18:07
TEDGlobal 2011

Tim Harford: Trial, error and the God complex

ティム・ハルフォード:試行、錯誤、そして全能感ゆえの固定観念

Filmed:

経済記者のティム・ハルフォードは複雑なシステムを研究して、成功しているシステムにおいて驚くべき相関を見いだしました。それらは試行錯誤から生まれたものなのです。2011 年の TEDGlobal で行われたこの際立った講演で、ティムは我々に、ランダムさを受け入れてより良い間違いを目指すよう訴えます。

- Economist, journalist and broadcaster
Tim Harford's writings reveal the economic ideas behind everyday experiences. Full bio

It's the Second World War.
第二次世界大戦のとき
00:15
A German prison camp.
ドイツの収容所で
00:17
And this man,
この男
00:20
Archie Cochrane,
アーチー・コクランは
00:23
is a prisoner of war and a doctor,
軍医でしたが捕虜として捕われ
00:26
and he has a problem.
問題を抱えていました
00:29
The problem is that the men under his care
患者たちが病気で
00:32
are suffering
苦しみながら
00:35
from an excruciating and debilitating condition
衰弱していくという
00:37
that Archie doesn't really understand.
コクランに理解のできない状況でした
00:40
The symptoms
症状は
00:43
are this horrible swelling up of fluids under the skin.
ひどい水ぶくれでした
00:45
But he doesn't know whether it's an infection, whether it's to do with malnutrition.
感染症か栄養失調なのかわかりません
00:48
He doesn't know how to cure it.
治療法もわかりません
00:51
And he's operating in a hostile environment.
しかもそこは敵地です
00:53
And people do terrible things in wars.
戦時下にはひどいことがおきます
00:56
The German camp guards, they've got bored.
ドイツの監視兵は退屈すると
00:58
They've taken to just firing into the prison camp at random
収容所に向けて
01:01
for fun.
いたずらに発砲するのです
01:03
On one particular occasion,
あるときには
01:05
one of the guards threw a grenade into the prisoners' lavatory
捕虜たちでいっぱいのトイレに
01:07
while it was full of prisoners.
手榴弾が投げ込まれたこともありました
01:10
He said he heard suspicious laughter.
彼は不審な笑い声を耳にしたと言います
01:13
And Archie Cochrane, as the camp doctor,
収容所の軍医であるアーチー・コクランは
01:15
was one of the first men in
事態をなんとか打開しようとした
01:18
to clear up the mess.
人のひとりでした
01:20
And one more thing:
付け加えると
01:22
Archie was suffering from this illness himself.
コクラン自身がその病気にかかっていました
01:24
So the situation seemed pretty desperate.
ずいぶん絶望的な状況です
01:27
But Archie Cochrane
ただアーチー・コクランは
01:30
was a resourceful person.
抜け目のない男でした
01:32
He'd already smuggled vitamin C into the camp,
すでにビタミンCを手配しており
01:35
and now he managed
さらにこんどは
01:38
to get hold of supplies of marmite
闇ルートを通して
01:40
on the black market.
マーマイトを入手しました
01:42
Now some of you will be wondering what marmite is.
マーマイトとは何だろうと思われる方もいるでしょう
01:44
Marmite is a breakfast spread beloved of the British.
イギリス人はこれをパンに塗るのを好みます
01:47
It looks like crude oil.
見た目は原油のようですが
01:50
It tastes ...
その味ときたら
01:52
zesty.
ピリっとした味です
01:54
And importantly,
重要なことですが
01:56
it's a rich source
マーマイトには
01:58
of vitamin B12.
ビタミンB12が豊富です
02:00
So Archie splits the men under his care as best he can
アーチーは患者たちをできるだけ同じ条件の
02:02
into two equal groups.
二つのグループに分けました
02:05
He gives half of them vitamin C.
一方にはビタミンCを与え
02:07
He gives half of them vitamin B12.
もう一方にはビタミンB12を与えました
02:09
He very carefully and meticulously notes his results
細心の注意をはらって結果を
02:12
in an exercise book.
ノートに記録しました
02:15
And after just a few days,
数日たつと
02:17
it becomes clear
病気の理由は何であれ
02:19
that whatever is causing this illness,
マーマイトで治せることが
02:21
marmite is the cure.
