sponsored links
INK Conference

Susan Lim: Transplant cells, not organs

スーザン・リム: 臓器移植ではなく細胞移植を

December 7, 2010

先駆的な外科医 スーザン・リムはアジア初の肝臓移植を行いました。しかし臓器の提供先にまつわる倫理的な懸念から、臓器そのものの移植の代わりに、細胞を移植する可能性が生まれました。INKカンファレンスで、リムは予想外な部位から得られる細胞をめぐる新しい研究を紹介します。

Susan Lim - Surgeon
A surgical pioneer in Singapore, Susan Lim is a researcher and entrepreneur. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
So I was privileged to train in transplantation
私は幸運にも 二人の先駆的外科医から
00:16
under two great surgical pioneers:
移植の研修を受けました
00:20
Thomas Starzl,
一人はトーマス・スターツル氏
00:22
who performed the world's first successful liver transplant
1967年に肝移植を世界で初めて
00:24
in 1967,
成功させた医師です
00:27
and Sir Roy Calne,
もう一人は ロイ・カーン氏
00:29
who performed the first liver transplant in the U.K.
翌年に イギリスで初めての
00:31
in the following year.
肝移植を行った医師です
00:34
I returned to Singapore
シンガポールに戻った私は
00:37
and, in 1990,
1990年に
00:39
performed Asia's first successful
死体肝移植を
00:41
cadaveric liver transplant procedure,
アジアで初めて成功させました
00:43
but against all odds.
大きな困難はありましたが
00:46
Now when I look back,
今 思い返してみると
00:49
the transplant was actually the easiest part.
移植手術は 一番容易な部分でした
00:51
Next, raising the money to fund the procedure.
手術費を賄うことのほうが大変でした
00:55
But perhaps the most challenging part
しかし 最も大変だったのは
00:59
was to convince the regulators --
行政の説得だったと思います
01:03
a matter which was debated in the parliament --
国会では 若い外科女医に この国の
01:05
that a young female surgeon
先駆者になる機会を
01:09
be allowed the opportunity
与えても良いかという
01:11
to pioneer for her country.
議論がされていました
01:13
But 20 years on,
それから20年経ちましたが
01:16
my patient, Surinder,
私が担当したスリンダーさんは
01:18
is Asia's longest surviving
死体肝移植を受けた患者の中で
01:20
cadaveric liver transplant to date.
現在 アジアでは最も長生きをしています
01:22
(Applause)
(拍手)
01:25
And perhaps more important,
それよりも 彼女の14歳になる息子の
01:29
I am the proud godmother
後見人であることを
01:32
to her 14 year-old son.
私は誇りに思っています
01:34
(Applause)
(拍手)
01:36
But not all patients on the transplant wait list
しかし 移植を待つ患者全員が
01:40
are so fortunate.
幸運なわけではありません
01:42
The truth is,
現実は
01:44
there are just simply not enough donor organs
ドナー提供される臓器が
01:46
to go around.
単に足りていないのです
01:48
As the demand for donor organs
ドナー臓器の需要は
01:50
continues to rise,
特に高齢者人口の関係で
01:52
in large part due to the aging population,
上がる一方ですが
01:54
the supply has remained relatively constant.
供給量は ほぼ横ばいのままです
01:57
In the United States alone,
アメリカだけを見ても
02:01
100,000 men, women and children
10万人もの成人男女と子どもが
02:03
are on the waiting list for donor organs,
移植を待っていて
02:07
and more than a dozen die each day
毎日12人以上の患者が 亡くなっています
02:10
because of a lack of donor organs.
ドナー提供される臓器の不足が原因です
02:13
The transplant community
移植に関わる人達は
02:16
has actively campaigned in organ donation.
これまで積極的な活動を推し進めています
02:18
And the gift of life
命の贈り物は
02:21
has been extended
脳死したドナーや
02:23
from brain-dead donors
生存中で血縁のある
02:25
to living, related donors --
ドナーから移植されています
02:27
relatives who might donate an organ
全臓器 または分割肝移植のように
02:29
or a part of an organ,
臓器の一部を
02:32
like a split liver graft,
親類や愛する人達へ
02:34
to a relative or loved one.
提供するのです
02:36
But as there was still a dire shortage of donor organs,
しかし ドナー提供される臓器が大幅に不足していたため
02:39
the gift of life was then extended
生存中で血縁のあるドナーだけではなく
02:42
from living, related donors
今では 生存中で
02:44
to now living, unrelated donors.
血縁のないドナーからも提供されるようになりました
02:46
And this then has given rise
これによって 誰も予期しなかった
02:49
to unprecedented and unexpected
前例のない倫理的な問題が
02:52
moral controversy.
議論されるようになりました
02:55
How can one distinguish
自発的でかつ利他的な思いから
02:58
a donation that is voluntary and altruistic
提供するケースと
03:01
from one that is forced or coerced
強要されて提供するケースを
03:04
from, for example,
どのように見分けることができるでしょうか
