16:32
TEDxMaastricht

Dave deBronkart: Meet e-Patient Dave

デイブ・デブロンカート:e-患者・デイブにこんにちは。

Filmed:

デイブ・デブロンカートさんが末期がんを告知された時、彼はネット上で患者たちのコミュニティーに参加し、彼の主治医たちも知らなかった治療法についての情報を得ることができました。そして、なんとこの治療法こそが彼の命を救ったのです。この経験を機に、彼は、患者同士の交流、患者自身が自分の医療データをきちんと把握することの重要さ、そして、e-患者一人ひとりへの医療の改善を促しています。

- e-Patient
Dave deBronkart wants to help patients help themselves -- by owning their medical data, connecting to fellow patients and making medical care better. Full bio

It's an amazing thing that we're here to talk
このようにして私たちが集結し、
00:15
about the year of patients rising.
現代の患者たちの立ち上がりについて話し合っていることは、素晴らしいことです。
00:18
You heard stories earlier today
今日、これまで患者達が自分たちのケースをきちんとコントロールし、
00:21
about patients who are taking control of their cases,
「治る可能性は分かっているけど、自分で色々な情報を検索してみよう。」
00:23
patients who are saying, "You know what, I know what the odds are,
という活動的な姿勢についての
00:26
but I'm going to go look for more information.
数々のお話を聞いてきました。
00:29
I'm going to define
私も、自分の実体験に基づき、患者として生活する中で
00:31
what the terms of my success are."
成し遂げられたものについてお話します。
00:33
I'm going to be sharing with you
私が4年前に死にそうになり、
00:35
how four years ago I almost died --
もうちょっとで息を引き取りそうになった
00:37
found out I was, in fact,
実体験についても
00:39
already almost dead.
お話したいと思います。
00:41
And what I then found out about what's called the e-Patient movement --
そして、私が知ることができた e-患者動向に
00:43
I'll explain what that term means.
ついてご説明します。
00:46
I had been blogging under the name Patient Dave,
このe-患者動向の存在を知った当時、私は「患者デイブ」
00:48
and when I discovered this,
というハンドルネームでブログをしていて、
00:51
I just renamed myself e-Patient Dave.
後に「e-患者デイブ」に改名しました。
00:53
Regarding the word "patient,"
「患者」という単語に関してですが、
00:55
when I first started a few years ago
私が医療と深く関わりを持つようになり、
00:57
getting involved in health care
見学者として数々のミーティングに
00:59
and attending meetings as just a casual observer,
参加して気付いたのは、
01:01
I noticed that people would talk about patients
皆患者をこの部屋にはいない人たち、
01:03
as if it was somebody who's not in the room here,
別世界の人たちのように
01:05
somebody out there.
話すことです。
01:08
Some of our talks today, we still act like that.
今日の数々のトークの中でも、私達はまだそういう姿勢をとっています。
01:10
But I'm here to tell you,
しかし、私が今日みなさんにお伝えしたいのは、
01:12
"patient" is not a third-person word.
「患者」とは3人称の言葉ではないということです。
01:14
You, yourself,
あなた、あなた自身が病院のベッドで
01:18
will find yourself in a hospital bed --
入院患者として横たわることもあれば、
01:20
or your mother, your child --
あなたの母親や子供がそういう状況におかれることもあるのです。
01:22
there are heads nodding, people who say, "Yes, I know exactly what you mean."
「納得!そのとおり!」とうんうんうなずいている人たちがいますね。
01:24
So when you hear what I'm going to talk about here today,
今日、私がお話するにあたって、
01:27
first of all, I want to say
まず知っておいて頂きたいのは、
01:30
that I am here on behalf
私は、私が今まで出会ってきた患者たち、
01:32
of all the patients that I have ever met,
そして、まだ会ったことがない全ての
01:34
all the ones I haven't met.
患者たちを代表して話をすることです。
01:36
This is about letting patients play a more active role
これは患者さんたちにもっと積極的な役割を与えること。
01:38
in helping health care, in fixing health care.
医療改善の手助けのため、医療修正のため。
01:41
One of the senior doctors at my hospital,
私の病院のベテラン医師のチャーリー・サフランと
01:44
Charlie Safran, and his colleague, Warner Slack,
彼の同僚ワーナー・スラックは、
01:46
have been saying for decades
何十年に渡って、「医療でもっとも活用されていない
01:49
that the most underutilized resource in all of health care
資源は患者だ」と
01:51
is the patient.
