17:25
TED2002

Dan Dennett: Dangerous memes

ダニエル・ダネットの危険なミーム

Filmed:

アリの単純な話からはじまって、哲学者ダニエル・ダネットは、辛辣なアイデアの集中攻撃を放ち、ミームの存在を論証します:文字通り生きている概念です。

- Philosopher, cognitive scientist
Dan Dennett argues that human consciousness and free will are the result of physical processes. His latest book is "Intuition Pumps and Other Tools for Thinking," Full bio

How many Creationists do we have in the room?
この中に創造説支持者は何人いますか?
00:25
Probably none. I think we're all Darwinians.
おそらく誰もいないでしょう 我々は皆ダーウィン信棒者ですね
00:28
And yet many Darwinians are anxious, a little uneasy --
それでも 多くのダーウィン信奉者は少々不安を抱えていて
00:31
would like to see some limits on just how far the Darwinism goes.
ダーウィン説はいったい何処まで行くのか限界を知りたがっています
00:38
It's all right.
もっともなことです
00:43
You know spiderwebs? Sure, they are products of evolution.
クモの巣を知っていまね?そうです これらは進化の産物です
00:45
The World Wide Web? Not so sure.
ワールドワイドウェブ?どうでしょう
00:49
Beaver dams, yes. Hoover Dam, no.
ビーバーダム そうです フーバーダムは 違います
00:53
What do they think it is that prevents the products of human ingenuity
人間の知恵の産物が、それ自身
00:55
from being themselves, fruits of the tree of life,
ただの産物であることを拒み、その結果
01:01
and hence, in some sense, obeying evolutionary rules?
進化の法則に従っていることを、彼らはどう思うだろう?
01:04
And yet people are interestingly resistant
面白いことに人は 進化的考えを
01:10
to the idea of applying evolutionary thinking to thinking -- to our thinking.
我々の思考に適用するというアイデアに抵抗があります
01:14
And so I'm going to talk a little bit about that,
今日 話すことは沢山あるのですが まずは
01:21
keeping in mind that we have a lot on the program here.
それについて少し話しましょう
01:25
So you're out in the woods, or you're out in the pasture,
あなたは森にいるか 牧草地にいます
01:29
and you see this ant crawling up this blade of grass.
そこで アリが草の葉に這い上がるのを見ます
01:33
It climbs up to the top, and it falls,
上まで這い上がり そして落ちます
01:36
and it climbs, and it falls, and it climbs --
這い上がって落ち また這い上がり
01:39
trying to stay at the very top of the blade of grass.
葉の頂上に留まろうとします
01:42
What is this ant doing? What is this in aid of?
いったい このアリは何をしているんだ?何の役割があるんだ?
01:46
What goals is this ant trying to achieve by climbing this blade of grass?
アリは 葉に登る事でどんな目的に達しようとしているんだ?
01:51
What's in it for the ant?
アリの為になる何があるんだ?
01:58
And the answer is: nothing. There's nothing in it for the ant.
答えは: アリの為になる事など 何もありません
02:00
Well then, why is it doing this?
じゃあ いったい 何でこんなことをするんだ?
02:06
Is it just a fluke?
まぐれ(吸虫)?
02:09
Yeah, it's just a fluke. It's a lancet fluke.
そう 吸虫です ランセット吸虫
02:11
It's a little brain worm.
それは 小さい脳虫です
02:18
It's a parasitic brain worm that has to get into the stomach of a sheep or a cow
そのライフサイクルを続けるために
02:20
in order to continue its life cycle.
羊や牛の胃に寄生する寄生脳虫です
02:25
Salmon swim upstream to get to their spawning grounds,
サケは彼らの産卵場所に着くために上流に向って泳ぎ
02:28
and lancet flukes commandeer a passing ant,
ランセット吸虫は通りすがりのアリを乗っ取って
02:33
crawl into its brain, and drive it up a blade of grass like an all-terrain vehicle.
脳に潜り込み まるでオフロードカーのように葉の上を運転します
02:37
So there's nothing in it for the ant.
だから アリにとっては何の意味もないのです
02:42
The ant's brain has been hijacked by a parasite that infects the brain,
アリの脳は脳に感染する寄生虫に乗っ取られ
02:46
inducing suicidal behavior.
自殺的なふるまいを誘導しました
02:54
Pretty scary.
恐ろしいことです
02:58
Well, does anything like that happen with human beings?
さて こんなことが人間にも起こりうるでしょうか?
03:00
This is all on behalf of a cause other than one's own genetic fitness, of course.
これはその人自身の遺伝的適合性要因はもちろん除きます
03:05
Well, it may already have occurred to you
あなたの心に こう浮かんだことがありますか
03:10