03:07
a submissive spouse, an in-law,
配偶者や義理の家族の言いなりになっている人
03:09
a servant, a slave,
召使いや奴隷
03:12
an employee?
雇い人のような人達です
03:14
Where and how can we draw the line?
どのように区別できるでしょうか
03:16
In my part of the world,
アジアでは あまりにも多くの人たちが
03:20
too many people live below the poverty line.
貧困線以下の暮らしをしています
03:23
And in some areas,
ある地域では
03:26
the commercial gifting of an organ
血縁のないドナーに
03:28
in exchange for monetary reward
対価を払って行われる
03:30
has led to a flourishing trade
臓器の売買が
03:33
in living, unrelated donors.
盛んに行われています
03:35
Shortly after I performed the first liver transplant,
私が初めて肝移植をしてから間も無く
03:39
I received my next assignment,
次の課題が与えられました
03:42
and that was to go to the prisons
それは刑務所に行き
03:44
to harvest organs
処刑された死刑囚から
03:47
from executed prisoners.
臓器を摘出することでした
03:49
I was also pregnant at the time.
そのとき私は妊娠中でした
03:52
Pregnancies are meant
妊娠している期間は
03:55
to be happy and fulfilling moments
どんな女性にとっても人生の中で
03:57
in any woman's life.
幸せに満ちたときであるはずです
04:00
But my joyful period
でも私の幸せな期間は
04:02
was marred by solemn and morbid thoughts --
重苦しく憂鬱な思いが離れませんでした
04:04
thoughts of walking through
重警備の死刑囚収容棟を
04:09
the prison's high-security death row,
通り抜けるときの思いです
04:11
as this was the only route
臨時の手術室には
04:14
to take me to the makeshift operating room.
ここを通らなければ行けませんでした
04:16
And at each time,
毎回
04:20
I would feel the chilling stares
有罪判決を受けた囚人から
04:22
of condemned prisoners' eyes follow me.
恐怖を覚えるような視線を感じました
04:25
And for two years,
2年間 私は
04:29
I struggled with the dilemma
ジレンマで苦しみました
04:31
of waking up at 4:30 am
金曜の朝
04:33
on a Friday morning,
4時半に目を覚まし
04:35
driving to the prison,
刑務所へ車を走らせ
04:37
getting down, gloved and scrubbed,
手を洗い 手袋をして
04:39
ready to receive the body
処刑された囚人の死体を
04:41
of an executed prisoner,
受け取る準備をし
04:44
remove the organs
臓器を摘出した後
04:46
and then transport these organs
その臓器を
04:48
to the recipient hospital
受取先の病院に運び
04:50
and then graft the gift of life
同じ日の午後には
04:52
to a recipient the same afternoon.
命の贈り物を患者に移植するのです
04:55
No doubt, I was informed,
同意が得られていたことは
04:58
the consent had been obtained.
知らされていました
05:00
But, in my life,
しかし 私の人生で
05:06
the one fulfilling skill that I had
やりがいを感じていた自分の唯一の技能が
05:08
was now invoking feelings of conflict --
心の葛藤を引き起こしていました
05:13
conflict ranging
早朝に
05:17
from extreme sorrow and doubt at dawn
これほどにないまでの悲しみと疑念を感じ
05:19
to celebratory joy
夕暮れには
05:23
at engrafting the gift of life at dusk.
命の贈り物を移植することで喜びを感じるのです
05:25
In my team,
私の医療チームには
05:29
the lives of one or two of my colleagues
心理的に追い込まれた同僚が
05:31
were tainted by this experience.
一人か二人いました
05:34
Some of us may have been sublimated,
感情を抑えて仕事をした仲間がいたかもしれませんが
05:37
but really none of us remained the same.
誰一人として影響を受けなかった者はいません
05:40
I was troubled
私には処刑された囚人から
05:44
that the retrieval of organs from executed prisoners
臓器を摘出するのは 少なくともヒト胚から
05:47
was at least as morally controversial
幹細胞を採取するのと同様に
05:51
as the harvesting of stem cells
倫理的問題であるように感じ
05:54
from human embryos.
思い悩みました
05:56
And in my mind,
また 先駆的な外科医として
05:59
I realized as a surgical pioneer
影響を及ぼせる地位にいる私は
06:01
that the purpose of my position of influence
そうでない人達のために
06:04
was surely to speak up
声をあげることが
06:07
for those who have no influence.
自らの目的であることに気づきました
06:09
It made me wonder
もっと良い方法はないかと
06:12
if there could be a better way --
思案しました
06:14
a way to circumvent death
死を回避しながらも
06:16
and yet deliver the gift of life
命の贈り物を 世界中にいる
06:19
that might exponentially impact
何百万人もの患者に届けて
06:21
millions of patients worldwide.
莫大な影響をもたらせる方法です
06:24
Now just about that time,
ちょうどその頃
06:28
the practice of surgery evolved
手術の仕方が進歩して
06:30
from big to small,
以前は大きく
06:32
from wide open incisions
切り開いていた手術が
06:34
