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TED2011

Kathryn Schulz: On being wrong

キャサリン・シュルツ: 間違えるという事

March 4, 2011

多くの人々は、間違いを避けようとします。でも、それ自体が間違いだとしたら?“間違い主義者”のキャサリン・シュルツが、人間の持つ、間違いをしがちな性質を受容するための事例をご紹介します。

Kathryn Schulz - Wrongologist
Kathryn Schulz is a staff writer for the New Yorker and is the author of "Being Wrong: Adventures in the Margin of Error." Full bio

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Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
So it's 1995,
1995年の事でした
00:15
I'm in college,
大学生だった私は
00:18
and a friend and I go on a road trip
友人と車の旅に出ました
00:20
from Providence, Rhode Island
ロードアイランド州のプロビデンスから
00:23
to Portland, Oregon.
オレゴン州のポートランドまでです
00:25
And you know, we're young and unemployed,
二人とも若く 職にも就いていなかったので
00:27
so we do the whole thing on back roads
一般道を使って遠回りをしました
00:30
through state parks
州立公園や
00:32
and national forests --
国有林を通って
00:34
basically the longest route we can possibly take.
できる限り長い距離を走りました
00:37
And somewhere in the middle of South Dakota,
サウスダコタ州の真ん中あたりで
00:41
I turn to my friend
私は友人に
00:44
and I ask her a question
質問をしました
00:47
that's been bothering me
2000マイルのドライブの間
00:49
for 2,000 miles.
ずっと気になっていた事です
00:51
"What's up with the Chinese character I keep seeing by the side of the road?"
"道の脇に見える漢字は どういう意味?"
00:55
My friend looks at me totally blankly.
友人はポカンとして私を見つめました
01:02
There's actually a gentleman in the front row
最前列にお座りの男性が
01:06
who's doing a perfect imitation of her look.
その時の彼女とまさに同じ表情をしています
01:08
(Laughter)
(観衆 笑)
01:11
And I'm like, "You know,
“だから
01:14
all the signs we keep seeing
さっきから出てる
01:16
with the Chinese character on them."
漢字の標識よ”
01:18
She just stares at me for a few moments,
友人はしばらく私を見つめ
01:22
and then she cracks up,
そして大笑いしました
01:25
because she figures out what I'm talking about.
私の質問を理解したのです
01:28
And what I'm talking about is this.
この標識のことです
01:30
(Laughter)
(観衆 笑)
01:33
Right, the famous Chinese character for picnic area.
ピクニック場を示す有名な漢字です
01:39
(Laughter)
(観衆 笑)
01:43
I've spent the last five years of my life
私はこの5年間ずっと
01:45
thinking about situations
似たような状況について
01:49
exactly like this --
考えてきました
01:51
why we sometimes misunderstand
なぜ時々人は 標識の意味を
01:54
the signs around us,
間違えるのか?
01:56
and how we behave when that happens,
間違えた時 人はどう反応するのか?
01:58
and what all of this can tell us about human nature.
これは人間の本質の何を示すのか?
02:01
In other words, as you heard Chris say,
言い換えると クリスさんが言ったように
02:05
I've spent the last five years
私はこの5年間
02:07
thinking about being wrong.
間違えるという事について考えてきました
02:09
This might strike you as a strange career move,
変わったキャリア転換と思われるでしょう
02:12
but it actually has one great advantage:
でも良い所もあります
02:15
no job competition.
仕事の競争はありません
02:18
(Laughter)
(観衆 笑)
02:20
In fact, most of us do everything we can
実際 多くの人々は間違いを避けるために
02:22
to avoid thinking about being wrong,
できる限りの事をします
02:25
or at least to avoid thinking about the possibility
少なくとも 自分が間違えるという
02:28
that we ourselves are wrong.
可能性は考えません
02:30
We get it in the abstract.
理論の上では
02:32
We all know everybody in this room makes mistakes.
ここにいる全員が間違いをすると理解しています
02:34
The human species, in general, is fallible -- okay fine.
