sponsored links
TEDGlobal 2011

Jeremy Gilley: One day of peace

ジェレミー・ギレイが語る「平和の日」

July 15, 2011

クレイジーなアイデアがあります:毎年9月21日を、世界の人々が平和に過ごす日にしようというのです。エネルギーに満ち溢れた率直なスピーチで、ジェレミー・ギレイが、このクレイジーなアイデアをどうやって本当に実現し、紛争地域の何百万という子供たちを助けるに至ったのかを語ります。

Jeremy Gilley - Peace activist
Filmmaker Jeremy Gilley founded Peace One Day to create an annual day without conflict. And ... it's happening. What will you do to make peace on September 21? Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
I was basically concerned about what was going on in the world.
元来 私は世界で起きていることを懸念していました
00:15
I couldn't understand
飢餓や破壊行為
00:18
the starvation, the destruction,
無実の人を殺すといったことが
00:20
the killing of innocent people.
理解できませんでした
00:22
Making sense of those things
これらの事について筋を通すことは
00:24
is a very difficult thing to do.
本当に難しいことです
00:26
And when I was 12, I became an actor.
そして 私は12歳の時に俳優になりました
00:29
I was bottom of the class. I haven't got any qualifications.
私は落ちこぼれで 何の能力もありませんでした
00:32
I was told I was dyslexic.
私は失読症だと言われました
00:35
In fact, I have got qualifications.
実際には私は資格を持っていました
00:38
I got a D in pottery, which was the one thing that I did get --
陶磁器のクラスでDを取ったのです
00:40
which was useful, obviously.
これは明らかに便利でした
00:42
And so concern
そして懸念は
00:44
is where all of this comes from.
これが来たところにあったのです
00:46
And then, being an actor, I was doing these different kinds of things,
俳優として 私はいろいろなことをしましたが
00:48
and I felt the content of the work that I was involved in
自分の仕事はあまり大したことがなく
00:51
really wasn't cutting it, that there surely had to be more.
もっとできることがあるはずだと感じていました
00:53
And at that point, I read a book by Frank Barnaby,
その時 フランク・バーナビーの本を読みました
00:56
this wonderful nuclear physicist,
この素晴らしい電子核物理学者は
00:58
and he said that media had a responsibility,
メディアには責任があると述べました
01:00
that all sectors of society had a responsibility
社会すべてのどんな部門でも責任があると言いました
01:02
to try and progress things and move things forward.
物事を改善し、先に進む努力をする責任です
01:05
And that fascinated me,
私はこれに感動しました
01:07
because I'd been messing around with a camera most of my life.
自分はカメラの周りで騒ぐ人生しか送ってこなかったからです
01:09
And then I thought, well maybe I could do something.
自分にもできることがあるだろうと思いました
01:12
Maybe I could become a filmmaker.
映像作家になれるかもしれないし
01:14
Maybe I can use the form of film constructively
何らかの変化を起こすために
01:16
to in some way make a difference.
映画を役立てることができるかもしれない
01:18
Maybe there's a little change I can get involved in.
小さな変革に自分が関われるかもしれない
01:20
So I started thinking about peace,
そして 私は平和について考え始めました
01:23
and I was obviously, as I said to you,
先ほど言った通り 私は明らかに
01:25
very much moved by these images,
これらのイメージに心を動かされ
01:27
trying to make sense of that.
理解しようとしていました
01:29
Could I go and speak to older and wiser people
年上で賢い人たちのところに行き
01:31
who would tell me how they made sense
今起きている恐ろしいことを
01:33
of the things that are going on?
どのように理解しているのか
01:35
Because it's obviously incredibly frightening.
教わってこようか?
01:37
But I realized that,
しかし、私は
01:39
having been messing around with structure as an actor,
俳優として雑多なことをしていた経験から
01:41
that a series of sound bites in itself wasn't enough,
言葉を使うだけでは十分ではなく
01:43
that there needed to be a mountain to climb,
登るべき山や 行うべき旅があると
01:46
there needed to be a journey that I had to take.
気づいていました
01:48
And if I took that journey,
その旅に出たならば
01:50
no matter whether it failed or succeeded, it would be completely irrelevant.
成功か失敗かは関係ありません
01:52
The point was that I would have something
人間は基本的に悪なのかという質問を
01:54
to hook the questions of -- is humankind fundamentally evil?
投げかけることが出来る何かを得ることが大切なのです
01:56
Is the destruction of the world inevitable? Should I have children?
破壊行為は避けられないのだろうか?
01:59
Is that a responsible thing to do? Etc., etc.
私は子供を持つべきか? それは責任あることなのか?等々
02:01
So I was thinking about peace,
そして私は平和について考えました
02:04
and then I was thinking, well where's the starting point for peace?
平和はどこから始まるのだろうか?
02:06
And that was when I had the idea.
その時にアイデアが浮かびました
02:08
There was no starting point for peace.
平和には始点はないということです