to keyhole procedures,
鍵穴のような切開へと
06:36
tiny incisions.
処置が変わりました
06:38
And in transplantation, concepts shifted
また 臓器移植の概念が
06:41
from whole organs to cells.
全臓器から細胞に移行しました
06:44
In 1988, at the University of Minnesota,
1988年にミネソタ大学で行われた
06:47
I participated in a small series
全膵移植の連続手術に
06:50
of whole organ pancreas transplants.
私は参加しました
06:53
I witnessed the technical difficulty.
技術的困難を目の当たりにし
06:56
And this inspired in my mind
全臓器移植から
06:59
a shift from transplanting whole organs
細胞移植にシフトする考えに
07:01
to perhaps transplanting cells.
動かされました
07:05
I thought to myself,
私は 膵臓から採取した
07:07
why not take the individual cells
個々の細胞を移植してはどうかと思いました
07:09
out of the pancreas --
その細胞は
07:12
the cells that secrete insulin to cure diabetes --
糖尿病の治療に用いられる
07:14
and transplant these cells? --
インスリンを分泌する細胞です
07:17
technically a much simpler procedure
厳密に言えば
07:20
than having to grapple with the complexities
全臓器を移植する複雑さより
07:22
of transplanting a whole organ.
ずっと簡単な取り組み方です
07:25
And at that time,
その頃
07:28
stem cell research
1990年代に
07:30
had gained momentum,
世界で初めて行われた
07:32
following the isolation of the world's first
ヒト胚性幹細胞の分離で
07:34
human embryonic stem cells
幹細胞の研究は
07:37
in the 1990s.
勢いを増していました
07:39
The observation that stem cells, as master cells,
マスト細胞とも呼ばれる幹細胞が
07:42
could give rise
様々な異なる細胞型
07:45
to a whole variety of different cell types --
例えば 心臓細胞
07:47
heart cells, liver cells,
肝臓細胞
07:49
pancreatic islet cells --
膵島細胞などを
07:51
captured the attention of the media
作り出せるという見方は メディアが注目し
07:53
and the imagination of the public.
世間の人たちの期待をかきたてました
07:56
I too was fascinated
この新しくて混乱をも起こす
07:59
by this new and disruptive cell technology,
細胞技術には私も興味がわき
08:01
and this inspired a shift in my mindset,
全臓器移植から細胞移植への
08:04
from transplanting whole organs
移行に対する
08:07
to transplanting cells.
私の考え方も変わりました
08:09
And I focused my research on stem cells
細胞移植の可能性を秘めた幹細胞に
08:12
as a possible source
私は研究の焦点を
08:15
for cell transplants.
定めました
08:17
Today we realize
幹細胞には たくさんの
08:20
that there are many different types of stem cells.
異なるタイプがあることがわかっています
08:22
Embryonic stem cells
主要な位置を占めるのが
08:25
have occupied center stage,
胚性幹細胞です
08:27
chiefly because of their pluripotency --
理由は その多能性です
08:29
that is their ease in differentiating
多能性とは 非常に多くの細胞に
08:33
into a variety of different cell types.
分化できると言う意味です
08:36
But the moral controversy
でも胚性幹細胞は
08:40
surrounding embryonic stem cells --
人間の5日目の桑実胚から
08:43
the fact that these cells are derived
採取されることから
08:46
from five-day old human embryos --
倫理的な問題があるため
08:48
has encouraged research
他の幹細胞の研究に
08:51
into other types of stem cells.
拍車がかかりました
08:53
Now to the ridicule of my colleagues,
同僚からは馬鹿にされましたが
08:56
I inspired my lab
研究所のスタッフには
09:00
to focus on what I thought
論争にならないと私が感じた幹細胞の根源に
09:02
was the most non-controversial source of stem cells,
焦点を当てるように話しました
09:05
adipose tissue, or fat, yes fat --
その根源とは脂肪組織です
09:09
nowadays available in abundant supply --
今や 必要以上に蓄えた脂肪を取り除くのは
09:12
you and I, I think, would be very happy to get rid of anyway.
多くの人にとって願ったり叶ったりでしょう
09:16
Fat-derived stem cells
脂肪から採取した幹細胞は
09:21
are adult stem cells.
成体幹細胞です
09:23
And adult stem cells
成体幹細胞は
09:25
are found in you and me --
私たちの血液や
09:27
in our blood, in our bone marrow,
骨髄や脂肪
09:29
in our fat, our skin and other organs.
皮膚や臓器から採取できますが
09:31
And as it turns out,
成体幹細胞を
09:34
fat is one of the best sources
採取するのに一番適しているのは
09:36
of adult stem cells.
脂肪だったのです
09:38
But adult stem cells
しかし成体幹細胞は
09:40
are not embryonic stem cells.
胚性幹細胞ではないため
09:42
And here is the limitation:
限界があります
09:45
adult stem cells are mature cells,
成体幹細胞は成熟した細胞です
09:47
and, like mature human beings,
