're too slow.
根本的に遅いのが問題です
05:25
When I find myself in a conversational situation,
会話をする状況では
05:28
I need to type fast and to jump right in.
どんどんタイプして
話についていかなければなりません
05:31
People don't have the time or the patience
言葉やフレーズを
コードをいじって調整するのを
05:35
to wait for me to fool around with the codes
待ってもらうわけにはいきません
05:37
for every word or phrase.
待ってもらうわけにはいきません
05:39
But what value do we place on the sound of our own voice?
ところで 自分の声には
どのくらいの価値があるのでしょう?
05:41
How does that affect who you are as a person?
自分であることに
どのくらい影響があるのでしょう
05:44
When people hear Alex speaking my words,
Alex の話す私の言葉を聞いて
05:47
do they experience a disconnect?
私との繋がりを感じるでしょうか?
05:49
Does that create a separation or a distance
それとも 隔たりや距離を
05:51
from one person to the next?
感じてしまうでしょうか?
05:53
How did I feel not being able to speak?
話すことができなくなって 何を感じたかというと
05:56
I felt, and I still feel,
今でも 感じているのは
05:58
a lot of distance from the human mainstream.
世間との大きな距離感です
06:00
I've become uncomfortable when I'm separated from my laptop.
ラップトップが手元にないと
不安に感じるようになりました
06:02
Even then, I'm aware that most people have little patience
私の言語障害に付き合うのは
06:06
for my speaking difficulties.
大変だということも分かっています
06:08
So Chaz suggested finding a company that could make a customized voice
チャズが 過去30年のテレビ番組の声を使って
06:11
using my TV show voice
私の声をカスタマイズしてくれる
06:14
from a period of 30 years.
会社を探そうと提案してくれましたが
06:16
At first I was against it.
最初はそれには反対でした
06:18
I thought it would be creepy
なんだか気持悪いと思ったんです
06:20
to hear my own voice coming from a computer.
コンピューターが私の声で話すのを聞くなんて
06:22
There was something comforting about a voice that was not my own.
自分の声でないところに
ほっとするようなものがありました
06:24
But I decided then to just give it a try.
でも とりあえずやってみようって決めたんです
06:27
So we contacted a company in Scotland
スコットランドにある 合成音声を
06:29
that created personalized computer voices.
カスタマイズする会社に問い合わせると
06:31
They'd never made one from previously-recorded materials.
既存の録音から合成音声を作った試しはなく
06:34
All of their voices had been made by a speaker
録音室で本人が読んだ単語を
録音して作っているのだそうです
06:37
recording original words in a control booth.
録音室で本人が読んだ単語を
録音して作っているのだそうです
06:39
But they were willing to give it a try.
でも やってみようと言ってくれたので
06:41
So I sent them many hours of recordings of my voice,
何時間もの私の声の録音や
06:43
including several audio commentary tracks
DVD用に録音した
06:46
that I'd made for movies on DVDs.
映画評論のオーディオトラックも
何本か渡しました
06:48
And it sounded like me, it really did.
これは私の声そのものです
06:51
There was a reason for that; it was me.
もちろんです だってこの声は私なんですから
06:53
But it wasn't that simple.
でも そう簡単に事は進みませんでした
06:56
The tapes from my TV show weren't very useful
テレビ番組の録画はあまり役に立たなかったんです
06:58
because there were too many other kinds of audio involved --
音声以外の雑音が多すぎました
07:01
movie soundtracks, for example, or Gene Siskel arguing with me --
映画のサウンドトラックとか
相棒のジーン・シスケルの口論とか
07:04
(Laughter)
(笑)
07:07
and my words often had a particular emphasis
しかも 私の発音に
独特の語調があったりして
07:09
that didn't fit into a sentence well enough.
文の中に 自然に収まらないのです
07:11
I'll let you hear a sample of that voice.
この声をお聞かせします
07:14
These are a few of the comments I recorded for use
これらはテレビのために録音したコメントで
07:16
when Chaz and I appeared on the Oprah Winfrey program.
オプラ・ウインフリーの番組に
チャズと一緒に出演した時のものです
07:19
And here's the voice we call Roger Jr.
この音声を私たちはロジャー・ジュニアとか
07:22
or Roger 2.0.