主張してきました。
01:54
They have been saying that since the 1970s.
彼らは、1970年代の頃から、この考えを主張してきました。
01:56
Now I'm going to step back in history.
さて、ここで、歴史を遡ってみたいと思います。
01:59
This is from July, 1969.
これは、1969年7月のものです。
02:01
I was a freshman in college,
私は、当時大学一年生で、
02:03
and this was when we first landed on the Moon.
ちょうど人類史上初の月面着陸が行なわれた年です。
02:05
And it was the first time
私たちが今いる、今住んでいる地球を
02:07
we had ever seen from another surface --
地球以外の
02:09
that's the place where you and I are right now,
他の場所から見たのは、
02:11
where we live.
この時が初めてでした。
02:13
The world was changing.
この時、世の中は目まぐるしく変化していました。
02:15
It was about to change in ways that nobody could foresee.
誰もが予知できぬ変化が待ち構えていました。
02:17
A few weeks later,
数週間後、ウッドストックが
02:20
Woodstock happened.
開催されました。
02:22
Three days of fun and music.
楽しさと音楽がぎっしりつまった3日間でした。
02:24
Here, just for historical authenticity,
実録として、
02:26
is a picture of me in that year.
私の写真もお見せしましょう。
02:28
(Laughter)
(笑)
02:30
Yeah, the wavy hair, the blue eyes --
このウェーブのかかった髪と言い、青い瞳と言い・・・
02:33
it was really something.
なかなかイケてましたね。
02:35
That Fall of 1969,
1969年の秋、
02:37
the Whole Earth Catalog came out.
雑誌「ホール・アース・カタログ」が発刊されました。
02:39
It was a hippie journal of self-sufficiency.
自己充足性のためのヒッピーな雑誌でした。
02:41
We think of hippies of being just hedonists,
一般的には、ヒッピーは単に快楽主義者だと思い込んでしまいがちですが、
02:44
but there's a very strong component -- I was in that movement --
でもそこに強い要素があります、私もその運動の一部でした、
02:47
a very strong component
自分自身の責任を持つという
02:50
of being responsible for yourself.
強い要素。
02:52
This book's title's subtitle
この本の副題は、
02:54
is: "Access to Tools."
「ツールへのアクセス」です。
02:56
And it talked about how to build your own house,
自分の家の建て方、
02:58
how to grow your own food, all kinds of things.
自分の家の建て方、その他色々。
03:00
In the 1980s,
1980年代では、
03:02
this young doctor, Tom Ferguson,
この医師トム・フューガソンが
03:04
was the medical editor of the Whole Earth Catalog.
雑誌「ホール・アース・カタログ」の医療専門の編集長を務めていました。
03:06
And he saw that the great majority
そして彼は私達が医学・医療の中で
03:09
of what we do in medicine and health care
することの大半は、自分自身の健康管理を
03:11
is taking care of ourselves.
することだということに気付いていました。
03:13
In fact, he said it was 70 to 80 percent
しかも、彼曰く私たちがどう健康管理をするかで
03:15
of how we actually take care of our bodies.
70~80%の健康状態が決まるそうです。
03:18
Well he also saw
そして彼は、より深刻な病気により
03:20
that when health care turns to medical care
保健医療がより高度な医療を必要とさせる時
03:22
because of a more serious disease,
私たちの足をひっぱるのは、
03:25
the key thing that holds us back is access to information.
情報をアクセスすることの難しさです。
03:27
And when the Web came along, that changed everything,
そして、ウェブの登場で、情報は即座に入手できるようになり、
03:30
because not only could we find information,
ネット上で仲間を見つけ、集結し、
03:33
we could find other people like ourselves
情報交換することができるようになり、
03:36
who could gather, who could bring us information.
全てが変わりました。
03:39
And he coined this term e-Patients --
そして、準備が整っている・深く携わっている・力が付与されている・可能性が満ち溢れている(全て英単語の場合、頭文字がE)という意味を取り入れ、
03:41
equipped, engaged, empowered, enabled.
「e-患者」という新造語を生み出したのです。
03:44
Obviously at this stage of life
当然のことながら、この頃の彼は、
03:47
he was in a somewhat more dignified form than he was back then.
もっと偉い立場の医師になっていました。
03:49
Now I was an engaged patient
私は「e-患者」という言葉を知る以前に
03:52
long before I ever heard of the term.