一般的に 人間は間違いをしがちな生き物です
02:37
But when it comes down to me, right now,
でも私自身について言えば
02:41
to all the beliefs I hold,
自分の信念にかけて
02:44
here in the present tense,
今この瞬間には
02:46
suddenly all of this abstract appreciation of fallibility
間違いをしがちな性質への理論上の理解は
02:49
goes out the window --
完全に消え失せています
02:53
and I can't actually think of anything I'm wrong about.
自分が間違っているとは思いもしません
02:56
And the thing is, the present tense is where we live.
つまり私たちは現在時制で生きているのです
03:00
We go to meetings in the present tense;
現在時制で会議に出席し
03:03
we go on family vacations in the present tense;
現在時制で家族と休暇に出かけ
03:06
we go to the polls and vote in the present tense.
現在時制で投票します
03:08
So effectively, we all kind of wind up traveling through life,
事実上 私たちは一生
03:12
trapped in this little bubble
常に正しいという感情に捕らわれて
03:15
of feeling very right about everything.
過ごす羽目になるのです
03:17
I think this is a problem.
これこそが問題です
03:21
I think it's a problem for each of us as individuals,
仕事やプライベートを問わず
03:23
in our personal and professional lives,
私たち個人レベルの問題であり
03:26
and I think it's a problem for all of us collectively as a culture.
人類全体の文化上の問題でもあります
03:29
So what I want to do today
今日は最初に
03:32
is, first of all, talk about why we get stuck
正しいという感情に
03:34
inside this feeling of being right.
陥る理由をお話します
03:37
And second, why it's such a problem.
次に なぜそれが問題なのか
03:39
And finally, I want to convince you
そして最後に 正しいという感情から
03:42
that it is possible
抜け出す事は可能だと
03:44
to step outside of that feeling
皆さんにご理解いただきたいのです
03:46
and that if you can do so,
正しいという感情から
03:48
it is the single greatest
抜け出す事は
03:50
moral, intellectual and creative leap you can make.
道徳的で知的で創造的な素晴らしい飛躍です
03:52
So why do we get stuck
なぜ私たちは
03:57
in this feeling of being right?
正しいという感情に陥ってしまうのでしょう
03:59
One reason, actually, has to do with a feeling of being wrong.
理由の一つは 間違える時の感情に起因します
04:01
So let me ask you guys something --
皆さんにお尋ねします―
04:04
or actually, let me ask you guys something, because you're right here:
そちらの方々に伺いましょう 近くですから
04:06
How does it feel -- emotionally --
間違えるという事について 気持ちの上では
04:10
how does it feel to be wrong?
どのように感じますか?
04:13
Dreadful. Thumbs down.
嫌悪 不満
04:16
Embarrassing. Okay, wonderful, great.
羞恥 良い回答です
04:19
Dreadful, thumbs down, embarrassing --
嫌悪 不満 羞恥
04:21
thank you, these are great answers,
ありがとう 素晴らしい回答です
04:23
but they're answers to a different question.
でも質問を取り違えています
04:26
You guys are answering the question:
皆さんの回答は
04:29
How does it feel to realize you're wrong?
“間違いを認識した時どう感じるか?”です
04:31
(Laughter)
(観衆 笑)
04:34
Realizing you're wrong can feel like all of that and a lot of other things, right?
間違いを認識した時 回答の通りに感じます
04:38
I mean it can be devastating, it can be revelatory,
つまり 破壊的であり 啓示的
04:41
it can actually be quite funny,
私の漢字の間違いのように
04:44
like my stupid Chinese character mistake.
冗談に聞こえるかもしれません
04:46
But just being wrong
しかし 間違える行為には
04:49
doesn't feel like anything.
何の感情も伴わないのです
04:52
I'll give you an analogy.
1つ例をご紹介します
04:54
Do you remember that Loony Tunes cartoon
アニメのルーニー・テューンズを覚えていますか?
04:57
where there's this pathetic coyote
哀れなコヨーテは
04:59
who's always chasing and never catching a roadrunner?
ロードランナーを追いかけますが 失敗します
05:01
In pretty much every episode of this cartoon,
毎回のように登場するエピソードです
05:03
there's a moment where the coyote is chasing the roadrunner
コヨーテがロードランナーを追いかけて
05:06
and the roadrunner runs off a cliff,
ロードランナーは崖の先に逃げます
05:08
which is fine -- he's a bird, he can fly.
