sponsored links
TEDGlobal 2011

Mark Pagel: How language transformed humanity

マーク・パーゲル「言語能力が人類に与えた影響」

July 13, 2011

生物学者マーク・パーゲルは「どうして人間は言語という複雑なシステムを発展させたのか」という問に対して面白い学説を紹介します。言語は一種の「社会的技術」であり、そのおかげで原始人たちが「協力」という新しい強力な道具を手に入れることができたと彼は主張します。

Mark Pagel - Evolutionary biologist
Using biological evolution as a template, Mark Pagel wonders how languages evolve. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
Each of you possesses
皆さんには自然淘汰が
00:15
the most powerful, dangerous and subversive trait
生み出した破壊的で危険な力強い
00:17
that natural selection has ever devised.
特徴が備わっています
00:20
It's a piece of neural audio technology
聴覚神経系技術で他人の脳を
00:23
for rewiring other people's minds.
いくらか操作できます
00:26
I'm talking about your language, of course,
もちろん 自然言語の話をしています
00:28
because it allows you to implant a thought from your mind
言語を使用することで皆さんは
00:31
directly into someone else's mind,
外科手術もなしに移植ができるのです
00:34
and they can attempt to do the same to you,
移植するのは考えですけどね
00:37
without either of you having to perform surgery.
皆さんだってその対象になりえます
00:39
Instead, when you speak,
その代わり テレビに対して
00:42
you're actually using a form of telemetry
リモコンを使うのと似ていますが
00:44
not so different
皆さんが話す時にはある種の
00:46
from the remote control device for your television.
遠隔測定法が使われています
00:48
It's just that, whereas that device
こんな感じで リモコンは
00:50
relies on pulses of infrared light,
赤外線を利用していますが
00:52
your language relies on pulses,
自然言語には断続的な
00:54
discrete pulses, of sound.
パルス波が利用されます
00:57
And just as you use the remote control device
気分に合わせて リモコンで
00:59
to alter the internal settings of your television
テレビの設定を変えるように
01:02
to suit your mood,
言語を通じて
01:04
you use your language
自分の利害に合わせて
01:06
to alter the settings inside someone else's brain
他人の脳のセッティングを
01:08
to suit your interests.
変えることができます
01:10
Languages are genes talking,
言語とは遺伝子の会話であり
01:12
getting things that they want.
何かを取得するためのものです
01:14
And just imagine the sense of wonder in a baby
ただ声を出すだけで 赤ん坊が
01:16
when it first discovers that, merely by uttering a sound,
魔法のように物を動かせたり
01:19
it can get objects to move across a room
食べ物を口に運べたときの
01:22
as if by magic,
驚きの具合を
01:24
and maybe even into its mouth.
想像してみて下さい
01:26
Now language's subversive power
言語の持つ強大な力は
01:29
has been recognized throughout the ages
昔から認知されており
01:31
in censorship, in books you can't read,
検閲で出版を禁じられたり
01:33
phrases you can't use
使用禁止表現や語句があるのは
01:35
and words you can't say.
このためです
01:37
In fact, the Tower of Babel story in the Bible
実際 聖書の中の『バベルの塔』は
01:39
is a fable and warning
言語の力に警鐘を
01:42
about the power of language.
鳴らしている寓話です
01:44
According to that story, early humans developed the conceit
自惚れた古代人が言語使用を通じて
01:46
that, by using their language to work together,
協力すれば天国へ続く
01:49
they could build a tower
塔の建設が可能と考えた
01:51
that would take them all the way to heaven.
というお話です
01:53
Now God, angered at this attempt to usurp his power,
権力を奪おうとする人類に怒り
01:55
destroyed the tower,
神は塔を破壊して
01:58
and then to ensure
二度と建てられないように
02:01
that it would never be rebuilt,
策を講じました
02:03
he scattered the people by giving them different languages --
人々を混乱させるために
02:05
confused them by giving them different languages.
異なる言語を与えたのです
02:08
And this leads to the wonderful irony
皮肉にも言語の多様性は
02:11
that our languages exist to prevent us from communicating.
意思疎通の妨げとなっています
02:13
Even today,
今日でも
02:16
we know that there are words we cannot use,
使用が禁止されている
02:18
phrases we cannot say,
単語や言い回しが存在します
02:20
because if we do so,
これらを口にすれば
02:22
we might be accosted, jailed,
補導や投獄 更には
02:24
or even killed.
殺される可能性もあります
02:27
And all of this from a puff of air
これらは全て口の中で
02:29
emanating from our mouths.