はっきりしてきました
02:24
So Cochrane then goes to the Germans who are running the prison camp.
そこで収容所を運営していたドイツ兵に面会を求めます
02:27
Now you've got to imagine at the moment --
そのようすを想像してみてください
02:30
forget this photo, imagine this guy
この写真は忘れて この男に
02:32
with this long ginger beard and this shock of red hair.
長い赤ひげと もじゃもじゃの赤毛を付けてください
02:34
He hasn't been able to shave -- a sort of Billy Connolly figure.
ずっとひげも剃れなくて ビリー・コノリーのような風体です
02:37
Cochrane, he starts ranting at these Germans
コクランは熱弁をふるいます
02:40
in this Scottish accent --
こんなスコットランド訛の ー
02:42
in fluent German, by the way, but in a Scottish accent --
訛ってはいても流暢なドイツ語です
02:44
and explains to them how German culture was the culture
シラーやゲーテを生んだドイツの文化の
02:47
that gave Schiller and Goethe to the world.
何たるかを語り
02:50
And he can't understand
そんなドイツでこのような
02:52
how this barbarism can be tolerated,
野蛮が許されるとは理解しがたいと訴えます
02:54
and he vents his frustrations.
彼は不満を爆発させます
02:56
And then he goes back to his quarters,
それから彼は自分の兵舎に戻り
02:59
breaks down and weeps
絶望してすすり泣きます
03:02
because he's convinced that the situation is hopeless.
望みがない事態だと確信したからです
03:05
But a young German doctor
しかし若いドイツ人の医師が
03:10
picks up Archie Cochrane's exercise book
アーチー・コクランのノートを手に取り
03:13
and says to his colleagues,
同僚に言います
03:16
"This evidence is incontrovertible.
この証拠に議論の余地はない
03:20
If we don't supply vitamins to the prisoners,
捕虜たちにビタミンを与えないと
03:25
it's a war crime."
戦争犯罪になるぞ
03:28
And the next morning,
翌朝には
03:30
supplies of vitamin B12 are delivered to the camp,
収容所にビタミンB12が届けられ
03:32
and the prisoners begin to recover.
捕虜たちは回復し始めました
03:35
Now I'm not telling you this story
さてこの話をした理由は
03:39
because I think Archie Cochrane is a dude,
コクランが大人物と思うからではなく
03:41
although Archie Cochrane is a dude.
ー もちろんアーチー・コクランは大人物ですが ー
03:43
I'm not even telling you the story
公共政策のあらゆる面において
03:47
because I think we should be running
注意深く管理された
03:49
more carefully controlled randomized trials
ランダム化比較試験が望ましいと
03:51
in all aspects of public policy,
言うためでもありません
03:53
although I think that would also be completely awesome.
その訴えも実にすばらしいこととは思います
03:55
I'm telling you this story
この話をした理由は
03:59
because Archie Cochrane, all his life,
アーチー・コクランが生涯に渡って
04:01
fought against a terrible affliction,
戦っていたやっかいな悩みの種だからです
04:04
and he realized it was debilitating to individuals
それが個人を弱らせ 社会を腐敗させるものだと
04:08
and it was corrosive to societies.
コクランは気付いていました
04:12
And he had a name for it.
彼はそれをこう名付けていました
04:14
He called it the God complex.
ゴッド・コンプレックス(全能感ゆえの固定観念)
04:16
Now I can describe the symptoms of the God complex very, very easily.
ゴッド・コンプレックスの症状は簡単に説明できます
04:19
So the symptoms of the complex
その固定観念の症候とは
04:23
are, no matter how complicated the problem,
問題がどれほど複雑であっても
04:26
you have an absolutely overwhelming belief
それを圧倒的で絶対的な信念を持って
04:29
that you are infallibly right in your solution.
自分の解決策が間違いなく正しいと思うことです
04:32
Now Archie was a doctor,
アーチーは医者でした
04:36
so he hung around with doctors a lot.
多くの医師と交流がありました
04:38
And doctors suffer from the God complex a lot.
多くの医師がゴッド・コンプレックスに罹っています
04:40
Now I'm an economist, I'm not a doctor,
まあ私は経済学者で医師ではありませんが
04:43
but I see the God complex around me all the time
でも身の回りで 始終これを目にします
04:45
in my fellow economists.
