sponsored links
INK Conference

Simon Lewis: Don't take consciousness for granted

サイモン•ルイス: 意識は当たり前の事ではない

December 1, 2010

サイモン•ルイスは重大な交通事故に遭い、深い昏睡状態に陥りました。しかしその後、誰も予期しなかった程の回復を肉体的にも精神的にも果たします。INKカンファレンスにて、サイモン•ルイスはこの奇跡的な物語と共に、現代の人類に忍び寄っている意識の危機と、それをいかに克服するかについて語ります。

Simon Lewis - Author, producer
Simon Lewis is the author of "Rise and Shine," a memoir about his remarkable recovery from a car accident and coma, and his new approach to our own consciousness. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
There was a time in my life
かつて私の人生は順風満帆でした
00:15
when everything seemed perfect.
かつて私の人生は順風満帆でした
00:18
Everywhere I went, I felt at home.
どこに行っても馴染みがあり
00:21
Everyone I met,
会う人は誰もが
00:23
I felt I knew them for as long as I could remember.
長年親交あるように思えました
00:25
And I want to share with you how I came to that place
では私があの場面に遭遇した状況と
00:28
and what I've learned since I left it.
その後に学んだ事をお話しします
00:31
This is where it began.
きっかけはこれです
00:33
And it raises an existential question,
実存的な疑問があります
00:36
which is, if I'm having this experience of complete connection and full consciousness,
もし私が完全な関連性と
完璧な意識を経験したのなら
00:38
why am I not visible in the photograph,
なぜこの写真に映っていないのか?
00:41
and where is this time and place?
ここはどこで何時のことだったのか?
00:44
This is Los Angeles, California, where I live.
場所は私が住むカリフォルニア州ロスアンジェルス
00:47
This is a police photo. That's actually my car.
警察の写真で あれは実は私の車です
00:50
We're less than a mile from one of the largest hospitals in Los Angeles,
現場はロスアンジェルス有数の病院 シダーズ・シナイから
00:53
called Cedars-Sinai.
1キロ位離れた所です
00:56
And the situation is that a car full of paramedics
状況は 勤務を終えて
00:58
on their way home from the hospital after work
帰宅中の救急救命士が多数乗った車が
01:00
have run across the wreckage,
事故現場に差し掛かり
01:03
and they've advised the police
車の中に生存者はおらず
01:05
that there were no survivors inside the car,
運転手の私は死亡したと
01:07
that the driver's dead, that I'm dead.
警察に助言したばかりです
01:09
And the police are waiting for the fire department to arrive
警察は消防が到着して車を切断し
01:12
to cut apart the vehicle
運転手を救出するのを待っています
01:15
to extract the body of the driver.
運転手を救出するのを待っています
01:17
And when they do, they find that behind the glass,
まもなくフロントガラスの背後に挟まれた私を発見します
01:19
they find me.
まもなくフロントガラスの背後に挟まれた私を発見します
01:22
And my skull's crushed and my collar bone is crushed;
頭蓋骨は挫傷し 鎖骨は骨折
01:24
all but two of my ribs,
助骨は2本を残し
01:26
my pelvis and both arms --
骨盤も両腕も
01:28
they're all crushed, but there is still a pulse.
全て骨折 しかし脈がありました
01:30
And they get me to that nearby hospital,
私はすぐ近くのシダーズ・シナイ病院に搬送されます
01:33
Cedars-Sinai,
私はすぐ近くのシダーズ・シナイ病院に搬送されます
01:35
where that night I receive, because of my internal bleeding,
その夜 内出血のため
01:37
45 units of blood --
45ユニットの輸血 ―体内の血液全てに匹敵する量― を受け
01:40
which means full replacements of all the blood in me --
45ユニットの輸血 ―体内の血液全てに匹敵する量― を受け
01:42
before they're able to staunch the flow.
何とか血流が確保されます
01:44
I'm put on full life support,
生命維持装置につながれ
01:46
and I have a massive stroke,
重篤な脳卒中を引き起こし
01:48
and my brain drops into a coma.
私は昏睡に陥ります
01:51
Now comas are measured
昏睡の程度は15~3に分類されます
01:53
on a scale from 15 down to three.
昏睡の程度は15~3に分類されます
01:55
Fifteen is a mild coma. Three is the deepest.
15は軽度の昏睡で3が最も重体です
01:57
And if you look, you'll see that there's only one way you can score three.
ご覧のように3の状態になると
02:00
It's essentially there's no sign of life
外部からは生命の印が全く見えません
02:03
from outside at all.
外部からは生命の印が全く見えません
02:05
I spent more than a month in a Glasgow Coma Scale three,
私は1か月以上 グラスゴー昏睡尺度3の容体でした
02:07
and it is inside that deepest level of coma,
そのような重体の昏睡の中
02:10
on the rim between my life and my death,
生死の瀬戸際にありながら
02:12
that I'm experiencing the full connection and full consciousness
私は精神世界の完璧な関連性と
完璧な意識を体験するのです
02:15
of inner space.
私は精神世界の完璧な関連性と
完璧な意識を体験するのです
02:18
From my family looking in from outside,
一方 外から内を見つめる家族は
02:20
what they're trying to figure out
別の実存的な問題に
02:23
is a different kind of existential question,
直面していました つまり
02:25
which is, how far is it going to be possible to bridge
彼らが見る昏睡して閉じた心と現実の心―
02:28
from the comatose potential mind that they're looking at
彼らが見る昏睡して閉じた心と現実の心―
02:31
to an actual mind,
すなわち 私の頭の中にわずかに残る脳機能― を
02:34
which I define simply
すなわち 私の頭の中にわずかに残る脳機能― を
02:36
as the functioning of the brain
お互い結びつける事はどこまで可能なのか?
02:38
that is remaining inside my head.
お互い結びつける事はどこまで可能なのか?