that Islam means "surrender," or "submission of self-interest to the will of Allah."
イスラム教とは「降伏」または「アラーの意志に自己利益を捧げる」
03:15
Well, it's ideas -- not worms -- that hijack our brains.
そうです 我々の脳をハイジャックするのは 虫ではなく アイデアです
03:25
Now, am I saying that a sizable minority of the world's population
さて私は 世界人口の相当数の少数派が寄生的な考えに
03:31
has had their brain hijacked by parasitic ideas?
脳を乗っ取られていると 言っているのでしょうか?
03:36
No, it's worse than that.
いいえ もっとひどいです
03:43
Most people have.
殆んどの人がです
03:45
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:49
There are a lot of ideas to die for.
死ぬに値するアイデアは山ほどあります
03:53
Freedom, if you're from New Hampshire.
自由 あなたがニューハンプシャー州から来たなら...
03:55
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:58
Justice. Truth. Communism.
正義 真実 共産主義
04:02
Many people have laid down their lives for communism,
多くの人が 共産主義のために命を懸け
04:06
and many have laid down their lives for capitalism.
多くは資本主義に命を懸け
04:09
And many for Catholicism. And many for Islam.
多くはカトリック教議 そして多くはイスラム教のため
04:12
These are just a few of the ideas that are to die for.
これらは 死ぬに値するアイデアのほんの少しの例です
04:16
They're infectious.
これらは 伝染性です
04:21
Yesterday, Amory Lovins spoke about "infectious repititis."
昨日 アモリー ラビンズ氏が「伝染性反複」について話しました
04:24
It was a term of abuse, in effect.
あれは実質上 言葉の乱用です
04:28
This is unthinking engineering.
軽率なエンジニアリングです
04:31
Well, most of the cultural spread that goes on
さて 広がり続ける文化の大半は
04:33
is not brilliant, new, out-of-the-box thinking.
目覚しくも 新しくも 斬新な考えでもありません
04:37
It's "infectious repetitis,"
それは 伝染性反複です
04:41
and we might as well try to have a theory of what's going on when that happens
そして 我々は それが起ったとき 伝染条件を理解する為
04:43
so that we can understand the conditions of infection.
何が起きているかを理論的に裏づけしようとするでしょう
04:48
Hosts work hard to spread these ideas to others.
宿主は これらの考えを他に広めるために、一生懸命に動きます
04:54
I myself am a philosopher, and one of our occupational hazards
私は哲学者ですが 職業病の一つは
05:01
is that people ask us what the meaning of life is.
生命の意味は何かと 人々が尋ねることです
05:07
And you have to have a bumper sticker,
あなたはメッセージ性を求め
05:11
you know. You have to have a statement.
意見を求めます
05:14
So, this is mine.
私の意見はこうです
05:17
The secret of happiness is: Find something more important than you are
幸福への秘訣は あなたより重要な何かを見つけ
05:19
and dedicate your life to it.
それに命を捧げること
05:23
Most of us -- now that the "Me Decade" is well in the past --
我々のほとんどは 「自己中心主義の時代」を過去のものとし
05:25
now we actually do this.
これを実行に移しています
05:29
One set of ideas or another
あるアイデア またはその他が
05:31
have simply replaced our biological imperatives in our own lives.
我々の生命における生物的義務に取って代わりました
05:34
This is what our summum bonum is.
我々の最高善が何か
05:38
It's not maximizing the number of grandchildren we have.
それは 孫の数を増やす事ではないのです
05:41
Now, this is a profound biological effect.
これは大きな生物学的影響を及ぼします
05:44
It's the subordination of genetic interest to other interests.
遺伝的興味がその他の興味へと従属したのです
05:48
And no other species does anything at all like it.
これは 他のいかなる種にもかつてなかったことです
05:51
Well, how are we going to think about this?
さて 我々はこれについてどう考えるべきでしょう?
05:55
It is, on the one hand, a biological effect, and a very large one.
一方では 非常に大きな生物学的影響を及ぼします
05:57
Unmistakable.
紛れもありません
06:01
Now, what theories do we want to use to look at this?
では どの理論を使って これを見ていきましょうか?
06:03
Well, many theories. But how could something tie them together?
多くの理論がありますが これらを結びつけるものは?
06:06
The idea of replicating ideas;
思考の複製というアイデア
06:09
ideas that replicate by passing from brain to brain.
脳から脳へと複製していくアイデア
06:12