調音された気息なのです
02:31
Now all this fuss about a single one of our traits
言語使用におけるこのトラブルから
02:33
tells us there's something worth explaining.
我々は何かを学べるようです
02:36
And that is how and why
つまり言語獲得の
02:38
did this remarkable trait evolve,
背景と原因 そして
02:40
and why did it evolve
人類にとっての言語の
02:42
only in our species?
特有性を物語っています
02:44
Now it's a little bit of a surprise
妙な話ですが
02:46
that to get an answer to that question,
これらの答えを得るには
02:48
we have to go to tool use
チンパンジーの道具使用に
02:50
in the chimpanzees.
目を向ける必要があります
02:52
Now these chimpanzees are using tools,
彼らは道具を使っていて
02:54
and we take that as a sign of their intelligence.
これは賢さの証と解釈されています
02:56
But if they really were intelligent,
しかし 本当に賢ければ
02:59
why would they use a stick to extract termites from the ground
シロアリ捕獲の際 スコップではなく
03:01
rather than a shovel?
木の棒を使うでしょうか?
03:04
And if they really were intelligent,
本当に賢いならば 木の実を割る際
03:06
why would they crack open nuts with a rock?
石なんて使うでしょうか?
03:09
Why wouldn't they just go to a shop and buy a bag of nuts
どうして お店に行って
03:11
that somebody else had already cracked open for them?
殻なしのものを買わないのでしょう 理由は
03:14
Why not? I mean, that's what we do.
チンパンジーだからです
03:17
Now the reason the chimpanzees don't do that
心理学・人類学で言う
03:19
is that they lack what psychologists and anthropologists call
社会的学習が人類ほどは
03:21
social learning.
徹底されていないのです
03:24
They seem to lack the ability
どうやらチンパンジーは
03:26
to learn from others
観察学習や
03:28
by copying or imitating
模倣学習が
03:30
or simply watching.
得意でないようです
03:32
As a result,
結果として
03:34
they can't improve on others' ideas
仲間のアイデアを発展させたり
03:36
or learn from others' mistakes --
仲間の過ちから学んだりできず
03:38
benefit from others' wisdom.
学び合いがないのです
03:40
And so they just do the same thing
つまり彼らは同じことを
03:42
over and over and over again.
何回も繰り返すだけです
03:44
In fact, we could go away for a million years and come back
実際 100万年後の未来でも
03:46
and these chimpanzees would be doing the same thing
チンパンジーは同じことをしているだけでしょう
03:50
with the same sticks for the termites
同じように木の棒でシロアリを捕り
03:53
and the same rocks to crack open the nuts.
同じように石で木の実を割っているでしょう
03:55
Now this may sound arrogant, or even full of hubris.
ただの思い上がりだと思われているでしょう
03:58
How do we know this?
なぜこんな事がわかるのか?
04:01
Because this is exactly what our ancestors, the Homo erectus, did.
それは我々の先祖が当にそうだったからです
04:03
These upright apes
このホモエレクトスは
04:06
evolved on the African savanna
アフリカのサバンナで
04:08
about two million years ago,
約200万年前に進化しました
04:10
and they made these splendid hand axes
彼らは手にぴったりと合う
04:12
that fit wonderfully into your hands.
素晴らしい手斧を作りました
04:14
But if we look at the fossil record,
しかし化石記録を見てみると
04:16
we see that they made the same hand axe
同じ手斧を何度も何度も
04:18
over and over and over again
100万年もの間
04:21
for one million years.
作り続けていたのです
04:23
You can follow it through the fossil record.
化石記録を見れば分かりますよ
04:25
Now if we make some guesses about how long Homo erectus lived,
生息時期予測では
04:27
what their generation time was,
ホモエレクロスは
04:29
that's about 40,000 generations
約4万世代続きましたが
04:31
of parents to offspring, and other individuals watching,
その間にも手斧は変化しませんでした
04:34
in which that hand axe didn't change.
遺伝子的に現代人に近い
04:37
It's not even clear
ネアンデルタール人でさえ
04:39
that our very close genetic relatives, the Neanderthals,
社会的学習能力を
04:41
had social learning.
備えていたかどうか不明です
04:43
Sure enough, their tools were more complicated
当然彼らの道具はホモエレクトスのものより
04:45
than those of Homo erectus,
発達を遂げていますが
04:48
but they too showed very little change
ユーラシア大陸で30万年以上も
04:50
over the 300,000 years or so
暮らしてきたネアンデルタール人の
04:52
that those species, the Neanderthals,
道具にもほとんど
04:55
lived in Eurasia.