自分の医療に深く携わる患者になっていました。
03:54
In 2006, I went to my doctor for a regular physical,
2006年に、身体検査を受けに行った時に
03:56
and I had said, "I have a sore shoulder."
「肩が痛む」と訴えました。
03:59
Well, I got an X-ray,
そして、レントゲンを撮り、
04:01
and the next morning --
その翌日・・・
04:03
you may have noticed, those of you who have been through a medical crisis
医療危機を経験した方なら理解してらっしゃるかもしれません、
04:05
will understand this.
皆さんもお気づきかもしれません。
04:07
This morning, some of the speakers
今朝の数々のトークの中でも、自分の症状の診断結果を
04:09
named the date when they found out about their condition.
言われた時を日付で呼ぶ人たちがいましたね。
04:11
For me, it was 9:00 AM
私の場合は、2007年1月3日の
04:15
on January 3, 2007.
午前9時でした。
04:18
I was at the office; my desk was clean;
私は、片付いているが机ある、
04:20
I had the blue partition carpet on the walls.
青い布張りの壁に囲まれたオフィスにいました。
04:22
The phone rang and it was my doctor.
電話が鳴り、医者からでした。
04:26
He said, "Dave, I pulled up the X-ray image
「デイブ、レントゲンを自宅のコンピューターで診たよ。」
04:29
on the screen on the computer at home."
と彼が言いました。
04:32
He said, "Your shoulder's going to be fine,
「肩は異常ないよ。しかし、デイブ、
04:34
but Dave, there's something in your lung."
肺に何かがあるんだ」と告げてきました。
04:36
And if you look in that red oval,
この赤い楕円形の中に見える影は、
04:38
that shadow was not supposed to be there.
本来ないものです。
04:40
To make a long story short,
話を短くしますと、私は、
04:44
I said, "So you need me to get back in there?"
「今すぐ病院に戻るべきなんですね?」と彼に言いました。
04:46
He said, "Yeah, we're going to need to do a CT scan of your chest."
「はい。胸郭のCTスキャンをしましょう」、と医者は返事しました。
04:48
And in parting I said, "Is there anything I should do?"
会話の終わり際に、「何かしておくべきことはありますか?」と尋ねました。
04:51
He said -- think about this one.
そしたら、彼がこんなことを言いました。
04:54
This is the advice your doctor gives you:
医者からの最高のアドバイスです:
04:56
"just go home and have a glass of wine with your wife."
「家に帰って、奥さんとゆっくりワインでも飲みなさい。」
04:58
I went in for the CAT scan,
CATスキャンを撮ったら、
05:03
and it turns out there were five of these things in both my lungs.
私の両方の肺にこういうものが5つ見つかりました。
05:07
So at that point we knew that it was cancer.
この時点で、癌だということが分かりました。
05:10
We knew it wasn't lung cancer.
しかし、肺がんではありませんでした。
05:12
That meant it was metastasized from somewhere.
どこからか転移してきたものだったのです。
05:14
The question was, where from?
一体どこから?
05:17
So I went in for an ultrasound.
調べるために、超音波検査をしました。
05:20
I got to do what many women have --
よく女性がやる、腹部に超音波ゼリーを塗布し、
05:22
the jelly on the belly and bzzzz.
ビーーーっとプローブを滑らせました。
05:25
My wife came with me.
私の妻も一緒に来ました。
05:28
She's a veterinarian,
彼女は獣医師なので、
05:30
so she's seen lots of ultrasounds.
超音波検査はたくさんやってきました。
05:32
I mean, she knows I'm not a dog.
もちろん、私が犬じゃないこともちゃんと理解していました。
05:34
But what we saw -- this is an MRI image.
これはMR像なのですが、
05:37
This is much sharper than an ultrasound would be.
超音波検査よりももっと具体的に撮影されます。
05:40
What we saw in that kidney
腎臓の中に、こんな
05:42
was that big blob there.
大きな塊が見つかりました。
05:44
And there were actually two of these.
しかも、2つも見つかりました。
05:46
One was growing out the front and it had already erupted,
一つは前の方にあり、既に破裂し、
05:48
and it latched onto the bowel.
腸にくっついていました。
05:50
One was growing out the back, and it attached to the soleus muscle,
もう一つは後ろにできていて、ヒラメ筋という
05:52
which is a big muscle in the back that I'd never heard of,
私が今までに聞いたことがなかった、大きな筋肉に
05:55
but all of a sudden I cared about it.