ロジャー2.0と呼んでいます
07:24
Roger 2.0: Oprah, I can't tell you how great it is
オプラ またこの番組で
ご一緒出来て
07:27
to be back on your show.
本当にうれしいです
07:29
We have been talking for a long time,
これまでも いろいろお話しましたが
07:32
and now here we are again.
またお会いできましたね
07:35
This is the first version of my computer voice.
これが出来立ての
私の合成音声です
07:37
It still needs improvement,
まだ改善が必要ですが
07:40
but at least it sounds like me
確かに私の声に聞こえますし
07:42
and not like HAL 9000.
『2001年宇宙の旅』の
HAL 9000 の声とは違います
07:44
When I heard it the first time,
これを最初に聞いた時
07:47
it sent chills down my spine.
背中がゾクっとしました
07:49
When I type anything,
何かをタイプすれば
07:52
this voice will speak whatever I type.
この声がタイプしたことをしゃべります
07:54
When I read something, it will read in my voice.
何か読むのも 私の声で読み上げてくれます
07:56
I have typed these words in advance,
ここに座って私がタイプするのを見ていても
07:59
as I didn't think it would be thrilling
あまり面白くないでしょうから
08:02
to sit here watching me typing.
事前に 言いたいことを入力してきました
08:04
The voice was created by a company in Scotland
この合成音声はスコットランドにある会社で作られました
08:06
named CereProc.
セレプロックという会社です
08:09
It makes me feel good
うれしいことに
08:11
that many of the words you are hearing were first spoken
お聞きいただいている言葉の大部分は
08:13
while I was commenting on "Casablanca"
実は『カサブランカ』と『市民ケーン』の評論に
08:16
and "Citizen Kane."
使われたものなんです
08:19
This is the first voice they've created for an individual.
これは この会社が個人のために作った
初めての音声です
08:22
There are several very good voices available for computers,
コンピューターの合成音声でも
かなり良いものもありますが
08:25
but they all sound like somebody else,
どれも他人が話しているように聞こえます
08:28
while this voice sounds like me.
その点 これは私が喋っているようです
08:31
I plan to use it on television, radio
これをテレビやラジオ
08:34
and the Internet.
インターネットで使うつもりです
08:37
People who need a voice should know
声が必要な人たちに知って欲しいのは
08:39
that most computers already come with built-in speaking systems.
殆どのコンピューターに
音声システムが付いていることです
08:42
Many blind people use them
目の不自由な人たちは こういった合成音声を
08:45
to read pages on the Web to themselves.
ウェブサイトを読む時に使っています
08:47
But I've got to say, in first grade,
小学校一年のとき
08:50
they said I talked too much,
しゃべりすぎると言われたものですが
08:52
and now I still can.
今でもそういられるのです
08:54
(Laughter)
(笑)
08:56
Roger Ebert: As you can hear, it sounds like me,
私が喋っているように 聞こえますが
08:59
but the words jump up and down.
単語があちこち 飛んでいる感じです
09:02
The flow isn't natural.
流れが自然ではないんです
09:04
The good people in Scotland are still improving my voice,
スコットランドで まだがんばって
私の声を改善してくれているので
09:06
and I'm optimistic about it.
今後 もっと良くなると思います
09:09
But so far, the Apple Alex voice
でも今の所 アップル社のAlex が
09:11
is the best one I've heard.
一番自然に聞こえます
09:13
I wrote a blog about it
ブログに書いたのですが
09:15
and actually got a comment from the actor who played Alex.
Alexの声を担当した俳優に訊いたところ
09:17
He said he recorded many long hours in various intonations
彼はこの合成音声のために様々な抑揚を
09:20
to be used in the voice.
何時間もかけて 録音したと言っていました
09:23
A very large sample is needed.
非常に多くのサンプルが必要なんですね
09:25
John Hunter: All my life I was a motormouth.
私は話し出すと止まらないタイプでした
09:28
Now I have spoken my last words,
最後に喋った言葉が何だったか
09:31
and I don't even remember for sure
はっきり思い出せないのですが
09:34
what they were.
はっきり思い出せないのですが
09:36
I feel like the hero of that Harlan Ellison story
ハーラン・エリスンの
『おれには口がない、それでもおれは叫ぶ』の
09:38
titled "I Have No Mouth and I Must Scream."