ロードランナーは大丈夫 鳥なので飛べます
05:10
But the thing is, the coyote runs off the cliff right after him.
でもコヨーテが 崖より先に追いかけると
05:13
And what's funny --
面白い事に
05:17
at least if you're six years old --
子供なら面白いはずですが
05:19
is that the coyote's totally fine too.
コヨーテも大丈夫な事です
05:21
He just keeps running --
コヨーテは走り続けます
05:23
right up until the moment that he looks down
足元を見るまでずっと
05:25
and realizes that he's in mid-air.
自分が空中にいると気付いたら
05:27
That's when he falls.
その時 落下が始まるのです
05:30
When we're wrong about something --
私たちが間違える時―
05:34
not when we realize it, but before that --
間違いを認識する直前は―
05:36
we're like that coyote
コヨーテそのものです
05:39
after he's gone off the cliff and before he looks down.
崖の先に行った後 下を見るまでの瞬間です
05:42
You know, we're already wrong,
もう間違っているのに
05:46
we're already in trouble,
ピンチに立っているのに
05:49
but we feel like we're on solid ground.
地面の上に居るかのように感じる
05:51
So I should actually correct something I said a moment ago.
先ほどの言葉を訂正します
05:55
It does feel like something to be wrong;
違う感情が起きるのです
05:58
it feels like being right.
つまり正しいと感じます
06:01
(Laughter)
(観衆 笑)
06:04
So this is one reason, a structural reason,
これが正しさに固執する
06:07
why we get stuck inside this feeling of rightness.
構造上の1つの理由です
06:10
I call this error blindness.
間違いの盲目性と私は呼んでいます
06:12
Most of the time,
多くの場合
06:14
we don't have any kind of internal cue
何か間違いをした時
06:16
to let us know that we're wrong about something,
それには全く気がつきません
06:19
until it's too late.
手遅れなのです
06:21
But there's a second reason that we get stuck inside this feeling as well --
正しいという感情に陥る 2つ目の理由は
06:24
and this one is cultural.
文化的なものです
06:27
Think back for a moment to elementary school.
小学生の頃を思い出してください
06:30
You're sitting there in class,
あなたは教室に居て
06:33
and your teacher is handing back quiz papers,
先生がテストを返却します
06:35
and one of them looks like this.
生徒の中にはこんな表情の子もいます
06:38
This is not mine, by the way.
私ではありませんよ
06:40
(Laughter)
(観衆 笑)
06:42
So there you are in grade school,
あなたが小学校に居て
06:44
and you know exactly what to think
採点されたテストを受け取る時
06:47
about the kid who got this paper.
こんな評価を受ける子は
06:49
It's the dumb kid, the troublemaker,
頭の悪い トラブルメーカーと思いますよね
06:52
the one who never does his homework.
宿題は絶対やらない子です
06:55
So by the time you are nine years old,
つまり 9歳になる頃には
06:58
you've already learned, first of all,
すでに学習しているのです
07:01
that people who get stuff wrong
間違いをする人間は
07:03
are lazy, irresponsible dimwits --
怠け者で 無責任で 愚か者であると
07:05
and second of all,
そして
07:08
that the way to succeed in life
人生で成功する方法は
07:10
is to never make any mistakes.
間違いをしない事だと
07:12
We learn these really bad lessons really well.
この悪い教訓をしっかりと学びます
07:16
And a lot of us --
多くの人々は―
07:21
and I suspect, especially a lot of us in this room --
特にこの会場の大多数の方は
07:23
deal with them by just becoming
この教訓をもとに
07:27
perfect little A students,
完璧な優等生になるのです
07:29
perfectionists, over-achievers.
完璧主義者 頑張り屋さん
07:31
Right,
そうです
07:34
Mr. CFO, astrophysicist, ultra-marathoner?
CFO兼宇宙物理学者で 熱心なマラソン選手の方のように
07:36
(Laughter)
(観衆 笑)
07:40
You're all CFO, astrophysicists, ultra-marathoners, it turns out.
皆さんはCFO兼宇宙物理学者で 熱心なマラソン選手ですね
07:47
Okay, so fine.
いいでしょう
07:51
Except that then we freak out
間違いをする可能性に
07:53
at the possibility that we've gotten something wrong.