02:40
Now to put this into a broader context,
より広い意味で言うと
02:42
I want you to imagine that you are an eternal alien
あなたがあたかも宇宙人で宇宙の果てから
02:44
watching the Earth from outer space,
地球を観察しており
02:47
and your favorite show on intergalactic satellite television
あなたのお気に入りのギャラクシー衛星テレビの
02:49
is the Earth channel,
番組が地球チャネルの人間ショーだとします
02:52
and your favorite show is the Human Show.
番組が地球チャネルの人間ショーだとします
02:54
And the reason I think it would be so interesting to you
この番組が気に入ってる理由は
02:57
is because consciousness is so interesting.
意識がとても興味深いものだからです
02:59
It's so unpredictable
意識はとても予測不能で壊れやすいのです
03:01
and so fragile.
意識はとても予測不能で壊れやすいのです
03:03
And this is how we began.
これがその始まりです
03:05
We all began in the Awash Valley in Ethiopia.
人類の故郷はエチオピアのアワッシュ谷です
03:07
The show began with tremendous special effects,
特殊効果で始まる理由は
03:10
because there were catastrophic climate shifts --
壊滅的な気候変動が起こり―
03:12
which sort of sounds interesting as a parallel to today.
まるで今日と同じようで興味深いですが―
03:15
Because of the Earth tilting on its axis
地球の地軸の傾斜が変わったために
03:18
and those catastrophic climate shifts,
壊滅的な気候変動が起こり
03:20
we had to figure out how to find better food,
我々の祖先はよりよい食物を見つけたり―
03:23
and we had to learn -- there's Lucy; that's how we all began --
祖先のルーシーです―
03:25
we had to learn how to crack open animal bones,
道具を使って動物の骨を割ることを覚え
03:28
use tools to do that, to feed on the marrow,
骨髄を食べたりして
03:31
to grow our brains more.
脳を発達させたのです
03:33
So we actually grew our consciousness
地球規模の危機に対応して
03:35
in response to this global threat.
意識が成長をとげたのです
03:37
Now you also continue to watch
意識は進化を続けますが
03:39
as consciousness evolved to the point
その一端は当地インドの
マドヤ・パラデシュ州にもあります
03:41
that here in India, in Madhya Pradesh,
その一端は当地インドの
マドヤ・パラデシュ州にもあります
03:43
there's one of the two oldest known pieces of rock art found.
世界に2ヶ所しかない最古の
ロックアートのひとつがあります
03:46
It's a cupule that took 40 to 50,000 blows with a stone tool to create,
これは4~5万回叩いて作った石器の盃です
03:50
and it's the first known expression of art
地球上最古の美術品です
03:54
on the planet.
地球上最古の美術品です
03:56
And the reason it connects us with consciousness today
これが意識と何の関連があるかと言うと
03:58
is that all of us still today,
これが意識と何の関連があるかと言うと
04:00
the very first shape we draw as a child
今日の人間の子供も最初に描く形は円だからです
04:02
is a circle.
今日の人間の子供も最初に描く形は円だからです
04:05
And then the next thing we do is we put a dot in the center of the circle.
そして次に円の中央に点をつけて
04:07
We create an eye --
目を作るのです
04:10
and the eye that evolves through all of our history.
目は人類史上進化を続けました
04:12
There's the Egyptian god Horus,
エジプトの神ホルスです
04:14
which symbolizes prosperity, wisdom and health.
繁栄 知恵 健康の象徴です
04:16
And that comes down right way to the present
現在に至るとアメリカの1ドル紙幣があります
04:19
with the dollar bill in the United States,
現在に至るとアメリカの1ドル紙幣があります
04:22
which has on it an eye of providence.
プロビデンスの目が描かれています
04:24
So watching all of this show from outer space,
従って 宇宙の果てからこの番組を見れば
04:27
you think we get it, we understand
分かった と思うでしょう
04:29
that the most precious resource on the blue planet
この青い惑星で最も貴重な
資源は私たちの知識だと
04:31
is our consciousness.
この青い惑星で最も貴重な
資源は私たちの知識だと
04:33
Because it's the first thing we draw;
生まれて初めて描くものだし
04:35
we surround ourselves with images of it;
周りをその絵で取り囲むし
04:37
it's probably the most common image on the planet.
たぶん地球上に最もある像でしょう
04:39
But we don't. We take our consciousness for granted.
いいえ 意識を当たり前の事と思っています
04:41
While I was producing in Los Angeles, I never thought about it for a second.
私もLAで仕事していた頃は
全く考えもしませんでした
04:44
Until it was stripped from me, I never thought about it.
剥奪されるまでは考えもしませんでした
04:47
And what I've learned since that event
あの事故にあって以来
04:49
and during my recovery
療養中に学んだのは
04:51
is that consciousness is under threat on this planet
意識は未だかつてない危機に瀕していることです
04:53
in ways it's never been under threat before.
意識は未だかつてない危機に瀕していることです
04:56
These are just some examples.
いくつか例をあげましょう
04:58
And the reason I'm so honored to be here
ここインドに来て講演するのは
05:00
to talk today in India
大変光栄ですが
05:02
is because India has the sad distinction
インドは頭部の負傷が
05:04
of being the head injury capital of the world.
世界で最も多い国として知られています
05:06
That statistic is so sad.
不名誉な統計です
05:09
There is no more drastic and sudden gap created
頭部に重傷を負う事故ほど 瞬時に心が閉じて
05:11
between potential and actual mind
現実の心との間に大きな断絶が
生じる事はありません
05:14
than a severe head injury.
現実の心との間に大きな断絶が
生じる事はありません
05:16
Each one can entail up to a decade of rehabilitation,
リハビリには長ければ10年間要します
05:18
which means that India, unless something changes,
従ってインドでは改善されない限り
05:21
is accumulating a need
のべ1千年間のリハビリ期間を
要するほどの状況にあります
05:23
for millennia of rehabilitation.