変化は見られません
04:57
Okay, so what this tells us
このことは古い格言
04:59
is that, contrary to the old adage,
「猿のものまね」とは対照的に
05:01
"monkey see, monkey do,"
人類以外の動物は猿まねが出来ない
05:04
the surprise really is
もしくは上手ではない
05:07
that all of the other animals
という驚愕の事実を
05:09
really cannot do that -- at least not very much.
示唆しているのです
05:11
And even this picture
写真のこの猿でさえも
05:14
has the suspicious taint of being rigged about it --
人為的な操作の臭いがしますね
05:16
something from a Barnum & Bailey circus.
まるでサーカスのようです
05:19
But by comparison,
それと比べると 人には
05:21
we can learn.
学習能力が備わっています
05:23
We can learn by watching other people
他人に出来ることは
05:25
and copying or imitating
観察・模倣を通じて
05:28
what they can do.
学習することができます
05:30
We can then choose, from among a range of options,
数ある選択肢から最良を抽出する
05:32
the best one.
選択能力もあります
05:35
We can benefit from others' ideas.
他人の知恵にあやかったり
05:37
We can build on their wisdom.
それを改良することもできます
05:39
And as a result, our ideas do accumulate,
結果的にアイデアが蓄積されて
05:41
and our technology progresses.
技術が発展していくのです
05:44
And this cumulative cultural adaptation,
この度重なる文化的適応を
05:48
as anthropologists call
人類学者は
05:53
this accumulation of ideas,
アイデアの蓄積と呼んでいます
05:55
is responsible for everything around you
このおかげで 我々は賑やかな
05:57
in your bustling and teeming everyday lives.
集団生活ができるのです
05:59
I mean the world has changed out of all proportion
1000 - 2000年前と比較しても
06:01
to what we would recognize
世界は劇的に変化してきたと
06:03
even 1,000 or 2,000 years ago.
言うことができます
06:05
And all of this because of cumulative cultural adaptation.
全て文化的適応の蓄積のおかげなのです
06:08
The chairs you're sitting in, the lights in this auditorium,
お座りの椅子や会場の照明
06:11
my microphone, the iPads and iPods that you carry around with you --
このマイク そしてiPadやiPodなど
06:13
all are a result
これらは全て文化的適応の
06:16
of cumulative cultural adaptation.
産物なのです
06:18
Now to many commentators,
多くの評論家にとって
06:20
cumulative cultural adaptation, or social learning,
文化的適応や社会的学習は
06:24
is job done, end of story.
完結したストーリーのようです
06:27
Our species can make stuff,
人間はモノを作れるがために
06:30
therefore we prospered in a way that no other species has.
他の種とは異なる方法で繁栄してきました
06:33
In fact, we can even make the "stuff of life" --
実際に我々は「生きもの」すら作れます
06:36
as I just said, all the stuff around us.
そう 何もかも
06:39
But in fact, it turns out
しかし20万年前に
06:41
that some time around 200,000 years ago,
現代人が登場して社会的学習を
06:43
when our species first arose
身につけたことは
06:46
and acquired social learning,
物語の終わりではなく
06:48
that this was really the beginning of our story,
実は物語の
06:50
not the end of our story.
始まりだったのです
06:52
Because our acquisition of social learning
なぜなら社会的学習能力の獲得は
06:54
would create a social and evolutionary dilemma,
後に社会的・進化論的ジレンマを生み出し
06:57
the resolution of which, it's fair to say,
人類だけでなく世界の
07:00
would determine not only the future course of our psychology,
未来にすら人類の決定権が
07:03
but the future course of the entire world.
及ぶことになりました
07:07
And most importantly for this,
言語獲得の理由を知る
07:09
it'll tell us why we have language.
これこそが最も重要です
07:12
And the reason that dilemma arose
社会的学習とは視覚的な
07:15
is, it turns out, that social learning is visual theft.
窃盗であり ジレンマを生みました
07:17
If I can learn by watching you,
もし私が皆さんを観察すれば
07:20
I can steal your best ideas,
みなさんのように時間や
07:23
and I can benefit from your efforts,
努力をかけることなく
07:25
without having to put in the time and energy that you did
最良のアイディアを盗んで
07:28
into developing them.