Richard Dawkins, whom you'll be hearing later in the day, invented the term "memes,"
あとで彼の話を聞けますが リチャード ドーキンスは 「ミーム」という単語を発明し
06:17
and put forward the first really clear and vivid version of this idea
最初に このアイデアを 彼の著書「利己的な遺伝子」で
06:22
in his book "The Selfish Gene."
まことに明白かつ鮮明な説で紹介しました
06:27
Now here am I talking about his idea.
今 私はここで彼のアイデアについて話しています
06:29
Well, you see, it's not his. Yes -- he started it.
わかりますか 彼が始めたアイデアは 今では彼のみのものでなく
06:32
But it's everybody's idea now.
今では皆のアイデアです
06:38
And he's not responsible for what I say about memes.
そして 私がミームを語ることは 彼の責任ではなく
06:41
I'm responsible for what I say about memes.
私がミームを どう語るかは 私に責任があります
06:45
Actually, I think we're all responsible
アイデアが 意図した効果のみでなく
06:50
for not just the intended effects of our ideas,
誤用されている可能性においても
06:53
but for their likely misuses.
事実、我々全ての責任なのです
06:59
So it is important, I think, to Richard, and to me,
だから リチャードや私にとって これらのアイデアが
07:03
that these ideas not be abused and misused.
乱用や誤用されないことは重要です
07:07
They're very easy to misuse. That's why they're dangerous.
それは誤用されやすく だから 危険なのです
07:11
And it's just about a full-time job
そのアイデアに恐れをなした人々が
07:14
trying to prevent people who are scared of these ideas
アイデアを風刺化し、さらに ひどい目的や その他に入り込むのを
07:17
from caricaturing them and then running off to one dire purpose or another.
防ごうとするのは大変な仕事です
07:20
So we have to keep plugging away,
そして 我々は 誤解を訂正するために
07:28
trying to correct the misapprehensions
アイデアの中でも 害の無い 便利な変異形のみが広がり続けるよう
07:31
so that only the benign and useful variants of our ideas continue to spread.
コツコツ働き続けなければなりません
07:33
But it is a problem.
しかし 問題があります
07:41
We don't have much time, and I'm going to go over just a little bit of this and cut out,
あまり時間がないので ほんのさわりだけ話します
07:45
because there's a lot of other things that are going to be said.
なぜなら他にも沢山言うことがあるからです
07:50
So let me just point out: memes are like viruses.
要点を言いますと ミームはウィルスのようなものです
07:53
That's what Richard said, back in '93.
これは93年にリチャードが言いました
07:58
And you might think, "Well, how can that be?
あなたはこう思うでしょう「なんだって どういうことだ?
08:00
I mean, a virus is -- you know, it's stuff! What's a meme made of?"
ウィルスって あれだろ! あんなものでミームが出来てるのか?」
08:02
Yesterday, Negroponte was talking about viral telecommunications
昨日 ニコラス ネグロポンテ氏がウィルス テレコミュニケーションについて話しました
08:09
but -- what's a virus?
じゃあ ウィルスってなんだ?
08:14
A virus is a string of nucleic acid with attitude.
ウイルスとは 行儀の悪い糸状の核酸です
08:15
(Laughter)
(笑)
08:19
That is, there is something about it
でも それ以上の何かがあります
08:20
that tends to make it replicate better than the competition does.
競争相手より 複製しやすい傾向があります
08:22
And that's what a meme is. It's an information packet with attitude.
そして それがミームの特性なのです 態度の悪い情報パケットです
08:26
What's a meme made of? What are bits made of, Mom?
ミームは 何でできてるの? ビットは 何でできてるの ママ?
08:30
Not silicon.
シリコンじゃありません
08:36
They're made of information, and can be carried in any physical medium.
彼らは情報で出来ていて どんな物理的媒体上でも運ぶことができます
08:38
What's a word made of?
単語は何で出来ていますか?
08:42
Sometimes when people say, "Do memes exist?"
私は「ミームは存在するのか?」と聞かれると
08:44
I say, "Well, do words exist? Are they in your ontology?"
「じゃあ 単語は存在しますかね? あなたの存在論にそれはありますか?」と言います
08:49
If they are, words are memes that can be pronounced.
もしあるならば 単語は発音されるミームです
08:53
Then there's all the other memes that can't be pronounced.
それから 発音されないミームも沢山あります
08:58
There are different species of memes.
ミームには異なった種があるのです
09:01
Remember the Shakers? Gift to be simple?
シェイカーズを覚えています?簡素な贈り物?
09:09
Simple, beautiful furniture?
簡素で美しい家具?
09:13