経済学者の仲間や
04:47
I see it in our business leaders.
経済界のリーダー達や
04:49
I see it in the politicians we vote for --
我々が投票する政治家達にも見られます
04:51
people who, in the face of an incredibly complicated world,
この驚くほど複雑化した世界を前にして
04:53
are nevertheless absolutely convinced
それでもこの世の仕組みを理解できていると
04:57
that they understand the way that the world works.
頭から信じている人たちです
05:00
And you know, with the future billions that we've been hearing about,
これから 100億近い人が住もうというこの世界は
05:03
the world is simply far too complex
あまりにも複雑すぎて
05:06
to understand in that way.
そんなやり方では全然理解できません
05:08
Well let me give you an example.
例をあげましょう
05:10
Imagine for a moment
しばらくの間
05:12
that, instead of Tim Harford in front of you,
ここにいるのはティム・ハフォードではなくて
05:14
there was Hans Rosling presenting his graphs.
ハンス・ロスリングがグラフを説明していると思ってください
05:16
You know Hans:
あのハンスです
05:19
the Mick Jagger of TED.
TED におけるミック・ジャガーですね
05:21
(Laughter)
(笑)
05:23
And he'd be showing you these amazing statistics,
ハンスはあの素晴らしい統計と
05:25
these amazing animations.
アニメーションをお目にかけます
05:27
And they are brilliant; it's wonderful work.
最高の内容です 素晴らしい
05:29
But a typical Hans Rosling graph:
さて例のハンス・ロスリングのグラフですが
05:31
think for a moment, not what it shows,
示している内容ではなくて
05:33
but think instead about what it leaves out.
そこで示されなかったことを考えてみてください
05:36
So it'll show you GDP per capita,
グラフが示しているのは ひとり当たりの GDP と
05:39
population, longevity,
人口と寿命
05:42
that's about it.
それだけです
05:44
So three pieces of data for each country --
国ごとに 3 種類のデータが揃っています
05:46
three pieces of data.
3 種のデータです
05:48
Three pieces of data is nothing.
3 種なんて 何も無いようなものです
05:50
I mean, have a look at this graph.
では こちらのグラフを見てください
05:52
This is produced by the physicist Cesar Hidalgo.
MIT の物理学者 シーザー・ヒダルゴが
05:54
He's at MIT.
作ったグラフです
05:56
Now you won't be able to understand a word of it,
パッと理解できるグラフではありませんが
05:58
but this is what it looks like.
こんなふうに見えるグラフです
06:00
Cesar has trolled the database
5000種類の様々な製品の
06:02
of over 5,000 different products,
データベースに対して
06:04
and he's used techniques of network analysis
ネットワーク解析の技術を適用して
06:07
to interrogate this database
このデータベースを調査しました
06:12
and to graph relationships between the different products.
様々な製品間の関係を表したグラフです
06:14
And it's wonderful, wonderful work.
これは実に素晴らしい研究です
06:16
You show all these interconnections, all these interrelations.
全ての繋がりと相関を示しています
06:18
And I think it'll be profoundly useful
経済が成長して行くときの
06:21
in understanding how it is that economies grow.
様子を理解する上で大変有用なことです
06:23
Brilliant work.
際立つ研究です
06:26
Cesar and I tried to write a piece for The New York Times Magazine
我々はニューヨーク・タイムズ・マガジンに
06:28
explaining how this works.
この研究についての記事を書こうとしました
06:30
And what we learned
このシーザーの研究は素晴らしすぎて
06:32
is Cesar's work is far too good to explain
ニューヨーク・タイムズ・マガジンに
06:34
in The New York Times Magazine.
収まりきらないことが判明しました
06:36
Five thousand products --
5000 品目の製品は
06:40
that's still nothing.
まだどうということはありません
06:43
Five thousand products --
5000 種類です
06:45
imagine counting every product category
シーザーのデータに登場するすべての
06:47
in Cesar Hidalgo's data.
項目を数え上げたとして
06:49
Imagine you had one second
一項目に一秒かけて
06:51
per product category.
読み上げていくと
06:53
In about the length of this session,
このセッションほどの時間で
06:55
you would have counted all 5,000.
5000種全てを数え終わります
06:58
Now imagine doing the same thing
同じことを
07:00
for every different type of product on sale in Walmart.