利用することもできます
07:30
If I can watch which lure you use to catch a fish,
釣りをする際 どのルアーを使うのか
07:32
or I can watch how you flake your hand axe
手斧を改良するために
07:35
to make it better,
どのように研磨するのか
07:37
or if I follow you secretly to your mushroom patch,
もしくはキノコの栽培方法を盗み見れば
07:39
I can benefit from your knowledge and wisdom and skills,
情報・知識・技術の利が得られますし
07:42
and maybe even catch that fish
先に魚を釣ることも
07:45
before you do.
できるかもしれません
07:47
Social learning really is visual theft.
社会的学習は当に視覚的窃盗なのです
07:49
And in any species that acquired it,
この能力をもつ種族間では
07:52
it would behoove you
知恵を盗まれないように
07:54
to hide your best ideas,
これを隠すよう努めるのは
07:56
lest somebody steal them from you.
当然のことです
07:58
And so some time around 200,000 years ago,
ですから20万年ほど前に
08:02
our species confronted this crisis.
この視覚的窃盗問題に直面した際に
08:05
And we really had only two options
人類がいざこざを解決するために
08:08
for dealing with the conflicts
取りえた選択肢は
08:11
that visual theft would bring.
2つしかありませんでした
08:13
One of those options
1つ目の選択肢は
08:15
was that we could have retreated
小さい身内のグループで
08:17
into small family groups.
引きこもることでした
08:20
Because then the benefits of our ideas and knowledge
アイデアの利用範囲を親族だけに
08:22
would flow just to our relatives.
制限することができます
08:25
Had we chosen this option,
20万年前 この選択を
08:27
sometime around 200,000 years ago,
していたら 2万年前にヨーロッパ進出を
08:29
we would probably still be living like the Neanderthals were
果たしたネアンデルタール人と現代人の
08:32
when we first entered Europe 40,000 years ago.
生活様式は同じものとなっていたでしょう
08:35
And this is because in small groups
この原因は小さい集団の中では
08:38
there are fewer ideas, there are fewer innovations.
アイデアや革新が少ないことにあります
08:40
And small groups are more prone to accidents and bad luck.
小さい集団は事故や不幸に遭いやすいようです
08:43
So if we'd chosen that path,
つまり その道を選んでいたら
08:46
our evolutionary path would have led into the forest --
人類は森の中に塞ぎ込み 進化は
08:48
and been a short one indeed.
些細なものだったでしょう
08:51
The other option we could choose
もう一方の選択肢は
08:53
was to develop the systems of communication
コミュニケーション手段を発達させて
08:55
that would allow us to share ideas
他人と協力したり
08:58
and to cooperate amongst others.
アイデアを共有することでした
09:00
Choosing this option would mean
こちらを選択すると
09:03
that a vastly greater fund of accumulated knowledge and wisdom
身内ないや個人のみで思いつく量より
09:05
would become available to any one individual
はるかに多い蓄積された知識や知恵が
09:08
than would ever arise from within an individual family
どの個々人にとっても
09:11
or an individual person on their own.
利用可能なものとなります
09:14
Well, we chose the second option,
まあ我々はこちらを選択したのですが
09:18
and language is the result.
その結果 言語が生まれました
09:21
Language evolved to solve the crisis
進化を遂げた言語は
09:24
of visual theft.
視覚的窃盗問題を解決しました
09:26
Language is a piece of social technology
言語というのは 合意を得たり
09:28
for enhancing the benefits of cooperation --
契約や団体行動をまとめたりと
09:31
for reaching agreements, for striking deals
協力という利を拡大するための
09:34
and for coordinating our activities.
社会技術の一種なのです
09:37
And you can see that, in a developing society
発達途上の社会にとって
09:41
that was beginning to acquire language,
言語獲得はスタートラインであり
09:43
not having language
言語のない文明社会とは
09:45
would be a like a bird without wings.
翼のない鳥のようなものです
09:47
Just as wings open up this sphere of air
鳥類が翼によって
09:49
for birds to exploit,
飛行能力を得たように
09:52
language opened up the sphere of cooperation
人類は言語使用によって
09:54
for humans to exploit.
協調性を獲得したのです
09:56
And we take this utterly for granted,
これは当然だと思いますよね
09:58
because we're a species that is so at home with language,
人間にとって言語はとても身近な存在ですから
10:00
but you have to realize
しかし考えてみて下さい
10:03
that even the simplest acts of exchange that we engage in
物々交換という極めて単純な
10:05
are utterly dependent upon language.
やり取りにすら言語は必要なのです
10:08
And to see why, consider two scenarios
これを理解する為に古代人の
10:11
from early in our evolution.