主人公のような気持ちになります
09:41
On Wednesday, David Christian explained to us
水曜日の講演で デビッド・クリスチャンが
09:45
what a tiny instant the human race represents
宇宙の歴史から見ると 人類の存在なんて
09:48
in the time-span of the universe.
ほんの一瞬だという話をしました
09:51
For almost all of its millions and billions of years,
何百万、何十億万年のほとんどの間
09:53
there was no life on Earth at all.
地球には生命体が全くなかったんです
09:56
For almost all the years of life on Earth,
地球生命体の歴史を見ても
09:59
there was no intelligent life.
知的生命体の歴史は浅いものです
10:02
Only after we learned to pass knowledge
私たちが知識を次の世代に
10:04
from one generation to the next,
受け渡すことを学んで始めて
10:06
did civilization become possible.
文明が可能になりました
10:08
In cosmological terms,
宇宙の視点から見れば
10:10
that was about 10 minutes ago.
それはたった10分前の事です
10:12
Finally came mankind's most advanced and mysterious tool,
そして人間にとって最も発達し
かつ神秘的な道具がやってきました
10:15
the computer.
コンピューターです
10:19
That has mostly happened in my lifetime.
この進歩は 私が生まれてから起こったものです
10:21
Some of the famous early computers
初期の有名なコンピューターの中には
10:24
were being built in my hometown of Urbana,
私の生まれ育ったアーバナ市で
作られたものもありました
10:26
the birthplace of HAL 9000.
HAL9000 の生誕地ともされています
10:29
When I heard the amazing talk
水曜日にサルマン・カーンの
10:32
by Salman Khan on Wednesday,
素晴らしい講演を聞きました
10:34
about the Khan Academy website
カーン・アカデミーのウェブサイトで
10:36
that teaches hundreds of subjects to students all over the world,
沢山の科目を世界中の人に教えているという話です
10:38
I had a flashback.
これを聞いて 思い出したんです
10:41
It was about 1960.
1960年頃だったと思います
10:43
As a local newspaper reporter still in high school,
私は高校生でしたが
地元の新聞記者をしていました
10:46
I was sent over to the computer lab of the University of Illinois
イリノイ大学のコンピューター室へ行って
10:49
to interview the creators
PLATOという名のものの
10:52
of something called PLATO.
製作者たちにインタービューするよう言われました
10:54
The initials stood for Programmed Logic
PLATOはプログラムド・ロジック・フォー
10:56
for Automated Teaching Operations.
オートメーテッド・ティーチング・
オペレーションズの頭文字です
10:58
This was a computer-assisted instruction system,
コンピュータを使った教育システムで
11:02
which in those days ran on a computer named ILLIAC.
当時 ILLIACというコンピュータ上で稼働していました
11:05
The programmers said it could assist students in their learning.
プログラマーたちは これが将来
学習を援助するんだ と言っていましたが
11:08
I doubt, on that day 50 years ago,
50年前のあの時
サルマン・カーンが達成した事が
11:12
they even dreamed of what Salman Khan has accomplished.
可能になるなんて 彼らですら
考えてもいなかったと思います
11:15
But that's not the point.
それはどうでも良いことで
11:19
The point is PLATO was only 50 years ago,
私が言いたかったのは
PLATOはたった50年前
11:21
an instant in time.
つい最近のものなのです
11:24
It continued to evolve and operated in one form or another
PLATO は進化を続け より高度な
コンピューターで
11:26
on more and more sophisticated computers,
いろいろな形で使われてきたのです
11:29
until only five years ago.
5年前に知ったのですが
11:32
I have learned from Wikipedia
ウィキベディアによると
11:34
that, starting with that humble beginning,
PLATO は地味な形で始まったものの
11:36
PLATO established forums, message boards,
フォーラムや掲示板
11:39
online testing,
オンラインのテストや
11:42
email, chat rooms,
メールやチャット
11:44
picture languages, instant messaging,
絵文字やインスタント・メッセージ
11:46
remote screen sharing
リモートでスクリーンをシェアしたり
11:49
and multiple-player games.