のべ1千年間のリハビリ期間を
要するほどの状況にあります
05:25
What you find in the United States
アメリカでは20秒に1件の割合で
05:29
is an injury every 20 seconds -- that's one and a half million every year --
負傷者が発生し 1年間では150万件を数えます
05:31
stroke every 40 seconds,
脳卒中は40秒に1件の割合
05:34
Alzheimer's disease, every 70 seconds somebody succumbs to that.
アルツハイマー病は70秒に1件の割合で発症しています
05:36
All of these represent gaps
これらが閉じた心と現実の心の断絶を引き起こすのです
05:39
between potential mind and actual mind.
これらが閉じた心と現実の心の断絶を引き起こすのです
05:41
And here are some of the other categories, if you look at the whole planet.
地球規模で他の統計を見ると次のとおりです
05:45
The World Health Organization tells us
世界保健機関(WHO)によると
05:48
that depression is the number one disease on Earth
うつ病は罹病中の累積年数の
05:50
in terms of years lived with disability.
観点では最悪の病気です
05:53
We find that the number two source of disability
2番目に多い身体障害である
05:56
is depression in the age group
うつ病は15歳~44歳の年齢層に見られます
05:59
of 15 to 44.
うつ病は15歳~44歳の年齢層に見られます
06:01
Our children are becoming depressed
子供たちのうつ病患者数も
06:03
at an alarming rate.
異常な増加傾向にあります
06:05
I discovered during my recovery
療養中に
06:07
the third leading cause of death amongst teenagers
十代の子供の死因で3番目に
06:09
is suicide.
多いのが自殺だと知りました
06:11
If you look at some of these other items -- concussions.
さらに別の統計を見ると― 脳震とう
06:13
Half of E.R. admissions from adolescents
青少年が救急治療を受ける
06:15
are for concussions.
件数の半分は脳震とうです
06:17
If I talk about migraine,
片頭痛については
06:19
40 percent of the population
人口の4割が発作性の頭痛に苦しんでいます
06:21
suffer episodic headaches.
人口の4割が発作性の頭痛に苦しんでいます
06:23
Fifteen percent suffer migraines
15%の人が片頭痛を訴え
06:25
that wipe them out for days on end.
何日間も療養を要します
06:27
All of this is leading -- computer addiction,
さらにコンピュータ依存もあります
06:29
just to cover that: the most frequent thing we do
私たちは頻繁にデジタル機器を使います
06:31
is use digital devices.
私たちは頻繁にデジタル機器を使います
06:33
The average teenager
平均的な十代の子供は
06:35
sends 3,300 texts every [month].
月に3,300件のメールを送ると言われます
06:37
We're talking about a society that is retreating
我々の社会はやがて直面するであろう
06:40
into depression and disassociation
壊滅的気候変動を避けるかのように
06:42
when we are potentially confronting
うつ病 引篭りに退避しているのです
06:45
the next great catastrophic climate shift.
うつ病 引篭りに退避しているのです
06:47
So what you'd be wondering, watching the Human Show,
人間ショーを見ながら気になることは―
06:50
is are we going to confront and address
人間は意識を発展させて
06:52
the catastrophic climate shift that may be heading our way
壊滅的気候変動に立ち向かい
06:54
by growing our consciousness,
解決しようとするのか?
06:56
or are we going to continue to retreat?
それとも退避し続けるのか?
06:58
And that then might lead you
心配な人は
07:00
to watch an episode one day
シダーズ・シナイの出来事を振り返り
07:02
of Cedars-Sinai medical center
閉じた心と現実の心の違いについて
07:04
and a consideration of the difference between potential mind and actual mind.
考えてみてはいかがでしょうか
07:07
This is a dense array EEG MRI
これは高密度電極脳波計が156chの
07:10
tracking 156 channels of information.
データを収集する様子です
07:13
It's not my EEG at Cedars;
これは入院中の私の脳波ではありません
07:15
it's your EEG tonight and last night.
皆さんの今夜や昨夜の脳波です
07:18
It's the what our minds do every night
毎晩私達の心はその日の出来事を
07:21
to digest the day
整理して睡眠中の閉じた心を
07:23
and to prepare to bridge from the potential mind when we're asleep
翌朝目が覚めると同時に
07:25
to the actual mind when we awaken the following morning.
現実の心に橋渡しする準備をします
07:27
This is how I was when I returned from the hospital
これが4か月の入院後の私です
07:30
after nearly four months.
これが4か月の入院後の私です
07:33
The horseshoe shape you can see on my skull
頭の馬蹄形の傷跡が
07:35
is where they operated and went inside my brain
私の命を救った脳内手術の際に切開した場所です
07:37
to do the surgeries they needed to do to rescue my life.
私の命を救った脳内手術の際に切開した場所です
07:39
But if you look into the eye of consciousness, that single eye you can see,
意識のある目は下を向いています
07:42
I'm looking down,
意識のある目は下を向いています
07:45
but let me tell you how I felt at that point.
その時感じたことをお話しましょう
07:47
I didn't feel empty; I felt everything simultaneously.
虚無感はなく 同時に全てを感じました
07:50
I felt empty and full, hot and cold,
無と全て 暑さと寒さ
07:52
euphoric and depressed
陶酔と落胆
07:55
because the brain is the world's first
脳は世界初の完璧に機能する
07:57
fully functional quantum computer;
量子コンピューターなので
07:59
it can occupy multiple states at the same time.
同時に多様な状態を取れます
08:01
And with all the internal regulators of my brain damaged,
私の脳の全ての内部調節機能が
08:04
I felt everything simultaneously.
破損したため同時に全てを感じたのです
08:07
But let's swivel around and look at me frontally.
では回転して前面から私を見てみましょう
08:10
This is now flash-forward to the point in time
退院したばかりの状態に早戻ししてみます
08:13
where I've been discharged by the health system.