2つのシナリオを考えてみます
10:13
Let's imagine that you are really good
想像して下さい あなたは
10:15
at making arrowheads,
矢じり作りの名手ですが
10:17
but you're hopeless at making the wooden shafts
矢の篦(棒の部分)の制作や
10:19
with the flight feathers attached.
矢羽根の取り付けはど素人です
10:22
Two other people you know are very good at making the wooden shafts,
そこに 矢じりは作れないが
10:25
but they're hopeless at making the arrowheads.
篦作りが得意な人が2人いるとします
10:28
So what you do is --
それとですね
10:31
one of those people has not really acquired language yet.
1人は言語能力なし もう1人は
10:33
And let's pretend the other one is good at language skills.
有りだとしておきましょう
10:36
So what you do one day is you take a pile of arrowheads,
ある日 あなたが前者のところに赴き
10:38
and you walk up to the one that can't speak very well,
担いできた山ほどある矢じりを
10:41
and you put the arrowheads down in front of him,
彼の前に下ろします
10:43
hoping that he'll get the idea that you want to trade your arrowheads
もちろん あなたは矢を完成させるために
10:45
for finished arrows.
矢じりと箆を交換したいのです
10:48
But he looks at the pile of arrowheads, thinks they're a gift,
しかし矢じりを贈り物だと思い
10:50
picks them up, smiles and walks off.
彼は笑みを浮かべて矢じりを持ち去ります
10:52
Now you pursue this guy, gesticulating.
あなたはこの男を追いかけ
10:55
A scuffle ensues and you get stabbed
ジェスチャーで話しかけますが
10:57
with one of your own arrowheads.
もみ合いになり 矢じりで刺されてしまいます
10:59
Okay, now replay this scene now, and you're approaching the one who has language.
やり直しです 今回は話のできる男を訪ねて
11:02
You put down your arrowheads and say,
矢じりを差し出して言います
11:05
"I'd like to trade these arrowheads for finished arrows. I'll split you 50/50."
「矢を作るために矢じりと箆を交換したいです」
11:07
The other one says, "Fine. Looks good to me.
男は言います 「いいでしょう
11:10
We'll do that."
交渉成立です」
11:12
Now the job is done.
やっと仕事が終わりました
11:15
Once we have language,
言語があればアイデアを
11:18
we can put our ideas together and cooperate
混ぜたり協力したりして
11:20
to have a prosperity
今まで見たこともない
11:22
that we couldn't have before we acquired it.
成功を収めることができます
11:24
And this is why our species
こうして動物園の檻の中で
11:27
has prospered around the world
動物がだらだらしている間に
11:29
while the rest of the animals
人類は世界中で
11:31
sit behind bars in zoos, languishing.
大繁栄をしたのでした
11:33
That's why we build space shuttles and cathedrals
人間がスペースシャトル・大聖堂を作る一方で
11:36
while the rest of the world sticks sticks into the ground
動物の中には棒で
11:39
to extract termites.
シロアリを捕るものもあります
11:41
All right, if this view of language
さて 言語が視覚的窃盗を防ぐという見解が
11:43
and its value
正しいものだとすれば
11:46
in solving the crisis of visual theft is true,
言語獲得すればどんな種でも
11:48
any species that acquires it
爆発的な創造力と
11:51
should show an explosion of creativity and prosperity.
繁栄を見せてくれるはずです
11:53
And this is exactly what the archeological record shows.
考古学記録が正しくこれを示しています
11:56
If you look at our ancestors,
我々の祖先である
11:59
the Neanderthals and the Homo erectus, our immediate ancestors,
ネアンデルタール人やホモエレクトス等の
12:01
they're confined to small regions of the world.
生息地域は狭くて限定的でした
12:04
But when our species arose
しかし約20万年前に
12:07
about 200,000 years ago,
人類が出現してまもなく
12:09
sometime after that we quickly walked out of Africa
我々の祖先はアフリカを出て
12:11
and spread around the entire world,
世界中に広がりを見せ
12:14
occupying nearly every habitat on Earth.
地球上のほとんどを生息地としました
12:17
Now whereas other species are confined
他の種は遺伝子が適応した場所のみで
12:20
to places that their genes adapt them to,
生活していたのに対して
12:23
with social learning and language,
我々は社会的学習と言語を用い
12:26
we could transform the environment
周りの環境を必要に応じて
12:28
to suit our needs.
変形させることができました
12:30
And so we prospered in a way
他の動物とは違う方法で
12:32
that no other animal has.
人類は繁栄してきたのです
12:34
Language really is
言語は人類進化の過程において
12:36
the most potent trait that has ever evolved.