ウォールマートで売られている商品の全てに行うとすると
07:02
There are 100,000 there. It would take you all day.
10万点ありますから 丸一日かかるでしょう
07:05
Now imagine trying to count
ではこんどは
07:08
every different specific product and service
大きな経済圏のあらゆる製品とサービスを
07:10
on sale in a major economy
数え上げるとしたらどうでしょう
07:13
such as Tokyo, London or New York.
例えば東京やロンドンやニューヨークです
07:15
It's even more difficult in Edinburgh
エジンバラだと難しくなる点は
07:17
because you have to count all the whisky and the tartan.
ウィスキーとタータンも数えなければならないことです
07:19
If you wanted to count every product and service
ニューヨークでの製品とサービスを
07:22
on offer in New York --
全て数え上げたら
07:24
there are 10 billion of them --
100億点になります
07:26
it would take you 317 years.
317年かかることになります
07:28
This is how complex the economy we've created is.
われわれが作り上げた経済はこれほど複雑なのです
07:31
And I'm just counting toasters here.
ここでは商品の数を数えただけです
07:34
I'm not trying to solve the Middle East problem.
中東問題を解決を目指してはいないのに
07:36
The complexity here is unbelievable.
信じがたいほどの複雑さです
07:39
And just a piece of context --
この見方で言うならー
07:42
the societies in which our brains evolved
私たちの頭脳が進化してきた社会には
07:44
had about 300 products and services.
300 種の製品とサービスがありました
07:46
You could count them in five minutes.
つまり5分で数え上げられます
07:48
So this is the complexity of the world that surrounds us.
こんな複雑な世界に私たちは囲まれています
07:51
This perhaps is why
おそらくはそれゆえに
07:54
we find the God complex so tempting.
ゴッド・コンプレックスに誘惑されるのです
07:56
We tend to retreat and say, "We can draw a picture,
押され気味になりながらも「概要がわかり
07:59
we can post some graphs,
なにかグラフも作れるだろう
08:02
we get it, we understand how this works."
よしわかった その仕組みもわかった」と言うのです
08:04
And we don't.
でもわかっていません
08:07
We never do.
決してわかりはしません
08:09
Now I'm not trying to deliver a nihilistic message here.
ニヒリズムを唱えているのではありません
08:11
I'm not trying to say we can't solve
複雑な世界の複雑な問題は解決できないと
08:13
complicated problems in a complicated world.
言いたいわけではありません
08:15
We clearly can.
明らかに可能ですから
08:17
But the way we solve them
しかし課題を解決する方法は
08:19
is with humility --
謙虚な取り組みによるものです
08:21
to abandon the God complex
ゴッド・コンプレックスは捨てて
08:23
and to actually use a problem-solving technique that works.
実際に有効な課題解決の方法を適用するのです
08:25
And we have a problem-solving technique that works.
そして有効な解決手法があります
08:28
Now you show me
うまく機能しているー
08:31
a successful complex system,
複雑なシステムがあればそれは
08:33
and I will show you a system
試行錯誤の中でー
08:35
that has evolved through trial and error.
進化したシステムなのです
08:38
Here's an example.
例えば
08:40
This baby was produced through trial and error.
この赤ちゃんは試行錯誤から生まれました
08:42
I realize that's an ambiguous statement.
あいまいな言い方でしたね
08:46
Maybe I should clarify it.
明確にしましょう
08:49
This baby is a human body: it evolved.
この赤ちゃんという肉体は進化の結果です
08:51
What is evolution?
進化とは何でしょうか?
08:54
Over millions of years, variation and selection,
何百万年にもわたる変化と選択
08:56
variation and selection --
変化と選択
08:59
trial and error,
試行と錯誤
09:02
trial and error.
試行と錯誤の繰り返しです
09:04
And it's not just biological systems
そして試行錯誤が奇跡を生み出すのは
09:07
that produce miracles through trial and error.
生体系に限った話ではありません
09:09
You could use it in an industrial context.
産業応用にも適用できるのです
09:11
So let's say you wanted to make detergent.
例えば 洗剤を作りたいとしましょう
09:13
Let's say you're Unilever
ユニリーバみたいに
09:15
and you want to make detergent in a factory near Liverpool.
リバプール近郊の工場で洗剤を製造しようとするとき
09:17
How do you do it?