退院したばかりの状態に早戻ししてみます
08:15
Look into those eyes. I'm not able to focus those eyes.
両目は焦点を合わせることができません
08:18
I'm not able to follow a line of text in a book.
本の1行すら追いかけられません
08:20
But the system has moved me on
それでも退院させられました
08:23
because, as my family started to discover,
家族も気付いたことですが
08:25
there is no long-term concept
医療制度には長期的視点がありません
08:28
in the health care system.
医療制度には長期的視点がありません
08:30
Neurological damage, 10 years of rehab,
神経的な障害は10年のリハビリが必要なので
08:32
requires a long-term perspective.
長期的な視点が必要です
08:35
But let's take a look behind my eyes.
さて私の目の裏側を見てみましょう
08:37
This is a gamma radiation spec scan
これはガンマ線を使ったガンマ線投射図です
08:39
that uses gamma radiation
これはガンマ線を使ったガンマ線投射図です
08:41
to map three-dimensional function within the brain.
脳内部の立体的機能図を作成できます
08:43
It requires a laboratory to see it in three dimension,
立体的描写には実験室が必要です
08:46
but in two dimensions I think you can see
二次元でも十分に正常な心が
08:48
the beautiful symmetry and illumination
美しく対称して動作しているのが分ります
08:50
of a normal mind at work.
美しく対称して動作しているのが分ります
08:52
Here's my brain.
これが私の脳です
08:54
That is the consequence of more than a third of the right side of my brain
脳卒中により右脳の1/3以上が
08:56
being destroyed by the stroke.
破壊された痕跡が見えます
08:59
So my family, as we moved forward
医療制度に見捨てられたので
09:01
and discovered that the health care system had moved us by,
私の家族は独自に解決策と解答を
09:03
had to try to find solutions and answers.
見つけようとしました
09:06
And during that process -- it took many years --
何年もかかったその過程で
09:08
one of the doctors said that my recovery, my degree of advance,
一人の医師が頭部損傷してからの
09:11
since the amount of head injury I'd suffered,
私の回復と進展の具合は
09:14
was miraculous.
奇跡的だと言いました
09:16
And that was when I started to write a book,
それをきっかけに 私は本を書き始めました
09:18
because I didn't think it was miraculous.
奇跡的とは思わなかったからです
09:20
I thought there were miraculous elements,
奇跡的な要素はあったでしょうが
09:22
but I also didn't think it was right
世界的にまん延する障害なのに
09:24
that one should have to struggle and search for answers
解答を探すのに こんなに苦労する
べきではないと思いました
09:26
when this is a pandemic within our society.
解答を探すのに こんなに苦労する
べきではないと思いました
09:28
So from this experience of my recovery,
そこで私の回復の体験から
09:31
I want to share four particular aspects --
4つの特有な要素をお話したいと思います
09:34
I call them the four C's of consciousness --
意識の4Cと呼んでいます
09:37
that helped me grow my potential mind
4Cのおかげで閉じた心から
09:39
back towards the actual mind that I work with every day.
毎日頼りにする現実の心に戻れたのです
09:42
The first C is cognitive training.
一つ目は認知力訓練
09:45
Unlike the smashed glass of my car,
私の車の割れたフロントガラスと違って
09:47
plasticity of the brain
脳には塑性能力があり
09:50
means that there was always a possibility, with treatment,
手当を受けながら覚醒と意識レベルの
09:52
to train the brain
手当を受けながら覚醒と意識レベルの
09:55
so that you can regain and raise your level of awareness and consciousness.
回復訓練をすることが可能です
09:57
Plasticity means that there was always
塑性があるということは
10:00
hope for our reason --
脳機能を回復させようとする理由があり
10:02
hope for our ability to rebuild that function.
回復させるには十分に可能性がある
10:04
Indeed, the mind can redefine itself,
心には再出発する能力があります
10:07
and this is demonstrated by two specialists called Hagen and Silva
1970年代にヘイガンとシルバという名の
10:09
back in the 1970's.
2人の専門家が実証しました
10:12
The global perspective
世界的な傾向では
10:14
is that up to 30 percent of children in school
学校で学ぶ子供の3割に
10:16
have learning weaknesses
自分では治せない
10:18
that are not self-correcting,
学習上の弱点があります
10:20
but with appropriate treatment,
しかし適切な検診をすれば
10:22
they can be screened for and detected and corrected
未然に発見し治療することにより
10:24
and avoid their academic failure.
落ちこぼれを防止できます
10:27
But what I discovered is it's almost impossible to find anyone
しかし そのような治療や世話を提供する人を
10:29
who provides that treatment or care.
見つけることがとても困難です
10:32
Here's what my neuropsychologist provided for me
私はようやくその人を探し当てました
10:34
when I actually found somebody who could apply it.
その神経医が施してくれた事を説明します
10:36
I'm not a doctor, so I'm not going to talk about the various subtests.
私は医師ではないので細かい
サブテストについては語りません
10:39
Let's just talk about full-scale I.Q.
全般のIQのみ説明しましょう
10:42
Full-scale I.Q. is the mental processing --
全般のIQは今日の生活に
10:44
how fast you can acquire information,
必須な頭脳処理― いかに早く
10:46
retain it and retrieve it --
情報を収集 保存し
10:48
that is essential for success in life today.
呼び戻すか― を測定します
10:50
And you can see here there are three columns.
ご覧のように3つのカラムがあります
10:53
Untestable -- that's when I'm in my coma.
試験不能は私が昏睡状態の時です
10:55
And then I creep up to the point that I get a score of 79,
徐々に回復し やがて79点を記録しました
10:58
which is just below average.
平均値をわずかに下回る数値です
11:01
In the health care system, if you touch average, you're done.
医療制度では平均に達すると終わりです
11:04
That's when I was discharged from the system.
その時点で退院させられました
11:07
What does average I.Q. really mean?