And, of course, they're basically extinct now.
そして もちろん 彼らは現在 基本的に消滅しました
09:16
And one of the reasons is that among the creed of Shaker-dom
その理由の1つは シェイカー王国の信条
09:19
is that one should be celibate.
「人は禁欲すべき」にあります
09:25
Not just the priests. Everybody.
聖職者だけでなく 皆です
09:27
Well, it's not so surprising that they've gone extinct. (Laughter)
これでは 彼らが消滅するのも驚くにはあたりませんね (笑)
09:29
But in fact that's not why they went extinct.
しかし 実際は それが彼らが消滅した理由でありません
09:37
They survived as long as they did
社会的セーフティネットがなければ
09:42
at a time when the social safety nets weren't there.
彼らは生き残ったでしょう
09:45
And there were lots of widows and orphans,
そこには沢山の未亡人や孤児のように
09:47
people like that, who needed a foster home.
住む家が必要な人々がいたので
09:50
And so they had a ready supply of converts.
改宗者は途絶えず
09:53
And they could keep it going.
存続することが出来ました
09:56
And, in principle, it could've gone on forever,
だから ホストの側が完全に禁欲主義でも
09:58
with perfect celibacy on the part of the hosts.
原則としては 永遠に続くことができのです
10:00
The idea being passed on through proselytizing,
遺伝子のラインではなく
10:03
instead of through the gene line.
布教活動を通じて伝わるアイデア
10:08
So the ideas can live on in spite of the fact
こうして アイデアは 遺伝的に伝わらないという
10:13
that they're not being passed on genetically.
事実にもかかわらず生き続けることができます
10:17
A meme can flourish in spite of having a negative impact on genetic fitness.
ミームは、遺伝適合性には負の影響であるのにも関わらず、繁栄できます
10:20
After all, the meme for Shaker-dom was essentially a sterilizing parasite.
結局 シェイカー王国のミームは 基本的に不妊化寄生虫でした
10:24
There are other parasites that do this -- which render the host sterile.
他にもこういう寄生虫がいます -- それはホストを不妊症にします
10:33
It's part of their plan.
それは 彼らの計画の一部です
10:40
They don't have to have minds to have a plan.
ミームは計画に知力を必要としません
10:42
I'm just going to draw your attention to just one
ミーム学の見解上 起こりうる影響は沢山ありますが
10:47
of the many implications of the memetic perspective, which I recommend.
そこから 注意して欲しいものを 一つ 取り上げます
10:52
I've not time to go into more of it.
それ以上にふれる時間はありません
11:01
In Jared Diamond's wonderful book, "Guns, Germs and Steel,"
ジャレド ダイアモンドの素晴らしい本 「銃、病原菌、鉄」で 彼は
11:03
he talks about how it was germs, more than guns and steel,
新しい半球 西半球 を征服し
11:07
that conquered the new hemisphere -- the Western hemisphere --
残りの世界をも征服したのは
11:13
that conquered the rest of the world.
銃と鉄よりも 細菌だったと述べます
11:18
When European explorers and travelers spread out,
ヨーロッパの探検家と旅行者が拡散したとき
11:20
they brought with them the germs
彼らは 彼ら自身には免疫がある
11:27
that they had become essentially immune to,
細菌を運んで行きました
11:29
that they had learned how to tolerate over
彼らは 何百年 何千年に亘って
11:32
hundreds and hundreds of years, thousands of years,
病原菌の源である 家畜と一緒に住むことにで
11:35
of living with domesticated animals who were the sources of those pathogens.
免疫を養ってきたのです
11:38
And they just wiped out -- these pathogens just wiped out the native people,
そして これらの病原菌に全く免疫のなかった
11:43
who had no immunity to them at all.
現地の人々を絶滅させました
11:48
And we're doing it again.
私達は同じ事をしています
11:51
We're doing it this time with toxic ideas.
今度は 有毒な 思考でです
11:55
Yesterday, a number of people -- Nicholas Negroponte and others --
昨日は ニコラス ネグロポンテ氏 を含む沢山の人が
12:00
spoke about all the wonderful things
これらすべての世界中の新しい技術のおかげて
12:04
that are happening when our ideas get spread out,
我々のアイデアが広がったときに起こる
12:06
thanks to all the new technology all over the world.
すべての素晴らしいことについて話しました
12:09
And I agree. It is largely wonderful. Largely wonderful.
それは賛成です 大変素晴らしいことです
12:11
But among all those ideas that inevitably flow out into the whole world