どうやりますか?
09:20
Well you have this great big tank full of liquid detergent.
こんな大きなタンク一杯に液体の洗剤を用意します
09:22
You pump it at a high pressure through a nozzle.
高圧をかけてノズルから噴き出し
09:25
You create a spray of detergent.
洗剤を霧状にします
09:27
Then the spray dries. It turns into powder.
霧はすぐに乾燥して粉になります
09:30
It falls to the floor.
粉は下にたまります
09:32
You scoop it up. You put it in cardboard boxes.
それをかき集めて箱に詰めます
09:34
You sell it at a supermarket.
スーパーで売ると
09:36
You make lots of money.
立派な売上が得られます
09:38
How do you design that nozzle?
そのノズルをどう設計しましょうか?
09:40
It turns out to be very important.
これが大変重要だとわかったのです
09:43
Now if you ascribe to the God complex,
ゴッド・コンプレックスの考え方に従うなら
09:46
what you do is you find yourself a little God.
ちょっとした神を探さなければなりません
09:48
You find yourself a mathematician; you find yourself a physicist --
数学者や物理学者だとか
09:51
somebody who understands the dynamics of this fluid.
液体の力学をわかる人を自分で探し出して
09:54
And he will, or she will,
その人に
09:57
calculate the optimal design of the nozzle.
ノズルの最適形状を計算してもらいます
10:00
Now Unilever did this and it didn't work --
ユニリーバもそうやって失敗しました
10:03
too complicated.
複雑すぎたのです
10:05
Even this problem, too complicated.
こんな問題でも複雑すぎるのです
10:07
But the geneticist Professor Steve Jones
しかし遺伝学者のスティーブ・ジョーンズ教授は
10:10
describes how Unilever actually did solve this problem --
ユニリーバがこの問題をどう解決したか説明しています
10:13
trial and error,
試行錯誤です
10:16
variation and selection.
変化と選択です
10:18
You take a nozzle
まずノズルを用意します
10:20
and you create 10 random variations on the nozzle.
ランダムに 10通りの変形をさせて
10:22
You try out all 10; you keep the one that works best.
この10個のノズルを試して 最良の一つを選びます
10:26
You create 10 variations on that one.
それをまた10通りに変化させ
10:29
You try out all 10. You keep the one that works best.
全部を試して一番良いのを選びます
10:31
You try out 10 variations on that one.
そしてまた10通りを試します
10:34
You see how this works, right?
どうやるかおわかりですね
10:36
And after 45 generations,
こうして 45 世代を繰り返した後で
10:38
you have this incredible nozzle.
このおどろくべきノズルができました
10:40
It looks a bit like a chess piece --
チェスの駒に似た感じです
10:42
functions absolutely brilliantly.
全くすばらしい性能を発揮します
10:44
We have no idea
どうしてうまく行くのか
10:47
why it works,
全然わかりません
10:49
no idea at all.
見当もつきません
10:51
And the moment you step back from the God complex --
しかしゴッド・コンプレックスを退けて
10:53
let's just try to have a bunch of stuff;
あれこれ試してみようと決めて
10:55
let's have a systematic way of determining what's working and what's not --
良否の判定をシステマチックに定めることにすると
10:57
you can solve your problem.
たちまち問題が解決するのです
11:00
Now this process of trial and error
この試行錯誤のプロセスというのは
11:02
is actually far more common in successful institutions
成功している組織においては
11:04
than we care to recognize.
想像する以上に 普通に見うけられます
11:07
And we've heard a lot about how economies function.
経済がどう機能するか この場で沢山聞きました
11:09
The U.S. economy is still the world's greatest economy.
米国経済は未だに世界一の経済です
11:12
How did it become the world's greatest economy?
どのようにして世界一の経済になったのでしょうか
11:16
I could give you all kinds of facts and figures
米国経済に関してあらゆる事実や数字を
11:19
about the U.S. economy,
並べ上げることができますが
11:21
but I think the most salient one is this:
最も際立った特徴はこれだと思います
11:23
ten percent of American businesses
アメリカでは毎年10パーセントの事業が
11:26
disappear every year.
消え去るのです
11:29
That is a huge failure rate.
とても大きな失敗率です
11:32
It's far higher than the failure rate of, say, Americans.
たとえば人の「失敗率」と比べてみましょう
11:35
Ten percent of Americans don't disappear every year.