平均IQが本当に意味するのは何なんでしょう?
11:09
It meant that when I was given two and a half hours
意味するのは 普通の人なら50分で回答できる
11:12
to take a test that anyone here
テストに私は2時間半を要し
11:15
would take in 50 minutes,
それでも
11:17
I might score an F.
落第点を取ることです
11:19
This is a very, very low level
医療制度から見放されるには
11:22
in order to be kicked out of the health care system.
とても低いレベルなのです
11:24
Then I underwent cognitive training.
それから認知力訓練を受けました
11:26
And let me show you what happened to the right-hand column
そして認知力訓練を一定期間受けた上で
11:28
when I did my cognitive training over a period of time.
記録した数値が右側のグラフです
11:30
This is not supposed to occur.
起こり得ない数値です
11:33
I.Q. is supposed to stabilize and solidify
IQは8歳になると安定して
11:36
at the age of eight.
変動しなくなるものです
11:39
Now the Journal of the National Medical Association
国立医療学会誌が
11:41
gave my memoir a full clinical review,
私の回顧録を臨床的に調査を行いました
11:43
which is very unusual.
異例のことです
11:45
I'm not a doctor. I have no medical background whatsoever.
私は医師ではなく医学的経験は全くありません
11:47
But they felt the evidences
それでも彼らは綿密に調査した上で
11:50
that there was important, valuable information in the book,
提示された証拠には重要で貴重な
11:52
and they commented about it when they gave the full peer review to it.
情報があるとコメントしました
11:55
But they asked one question. They said, "Is this repeatable?"
“この事象は再現性があるのか” と問われました
11:58
That was a fair question
無理もないことです
12:01
because my memoir was simply how I found solutions that worked for me.
回顧録には自身の解決策を
発見する過程のみ記述しました
12:03
The answer is yes, and for the first time,
答えは“ある”です ここで初めて
12:06
it's my pleasure to be able to share two examples.
事例を二つ紹介しましょう
12:08
Here's somebody, what they did as they went through cognitive training
ある人が7歳と11歳の時に
12:10
at ages seven and 11.
認知力訓練を受けた結果がこれです
12:12
And here's another person in, call it, high school and college.
また別の人が高校と大学在学中に訓練を受けた例です
12:14
And this person is particularly interesting.
この人は特に興味深いです
12:17
I won't go into the intrascatter that's in the subtests,
サブテストの詳細については語りません
12:19
but they still had a neurologic issue.
2人とも精神的に問題がありました
12:21
But that person could be identified
この人には学習能力障害があったと認められたが
12:23
as having a learning disability.
この人には学習能力障害があったと認められたが
12:25
And with accommodation, they went on to college
援助を受けて 2人とも大学に進学し
12:27
and had a full life in terms of their opportunities.
機会に恵まれて充実した人生を送りました
12:29
Second aspect:
二つ目は頭蓋骨と顎骨の配置です
私は激しい片頭痛に襲われていました
12:32
I still had crushing migraine headaches.
二つ目は頭蓋骨と顎骨の配置です
私は激しい片頭痛に襲われていました
12:34
Two elements that worked for me here
役立ったのは二つの事です
12:36
are -- the first is 90 percent, I learned, of head and neck pain
一つ目が9割を占めるのですが頭と首の痛みは
12:38
is through muscular-skeletal imbalance.
筋肉と骨格のずれのせいです
12:42
The craniomandibular system is critical to that.
頭部の骨格が極めて重要です
12:44
And when I underwent it and found solutions,
治療を受けて分かったのは
12:48
this is the interrelationship between the TMJ and the teeth.
顎関節と歯には密接な関連があることです
12:51
Up to 30 percent of the population
人口の3割にも及ぶ人が
12:54
have a disorder, disease or dysfunction in the jaw
顎に何らかの障害 病気 機能不全があり
12:56
that affects the entire body.
身体全体に悪影響を及ぼしています
12:59
I was fortunate to find a dentist
私は幸運にも
13:01
who applied this entire universe
これから説明する新技術を持つ歯科医に恵まれ
13:03
of technology you're about to see
これから説明する新技術を持つ歯科医に恵まれ
13:05
to establish that if he repositioned my jaw,
顎の位置を再調整することで
13:07
the headaches pretty much resolved,
頭痛がほぼ完全になくなりました
13:09
but that then my teeth weren't in the right place.
しかし歯並びが良くありませんでした
13:11
He then held my jaw in the right position
そこで歯科医は顎を直すと共に
13:13
while orthodontically he put my teeth into correct alignment.
歯並びも矯正してくれました
13:15
So my teeth actually hold my jaw in the correct position.
これで歯と顎が正しい配置になりました
13:19
This affected my entire body.
その結果 体全体に良い影響がでました
13:22
If that sounds like a very, very strange thing to say
顎が体全体に
13:25
and rather a bold statement --
関わっているという発言は
13:27
How can the jaw affect the entire body? --
奇異に聞こえるかもしれません
13:29
let me simply point out to you,
簡単に証明できます
13:31
if I ask you tomorrow
明日になったら
13:33
to put one grain of sand between your teeth
砂の一粒を歯の間に挟んで
13:35
and go for a nice long walk,
長めの散歩をしてみてください
13:37
how far would you last
そして砂をとれずに
13:39
before you had to remove that grain of sand?
どれだけ長く歩けるか試して下さい
13:41
That tiny misalignment.
ほんの小さなずれです
13:43
Bear in mind, there are no nerves in the teeth.
しかも歯の表面には神経がありません
13:45
That's why the same between the before and after that this shows,
試す前と後には外見上の違いは
13:47
it's hard to see the difference.
全くない位です
13:50
Now just trying putting a few grains of sand between your teeth
砂をほんの少し歯の間に挟んで
13:52
and see the difference it makes.
どう違うのか試して下さい
13:54
I still had migraine headaches.