くっついていて、急にヒラメ筋が気になり始めました。
05:58
I went home.
私は帰宅しました。
06:01
Now I've been Googling -- I've been online since 1989 on CompuServe.
1989年からコンピュサーブでネットを使っていましたが、今はグーグルを使っています。
06:03
I went home, and I know you can't read the details here;
私は帰宅しました。細かくて詳細が
06:06
that's not important.
読めないと思いますが、そこは重要ではありません。
06:08
My point is I went to a respected medical website,
私は、様々なサイトをフィルターし、
06:10
WebMD,
信頼度の高い医療情報ウェブサイト
06:12
because I know how to filter out junk.
ウェブMDにたどり着きました。
06:14
I also found my wife online.
そうそう、実は妻もネットでみつけました。
06:17
Before I met her,
彼女に出逢う前は、
06:19
I went through some suboptimal search results.
最適以下の検索結果の女性達と会ってきました。
06:21
(Laughter)
(笑)
06:23
So I looked for quality information.
検索するにあたり、情報の質に注目しました。
06:25
There's so much about trust --
信頼できるかどうかが問題です。
06:28
what sources of information can we trust?
情報源は信頼できるのか?
06:30
Where does my body end
私の身体はどこで終わり、
06:32
and an invader start?
侵入してきた異物はどこから始まるのか?
06:35
And cancer, a tumor, is something you grow out of your own tissue.
癌、腫瘍は、自分の体内組織からできるものです。
06:37
How does that happen?
どのようにしてできるのでしょう?
06:40
Where does medical ability
医療のできることは、
06:42
end and start?
どこからどこまででしょう?
06:44
Well, so what I read on WebMD:
ウェブMDで検索してみた結果、
06:46
"The prognosis is poor
腎細胞癌の場合、
06:48
for progressing renal cell cancer.
予後は思わしくない。
06:51
Almost all patients are incurable."
ほとんどの患者は治らない。」と書いてありました。
06:53
I've been online long enough to know
長年ネットを使ってきた習慣で、
06:56
if I don't like the first results I get,
最初の検索結果が気に入らない場合、
06:58
I go look for more.
もっと情報を検索します。
07:00
And what I found was on other websites,
他の検索したウェブサイトにも、
07:02
even by the third page of Google results,
グーグルの検索ページ3ページ目でさえ、
07:05
"Outlook is bleak",
「見通しは暗い。」
07:07
"Prognosis is grim."
「予後は思わしくない」と書かれていました。
07:09
And I'm thinking, "What the heck?"
「なぜなんだ?」と思いました。
07:11
I didn't feel sick at all.
病気をしているとは思えませんでした。
07:13
I mean, I'd been getting tired in the evening,
夕方になると疲れが出ていましたが、
07:15
but I was 56 years old.
私は56歳でした。
07:17
I was slowly losing weight,
ゆっくりしたペースで体重も減っていましたが、
07:19
but for me, that was what the doctor told me to do.
それは医師に言われてやってきたダイエットの結果だと思っていました。
07:21
It was really something.
考えられない事態でした。
07:24
And this is the diagram of stage four kidney cancer
そして、これは薬の投与を始めた後の
07:27
from the drug I eventually got.
後期の腎臓癌の図です。
07:30
Totally by coincidence, there's that thing in my lung.
偶然にも、あの塊が肺にありました。
07:32
In the left femur, the left thigh bone, there's another one.
左大腿骨にもありました。
07:35
I had one. My leg eventually snapped.
このせいで、足がポキッと折れました。
07:38
I fainted and landed on it, and it broke.
失神し、地面についた時に折れてしまいました。
07:40
There's one in the skull,
頭蓋骨にもあります、
07:43
and then just for good measure, I had these other tumors --
そして、その他にこの場所に腫瘍もありました。
07:45
including, by the time my treatment started,
治療が始まった頃、
07:47
one was growing out of my tongue.
舌にもありました。
07:49
I had kidney cancer growing out of my tongue.
腎臓癌が舌にまで転移していました。
07:51
And what I read was that my median survival
情報をかき集めてみた結果、
07:53
was 24 weeks.
私は平均24週間しかもたない、とのことでした。
07:55
This was bad.
最悪でした。
07:57
I was facing the grave.
私は既に墓場に向かっていたのです。
07:59
I thought, "What's my mother's face going to look like
「母親はどんな顔をして葬式に出席するのか?」
08:02
on the day of my funeral?"