まさに 最も強力な特性なのです
12:39
It is the most valuable trait we have
言語は最も価値ある特性であり
12:42
for converting new lands and resources
これを有効活用しながら
12:45
into more people and their genes
自然淘汰の枠を超える数の
12:48
that natural selection has ever devised.
人・遺伝子を生み出してきました
12:51
Language really is
言語は本当に
12:53
the voice of our genes.
我々の遺伝子の声なのです
12:55
Now having evolved language, though,
言語を発達させた我々は
12:57
we did something peculiar,
風変わりというか
12:59
even bizarre.
奇妙なことをしました
13:01
As we spread out around the world,
世界中に散らばるにつれ
13:03
we developed thousands of different languages.
数千もの異なる言語を発達させてきました
13:05
Currently, there are about seven or 8,000
今日 地球上には
13:08
different languages spoken on Earth.
7000 - 8000の言語が存在します
13:10
Now you might say, well, this is just natural.
人が枝分かれするに連れて
13:13
As we diverge, our languages are naturally going to diverge.
言語も分化するのは自然な事だと考えるでしょう
13:15
But the real puzzle and irony
しかし言語の謎と皮肉とは
13:18
is that the greatest density of different languages on Earth
地球上で最も多くの言語を数える場所は
13:20
is found where people are most tightly packed together.
人口密度がかなり高い地域なのです
13:23
If we go to the island of Papua New Guinea,
パプアニューギニアに行くと
13:27
we can find about 800 to 1,000
1つの島の中で
13:29
distinct human languages,
800 - 1000という数の
13:32
different human languages,
異なる自然言語を
13:34
spoken on that island alone.
見つけることができます
13:36
There are places on that island
この島には3 - 4 km
13:38
where you can encounter a new language
進むごとに別の言語に
13:40
every two or three miles.
出会えるところもあります
13:42
Now, incredible as this sounds,
信じがたいでしょうが 以前
13:44
I once met a Papuan man, and I asked him if this could possibly be true.
あるパプア人にこのことについて質問すると
13:46
And he said to me, "Oh no.
彼は答えました 「ちがうよ
13:49
They're far closer together than that."
3 - 4 kmなんて大げさなだな」
13:51
And it's true; there are places on that island
実際には2 kmも行かずに
13:54
where you can encounter a new language in under a mile.
異なる言語に遭遇する場所もあるのです
13:56
And this is also true of some remote oceanic islands.
この現象が見られる離れ島は他にもあります
13:59
And so it seems that we use our language,
どうやら言語の使用目的は
14:03
not just to cooperate,
協力だけにとどまらず
14:05
but to draw rings around our cooperative groups
集団の輪を作り出したり
14:07
and to establish identities,
アイデンティティの確立
14:10
and perhaps to protect our knowledge and wisdom and skills
自分たちの情報・知恵・技術の
14:12
from eavesdropping from outside.
盗用保護と多岐にわたります
14:15
And we know this
我々はこれを知っています
14:18
because when we study different language groups
なぜなら 他言語集団と文化を
14:20
and associate them with their cultures,
関連させて研究してみると
14:22
we see that different languages
他言語がその集団の中での
14:24
slow the flow of ideas between groups.
アイデアの交流を遅らせることがわかります
14:26
They slow the flow of technologies.
技術や遺伝子の流れも
14:29
And they even slow the flow of genes.
停滞させてしまうのです
14:32
Now I can't speak for you,
皆さんのことは知りませんが
14:35
but it seems to be the case
どうやら人は一般的に
14:37
that we don't have sex with people we can't talk to.
喋れない人とセックスはしないようです
14:39
(Laughter)
(笑)
14:43
Now we have to counter that, though,
ネアンデルタール人やデニソワ人の
14:45
against the evidence we've heard
不快な好色関係に関する
14:47
that we might have had some rather distasteful genetic dalliances
証拠は虚であったと反論を
14:49
with the Neanderthals and the Denisovans.
しなくてはいけませんね
14:52
(Laughter)
(笑)
14:54
Okay, this tendency we have,
さてこの一見自然にも見える
14:56
this seemingly natural tendency we have,
私たちの分離・隠遁への
14:58
towards isolation, towards keeping to ourselves,
傾向は現代世界の抱える
15:00
crashes head first into our modern world.
完璧な矛盾なのです
15:03
This remarkable image
この派手な図は
15:06
is not a map of the world.
世界地図ではありません
15:08
In fact, it's a map of Facebook friendship links.