マルチプレーヤー・ゲームを可能にしたのです
11:51
Since the first Web browser was also developed in Urbana,
最初のウェブブラウザもアーバナ市で
開発されたので
11:54
it appears that my hometown
私の生まれ育った
11:57
in downstate Illinois
イリノイ州の南部のこの街は
11:59
was the birthplace
現在 我々の生きる バーチャルな
12:01
of much of the virtual, online universe we occupy today.
ネット世界の生誕地だったんです
12:03
But I'm not here from the Chamber of Commerce.
商工会議所に頼まれて
宣伝している訳ではありません(笑)
12:06
(Laughter)
商工会議所に頼まれて
宣伝している訳ではありません(笑)
12:08
I'm here as a man who wants to communicate.
コミュニケートしたい1人の人間として
話しているのです
12:10
All of this has happened in my lifetime.
すべて私の生涯中に起こったことです
12:13
I started writing on a computer back in the 1970s
1970年代にコンピューターを使って書き始めました
12:16
when one of the first Atech systems was installed
シカゴ・サン・タイムズ社に ごく初期の
12:19
at the Chicago Sun-Times.
Atechシステムが設置されたんです
12:22
I was in line at Radio Shack
ラジオシャック社のModel100を
12:25
to buy one of the first Model 100's.
発売直後に買うために並んだこともありました
12:27
And when I told the people in the press room at the Academy Awards
アカデミー賞のプレスルームの係りに
こう言った事もあります
12:30
that they'd better install some phone lines for Internet connections,
インターネット接続用に
電話線を何本か用意したらいいって
12:33
they didn't know what I was talking about.
でも あの頃は わかってもらえなかった
12:36
When I bought my first desktop,
初めて買ったデスクトップは
12:39
it was a DEC Rainbow.
DEC のレインボーでした
12:41
Does anybody remember that?"
覚えている方いらっしゃいますか?
12:43
(Applause)
(拍手)
12:45
"The Sun Times sent me to the Cannes Film Festival
サン・タイムズ社の仕事で
カンヌ映画祭に携行した
12:48
with a portable computer the size of a suitcase
ポータブル・コンピューターは
スーツケースの大きさで
12:50
named the Porteram Telebubble.
ポーテラム・テレバブル という名前でした
12:54
I joined CompuServe
コンピュサーブに入会した頃の
12:56
when it had fewer numbers
総会員数は私のツイッターのフォロワーの
12:58
than I currently have followers on Twitter.
人数よりも少なかったんです
13:00
(Laughter)
(笑)
13:02
CE: All of this has happened
これら全ては
13:06
in the blink of an eye.
またたく間に起こったんです
13:08
It is unimaginable
次に何が起こるかなんて
13:10
what will happen next.
想像できません
13:12
It makes me incredibly fortunate
歴史上のこんな時代に生きているなんて
13:14
to live at this moment in history.
とても幸運だと思います
13:17
Indeed, I am lucky to live in history at all,
歴史上に生きていること自体
ラッキーなことです
13:19
because without intelligence and memory
なぜなら知識や記憶がなかったら
13:22
there is no history.
歴史なんてないからです
13:25
For billions of years,
何十億年もの間
13:27
the universe evolved
なんの予兆もなしに
13:29
completely without notice.
宇宙は進化してきました
13:31
Now we live in the age of the Internet,
私たちは今 インターネットの時代に生き
13:33
which seems to be creating a form of global consciousness.
グローバルな意識を形作っているようです
13:36
And because of it,
そのおかげで
13:39
I can communicate
私はこれまでと同じように
13:41
as well as I ever could.
コミュニケーションがとれるのです
13:43
We are born into a box
私たちは 時と空間に枠付けられた
13:45
of time and space.
箱の中に産まれてきますが
13:47
We use words and communication
その箱から出て
13:50
to break out of it
他の人とつながるために
13:52
and to reach out to others.
言葉やコミュニケーションを使うのです
13:54
For me, the Internet began
便利な道具として使い始めた
13:57
as a useful tool
便利な道具として使い始めた
13:59
and now has become something I rely on
インターネットは 私が毎日生きるために
14:01
for my actual daily existence.
なくてはならないものとなりました
14:04
I cannot speak;
私は話すことができません
14:07
I can only type so fast.