と考えてしまいました。
08:04
I had to sit down with my daughter
娘ともちゃんと話しました。
08:06
and say, "Here's the situation."
「今こういう状態なんだ」、と。
08:08
Her boyfriend was with her.
彼女の彼氏も一緒にいました。
08:11
I said, "I don't want you guys to get married prematurely
「私が生きている間にやっておきたいからと
08:13
just so you can do it while Dad's still alive."
結婚を焦ってはいけない」、と言いました。
08:16
It's really serious.
とても深刻でした。
08:19
Because if you wonder why patients are motivated and want to help,
なぜ患者にはモチベーションがあって他の人を助けたいと思うのかは
08:21
think about this.
これを考えて下さい。
08:24
Well, my doctor prescribed a patient community,
医師が患者コミュニティー、Acor.org
08:26
Acor.org,
という癌患者のネットワークサイトを
08:28
a network of cancer patients, of all amazing things.
紹介してくれました。
08:30
Very quickly they told me,
このコミュニティーが即座に教えてくれたのは
08:33
"Kidney cancer is an uncommon disease.
「腎臓癌は稀な病気だ。
08:35
Get yourself to a specialist center.
専門治療センターに行った方が良い。
08:37
There is no cure, but there's something that sometimes works --
完治することはないし、
08:39
it usually doesn't --
成功例も少ないが、
08:42
called high-dosage interleukin.
インターロイキンという薬がある。
08:44
Most hospitals don't offer it,
ほとんどの病院では取り扱っていないから
08:46
so they won't even tell you it exists.
この薬の事を教えてくれることもない。
08:48
And don't let them give you anything else first.
彼らが勧めてくる治療薬を素直に受け入れたらだめだ。
08:50
And by the way, here are four doctors
ついでに、あなたの地域にこの薬を取り扱っている
08:52
in your part of the United States who offer it and their phone numbers."
4人の医師と電話番号を教えておくね。」でした。
08:54
How amazing is that?
なんて素晴らしいことでしょう。
08:57
(Applause)
(拍手)
08:59
Here's the thing.
ここがポイントです。
09:02
Here we are, four years later:
4年後の今、
09:04
you can't find a website that gives patients that information.
こういう情報を患者に与えているサイトはありません。
09:06
Government-approved, American Cancer Society,
政府が認証した、アメリカ癌協会のサイトには載っていませんが、
09:09
but patients know what patients want to know.
患者同士はどういう情報を欲しがっているかが分かります。
09:12
It's the power of patient networks.
これが患者ネットワークの力です。
09:15
This amazing substance --
この素晴らしい投薬・・・
09:18
again I mentioned, where does my body end?
再び、私の身体はどこで終わるのか、と問いました。
09:20
My oncologist and I talk a lot these days
最近、腫瘍専門医とよく会話するのは、
09:23
because I try to keep my talks technically accurate.
私のトークの情報を正確にしたいからです。
09:25
And he said, "You know, the immune system
腫瘍専門医は、「免疫システムは
09:27
is good at detecting invaders --
異物を察知するのがすごく上手。
09:29
bacteria coming from outside --
例えば外からやってきたバクテリア。
09:32
but when it's your own tissue that you've grown,
しかし、自分の体内組織からできたものの場合は
09:35
it's a whole different thing."
全く別だ。」と言いました。
09:37
And I went through a mental exercise actually,
自分で患者サポートコミュニティーをウェブ立ち上げたのもあり、
09:39
because I started a patient support community of my own
この免疫システムが腫瘍に対してどう反応するのかを
09:42
on a website,
じっくり勉強していたところ、
09:45
and one of my friends, one of my relatives actually,
親戚でもある一人の友人が
09:47
said, "Look, Dave, who grew this thing?
「デイブ、何をしているんだ?
09:49
Are you going to set yourself up
あんまり一人で頑張りすぎたら、
09:53
as mentally attacking yourself?"
精神的に自虐することになるぞ」と言ってくれました。
09:55
So we went into it.
そんなことで、二人で勉強しました。
09:57
And the story of how all that happens is in this book.
この話の詳細は本に書かれています。
09:59
Anyway, this is the way the numbers unfolded.
それはさておき、数値はこのように展開していきました。
10:02
Me being me, I put the numbers from my hospital's website
自分の性格上、通院していた病院のウェブサイトから得た
10:04
from my tumor sizes into a spreadsheet.