実はFacebookの友人関係を示す地図なのです
15:10
And when you plot those friendship links
この友達との繋がりという点を
15:14
by their latitude and longitude,
縦横全て線で結ぶと
15:16
it literally draws a map of the world.
まさしく世界地図となるのです
15:18
Our modern world is communicating
現代社会では過去に
15:21
with itself and with each other
類を見ないほどの
15:23
more than it has
コミュニケーションが
15:25
at any time in its past.
とられています
15:27
And that communication, that connectivity around the world,
このコミュニケーション・世界との繋がり―
15:29
that globalization
つまりグローバリゼーションが
15:32
now raises a burden.
今では負担となっています
15:34
Because these different languages
今まで見てきたように
15:37
impose a barrier, as we've just seen,
異なる言語は商品・アイデア―
15:39
to the transfer of goods and ideas
技術・知恵の交流を
15:41
and technologies and wisdom.
妨げてしまっているからです
15:43
And they impose a barrier to cooperation.
つまり協力関係構築への障害となっているのです
15:45
And nowhere do we see that more clearly
この問題はEU(欧州連合)に最も
15:48
than in the European Union,
顕著に表れています
15:51
whose 27 member countries
加盟国は27ヶ国
15:53
speak 23 official languages.
公用語の数は23に上ります
15:56
The European Union
この23の言語間の翻訳に
15:59
is now spending over one billion euros annually
費やされる欧州連合の支出は毎年
16:01
translating among their 23 official languages.
10億ユーロを超えています
16:05
That's something on the order
おおよそ
16:08
of 1.45 billion U.S. dollars
14億5000万ドルもの大金が
16:10
on translation costs alone.
翻訳のためだけに割かれています
16:12
Now think of the absurdity of this situation.
非合理的ではありませんか?
16:15
If 27 individuals
27の加盟国の代表
16:17
from those 27 member states
27人の代表がテーブルに座り
16:19
sat around table, speaking their 23 languages,
23の言語で討論を交わします
16:21
some very simple mathematics will tell you
すべてのペアを網羅するには
16:24
that you need an army of 253 translators
単純計算で253人もの
16:26
to anticipate all the pairwise possibilities.
翻訳者軍団が必要となります
16:30
The European Union employs a permanent staff
EUは常任の翻訳者を
16:34
of about 2,500 translators.
約2500人も雇っています
16:37
And in 2007 alone --
もっと新しいデータも
16:39
and I'm sure there are more recent figures --
あるはずですが2007年には
16:41
something on the order of 1.3 million pages
おおよそ130万ページが
16:43
were translated into English alone.
英訳されました 英語だけでですよ
16:46
And so if language really is
では もし言語が本当に
16:49
the solution to the crisis of visual theft,
視覚的窃盗への解決策であり
16:52
if language really is
そして もし言語が本当に
16:55
the conduit of our cooperation,
協力のパイプラインであり
16:57
the technology that our species derived
アイデアと人の交流の自由化促進を
16:59
to promote the free flow and exchange of ideas,
目的とする道具であるならば
17:02
in our modern world,
現代に生きる私たちは
17:06
we confront a question.
問題に直面しています
17:08
And that question is whether
「現代のグローバル社会において
17:10
in this modern, globalized world
これら全ての言語と共存できるか?」
17:12
we can really afford to have all these different languages.
というのが私たちの問題です
17:14
To put it this way, nature knows no other circumstance
こう考えてみましょう
17:17
in which functionally equivalent traits coexist.
同機能が自然に共存できる環境は存在しないのです
17:20
One of them always drives the other extinct.
いつも一方がもう一方を死滅させます
17:25
And we see this in the inexorable march
このことは容赦ない
17:28
towards standardization.
標準化の流れに確認できます
17:30
There are lots and lots of ways of measuring things --
物体の重量・長さを測る計測法は
17:32
weighing them and measuring their length --
いくつもありますが
17:35
but the metric system is winning.
メートル法が優勢です
17:37
There are lots and lots of ways of measuring time,
時間を計る方法もたくさんあるのに
17:39
but a really bizarre base 60 system
時間・分・秒を基準とする奇妙な
17:42
known as hours and minutes and seconds
六十進法が事実上
17:45
is nearly universal around the world.
世界共通となっています
17:47
There are many, many ways
CDやDVDにも
17:50
of imprinting CDs or DVDs,
様々な記憶方法がありますが
17:52
but those are all being standardized as well.
全て標準化されてしまっています
17:54
And you can probably think of many, many more
皆さんの日常にもまだまだ
17:57
in your own everyday lives.