毎年10パーセントのアメリカ人が消えたりはしません
11:37
Which leads us to conclude
このことから
11:40
American businesses fail faster than Americans,
アメリカでは事業は人よりも早く消え去るので
11:42
and therefore American businesses are evolving faster than Americans.
事業の進化の速度が 人よりも速いことがわかります
11:45
And eventually, they'll have evolved to such a high peak of perfection
こうして事業は進化してその完成度を高めていき
11:48
that they will make us all their pets --
いずれは我々すべてを飼いならすでしょう
11:51
(Laughter)
(笑)
11:54
if, of course, they haven't already done so.
まだそうなっていないとしても いずれは
11:56
I sometimes wonder.
ときどきそう考えます
11:59
But it's this process of trial and error
ただ この試行錯誤の過程こそが
12:02
that explains this great divergence,
西側諸国の多様な経済の
12:04
this incredible performance of Western economies.
すばらしいパフォーマンスを説明するのです
12:08
It didn't come because you put some incredibly smart person in charge.
すばらしく優秀な人を責任者にしたからではなく
12:11
It's come through trial and error.
試行錯誤によって到達したのです
12:14
Now I've been sort of banging on about this
ここ数ヶ月の間
12:16
for the last couple of months,
あちこちでこのことを話していると
12:18
and people sometimes say to me,
こんなことを言う人もいます
12:20
"Well Tim, it's kind of obvious.
「ティム それはわかり切ったことだ
12:22
Obviously trial and error is very important.
確かに試行錯誤は重要だ
12:24
Obviously experimentation is very important.
確かに検証実験が大変重要だ
12:26
Now why are you just wandering around saying this obvious thing?"
なんだってこんな当たり前のことを吹聴して廻ってるんだ?」
12:28
So I say, okay, fine.
なるほど
12:31
You think it's obvious?
当たり前だとおっしゃるのですね?
12:33
I will admit it's obvious
学校で子どもたちに
12:35
when schools
こんなふうに教え始めたら
12:37
start teaching children
これが当たり前になったと認めましょう
12:39
that there are some problems that don't have a correct answer.
正解のない問題があるのだと教え始めることです
12:42
Stop giving them lists of questions
全てに答えがあるような質問を列挙して
12:45
every single one of which has an answer.
子どもたちに与えるのはやめましょう
12:48
And there's an authority figure in the corner
そして教卓の後ろの偉そうな人が
12:50
behind the teacher's desk who knows all the answers.
答えを全部知っているという方法はやめて
12:52
And if you can't find the answers,
また 答えが見つからない生徒を
12:54
you must be lazy or stupid.
怠け者や愚か者だと呼ぶのはやめましょう
12:56
When schools stop doing that all the time,
学校のそういうやり方を全部やめるなら
12:58
I will admit that, yes,
試行錯誤が良いことだということが
13:00
it's obvious that trial and error is a good thing.
当たり前になったと認めましょう
13:02
When a politician stands up
立候補した候補者が選挙運動で
13:04
campaigning for elected office
こんなことを言うでしょうか
13:07
and says, "I want to fix our health system.
「健康保険システムを改革しましょう
13:09
I want to fix our education system.
教育システムを改革しましょう
13:11
I have no idea how to do it.
それをどうするか考えはありませんが
13:13
I have half a dozen ideas.
アイデアは5-6個あります
13:16
We're going to test them out. They'll probably all fail.
それを試して行きます 全部失敗するかもしれません
13:18
Then we'll test some other ideas out.
だめならさらに他のアイデアを試し
13:21
We'll find some that work. We'll build on those.
見つけた方法を基に改革します
13:23
We'll get rid of the ones that don't." --
失敗アイデアは使いません」
13:25
when a politician campaigns on that platform,
こういう考え方の政治家が出てきたら
13:27
and more importantly, when voters like you and me
さらに大事なことは 私たちのような有権者が
13:30
are willing to vote for that kind of politician,
そんな政治家に投票するようになったら
13:33
then I will admit
試行錯誤が有効なことは当たり前になったと
13:35
that it is obvious that trial and error works, and that -- thank you.
私も認めましょう ー ありがとうございます
13:37
(Applause)
(拍手)
13:40
Until then, until then
それまでは試行錯誤を語り
13:44
I'm going to keep banging on about trial and error
ゴッド・コンプレックスを
13:47
and why we should abandon the God complex.