私には依然片頭痛がありました
13:56
The next issue that resolved
次に解決した問題は
13:58
was that, if 90 percent of head and neck pain
頭と首の痛みの9割がずれのせいだとすると
14:00
is caused by imbalance,
頭と首の痛みの9割がずれのせいだとすると
14:02
the other 10 percent, largely --
残りの1割は
14:04
if you set aside aneurysms, brain cancer
動脈瘤 脳腫瘍 ホルモン性障害を除くと
14:06
and hormonal issues --
動脈瘤 脳腫瘍 ホルモン性障害を除くと
14:08
is the circulation.
循環に問題があります
14:10
Imagine the blood flowing through your body --
UCLAメディカル・センターで言われたのは
14:12
I was told at UCLA Medical Center --
体内を流れる血液を
14:14
as one sealed system.
密封されたシステムと思ってください
14:16
There's a big pipe with the blood flowing through it,
大きなパイプがあり中を血液が流れます
14:18
and around that pipe are the nerves
パイプの周りには神経があり
14:20
drawing their nutrient supply from the blood.
血液が運ぶ栄養素を吸収します
14:22
That's basically it.
それが基本的構造です
14:24
If you press on a hose pipe in a sealed system,
密封されたパイプの一カ所を
14:26
it bulges someplace else.
押すと他の場所が膨らみます
14:28
If that some place else where it bulges
もしその膨らむ場所が
14:30
is inside the biggest nerve in your body, your brain,
一番神経が集中している脳の中だと
14:32
you get a vascular migraine.
片頭痛型血管性頭痛になります
14:35
This is a level of pain that's only known
痛みは片頭痛型血管性頭痛を
14:37
to other people who suffer vascular migraines.
体験した人にしか分かりません
14:39
Using this technology,
この技術を使えば
14:42
this is mapping in three dimensions.
三次元マッピングが可能です
14:44
This is an MRI MRA MRV,
MRI MRA MRV
14:46
a volumetric MRI.
MRI計量です
14:48
Using this technology, the specialists at UCLA Medical Center
UCLAメディカル・センターの専門家は
14:50
were able to identify
この技術を使ってパイプのどこに
14:53
where that compression in the hose pipe was occurring.
圧迫があるか特定しました
14:55
A vascular surgeon removed most of the first rib on both sides of my body.
循環器系外科医は左右の第一助骨を取り除きました
14:57
And in the following months and years,
そのおかげで
15:01
I felt the neurological flow of life itself returning.
神経系統は正常に戻りました
15:03
Communication, the next C. This is critical.
次はコミュニケーションです とても重要です
15:06
All consciousness is about communication.
意識はコミュニケーションが全てです
15:09
And here, by great fortune,
非常に幸いにも
15:12
one of my father's clients
父親のある取引先の
15:14
had a husband who worked
夫がアルフレッド・マン科学研究財団に勤務していました
15:16
at the Alfred Mann Foundation for Scientific Research.
夫がアルフレッド・マン科学研究財団に勤務していました
15:18
Alfred Mann is a brilliant physicist and innovator
アルフレッド・マンは優れた科学者 発明家です
15:21
who's fascinated with bridging gaps in consciousness,
意識の断絶を塞ぐことに情熱を注ぎ
15:23
whether to restore hearing to the deaf, vision to the blind
聴覚障がい者には音 視覚障がい者には光
15:26
or movement to the paralyzed.
身体麻痺者には動作の回復に努めました
15:29
And I'm just going to give you an example today
例として身体麻痺障がい者が
15:31
of movement to the paralyzed.
動作を取り戻す様子をお見せします
15:33
I've brought with me, from Southern California,
南カリフォルニアから持ってきたのは
15:35
the FM device.
このFM装置です
15:38
This is it being held in the hand.
手の平に乗っています
15:40
It weighs less than a gram.
1グラムもありません
15:42
So two of them implanted in the body would weigh less than a dime.
体内に2個埋め込んでも10セント硬貨より軽いです
15:44
Five of them would still weigh less
5個でも1インド・ルピー硬貨以下の重さです
15:47
than a rupee coin.
5個でも1インド・ルピー硬貨以下の重さです
15:49
Where does it go inside the body?
身体のどこにつけるのでしょう?
15:51
It has been simulated and tested to endure in the body corrosion-free
この装置は耐久試験を経て
15:53
for over 80 years.
体内でも80年以上劣化しません
15:55
So it goes in and it stays there.
設置したらそのままです
15:57
Here are the implantation sites.
埋め込み個所はこのとおりです
15:59
The concept that they're working towards -- and they have working prototypes --
実証中の概念ではこの装置を
16:01
is that we placed it throughout the motor points of the body
身体の必要な稼働部分に広く設置します
16:04
where they're needed.
身体の必要な稼働部分に広く設置します
16:06
The main unit will then go inside the brain.
主ユニットは脳内に設置します
16:08
An FM device in the cortex of the brain, the motor cortex,
運動皮質に埋め込まれたFM装置は
16:10
will send signals in real time
リアルタイムに関連する筋肉の
16:13
to the motor points in the relevant muscles
駆動ポイントに信号を送ります
16:15
so that the person will be able to move their arm, let's say, in real time,
すると例えば腕が麻痺した人が
16:17
if they've lost control of their arm.
リアルタイムに腕を動かせます
16:20
And other FM devices implanted in fingertips,
指先に埋め込まれた別のFM装置は
16:22
on contacting a surface,
何か表面に触れると
16:25
will send a message back to the sensory cortex of the brain,
脳の感覚皮質に信号を送り
16:27
so that the person feels a sense of touch.
何かに触れた感覚が生じます
16:30
Is this science fiction? No,
サイエンス・フィクション? いいえ
16:33
because I'm wearing the first application of this technology.
実は私がこの技術を初めて装着しています
16:35
I don't have the ability to control my left foot.