成人した人間のようなものです
09:50
these cells are more restricted in their thought
このような細胞は可能性が限られていて
09:53
and more restricted in their behavior
性質に制限があるので
09:56
and are unable to give rise
胚性幹細胞のように
09:59
to the wide variety of specialized cell types,
様々な特化している細胞は
10:01
as embryonic stem cells [can].
つくりだせません
10:04
But in 2007,
しかし2007年に
10:06
two remarkable individuals,
素晴らしい二人
10:09
Shinya Yamanaka of Japan
日本にいる山中 伸弥氏と
10:12
and Jamie Thomson of the United States,
アメリカにいるジェイミー・トンプソン氏が
10:14
made an astounding discovery.
目覚ましい発見をしました
10:17
They discovered
成人から採取した
10:20
that adult cells, taken from you and me,
成体幹細胞を
10:22
could be reprogrammed
胚性幹細胞のようにプログラムし直せることを
10:25
back into embryonic-like cells,
発見しました
10:28
which they termed IPS cells,
その細胞は iPS細胞 または
10:30
or induced pluripotent stem cells.
人工多能性幹細胞と呼ばれています
10:33
And so guess what,
今や 世界中で
10:38
scientists around the world and in the labs
研究者たちが競っているのは
10:40
are racing
我々の体にある
10:43
to convert aging adult cells --
老化している大人の細胞を
10:45
aging adult cells from you and me --
プログラムし直して
10:48
they are racing to reprogram these cells
もっと有効活用できるiPS細胞に
10:50
back into more useful IPS cells.
つくりかえることです
10:53
And in our lab,
私たちの研究所では
10:58
we are focused on taking fat
採取した大量の脂肪を
11:00
and reprogramming
若い細胞を
11:02
mounds of fat
プログラムし直すことに
11:04
into fountains of youthful cells --
集中しました
11:06
cells that we may use
将来的に若い細胞を
11:10
to then form other,
他の特化した細胞につくり変え
11:12
more specialized, cells,
さらに それを
11:14
which one day may be used as cell transplants.
細胞移植に使用できるかもしれません
11:16
If this research is successful,
この研究が成功すれば
11:20
it may then reduce the need
ヒト胚の研究の必要性や
11:23
to research and sacrifice
犠牲になるヒト胚も
11:26
human embryos.
減るでしょう
11:28
Indeed, there is a lot of hype, but also hope
様々な憶測も耳にしますが
11:32
that the promise of stem cells
幹細胞の可能性が
11:35
will one day provide cures
様々な病気の
11:37
for a whole range of conditions.
治療法をもたらす可能性もあります
11:39
Heart disease, stroke, diabetes,
心臓病 脳卒中 糖尿病
11:41
spinal cord injury, muscular dystrophy,
骨髄損傷 筋ジストロフィー
11:44
retinal eye diseases --
網膜の病気などありますが
11:46
are any of these conditions
皆さん自身に
11:49
relevant, personally, to you?
関係があるものはありませんか?
11:51
In May 2006,
2006年の5月
11:54
something horrible happened to me.
私は恐ろしい経験をしました
11:57
I was about to start a robotic operation,
ロボット手術をするために
12:00
but stepping out of the elevator
エレベーターから
12:02
into the bright and glaring lights of the operating room,
まぶしい照明が設置されている手術室へ出たとき
12:04
I realized
急に
12:07
that my left visual field
左目の視界が
12:09
was fast collapsing into darkness.
真っ暗になりました
12:11
Earlier that week,
その週
12:14
I had taken a rather hard knock
私は春スキーに行き 転んだ時に
12:16
during late spring skiing -- yes, I fell.
かなり強い衝撃を受けて 視界に
12:18
And I started to see floaters and stars,
浮遊物や星が見えていました
12:21
which I casually dismissed
高地の太陽光の強さも
12:23
as too much high-altitude sun exposure.
原因となるため 普段は気にしていません
12:25
What happened to me
ここで起きていたのは
12:28
might have been catastrophic,
もし適切な外科処置がなければ
12:30
if not for the fact
大変な結果に
12:32
that I was in reach of good surgical access.
なったかもしれなかったのです
12:34
And I had my vision restored,
視覚は取り戻しましたが
12:36
but not before a prolonged period of convalescence --
回復まで ずいぶんかかりました
12:38
three months --
3ヶ月間も
12:41
in a head down position.
うつ伏せのままでした
12:43
This experience
この経験をしたことで
12:45
taught me to empathize more with my patients,
自分の患者 特に網膜の病気を患っている方たちの
12:47
and especially those with retinal diseases.
大変さがよくわかりました
12:50
37 million people worldwide
世界には3700万人も
12:54
are blind,
目が見えない人たちがいます
12:56
and 127 million more
更に1億2700万人の人たちが
12:58
suffer from impaired vision.
視覚障害をもっています
13:01
Stem cell-derived retinal transplants,
網膜幹細胞移植の研究が
13:04
now in a research phase,