捨てるべきである理由を語り続けるつもりです
13:49
Because it's so hard
自分たちが誤りやすいと認めることは
13:52
to admit our own fallibility.
とても困難です
13:55
It's so uncomfortable.
それは非常に不愉快なことです
13:57
And Archie Cochrane understood this as well as anybody.
アーチー・コクランはこのことを誰よりも理解していました
13:59
There's this one trial he ran
第二次世界大戦よりも何年も後のこと
14:02
many years after World War II.
彼はある治験を行いました
14:04
He wanted to test out
彼が試験したかったのは
14:06
the question of, where is it
心不全の患者は
14:09
that patients should recover
どこで回復させるのが
14:11
from heart attacks?
良いか ということでした
14:13
Should they recover in a specialized cardiac unit in hospital,
専門的な循環器病棟でしょうか
14:15
or should they recover at home?
それとも自宅でしょうか
14:18
All the cardiac doctors tried to shut him down.
循環器科の医師たちは治験を止めさせようとしました
14:21
They had the God complex in spades.
医師達は紛れもなくゴッド・コンプレックスに罹っていました
14:24
They knew that their hospitals were the right place for patients,
患者のためには病院がいいことは明らかで
14:27
and they knew it was very unethical
これを治験するとか実験するなどというのは
14:30
to run any kind of trial or experiment.
倫理に背くことだと考えました
14:32
Nevertheless, Archie managed to get permission to do this.
それでもコクランはこの治験の許可を得て
14:35
He ran his trial.
治験を行いました
14:37
And after the trial had been running for a little while,
治験が始まってしばらく経ったときのこと
14:39
he gathered together all his colleagues
彼は同僚たちを
14:41
around his table,
集めて会議を催しました
14:43
and he said, "Well, gentlemen,
「さてみなさん
14:45
we have some preliminary results.
ここに初期的な結果があります
14:47
They're not statistically significant.
統計的な有意性はまだありませんが
14:49
But we have something.
ちょっとした内容があります
14:51
And it turns out that you're right and I'm wrong.
みなさんが正しく私が間違っていたようです
14:54
It is dangerous for patients
回復中の患者が家で過ごすのは
14:57
to recover from heart attacks at home.
危険です
14:59
They should be in hospital."
病院で回復させるべきです」
15:01
And there's this uproar, and all the doctors start pounding the table
大騒ぎです 全ての医師が机を叩いて言います
15:04
and saying, "We always said you were unethical, Archie.
「倫理的でないと ずっと言ってきただろう
15:06
You're killing people with your clinical trials. You need to shut it down now.
治験で人が死んでいくのだ すぐ中止すべきだ
15:09
Shut it down at once."
ただちに中止しろ」
15:12
And there's this huge hubbub.
こんな大騒ぎです
15:14
Archie lets it die down.
コクランは皆を黙らせます
15:16
And then he says, "Well that's very interesting, gentlemen,
「大変興味深いご意見です 皆さん
15:18
because when I gave you the table of results,
皆さんにお渡しした結果の表で
15:20
I swapped the two columns around.
2つの列は入れ替えてあったのです
15:23
It turns out your hospitals are killing people,
つまり 患者は病院で亡くなっており
15:27
and they should be at home.
家に帰すべきなのです
15:29
Would you like to close down the trial now,
治験を止めた方がよろしいでしょうか?
15:31
or should we wait until we have robust results?"
それとも結果が確実なものになるまで待ちましょうか」
15:34
Tumbleweed
会議室に
15:38
rolls through the meeting room.
冷たい空気が流れます
15:40
But Cochrane would do that kind of thing.
そう コクランはこういうことをする人物でした
15:43
And the reason he would do that kind of thing
彼がそんなことをした理由は
15:46
is because he understood
そこに立ちはだかって
15:48
it feels so much better
こんなふうに言う方がずっと楽だと
15:50
to stand there and say,
理解していたからです
15:52
"Here in my own little world,
「私の小さな世界では
15:54
I am a god, I understand everything.
私は神だ 全てを理解している
15:56
I do not want to have my opinions challenged.
私の意見に異議は聞きたくない
15:58
I do not want to have my conclusions tested."