私の左足は麻痺しています
16:38
A radio device is controlling every step I take,
無線装置が一歩一歩を制御しています
16:40
and a sensor picks up my foot for me
そして歩くたびにセンサーが
16:43
every time I walk.
私の足を見ています
16:45
And in closing, I want to share
最後にこの体験が個人的に
16:47
the personal reason why this meant so much to me
いかに重要な意味を持ち
16:49
and changed the direction of my life.
私の人生を変えたかお話します
16:51
In my coma, one of the presences I sensed
昏睡状態にあった時 私は誰かが
16:53
was someone I felt was a protector.
見守っていると気付いていました
16:55
And when I came out of my coma, I recognized my family,
昏睡から脱した時 家族は認識できましたが
16:57
but I didn't remember my own past.
自分の過去は思い出せませんでした
17:00
Gradually, I remembered the protector was my wife.
やがて見守っていた人は自分の妻だと知りました
17:03
And I whispered the good news
そのよい知らせを
17:06
through my broken jaw, which was wired shut,
固定されて動かない口で
17:08
to my night nurse.
当直の看護婦にささやきました
17:10
And the following morning, my mother came to explain
翌朝 母親が来て言いました
17:12
that I'd not always been in this bed, in this room,
私は常に病室のベッドに居るのではなく
17:14
that I'd been working in film and television
私は映画やテレビ業界で仕事をしていて
17:16
and that I had been in a crash
交通事故に遭ったこと
17:18
and that, yes, I was married,
そして結婚していたこと
17:20
but Marcy had been killed instantly in the crash.
妻のマーシーはその事故で即死したこと
17:23
And during my time in coma,
そして私が昏睡中に
17:26
she had been laid to rest in her hometown of Phoenix.
彼女の故郷フィニックスに埋葬されたこと
17:28
Now in the dark years that followed, I had to work out what remained for me
その後の暗い年月の中 今を特別にした全てが
17:32
if everything that made today special was gone.
失われ 自分に残るのは何か探し求めました
17:35
And as I discovered these threats to consciousness
やがて意識の危機について知り
17:38
and how they are surrounding the world
それが世界的な傾向で
17:41
and enveloping the lives of more and more people every day,
より多くの人々の命を日々蝕んでいることに
17:43
I discovered what truly remained.
自分の存在意義を見つけました
17:46
I believe that we can overcome the threats to our consciousness,
私は我々の意識の危機は克服できると信じます
17:48
that the Human Show can stay on the air
人間ショーの放映は永久に続きます
17:51
for millennia to come.
人間ショーの放映は永久に続きます
17:53
I believe that we can all rise and shine.
私達は皆立ち上がって輝けるのです
17:55
Thank you very much.
たいへんありがとうございました
17:58
(Applause)
(拍手)
18:00
Lakshmi Pratury: Just stay for a second. Just stay here for a second.
少しだけいいでしょうか?
18:06
(Applause)
(拍手)
18:09
You know,
サイモンのお話を聞いた時―
18:13
when I heard Simon's --
どうか座ってください
18:16
please sit down; I just want to talk to him for a second --
少しだけお話したいだけですから
18:20
when I read his book, I went to LA to meet him.
本を読み彼に会うためにLAに行きました
18:23
And so I was sitting in this restaurant,
待ち合わせのレストランで
18:26
waiting for a man to come by
明らかに体が不自由な人が
18:29
who obviously would have some difficulty ...
現れるのを待っていました
18:32
I don't know what I had in my mind.
何を考えていたか分かりません
18:34
And he was walking around.
誰かが歩いていました
18:36
I didn't expect that person that I was going to meet
私が会う当人とは全く気づきませんでした
18:38
to be him.
私が会う当人とは全く気づきませんでした
18:40
And then we met and we talked,
あいさつして話始めても
18:42
and I'm like, he doesn't look
大事故を克服した人には到底見えません
18:44
like somebody who was built out of nothing.
大事故を克服した人には到底見えません
18:46
And then I was amazed
と同時に
18:50
at what role technology played
あなたの回復に技術が果たした
18:52
in your recovery.
役割にも驚きました
18:54
And we have his book outside
彼の著書は外の書店にあります
18:56
in the bookshop.
彼の著書は外の書店にあります
18:58
The thing that amazed me
私が驚いたのは
19:00
is the painstaking detail
その本には 掛かった全ての病院
19:02
with which he has written
受けた全ての治療
19:05
every hospital he has been to,
遭遇した全てのニアミス
19:07
every treatment he got,
そして新発明に出会った様子等が
19:09
every near-miss he had,
そして新発明に出会った様子等が
19:11
and how accidentally he stumbled upon innovations.
とても克明に記述されていたことです
19:14
So I think this one detail
一点だけもう少し詳しく知りたいのですが
19:18
went past people really quick.
一点だけもう少し詳しく知りたいのですが
19:23
Tell a little bit about what you're wearing on your leg.
足に何を装着しているか説明して下さい
19:25
Simon Lewis: I knew when I was timing this
予行の時 この事に触れる
19:28
that there wouldn't be time for me to do anything about --
時間はないと思っていました
19:30
Well this is it. This is the control unit.
これが実物です これが制御装置です
19:32
And this records every single step I've taken
私が取る全ての行動を
19:35
for, ooh, five or six years now.
もう5~6年も記録しています
19:37
And if I do this, probably the mic won't hear it.
マイクが音を拾えるでしょうか
19:39
That little chirp followed by two chirps is now switched on.
小さな発信音に続けて2つ音がすると電源が入ります
19:44
When I press it again, it'll chirp three times,
もう一度押すと3回鳴ります
19:47
and that'll mean that it's armed and ready to go.
これで準備完了です
19:50
And that's my friend. I mean, I charge it every night.
私の友達です 毎晩チャージします
19:54
And it works. It works.
しっかり動きます
19:57
And what I would love to add because I didn't have time ...