恐れる事を除けば
07:56
Because according to this,
間違いの盲目性によると
07:58
getting something wrong
間違いをする事は
08:01
means there's something wrong with us.
何か自分に間違いがあると意味します
08:03
So we just insist that we're right,
だから人は正しいと主張するのです
08:06
because it makes us feel smart and responsible
自分は賢くて信頼を得る高潔で
08:08
and virtuous and safe.
安全な人間と感じるためです
08:10
So let me tell you a story.
ある女性の話をしましょう
08:14
A couple of years ago,
数年前
08:16
a woman comes into Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center for a surgery.
ベス・イスラエル・ディアコネス・メディカルセンターで手術を受けました
08:18
Beth Israel's in Boston.
ボストンのベス・イスラエルは
08:21
It's the teaching hospital for Harvard --
ハーバードの教育病院で―
08:23
one of the best hospitals in the country.
全米屈指の病院です
08:25
So this woman comes in and she's taken into the operating room.
その女性は手術室に運ばれ
08:27
She's anesthetized, the surgeon does his thing --
麻酔をかけられ 手術を受け
08:30
stitches her back up, sends her out to the recovery room.
縫合され 術後回復室に入りました
08:32
Everything seems to have gone fine.
すべてが順調に見えました
08:35
And she wakes up, and she looks down at herself,
彼女は眼を覚まし 自分の姿を見て言いました
08:38
and she says, "Why is the wrong side of my body in bandages?"
“なぜ違う側が包帯されているのかしら?”
08:41
Well the wrong side of her body is in bandages
間違った側面に包帯が巻かれていたのです
08:45
because the surgeon has performed a major operation
外科医が手術したのは
08:48
on her left leg instead of her right one.
手術すべき右足ではなく 左足だったのです
08:50
When the vice president for health care quality at Beth Israel
ベス・イスラエルの医療機能評価機構の副会長が
08:54
spoke about this incident,
この出来事について
08:57
he said something very interesting.
非常に興味深い発言をしました
09:00
He said, "For whatever reason,
“どんな理由にせよ
09:03
the surgeon simply felt
外科医は純粋に
09:06
that he was on the correct side of the patient."
患者の正しい側面を手術していると思っていた”
09:08
(Laughter)
(観衆 笑)
09:10
The point of this story
この話の要点は
09:15
is that trusting too much in the feeling
いかなる場合でも 正しいという感覚に
09:17
of being on the correct side of anything
頼りすぎると
09:20
can be very dangerous.
危険だという事です
09:23
This internal sense of rightness
直感的に正しいと思う事は
09:26
that we all experience so often
頻繁にありますが
09:29
is not a reliable guide
外界の現実の出来事の
09:31
to what is actually going on in the external world.
指針としては信頼できません
09:33
And when we act like it is,
正しさの内部感覚を信頼し
09:36
and we stop entertaining the possibility that we could be wrong,
間違いをする可能性を楽しむ事を
09:38
well that's when we end up doing things
やめてしまうと
09:42
like dumping 200 million gallons of oil into the Gulf of Mexico,
メキシコ湾に2億ガロンの石油を投棄したり
09:44
or torpedoing the global economy.
世界経済を粉砕したりする事態に陥ります
09:48
So this is a huge practical problem.
とても現実的な問題なのです
09:52
But it's also a huge social problem.
同時に 社会的な問題です
09:55
Think for a moment about what it means to feel right.
正しく感じる瞬間とは
09:58
It means that you think that your beliefs
あなたの信念が
10:02
just perfectly reflect reality.
そのまま現実に反映された時です
10:04
And when you feel that way,
正しいと感じるている時
10:07
you've got a problem to solve,
仮に何か解決すべき問題があって
10:09
which is, how are you going to explain
周囲の全員があなたに反対している時
10:11
all of those people who disagree with you?
彼らに どう説明しますか?
10:13
It turns out, most of us explain those people the same way,
多くの人は 残念な仮説に基づき
10:16
by resorting to a series of unfortunate assumptions.
同じ方法を使って説明します
10:19
The first thing we usually do when someone disagrees with us
周囲に反対されたら まず最初に
10:23
is we just assume they're ignorant.