02:10
There was no day of global unity.
地球が一体となる日は一日もなかった
02:12
There was no day of intercultural cooperation.
異文化が協力し合う日は一日もなかった
02:14
There was no day when humanity came together,
思いやりが一体になる日は一日もなかった
02:16
separate in all of those things
これらの事を切り離して
02:18
and just shared it together --
みんなで分かち合う―
02:20
that we're in this together,
みんなが参加して
02:22
and that if we united and we interculturally cooperated,
一体になって異文化が協力し合えば
02:24
then that might be the key to humanity's survival.
人類存続の鍵となるかもしれません
02:27
That might shift the level of consciousness
もしこれを1日でも行えば
02:29
around the fundamental issues that humanity faces --
人類が直面する大きな問題に対する
02:31
if we did it just for a day.
意識のレベルを変えることになるかもしれません
02:34
So obviously we didn't have any money.
でも私たちにはお金がありませんでした
02:36
I was living at my mom's place.
私は母親の家に住んでいたので
02:38
And we started writing letters to everybody.
一緒にみんなに宛てて手紙を書き始めました
02:41
You very quickly work out what is it that you've got to do
何をやらなくてはいけないかを理解するためには
02:44
to fathom that out.
物事を迅速にすすめなくてはならないのです
02:47
How do you create a day voted by every single head of state in the world
いかにして 世界各国の元首から投票を募り
02:49
to create the first ever Ceasefire Nonviolence Day,
世界最初の停戦・無暴力の日
02:52
the 21st of September?
9月21日を作れるでしょうか?
02:54
And I wanted it to be the 21st of September
私はそれを9月21日にしたかったんです
02:56
because it was my granddad's favorite number.
祖父の大好きな番号だったからです
02:58
He was a prisoner of war.
私の祖父は戦争捕虜でした
03:00
He saw the bomb go off at Nagasaki.
彼は長崎の原爆が落ちたのを見ました
03:02
It poisoned his blood. He died when I was 11.
彼は被爆して 私が11歳の時に亡くなりました
03:04
So he was like my hero.
祖父は私のヒーローでした
03:07
And the reason why 21 was the number is
21という数字には理由があります
03:09
700 men left, 23 came back,
700人が出征し 帰途に就いたのが23人でした
03:11
two died on the boat and 21 hit the ground.
船の上で2人亡くなり 21人が帰還しました
03:13
And that's why we wanted it to be the 21st of September as the date of peace.
だから私は9月21日にしたかったんです
03:15
So we began this journey,
そこから私たちは旅を始め
03:18
and we launched it in 1999.
1999年にこの計画を立ち上げました
03:20
And we wrote to heads of state, their ambassadors,
私たちは各国元首や大使、
03:22
Nobel Peace laureates, NGOs, faiths,
ノーベル賞受賞者、NGO、宗教団体、
03:25
various organizations -- literally wrote to everybody.
様々な組織に―文字通りすべての人に手紙を書きました
03:27
And very quickly, some letters started coming back.
そして、一部の手紙はすぐに返信がありました
03:30
And we started to build this case.
そこからこのプロジェクトを組み立て始めたんです
03:33
And I remember the first letter.
最初の手紙の事を覚えています
03:36
One of the first letters was from the Dalai Lama.
その中の一通は ダライ・ラマからでした
03:38
And of course we didn't have the money; we were playing guitars
私たちにはお金がなく
03:40
and getting the money for the stamps that we were sending out all of [this mail].
ギターを弾いてお金を集め 切手代に充てていました
03:42
A letter came through from the Dalai Lama saying,
ダライ・ラマからの手紙にはこうありました
03:45
"This is an amazing thing. Come and see me.
「すばらしいことです 会いに来なさい
03:47
I'd love to talk to you about the first ever day of peace."
最初の平和の日について話をしましょう」
03:49
And we didn't have money for the flight.
でも、私たちには飛行機代がなかったんです
03:51
And I rang Sir Bob Ayling, who was CEO of BA at the time,
そこで英国航空のCEOボブ・アイリングに電話して言いました
03:53
and said, "Mate, we've got this invitation.
「私たちにこんな招待が来ています
03:56
Could you give me a flight? Because we're going to go see him."
飛行機に乗せてもらえませんか?ダライ・ラマに会うんです」
03:58
And of course, we went and saw him and it was amazing.
そうやって会いに行きました すばらしかったです
04:01
And then Dr. Oscar Arias came forward.
そして、オスカー・アリアス医師です
04:03
And actually, let me go back to that slide,
このスライドに戻ります
04:05
because when we launched it in 1999 --
1999年にこの計画を立ち上げた時 -
04:07
this idea to create the first ever day of ceasefire and non-violence --
最初の停戦と無暴力の日というアイデアです -
04:09
we invited thousands of people.
何千人もの人を招待しました
04:12
Well not thousands -- hundreds of people, lots of people --
何千ではないですね、何百人もの多くの人―
04:14
all the press, because we were going to try and create
多くのメディアもです 私たちは世界初の
04:17
the first ever World Peace Day, a peace day.
「世界平和の日」を作ろうとしていたのです
04:19