私の結論を実証しなくてよい
16:00
It feels so much more comfortable
単純に頭ごなしに命令する方が
16:03
simply to lay down the law.
ずっと楽なのです
16:05
Cochrane understood
コクランはわかっていました
16:08
that uncertainty, that fallibility,
不確実性や間違えやすさや
16:10
that being challenged, they hurt.
反論は人を傷つけると
16:12
And you sometimes need to be shocked out of that.
だから時にショックを与える必要があるのです
16:14
Now I'm not going to pretend that this is easy.
それが簡単なことだと 見せかけるつもりはありません
16:18
It isn't easy.
簡単なことではありません
16:21
It's incredibly painful.
おそろしくつらいことです
16:23
And since I started talking about this subject
でもこの話を始めてからずっと
16:25
and researching this subject,
この研究を始めてからずっと
16:27
I've been really haunted by something
ある日本人の数学者が言った言葉が
16:29
a Japanese mathematician said on the subject.
私の頭から離れません
16:31
So shortly after the war,
戦争の直後のことでした
16:33
this young man, Yutaka Taniyama,
谷山豊という若い数学者は
16:35
developed this amazing conjecture
谷山・志村予想という
16:38
called the Taniyama-Shimura Conjecture.
すばらしい予想を立てました
16:40
It turned out to be absolutely instrumental
数十年が経った後でこの予想は
16:42
many decades later
フェルマーの最終定理を証明する上で
16:45
in proving Fermat's Last Theorem.
たいへん有用だったことが示されました
16:47
In fact, it turns out it's equivalent
実際 フェルマーの最終定理を証明するのと
16:49
to proving Fermat's Last Theorem.
等しいものであることがわかったのでした
16:51
You prove one, you prove the other.
片方を証明すればもう一方も証明されるのです
16:53
But it was always a conjecture.
しかしこれはずっと予想に留まっていました
16:57
Taniyama tried and tried and tried
谷山はこれを解こうと何度も試みましたが
17:00
and he could never prove that it was true.
それが真であると証明することはできませんでした
17:03
And shortly before his 30th birthday in 1958,
そして1958年に 30歳の誕生日の少し前に
17:06
Yutaka Taniyama killed himself.
谷山豊は自殺してしまいました
17:09
His friend, Goro Shimura --
彼の友人であった志村五郎は
17:13
who worked on the mathematics with him --
一緒にその課題に取り組んでいました
17:15
many decades later, reflected on Taniyama's life.
何十年も後になって谷山の人生を振り返って
17:17
He said,
こう述べています
17:22
"He was not a very careful person
「彼は数学者として非常に注意深いー
17:25
as a mathematician.
という人ではなかった
17:27
He made a lot of mistakes.
彼はたくさんの間違いを犯した
17:29
But he made mistakes in a good direction.
だがよい方向に間違えるのだ
17:32
I tried to emulate him,
私も彼を真似ようとしてみて
17:36
but I realized
良い間違いを犯すのは
17:39
it is very difficult
実は非常に難しいのだというー
17:41
to make good mistakes."
ことを知った」
17:43
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
17:46
(Applause)
(拍手)
17:48
Translated by Natsuhiko Mizutani
Reviewed by Naoki Funahashi

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Tim Harford - Economist, journalist and broadcaster
Tim Harford's writings reveal the economic ideas behind everyday experiences.

Why you should listen

In the Undercover Economist column he writes for the Financial Times, Tim Harford looks at familiar situations in unfamiliar ways and explains the fundamental principles of the modern economy. He illuminates them with clear writing and a variety of examples borrowed from daily life.

His book, Adapt: Why Success Always Starts With Failure, argues that the world has become far too unpredictable and complex for today's challenges to be tackled with ready-made solutions and expert opinions. Instead, Harford suggests, we need to learn to embrace failure and to constantly adapt, to improvise rather than plan, to work from the bottom up rather than the top down. His next book, Messy: Thriving in a Tidy-Minded World will be published in September 2016. 

Harford also presents the BBC radio series More or Less, a rare broadcast program devoted, as he says, to "the powerful, sometimes beautiful, often abused but ever ubiquitous world of numbers."

He says: "I’d like to see many more complex problems approached with a willingness to experiment."

More profile about the speaker
Tim Harford | Speaker | TED.com