自分の腫瘍のサイズの数値をスプレッドシートにまとめました。
10:07
Don't worry about the numbers.
数値自体は気にしないでください。
10:09
You see, that's the immune system.
これが私の免疫システムです。
10:11
Amazing thing, those two yellow lines
この2つの黄色い線は
10:13
are where I got the two doses of interleukin
私が2ヶ月の間を空けて受けた2つのインターロイケンの
10:15
two months apart.
投与を示しています。
10:17
And look at how the tumor sizes plummeted in between.
ご覧のとおり、投薬のおかげで腫瘍の大きさが激減しました。
10:19
Just incredible.
本当に驚きです。
10:22
Who knows what we'll be able to do when we learn to make more use of it.
インターロイケンの使用が増えたら、もっと色々な使い方がでてくるかもしれません。
10:24
The punch line is that a year and a half later,
この話のオチは、一年半後に私は
10:27
I was there when this magnificent young woman, my daughter,
この美しい女性、私の娘の結婚式に
10:30
got married.
出席することができたことです。
10:33
And when she came down those steps,
彼女が階段を降りてきた時、
10:35
and it was just her and me for that moment,
一瞬私と彼女だけになった時に、
10:38
I was so glad that she didn't have to say to her mother,
彼女が母親に向かって「パパにも出席してもらいたかった。」と
10:40
"I wish Dad could have been here."
言わせずに済んで、本当によかったと思ったのです。
10:43
And this is what we're doing
医療を改善することにより、
10:45
when we make health care better.
こういうことが可能になるのです。
10:47
Now I want to talk briefly about a couple of other patients
ここで、医療改善のために全力を尽くしている
10:49
who are doing everything in their power to improve health care.
他の患者たちの話もしたいと思います。
10:52
This is Regina Holliday,
この方は、レジーナ・ホリデー、
10:55
a painter in Washington D.C.,
首都ワシントン在住の画家で、
10:57
whose husband died of kidney cancer a year after my disease.
私が発症した翌年にご主人を腎臓ガンで亡くしました。
10:59
She's painting here a mural
これは、彼女がご主人の病院で過ごした
11:02
of his horrible final weeks in the hospital.
過酷な最後の一週間を壁画として描いている姿です。
11:04
One of the things that she discovered
彼女が分かったことの一つは、
11:07
was that her husband's medical record
ご主人の医療記録が
11:09
in this paper folder
かなりぐちゃぐちゃに
11:11
was just disorganized.
ファイルされていることでした。
11:13
And she thought, "You know, if I have a nutrition facts label
「なぜ医療の場では、シリアルの箱に記されている
11:15
on the side of a cereal box,
食品の栄養表示のように、
11:18
why can't there be something that simple
新しく入ってきた看護師や医師が
11:20
telling every new nurse who comes on duty,
簡単に主人の病状の基礎を簡単に
11:22
every new doctor,
読むことができる、シンプルな医療記録がないのだろう?」
11:24
the basics about my husband's condition?"
と彼女は思いました。
11:26
So she painted this medical facts mural
そこで、彼女は栄養表示のフォーマットに真似た
11:28
with a nutrition label,
医療記録をこのようにして、
11:30
something like that,
彼を描いた絵の横に
11:32
in a diagram of him.
描きました。
11:34
She then, last year, painted this diagram.
そして、去年、彼女はこの絵を描きました。
11:36
She studied health care like me.
彼女は、私のように、医療についで勉強しました。
11:39
She came to realize that there were a lot of people
沢山の人が患者を提唱する本を
11:41
who'd written patient advocate books
出版していることを知りましたが
11:43
that you just don't hear about at medical conferences.
医療のカンファレンスでは全く聞きませんでした。
11:45
Patients are such an underutilized resource.
患者は、全く活用されていない資源なのです。
11:48
Well as it says in my introduction,
私の紹介文にも書かれているように、私は
11:52
I've gotten somewhat known for saying that patients should have access to their data.
患者は自分の医療データへのアクセス権があるべきだと主張してきました。
11:54
And I actually said at one conference a couple of years ago,
そして、実は数年前のカンファレンスで、私はこんな事を言いました:
11:57
"Give me my damn data,
「俺のデータをよこせ!
12:00
because you people can't be trusted to keep it clean."