キーボードでの入力は
そんなに速くはできませんし
14:09
Computer voices
合成音声だって
14:12
are sometimes not very sophisticated,
大したものではありませんが
14:14
but with my computer,
でも コンピューターを使って
14:17
I can communicate more widely
以前よりずっと広い
コミュニケーションが取れるようになりました
14:19
than ever before.
以前よりずっと広い
コミュニケーションが取れるようになりました
14:21
I feel as if my blog,
なんだか私のブログ
14:23
my email, Twitter and Facebook
メール、ツイッター、フェースブックが
14:26
have given me a substitute
日々の会話の
14:29
for everyday conversation.
代理のように感じます
14:31
They aren't an improvement,
普通に話せるより良いとは言えませんが
14:34
but they're the best I can do.
これが私にできる最善の事です
14:36
They give me a way to speak.
これらのツールで
私は話せるようになったのです
14:38
Not everybody has the patience
全ての人が 妻 のチャズのように
14:41
of my wife, Chaz.
気長に待ってくれるわけではありません
14:44
But online,
でもネット上では
14:48
everybody speaks at the same speed.
誰もが同じスピードで話しています
14:49
This whole adventure
この人生の冒険を通して
14:54
has been a learning experience.
いろいろな事を学びました
14:56
Every time there was a surgery that failed,
手術が失敗するたびに
14:58
I was left with a little less flesh and bone.
肉と骨は減ってしまい
15:01
Now I have no jaw left at all.
もう顎は全く残っていません
15:04
While harvesting tissue from both my shoulders,
両肩から組織を移植するため手術を繰り返すうちに
15:07
the surgeries left me with back pain
腰痛が生じ
15:10
and reduced my ability to walk easily.
歩くのが困難になりました
15:12
Ironic that my legs are fine,
皮肉なことに 足は大丈夫なんです
15:16
and it's my shoulders that slow up my walk.
肩のせいで歩くのが遅くなったのです
15:18
When you see me today,
今の私は
15:21
I look like the Phantom of the Opera.
「オペラ座の怪人」みたいです
15:23
But no you don't.
そんなことは ないわよ
15:25
(Laughter)
(笑)
15:27
(Applause)
(拍手)
15:29
It is human nature to look at someone like me
私のような人間を見て
15:39
and assume I have lost some of my marbles.
輝きを失ったと推測するのは当然です
15:42
People --
人に --
15:46
(Applause)
(拍手)
15:57
People talk loudly --
大声で--
16:03
I'm so sorry.
ごめんなさい
16:05
Excuse me.
すいません
16:07
(Applause)
(拍手)
16:09
People talk loudly and slowly to me.
大声でゆっくり話しかけられたり
16:13
Sometimes they assume I am deaf.
耳が聞こえないのかと誤解されることもあります
16:17
There are people who don't want to make eye contact.
目が合わない様 視線をそらす人もいます
16:20
Believe me, he didn't mean this as --
こんなはずでは なかったんです
16:24
anyway, let me just read it.
とにかく 続けさせてください
16:26
(Laughter)
(笑)
16:28
You should never let your wife read something like this.
こんなこと自分の妻に
読ませるものじゃないわよ
16:33
(Laughter)
(笑)
16:36
It is human nature
人間というものは
16:40
to look away from illness.
病気から目をそらせるものなのです
16:42
We don't enjoy a reminder
命のもろさを
16:45
of our own fragile mortality.
思い起こさせるものは嫌なのです
16:47
That's why writing on the Internet
だからインターネットを使って
16:50
has become a lifesaver for me.
ものが書ける事に救われたんです
16:52
My ability to think and write
考えたり 書く能力は
16:54
have not been affected.
昔のままです
16:57
And on the Web, my real voice finds expression.
ネット上では 言いたいことを上手く表現できます
16:59
I have also met many other disabled people
このようなコミュニケーションの手段をとる
17:02
who communicate this way.
他の障碍者にも多く出会いました
17:05
One of my Twitter friends
足の指でキーボードを打つ
17:08
can type only with his toes.
ツイッターフレンドもいます
17:10
One of the funniest blogs on the Web
とても面白いブログを書く
17:12
is written by a friend of mine
友達がいるんですが
17:14
named Smartass Cripple.
ペンネームは「キザな障害者」
17:16
(Laughter)
(笑)
17:18
Google him and he will make you laugh.