彼らが無知だと思います
10:26
They don't have access to the same information that we do,
同じ情報を持たないため
10:29
and when we generously share that information with them,
親切に情報を共有してあげれば
10:31
they're going to see the light and come on over to our team.
彼らは真理を知り 自分の側につくだろうと
10:34
When that doesn't work,
この考えが違った場合
10:37
when it turns out those people have all the same facts that we do
つまり 同じ事実を共有していても
10:40
and they still disagree with us,
彼らに反対されたら
10:42
then we move on to a second assumption,
2つ目の仮説を立てます
10:44
which is that they're idiots.
彼らは間抜け
10:46
(Laughter)
(観衆 笑)
10:48
They have all the right pieces of the puzzle,
パズルのピースが全て揃っても
10:50
and they are too moronic to put them together correctly.
愚かさ故に 正しくピースを合わせられない
10:52
And when that doesn't work,
さらにその仮説が正しくない場合
10:55
when it turns out that people who disagree with us
つまり 彼らは反対し
10:57
have all the same facts we do
同じ事実を共有し
11:00
and are actually pretty smart,
彼らは優秀である
11:02
then we move on to a third assumption:
そこで3つ目の仮説に移ります
11:05
they know the truth,
彼らは真実を知っていて
11:08
and they are deliberately distorting it
悪意を持って
11:11
for their own malevolent purposes.
意図的に歪めているのだと
11:13
So this is a catastrophe.
これは大惨事です
11:17
This attachment to our own rightness
自身の正しさへの愛着は
11:19
keeps us from preventing mistakes
最も大事な時でも
11:22
when we absolutely need to
間違いの防止には役立ちません
11:24
and causes us to treat each other terribly.
酷い態度で接し合う事態を招きます
11:26
But to me, what's most baffling
私にとって 最も不可解で
11:30
and most tragic about this
悲劇的な事は
11:32
is that it misses the whole point of being human.
人間である意味を失う事です
11:35
It's like we want to imagine
例えて言うと
11:39
that our minds are just these perfectly translucent windows
私たちの考えが半透明な窓で
11:41
and we just gaze out of them
ぼんやりと その窓を眺めるだけで
11:44
and describe the world as it unfolds.
それが全世界だと評し
11:46
And we want everybody else to gaze out of the same window
皆が同じ窓から眺める景色が
11:49
and see the exact same thing.
全く同じである事なんて
11:51
That is not true,
望みませんよね
11:53
and if it were, life would be incredibly boring.
仮にそれが真実なら 人生はなんと退屈でしょう
11:55
The miracle of your mind
精神の奇跡は
11:58
isn't that you can see the world as it is.
世界をそのままに見られる事ではなく
12:01
It's that you can see the world as it isn't.
世界を違う角度から見られる事です
12:05
We can remember the past,
過去を思い出したり
12:09
and we can think about the future,
未来のことを考えたり
12:11
and we can imagine what it's like
別の場所で別の人物としての生活を
12:14
to be some other person in some other place.
想像する事も可能です
12:16
And we all do this a little differently,
人は それぞれ違う視点を持つのです
12:19
which is why we can all look up at the same night sky
同じ夜空を見上げて
12:21
and see this
夜空がこのように見えたり
12:23
and also this
またはこんな風に
12:25
and also this.
こう見えるのと同じです
12:27
And yeah, it is also why we get things wrong.
そうです 違う視点も 間違いの要因です
12:30
1,200 years before Descartes said his famous thing
1200年前 デカルトは有名な言葉を残しました
12:34
about "I think therefore I am,"
“我思う 故に我あり”
12:36
this guy, St. Augustine, sat down
聖アウグスティヌスも 座り込み
12:38
and wrote "Fallor ergo sum" --
“ファーラー エルゴ スム”と書き残しました
12:40
"I err therefore I am."
“我誤る 故に我あり”
12:43
Augustine understood
アウグスティヌスは
12:47
that our capacity to screw up,
失敗する能力は
12:49
it's not some kind of embarrassing defect
人間の仕組みの中の
12:51
in the human system,
恥ずべき欠点ではなく
12:53
something we can eradicate or overcome.
克服し 乗り越えらえるものと考えました
12:55
It's totally fundamental to who we are.
人間の在り方の根本です
12:58
Because, unlike God,
なぜなら 神と違って人間は
13:01
we don't really know what's going on out there.