しかし そのテクノロジーのおかげで必然的に全世界に流布する
12:17
thanks to our technology, are a lot of toxic ideas.
これら全てのアイデアの中に 有毒なアイデアもあるのです
12:25
Now, this has been realized for some time.
今では これは自覚されています
12:30
Sayyid Qutb is one of the founding fathers of fanatical Islam,
サイイド クトゥブは 狂信的なイスラム教の創始者のうちの1人で
12:33
one of the ideologues that inspired Osama bin Laden.
ウサーマ ビン ラーディンを奮起させた夢想家の1人です
12:39
"One has only to glance at its press films, fashion shows, beauty contests,
「人は 報道映像や ファッションショー 美人コンテスト
12:44
ballrooms, wine bars and broadcasting stations." Memes.
ダンス場 ワインバーそして放送局をちらっと見るだけ」 ミーム
12:49
These memes are spreading around the world
これらのミームは世界中で広がっています
12:55
and they are wiping out whole cultures.
そして 彼らは文化全体を一掃します
12:59
They are wiping out languages.
言語を一掃します
13:04
They are wiping out traditions and practices.
また 伝統や慣習を一掃します
13:06
And it's not our fault, anymore than it's our fault when our germs lay waste
そして その細菌が 免疫力のない人々を荒廃させるとき
13:11
to people that haven't developed the immunity.
それはもう取り返しのつかない事になります
13:19
We have an immunity to all of the junk that lies around the edges of our culture.
我々は この文化の端々にあるジャンクの全てに対する免疫があります
13:22
We're a free society, so we let pornography and all these things -- we shrug them off.
自由社会だから ポルノとか全部 解禁しよう -- 我々はそれら一蹴します
13:28
They're like a mild cold.
それらは軽い風邪のようなもので
13:34
They're not a big deal for us.
我々にとっては 大した事でありません
13:36
But we should recognize that for many people in the world,
しかし 我々が自覚しなければいけないのは 世界の多くの人々にとって
13:38
they are a big deal.
それは 大変なことなのです
13:42
And we should be very alert to this.
我々は 教育やテクノロジーを広めるにあたって
13:46
As we spread our education and our technology,
非常に気を配らなければなりません
13:49
one of the things that we are doing is we're the vectors of memes
我々はその他沢山のミームのホスト達が
13:52
that are correctly viewed by the hosts of many other memes
正しく予見しているように 彼らにとって 命に代えても守る
14:00
as a dire threat to their favorite memes --
大切なミームを脅かす
14:06
the memes that they are prepared to die for.
有毒なミームを運ぶ媒介者だからです
14:09
Well now, how are we going to tell the good memes from the bad memes?
では どのように 良いミームと悪いミームを見分るのでしょう?
14:12
That is not the job of the science of memetics.
それはミーム学者の仕事ではありません
14:16
Memetics is morally neutral. And so it should be.
ミーム学は 道徳上中立的であるべきで
14:21
This is not the place for hate and anger.
憎しみと怒りの対象ではありません
14:27
If you've had a friend who's died of AIDS, then you hate HIV.
もし あなたに エイズで死んだ友人がいたら あなたはHIVを憎みます
14:31
But the way to deal with that is to do science,
しかし それに対処するのは 科学的にやるべきです
14:36
and understand how it spreads and why in a morally neutral perspective.
なぜ どのように広がるかを 道徳的には中立の視点で理解すること
14:40
Get the facts.
事実を掴むこと
14:47
Work out the implications.
含まれる問題を把握すること
14:49
There's plenty of room for moral passion once we've got the facts
一旦事実を掴めば 道徳的情熱のやり場は山ほどあります
14:53
and can figure out the best thing to do.
そして 一番良いやり方を考えられます
14:57
And, as with germs, the trick is not to try to annihilate them.
そして 細菌のように絶滅させようとしないことがミソです
14:59
You will never annihilate the germs.
細菌は決して絶滅しません
15:04
What you can do, however, is foster public health measures and the like
あなたにできることは 公衆衛生的手段を育むことで
15:07
that will encourage the evolution of avirulence.
非病原性の進化を促すことです
15:13
That will encourage the spread of relatively benign mutations
それは 最有毒種が 比較的良性に変異した種を
15:19
of the most toxic varieties.
広げるように促進することです
15:26
That's all the time I have,
これで 時間切れです
15:29
so thank you very much for your attention.
ご清聴ありがとうございました
15:32
Translated by Kayo Mizutani
Reviewed by Masahiro Kyushima