ググってみて下さい
笑えると思いますよ
17:20
All of these people are saying, in one way or another,
言い方は違っても こういった人が
17:23
that what you see
口をそろえて言うのは
17:25
is not all you get.
見た目が全てではないということです
17:27
So I have not come here to complain.
泣き言を言うために ここに来たのではありません
17:29
I have much to make me happy and relieved.
生活を幸せにし安心させてくれるものにも恵まれています
17:32
I seem, for the time being,
当面は ガンも治ったみたいです
17:35
to be cancer-free.
当面は ガンも治ったみたいです
17:37
I am writing as well as ever.
執筆も進み 今まで以上に
17:39
I am productive.
良いものを書いています
17:41
If I were in this condition at any point
もし私が宇宙の時間で
ほんのちょっとでも前に
17:43
before a few cosmological instants ago,
こんな状況におかれていたら
17:46
I would be as isolated as a hermit.
世から引っ込んで孤立していたでしょう
17:49
I would be trapped inside my head.
自分だけの世界に閉じ込められていたはずです
17:52
Because of the rush of human knowledge,
人類の知識が飛躍し
17:54
because of the digital revolution,
デジタル革命のおかげで
17:57
I have a voice,
私は言いたいことが言え
17:59
and I do not need to scream.
叫ぶ必要がないのです
18:01
RE: Wait. I have one more thing to add.
もう一つ付け加えたいことがあります
18:05
A guy goes into a psychiatrist.
ある男が精神科に行きました
18:10
The psychiatrist says, "You're crazy."
精神科医に「きちがいだ」と言われ
18:12
The guy says, "I want a second opinion."
男が「セカンド・オピニオンが欲しい」と言うと
18:15
The psychiatrist says, "All right, you're ugly."
精神科医は言いました
「付け足すとすれば 顔もブサイクだ」
18:18
(Laughter)
(笑)
18:22
You all know the test for artificial intelligence -- the Turing test.
人工知能のチューリングテストは
皆さん ご存知です
18:25
A human judge has a conversation
人間の判定者に
18:29
with a human and a computer.
人間と機械相手に会話をしてもらい
18:31
If the judge can't tell the machine apart from the human,
もし判定者が相手が人間か機械か
区別ができなかったら
18:33
the machine has passed the test.
その機械はテストに合格です
18:36
I now propose a test for computer voices -- the Ebert test.
合成音声のテストに
イーバート・テストはどうでしょう?
18:39
If a computer voice can successfully tell a joke
もし 合成音声が
ヘニー・ヤングマンの様に
18:43
and do the timing and delivery as well as Henny Youngman,
うまいタイミングでギャグを言えたなら
18:46
then that's the voice I want.
それが私の欲しい声なのです
18:49
(Applause)
(拍手)
18:51
Translated by Mariko Imada
Reviewed by Akiko Hicks

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Roger Ebert - Film critic and blogger
After losing the power to speak, legendary film critic Roger Ebert went on to write about creativity, race, politics and culture -- and film, just as brilliantly as ever.

Why you should listen

By any measure, Roger Ebert was a legend. The first person to win a Pulitzer for film criticism, as film critic for the Chicago Sun-Times, he was best known for his decades-long reign as the co-host of Sneak Previews, a TV show with fellow Chicago critic Gene Siskel. For 23 years and three title changes (finally settling on Siskel and Ebert and the Movies) the two critics offered smart, short-form film criticism that guided America's moviegoing. After Gene Siskel died in 1999, Ebert kept on with critic Richard Roeper. (And he was also the co-screenwriter of the Russ Meyer cult classic Beyond the Valley of the Dolls, a fact that astounded more than a few young film students.)

In 2006, Ebert began treatment for thyroid cancer. He told the story of his many surgeries and setbacks in an immensely-worth-reading Esquire story in 2010. Enduring procedure after procedure, he eventually lost the lower part of his jaw -- and with it his ability to eat and speak. Turning to his blog and to Twitter, he found a new voice for his film work and his sparkling thoughts on ... just about everything. He tried his hand as an Amazon affiliate, became a finalist in the New Yorker caption contest, and started a controversy or two. In 2013 Ebert passed away from cancer at the age of 70.

More profile about the speaker
Roger Ebert | Speaker | TED.com