すべての出来事を把握はできません
13:03
And unlike all of the other animals,
また 他の動物と違って
13:06
we are obsessed with trying to figure it out.
その出来事を理解することに執着します
13:09
To me, this obsession
私にとって この執着こそが
13:13
is the source and root
生産や創造の
13:15
of all of our productivity and creativity.
すべての根源です
13:17
Last year, for various reasons,
昨年 諸般の事情から
13:20
I found myself listening to a lot of episodes
公営ラジオをよく聴きました
13:23
of the Public Radio show This American Life.
アメリカン・ライフという名前の番組を
13:25
And so I'm listening and I'm listening,
ずっと聴いているうちに
13:27
and at some point, I start feeling
ある時
13:30
like all the stories are about being wrong.
番組は全て 間違いに関する話だと考え始めました
13:33
And my first thought was,
最初は思いました
13:37
"I've lost it.
私は頭がおかしくなってしまった
13:39
I've become the crazy wrongness lady.
正気じゃないおばさんだ
13:41
I just imagined it everywhere,"
常にそう感じていました
13:43
which has happened.
本当の話です
13:45
But a couple of months later,
でも数ヵ月後
13:47
I actually had a chance to interview Ira Glass, who's the host of the show.
番組司会者のアイラ・グラスにインタビューする機会があり
13:49
And I mentioned this to him,
彼にこの事を話すと
13:51
and he was like, "No actually, that's true.
彼は言いました
13:53
In fact," he says,
“別におかしくない 本当だよ
13:56
"as a staff, we joke
スタッフは
13:58
that every single episode of our show
番組のエピソードには
14:00
has the same crypto-theme.
共通の秘密のテーマがあるって笑うよ
14:02
And the crypto-theme is:
秘密のテーマとは
14:05
'I thought this one thing was going to happen
『最初に予測していた事と
14:07
and something else happened instead.'
別の事が代わりに起こる』”
14:10
And the thing is," says Ira Glass, "we need this.
“実のところ
14:13
We need these moments
驚きや逆転
14:16
of surprise and reversal and wrongness
誤りの瞬間が
14:18
to make these stories work."
ストーリーを成立させる為に必要だ”
14:20
And for the rest of us, audience members,
他の人や観客
14:22
as listeners, as readers,
リスナーや読者たちは
14:24
we eat this stuff up.
もう夢中です
14:27
We love things like plot twists
ひねりの効いたプロットや
14:29
and red herrings and surprise endings.
ひっかけや 意外な結末が好きなのです
14:32
When it comes to our stories,
ストーリーに関して言えば
14:35
we love being wrong.
間違える事は大好きです
14:38
But, you know, our stories are like this
ストーリーと同じ事が
14:41
because our lives are like this.
人生にも当てはまります
14:43
We think this one thing is going to happen
最初に起こると思った事と
14:46
and something else happens instead.
違う事が起こる
14:49
George Bush thought he was going to invade Iraq,
ジョージ・ブッシュ元大統領はイラクに侵攻し
14:52
find a bunch of weapons of mass destruction,
大量破壊兵器を沢山発見するだろうと考えました
14:54
liberate the people and bring democracy to the Middle East.
人々を解放し 中東に民主主義をもたらすと
14:56
And something else happened instead.
でも代わりに別の事が起きました
15:00
And Hosni Mubarak
ホスニ・ムバラク元大統領は
15:03
thought he was going to be the dictator of Egypt for the rest of his life,
生涯 エジプトの独裁者として
15:05
until he got too old or too sick
老衰か病気になるまで地位に留まり
15:07
and could pass the reigns of power onto his son.
息子に支配権を譲ると考えていました
15:09
And something else happened instead.
でも代わりに別の事が起きました
15:12
And maybe you thought
きっとあなたも昔は
15:16
you were going to grow up and marry your high school sweetheart
大人になって 高校時代の恋人と結婚し
15:18
and move back to your hometown and raise a bunch of kids together.
故郷に帰り 子育てをする姿を想像したでしょう
15:20
And something else happened instead.