現在進行中なので
13:07
may one day restore vision,
将来は 世界中にいる
13:09
or part vision,
網膜の病気を患う
13:11
to millions of patients with retinal diseases worldwide.
何百万人もの患者の視覚を回復させられるかもしれません
13:13
Indeed, we live
私たちは
13:17
in both challenging
能力が試される時代
13:19
as well as exciting times.
刺激的な時代を生きています
13:21
As the world population ages,
世界人口が高齢化しているため
13:25
scientists are racing
科学者たちは競うように
13:28
to discover new ways
幹細胞を使った治療法で
13:30
to enhance the power of the body
体の力を強める方法を
13:32
to heal itself through stem cells.
研究しています
13:34
It is a fact
人間の臓器や
13:37
that when our organs or tissues are injured,
組織が損傷すると
13:39
our bone marrow
骨髄は
13:42
releases stem cells
血液に
13:44
into our circulation.
幹細胞を放出します
13:46
And these stem cells
その幹細胞は
13:48
then float in the bloodstream
血流をただよって
13:50
and hone in to damaged organs
損傷した臓器へ向かい 損傷した組織を
13:52
to release growth factors
修復する増殖因子を
13:55
to repair the damaged tissue.
放出します
13:57
Stem cells may be used as building blocks
幹細胞は体内の損傷した組織を治すための
13:59
to repair damaged scaffolds within our body,
構成要素になったり
14:02
or to provide new liver cells
損傷した肝臓を治すために
14:06
to repair damaged liver.
新たな肝臓細胞をつくれるかもしれません
14:08
As we speak, there are 117 or so clinical trials
現在 肝臓病用の幹細胞を調査するために
14:11
researching the use of stem cells
117ほどの臨床試験が
14:14
for liver diseases.
行われています
14:17
What lies ahead?
次は何が起きるでしょう
14:19
Heart disease
心臓病は世界中で
14:21
is the leading cause of death worldwide.
死因のトップです
14:23
1.1 million Americans
110万人ものアメリカ人が
14:25
suffer heart attacks yearly.
毎年 心臓発作を起こしています
14:27
4.8 million
480万人が
14:30
suffer cardiac failure.
心不全になっています
14:32
Stem cells may be used
幹細胞は
14:34
to deliver growth factors
損傷した心臓筋を治す
14:36
to repair damaged heart muscle
増殖因子を運ぶために使われたり
14:38
or be differentiated
心臓機能を回復させるための
14:40
into heart muscle cells
心臓筋細胞に
14:42
to restore heart function.
分化されるかもしれません
14:44
There are 170 clinical trials
心臓病に関わる幹細胞の役割を調査するため
14:46
investigating the role of stem cells in heart disease.
170もの臨床試験が行われています
14:49
While still in a research phase,
研究が行われている中
14:53
stem cells may one day herald
幹細胞が心臓学の分野で
14:56
a quantum leap in the field of cardiology.
飛躍的な前進を見せるかもしれません
14:59
Stem cells provide hope for new beginnings --
幹細胞は新たな始まりにつなぐ希望を与えてくれます
15:03
small, incremental steps,
進歩は少しずつではあっても
15:06
cells rather than organs,
臓器ではなく細胞を移植し
15:09
repair rather than replacement.
交換ではなく復元できる希望があります
15:12
Stem cell therapies
幹細胞療法は 将来的に
15:15
may one day reduce the need for donor organs.
臓器提供の必要性を減少させるかもしれません
15:18
Powerful new technologies
大きな変化をもたらす新技術は
15:22
always present enigmas.
必ず難題がつきものです
15:24
As we speak,
現在も
15:26
the world's first human embryonic stem cell trial for spinal cord injury
骨髄損傷にヒト胚性幹細胞を使う世界初の試みが
15:28
is currently underway
米国食品医薬局の
15:31
following the USFDA approval.
承諾を得て進行中です
15:33
And in the U.K.,
また英国では
15:36
neural stem cells to treat stroke
脳卒中治療のための神経幹細胞を
15:38
are being investigated in a phase one trial.
調査する臨床試験が第一段階にあります
15:40
The research success that we celebrate today
現在 大きな役割を果たしている
15:44
has been made possible
研究の成功例は
15:47
by the curiosity and contribution and commitment
科学者や医療先駆者の好奇心と貢献と
15:49
of individual scientists
献身があるからこそ
15:53
and medical pioneers.
実現しているのです
15:55
Each one has his story.
そこにはそれぞれの物語があります
15:57
My story has been about my journey
私の物語は 臓器から細胞へ至るまでに
16:00
from organs to cells --
論争を通じて
16:03
a journey through controversy,
経験した出来事です
16:05
inspired by hope --
また そこには
16:07
hope that, as we age,
我々が年をとり長生きしたときに
16:09
you and I may one day celebrate longevity
人生の質の向上を喜んでいる可能性を含んだ
16:12
with an improved quality of life.
希望があるのです
16:15
Thank you.
ありがとう
16:17
Translator:Takako Sato
Reviewer:Lily Yichen Shi