お前らは俺のデータをぐちゃぐちゃにしてしまうだけだ!」
12:02
And here she has our damned data --
データがせき止められてしまったのだ(DamnとDamをかけている)-
12:05
it's a pun --
だじゃれです-
12:07
which is starting to break out, starting to break through --
しかし、この絵でデータを表す水のように、データは少しずつ
12:09
the water symbolizes our data.
入手できるようになってきているのです。
12:11
And in fact, I want to do a little something improvisational for you here.
ここでちょっと即興してみたいと思います。
12:14
There's a guy on Twitter that I know,
ボストン郊外に住む、ツイッター上で知り合った
12:17
a health IT guy outside Boston,
医療IT技術者がいるのですが、
12:19
and he wrote the e-Patient rap.
彼が「e-患者ラップ」を作曲しました。
12:21
And it goes like this.
こんな歌です。
12:24
♫ Gimme my damn data ♫
♫俺のデータをよこせ♫
12:32
♫ I want to be an e-Patient just like Dave ♫
♫e-患者デイブみたいになりてぇ♫
12:34
♫ Gimme my damn data, cuz it's my life to save ♫
♫俺のデータをよこせ、俺が守るべき人生だ♫
12:36
Now I'm not going to go any further.
ここらへんで止めておきます。
12:39
(Applause)
(拍手)
12:41
Well thank you. That shot the timing.
ありがとうございます。タイムオーバーしちゃいますね。
12:55
(Laughter)
(笑)
12:58
Think about the possibility,
可能性を考えてみて下さい。
13:00
why is it that iPhones and iPads
なぜiPhoneやiPadの技術は
13:02
advance far faster
明らかに速いスピードで発展していくのに、
13:04
than the health tools that are available to you
私たちが家族を救うために使える医療ツールの
13:06
to help take care of your family?
技術はうまれないのでしょう。
13:08
Here's a website, VisibleBody.com,
これは、VisibleBody.comという
13:10
that I stumbled across.
私がたまたま見つけたサイトです。
13:12
And I thought, "You know, I wonder what my soleus muscle is?"
「私のヒラメ筋ってどこにあるんだろう?」と思い、検索してみました。
13:14
So you can click on things and remove it.
除きたい箇所をクリックして取り除くことができます。
13:17
And I saw, "Aha, that's the kidney and the soleus muscle."
操作しているうちに、「おー、これが腎臓で、これがヒラメ筋か!」
13:19
And I was rotating it in 3D
と納得し、更に三次元で回転させて、
13:22
and saying, "I understand now."
深く理解することができました。
13:24
And then I realized it reminded me of Google Earth,
このサイトは、住所を打ち込むと何処の住所へも飛んで行ける
13:26
where you can fly to any address.
グーグルアースを連想しました。
13:29
And I thought, "Why not take this
「このツールを使って、私の画像を取り込み、
13:32
and connect it to my digital scan data
自分の体のためのグーグルアースのような
13:34
and have Google Earth for my body?"
ものがあればいいのに!」とひらめきました。
13:37
What did Google come out with this year?
グーグルは今年何を発表しましたか?
13:40
Now there's Google Body browser.
そう、グーグルボディーブラウザーです。
13:42
But you see, it's still generic.
しかし、まだ一般的なものです。
13:45
It's not my data.
私のデータは取り込めません。
13:47
But if we can get that data out from behind the dam
でも、私たちが各自の医療データをアクセスできる
13:49
so software innovators can pounce on it,
ようになり、ソフト開発者にアクセス権を与えたら、
13:52
the way software innovators like to do,
開発が好きな彼らなら
13:55
who knows what we'll be able to come up with.
きっと素晴らしいものを開発できるでしょう。
13:57
One final story: this is Kelly Young,
最後のお話です:この方は、ケリー・ヤング、
13:59
a rheumatoid arthritis patient
フロリダ在住の
14:01
from Florida.
関節リウマチ患者です。
14:03
This is a live story
この話はここ数週間の間に
14:05
unfolding just in the last few weeks.
展開し始めた、かなり最近の話です。
14:07
RA patients, as they call themselves --
自分達を「RA患者」と称する関節リウマチ患者たち--
14:09
her blog is RA Warrior --
彼女のブログの名前は「RA戦士」--
14:12
have a big problem
が抱える大きな問題は、40%の患者が
14:14
because 40 percent of them have no visible symptoms.
目に見える症状がないことです。
14:16
And that makes it just really hard to tell how the disease is going.
病状がどう経過しているのかを知ることも困難です。
14:19
And some doctors think, "Yeah right, you're really in pain."