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Dan Dennett - Philosopher, cognitive scientist
Dan Dennett argues that human consciousness and free will are the result of physical processes. His latest book is "Intuition Pumps and Other Tools for Thinking,"

Why you should listen

One of our most important living philosophers, Dan Dennett is best known for his provocative and controversial arguments that human consciousness and free will are the result of physical processes in the brain. He argues that the brain's computational circuitry fools us into thinking we know more than we do, and that what we call consciousness — isn't. His 2003 book "Freedom Evolves" explores how our brains evolved to give us -- and only us -- the kind of freedom that matters, while 2006's "Breaking the Spell" examines belief through the lens of biology.

This mind-shifting perspective on the mind itself has distinguished Dennett's career as a philosopher and cognitive scientist. And while the philosophy community has never quite known what to make of Dennett (he defies easy categorization, and refuses to affiliate himself with accepted schools of thought), his computational approach to understanding the brain has made him, as Edge's John Brockman writes, “the philosopher of choice of the AI community.”

“It's tempting to say that Dennett has never met a robot he didn't like, and that what he likes most about them is that they are philosophical experiments,” Harry Blume wrote in the Atlantic Monthly in 1998. “To the question of whether machines can attain high-order intelligence, Dennett makes this provocative answer: ‘The best reason for believing that robots might some day become conscious is that we human beings are conscious, and we are a sort of robot ourselves.'"

In recent years, Dennett has become outspoken in his atheism, and his 2006 book Breaking the Spell calls for religion to be studied through the scientific lens of evolutionary biology. Dennett regards religion as a natural -- rather than supernatural -- phenomenon, and urges schools to break the taboo against empirical examination of religion. He argues that religion's influence over human behavior is precisely what makes gaining a rational understanding of it so necessary: “If we don't understand religion, we're going to miss our chance to improve the world in the 21st century.”

Dennett's landmark books include The Mind's I, co-edited with Douglas Hofstaedter, Consciousness Explained, and Darwin's Dangerous Idea. Read an excerpt from his 2013 book, Intuition Pumps, in the Guardian >>

More profile about the speaker
Dan Dennett | Speaker | TED.com