でも代わりに別の事が起きました
15:24
And I have to tell you
それから私は
15:27
that I thought I was writing an incredibly nerdy book
途方もなく間抜けな本を書いていると思っていました
15:29
about a subject everybody hates
人が嫌うテーマについて
15:31
for an audience that would never materialize.
存在しない観客のために
15:33
And something else happened instead.
でも代わりに別の事が起きました
15:36
(Laughter)
(観衆 笑)
15:38
I mean, this is life.
つまり これが人生です
15:40
For good and for ill,
良くも悪くも
15:42
we generate these incredible stories
このような素晴らしいストーリーは
15:44
about the world around us,
世界中で作り出されています
15:47
and then the world turns around and astonishes us.
地球は回り 私たちを驚かせます
15:49
No offense, but this entire conference
悪く思わないでください この会議はすべて
15:55
is an unbelievable monument
私達の持つ 間違える性質のための
15:58
to our capacity to get stuff wrong.
素晴らしいモニュメントなのです
16:00
We just spent an entire week
この一週間
16:02
talking about innovations and advancements
革新や進歩について
16:04
and improvements,
そして 改善について話をしました
16:06
but you know why we need all of those innovations
なぜ革新 進歩 改善が
16:08
and advancements and improvements?
必要なのでしょう?
16:11
Because half the stuff
その理由の半分は
16:13
that's the most mind-boggling and world-altering --
小難しくて 世界を変えると言った―
16:15
TED 1998 --
TED 1998です―
16:18
eh.
16:20
(Laughter)
(観衆 笑)
16:22
Didn't really work out that way, did it?
そんなに上手くいきませんでしたよね
16:26
(Laughter)
(観衆 笑)
16:28
Where's my jet pack, Chris?
早めに会場から脱出した方が良さそうです
16:30
(Laughter)
(観衆 笑)
16:33
(Applause)
(観衆 拍手)
16:37
So here we are again.
つまり
16:42
And that's how it goes.
こういう事です
16:45
We come up with another idea.
アイデアを思いつき
16:47
We tell another story.
話をして
16:49
We hold another conference.
会議を開催する
16:52
The theme of this one,
テーマは
16:55
as you guys have now heard seven million times,
もう何百万回も聞かされた
16:57
is the rediscovery of wonder.
驚きの再発見です
16:59
And to me,
私にとって
17:01
if you really want to rediscover wonder,
驚きを再発見することは
17:03
you need to step outside
自分を解放し 正しさという名の
17:06
of that tiny, terrified space of rightness
小さくて恐ろしい殻から抜け出すことです
17:08
and look around at each other
お互いを見つめ
17:14
and look out at the vastness
この広大で
17:17
and complexity and mystery
複雑で神秘的な
17:20
of the universe
宇宙を仰ぎ
17:23
and be able to say,
こう呟く事です
17:26
"Wow, I don't know.
ああ 何だろう
17:29
Maybe I'm wrong."
きっと自分は間違っている'
17:33
Thank you.
ありがとうございます
17:35
(Applause)
(観衆 拍手)
17:37
Thank you guys.
皆さんありがとう
17:40
(Applause)
(観衆 拍手)
17:42
Translator:Yuko Yamanouchi
Reviewer:SHIGERU MASUKAWA

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Kathryn Schulz - Wrongologist
Kathryn Schulz is a staff writer for the New Yorker and is the author of "Being Wrong: Adventures in the Margin of Error."

Why you should listen

Kathryn Schulz is a journalist, author, and public speaker with a credible (if not necessarily enviable) claim to being the world's leading wrongologist.  She is the author of Being Wrong: Adventures in the Margin of Error. She was previously the book critic for New York Magazine; her writing has also appeared in the New York Times Magazine, Rolling Stone, TIME Magazine, the Boston Globe, the "Freakonomics" blog of The New York Times, The Nation, Foreign Policy, and the New York Times Book Review, among other publications. She is the former editor of the online environmental magazine Grist, and a former reporter and editor for The Santiago Times, of Santiago, Chile, where she covered environmental, labor, and human rights issues. She was a 2004 recipient of the Pew Fellowship in International Journalism (now the International Reporting Project), and has reported from throughout Central and South America, Japan, and, most recently, the Middle East. A graduate of Brown University and a former Ohioan, Oregonian and Brooklynite, she currently lives in New York's Hudson Valley.

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