標準化は潜んでいるはずです
18:00
And so our modern world now
つまり この現代世界で我々は
18:02
is confronting us with a dilemma.
ジレンマに直面しているのです
18:05
And it's the dilemma
そのジレンマは
18:07
that this Chinese man faces,
彼の話す中国語という
18:09
who's language is spoken
言語は世界一の
18:11
by more people in the world
話者数を誇るにもかかわらず
18:13
than any other single language,
黒板の前に腰掛けては
18:15
and yet he is sitting at his blackboard,
中国語の文章を英語に
18:18
converting Chinese phrases
翻訳しなくてはいけない
18:22
into English language phrases.
というものです
18:25
And what this does is it raises the possibility to us
このジレンマはある可能性を提起しています
18:27
that in a world in which we want to promote
協力・意見交換を推奨し
18:30
cooperation and exchange,
人類の繁栄の持続または
18:32
and in a world that might be dependent more than ever before
推進のために必要な
18:34
on cooperation
協調関係が今一層
18:37
to maintain and enhance our levels of prosperity,
求められる世界においては
18:39
his actions suggest to us
この中国人が示唆するように
18:42
it might be inevitable
「一つの世界 = 一つの言語」
18:44
that we have to confront the idea
という考えも
18:46
that our destiny is to be one world with one language.
見逃すわけにはいかないということです
18:48
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
18:51
(Applause)
(拍手)
18:53
Matt Ridley: Mark, one question.
マット:質問なんですが
19:01
Svante found that the FOXP2 gene,
スヴァンテは言語能力と関連があると思われる
19:03
which seems to be associated with language,
FOXP2遺伝子を
19:06
was also shared in the same form
ネアンデルタール人の中からも
19:08
in Neanderthals as us.
発見しています
19:10
Do we have any idea
もし彼らが言語を使えた場合
19:12
how we could have defeated Neanderthals
我々はどのようにして
19:14
if they also had language?
彼らに打ち勝ったのでしょうか
19:16
Mark Pagel: This is a very good question.
マーク:とてもいい質問です
19:18
So many of you will be familiar with the idea that there's this gene called FOXP2
FOXP2という遺伝子が運動制御の面では
19:20
that seems to be implicated in some ways
言語能力と何か関係があるとする見解に
19:23
in the fine motor control that's associated with language.
多くの方が精通しているようですね
19:26
The reason why I don't believe that tells us
ネアンデルタール人に
19:29
that the Neanderthals had language
言語能力がないと思う理由を
19:31
is -- here's a simple analogy:
簡単な例え話で説明します
19:33
Ferraris are cars that have engines.
フェラーリはエンジンのついた車ですね
19:36
My car has an engine,
私の車にもエンジンがありますが
19:39
but it's not a Ferrari.
これはフェラーリではありません
19:41
Now the simple answer then
シンプルな回答ですが
19:43
is that genes alone don't, all by themselves,
この遺伝子単体では
19:45
determine the outcome
言語のような複雑なものの
19:47
of very complicated things like language.
存在を決定できないのです
19:49
What we know about this FOXP2 and Neanderthals
この遺伝子から分かる事といえば
19:51
is that they may have had fine motor control of their mouths -- who knows.
口の運動制御が発達していた 等です
19:53
But that doesn't tell us they necessarily had language.
言語能力は別問題なんです
19:57
MR: Thank you very much indeed.
マーク: ありがとうございました
19:59
(Applause)
(拍手)
20:01
Translator:Naoki Funahashi
Reviewer:Takahiro Shimpo

sponsored links

Mark Pagel - Evolutionary biologist
Using biological evolution as a template, Mark Pagel wonders how languages evolve.

Why you should listen

Mark Pagel builds statistical models to examine the evolutionary processes imprinted in human behavior, from genomics to the emergence of complex systems -- to culture. His latest work examines the parallels between linguistic and biological evolution by applying methods of phylogenetics, or the study of evolutionary relatedness among groups, essentially viewing language as a culturally transmitted replicator with many of the same properties we find in genes. He’s looking for patterns in the rates of evolution of language elements, and hoping to find the social factors that influence trends of language evolution.
 
At the University of Reading, Pagel heads the Evolution Laboratory in the biology department, where he explores such questions as, "Why would humans evolve a system of communication that prevents them with communicating with other members of the same species?" He has used statistical methods to reconstruct features of dinosaur genomes, and to infer ancestral features of genes and proteins.

He says: "Just as we have highly conserved genes, we have highly conserved words. Language shows a truly remarkable fidelity."

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.