こういうことから、医師によっては「痛むだなんて、うそだろ」と信じてくれません。
14:22
Well she found, through her online research,
彼女はネット検索をとおして、
14:25
a nuclear bone scan
よく癌患者が受ける核骨のスキャンが
14:28
that's usually used for cancer,
なんと、実は、炎症も
14:30
but it can also reveal inflammation.
写し出すことができると知りました。
14:32
And she saw
炎症がない場合は、
14:34
that if there is no inflammation
スキャンが灰色に
14:36
then the scan is a uniform gray.
写し出されることを知りました。
14:38
So she took it.
そして、彼女はスキャンを受けました。
14:41
And the radiologist report said, "No cancer found."
放射線科医は「癌は見当たらない」と報告しました。
14:43
Well that's not what he was supposed to do with it.
しかし、彼は癌かどうかを診るのではなかったのです。
14:46
So she had it read again, she wanted to have it read again,
再度診てもらえるよう頼んだのですが、
14:48
and her doctor fired her.
医師が反対しました。
14:51
She pulled up the CD.
彼女はCDを取り出しました。
14:53
He said, "If you don't want to follow my instructions,
彼は「私の指示に逆らうのであれば、
14:55
go away."
出て行け。」と言いました。
14:57
So she pulled up the CD of the scan images,
彼女は、CDからスキャン画像を取り出し、
14:59
and look at all those hot spots.
注目するべき箇所を見ていきました。
15:02
And she's now actively engaged on her blog
現在、彼女はブログを通して、
15:04
in looking for assistance in getting better care.
積極的により良い医療の追求を主張しています。
15:07
See, that is an empowered patient -- no medical training.
まさに彼女は、医学教育は受けていないが、権限をフル活用している患者です。
15:10
We are, you are,
私たち、あなたは、
15:13
the most underused resource in health care.
医療の場では最も活用されていない資源なのです。
15:15
What she was able to do
彼女が成し遂げられたことは、
15:18
was because she had access to the raw data.
生データにアクセスできたからです。
15:20
How big a deal was this?
これは、どのぐらい重要なことなのか?
15:22
Well at TED2009,
実は、TED2009で
15:24
Tim Berners-Lee himself, inventor of the Web, gave a talk
ウェブ開発者ティム・バーナーズリーがトークで、
15:26
where he said the next big thing
次の革命は、ブラウザーを使って
15:29
is not to have your browser go out
他者の記事を
15:32
and find other people's articles about the data,
アクセスすることではなく、
15:34
but the raw data.
生データをアクセスすることだ、と言いました。
15:36
And he got them chanting by the end of the talk,
トークの最後の方では、彼は観衆とともに、
15:38
"Raw data now.
「今こそ、生データを!
15:40
Raw data now."
「今こそ、生データを!」と繰り返し唱えました。
15:42
And I ask you,
あなたにお願いします。
15:44
three words, please, to improve health care:
医療を改善するための3つの単語を言ってください。
15:46
let patients help.
患者達の参加を!
15:49
Let patients help.
患者達の参加を!
15:51
Let patients help.
患者達の参加を!
15:53
Let patients help.
患者達の参加を!
15:55
Thank you.
ありがとうございました。
15:57
(Applause)
(拍手)
15:59
For all the patients around the world
世界中でこのウェブキャストをご覧の
16:15
watching this on the webcast,
患者さん方皆さま、
16:18
God bless you, everyone -- let patients help.
神の恵みがありますように -- 患者達の参加を!
16:20
Host: And bless yourself. Thank you very much.
司会者:あなたにも神の恵みがありますように。ありがとうございました。
16:22
Translated by Lisa Akiyama
Reviewed by Eriko Nagai

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Dave deBronkart - e-Patient
Dave deBronkart wants to help patients help themselves -- by owning their medical data, connecting to fellow patients and making medical care better.

Why you should listen

David deBronkart, better known as “e-patient Dave,” was diagnosed in January 2007 with kidney cancer at a very late stage. Odds were stacked against him, with tumors in both lungs, several bones and muscle tissue. He received great treatment, and was able to fight through and win the battle over his cancer.  His last treatment was July 23, 2007, and by September it was clear he’d beaten the disease.

deBronkart is now actively engaged in opening health care information directly to patients on an unprecedented level, thus creating a new dynamic in how information is delivered, accessed and used by the patient.

More profile about the speaker
Dave deBronkart | Speaker | TED.com