それにお話ししたいことは 時間がなかったので
19:59
What does it do? Well actually, I'll show you down here.
何をするのかって? 実際にお見せします
20:02
This down here, if the camera can see that,
この下の部分を映せますか
20:05
that is a small antenna.
小さなアンテナです
20:08
Underneath my heel, there is a sensor
踵の下にセンサーがあって
20:11
that detects when my foot leaves the ground --
足が地面から離れるのを検知します
20:14
what's called the heel lift.
ヒール・リフトといいます
20:16
This thing blinks all the time; I'll leave it out, so you might be able to see it.
常に点滅します
出したままにしますが見えますか
20:18
But this is blinking all the time. It's sending signals in real time.
この装置も常に点滅します
信号をリアルタイムで送信します
20:21
And if you walk faster, if I walk faster,
もし速足になると
20:24
it detects what's called the time interval,
間隔の変化を検知し―
20:27
which is the interval between each heel lift.
ヒール・リストの間隔です―
20:29
And it accelerates the amount and level of the stimulation.
感覚刺激の量と強度を加速させるのです
20:31
The other things they've worked on -- I didn't have time to say this in my talk --
もうひとつ先ほど話す時間がなかったことは
20:35
is they've restored functional hearing
既に多くの聴覚障がい者の
20:38
to thousands of deaf people.
回復に役立っていることです
20:40
I could tell you the story: this was going to be an abandoned technology,
長い話を短くすると 隠された技術でした
20:42
but Alfred Mann met the doctor who was going to retire,
アルフレッド・マンが引退間近の医師
20:45
[Dr. Schindler.]
フィッシャー博士に会ったのです
20:47
And he was going to retire -- all the technology was going to be lost,
引退に伴い技術が捨てられるところでした
20:49
because not a single medical manufacturer would take it on
医療機器メーカーが採用しなかったのです
20:52
because it was a small issue.
大した問題ではなかったからです
20:55
But there's millions of deaf people in the world,
しかし世界中には多くの聴覚障がい者がいます
20:57
and the Cochlear implant has given hearing to thousands of deaf people now.
現在 人工内耳は多くの人々の
21:00
It works.
聴覚回復に役立っています
21:03
And the other thing is they're working on artificial retinas for the blind.
視覚障がい者には人工網膜を開発中です
21:05
And this, this is the implantable generation.
この装置は埋め込み可能です
21:08
Because what I didn't say in my talk
さきほど触れなかったのは
21:11
is this is actually exoskeletal.
この装置は外骨格型です
21:13
I should clarify that.
つまり第一世代の
21:15
Because the first generation is exoskeletal,
外骨格型装置は
21:17
it's wrapped around the leg,
足に巻いたりして
21:19
around the affected limb.
影響受けた手足に着用できます
21:21
I must tell you, they're an amazing --
彼らは素晴らしいです
21:23
there's a hundred people who work in that building --
百人もの技術者や科学者が働いています
21:25
engineers, scientists,
百人もの技術者や科学者が働いています
21:27
and other team members -- all the time.
他にもスタッフがいます
21:29
Alfred Mann has set up this foundation
アルフレッド・マンがこの財団を設立したのは
21:31
to advance this research
ベンチャーがこの分野には
21:34
because he saw
興味を示さなくても
21:36
there's no way venture capital would come in for something like this.
研究を推進するためでした
21:38
The audience is too small.
市場が小さすぎるのです
21:41
You'd think, there's plenty of paralyzed people in the world,
世界中には運動障がい者が
たくさんいると思いがちですが
21:43
but the audience is too small,
市場は小さすぎるのです
21:45
and the amount of research, the time it takes,
研究投資 研究期間
21:47
the FDA clearances,
当局の認可を考えると
21:50
the payback time is too long
ベンチャーにとっては資金回収には
21:52
for V.C. to be interested.
あまりにも長くかかります
21:54
So he saw a need and he stepped in.
そこで彼が立ち上がりました
21:56
He's a very, very remarkable man.
本当に素晴らしい人物です
21:58
He's done a lot of very cutting-edge science.
実に多くの最新科学を取り入れています
22:01
LP: So when you get a chance, spend some time with Simon.
機会があれば ぜひサイモンと会って下さい
22:04
Thank you. Thank you.
ありがとうございました
22:06
(Applause)
(拍手)
22:08
Translator:Akira Kan
Reviewer:Jarred Tucker

sponsored links

Simon Lewis - Author, producer
Simon Lewis is the author of "Rise and Shine," a memoir about his remarkable recovery from a car accident and coma, and his new approach to our own consciousness.

Why you should listen

Born in London, Simon Lewis is a film and television producer and author. After earning law degrees from Christ's College Cambridge and Boalt Hall, Berkeley, Lewis moved to Los Angeles, where his Hollywood experience includes managing writers, directors and stars, as well as producing Look Who's Talking, critically acclaimed films such as The Chocolate War, the Emmy-winning international co-production for HBO and ITV Central A Month of Sundays (Age Old Friends), and variety specials starring Howie Mandel. 

He's the author of Rise and Shine, a memoir that uses his personal story -- of recovery from coma -- to illustrate deep and universal insights about consciousness itself. An acclaimed author, speaker and commentator, Lewis uses creative visualizations that fuse cutting-edge medicine, scientific research and digital art to illustrate solutions to society’s most pressing problem: the erosion of consciousness and need for solutions to nurture and grow our minds through cognitive and other therapies.

An advocate for change in how we educate our children and ourselves, he says that we must not take our consciousness for granted, but use specific tools to screen and detect learning weaknesses and prevent academic failure. Bridge the gap from our potential mind toward our actual mind and maximize consciousness itself across our population, from child to adult.

The Atavist magazine devoted Issue No. 7 to Chris Colin's in-depth biographical profile of Lewis, called "Blindsight." Read a review or buy the issue.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.