sponsored links

Susan Lim - Surgeon
A surgical pioneer in Singapore, Susan Lim is a researcher and entrepreneur.

Why you should listen

Dr Susan Lim is the current Co-chair of the Global Advisory Council of the International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR). She performed the first successful cadaveric liver transplant for Singapore in 1990, the second woman in the world to have done so at the time.

Her academic recognitions include election as Fellow, Trinity College (2005), University of Melbourne, the Monash University Distinguished Alumnus Award (2006), and an Honorary Degree of Doctor of Medicine by The University of Newcastle, Australia (2007). In 2007, the American Academy of Continuing Medical Education (AACME) 28th award, was named the “Dr Susan Lim Award” for the advancement in Laparoscopic & Minimally Invasive Surgery. Her more recent public lectures include “Robotic Surgery - Engineering from a surgeon’s perspective”, as visiting scholar to UC Berkeley, and a 2016 TEDx Berkeley talk “The Dawn of a New Ecosystem in Organ Replacement.”

For her humanitarian work, she was recognized in the Australian House of Parliament (House of Representatives Official Hansard no. 17, 2005) for treating Australian victims of the second Bali bomb blast. In giving back to society, the family have established the Dr. Susan Lim Endowment for Education and Research, which supports medical and research scholarships at Trinity College, University of Melbourne, the University of Newcastle, Australia, and the International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR).

 

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.