And we invited everybody,
あらゆる人を招待しましたが
04:21
and no press showed up.
メディアは1社も来ませんでした
04:23
There were 114 people there -- they were mostly my friends and family.
出席は114人- ほとんどが友人や家族でした
04:25
And that was kind of like the launch of this thing.
この計画はそんな風に始まりました
04:28
But it didn't matter because we were documenting, and that was the thing.
でもそれは問題ではなく 記録するということが大切でした
04:30
For me, it was really about the process.
立ち上げは単なるプロセスであり
04:33
It wasn't about the end result.
これが最終的な結果ではなかったんです
04:35
And that's the beautiful thing about the camera.
そして それがカメラのすごいところです
04:37
They used to say the pen is mightier than the sword. I think the camera is.
文は武より強しと言われますが カメラもそうです
04:39
And just staying in the moment with it was a beautiful thing
その場にいて一瞬をとらえるのは
04:42
and really empowering actually.
本当に美しく勇気づけられることです
04:44
So anyway, we began the journey.
そうして私たちは旅を始めました
04:46
And here you see people like Mary Robinson, I went to see in Geneva.
メアリー・ロビンソンに会いに ジュネーブに行きました
04:48
I'm cutting my hair, it's getting short and long,
私は髪を切ったり伸ばしたりしています
04:51
because every time I saw Kofi Annan,
コフィ・アナンに会うたびに
04:53
I was so worried that he thought I was a hippie that I cut it,
ヒッピーだと思われるのが怖くて髪を切ります
04:55
and that was kind of what was going on.
だからなんですよ
04:58
(Laughter)
(笑)
05:00
Yeah, I'm not worried about it now.
うん、私は今その事は心配していません
05:03
So Mary Robinson,
メアリー・ロビンソンはこう言いました
05:05
she said to me, "Listen, this is an idea whose time has come. This must be created."
「まさに時宜を得たアイデアね 実現させないと」
05:07
Kofi Annan said, "This will be beneficial to my troops on the ground."
コフィ・アナンは「国連軍にも役立つ提案だ」
05:10
The OAU at the time, led by Salim Ahmed Salim,
アフリカ統一機構(OAU)ののサリム・アハメド・サリムは
05:13
said, "I must get the African countries involved."
「アフリカ諸国に参加させなくては」と言いました
05:15
Dr. Oscar Arias, Nobel Peace laureate,
ノーベル平和賞受賞のオスカー・エイリアスは
05:17
president now of Costa Rica,
今、コスタリカの大統領ですが
05:19
said, "I'll do everything that I can."
「私ができることは何でもしよう」と言いました
05:21
So I went and saw Amr Moussa at the League of Arab States.
それで私はアラブ諸国連盟のアムル・ムーサに会いに行きました
05:23
I met Mandela at the Arusha peace talks,
アルーシャ平和会議でマンデラ氏にも会いました
05:26
and so on and so on and so on --
などなどです―
05:28
while I was building the case
私がこのアイデアが理にかなったものだと
05:30
to prove whether this idea
証明する活動をする中で
05:32
would make sense.
こんなことをしてきました
05:34
And then we were listening to the people. We were documenting everywhere.
そして私たちは人々の話を聞き 各地で記録を取りました
05:36
76 countries in the last 12 years, I've visited.
過去12年間で、76の国を訪れました
05:39
And I've always spoken to women and children wherever I've gone.
行く場所全てで 女性や子供と話をして
05:42
I've recorded 44,000 young people.
4万4千人の若者を撮影しました
05:44
I've recorded about 900 hours of their thoughts.
彼らの考えを900時間分収録しました
05:46
I'm really clear about how young people feel
より平和な世界のためのスタート地点を持つという
05:48
when you talk to them about this idea
このアイデアについて若者を話すと
05:51
of having a starting point for their actions for a more peaceful world
彼らがどのように感じているのかとてもはっきりします
05:53
through their poetry, their art, their literature,
そのスタート地点は詩、芸術、文学、
05:56
their music, their sport, whatever it might be.
音楽、スポーツなど、何でもいいんです
05:58
And we were listening to everybody.
私たちは皆さんの話を聞きました
06:00
And it was an incredibly thing, working with the U.N.
国連や、NGOとこのことについて
06:02
and working with NGOs and building this case.
取り組むのは信じられないことでした
06:04
I felt that I was presenting a case
私は、地球社会を代表して
06:06
on behalf of the global community
この日を作るという試みを
06:08
to try and create this day.
提示しているのだと感じました
06:10
And the stronger the case and the more detailed it was,
この活動がより強固に 詳細になるにつれて
06:12
the better chance we had of creating this day.
この日をつくる可能性が大きくなっていったのです
06:14
And it was this stuff, this,
当時 私は
06:17
where I actually was in the beginning
実際の結果がどうなろうとも
06:20
kind of thinking no matter what happened, it didn't actually matter.
それは問題ではないと思っていました
06:22
It didn't matter if it didn't create a day of peace.
平和の日が実現しなくても 問題ありませんでした
06:24
The fact is that, if I tried and it didn't work,
もし、この試みがうまくいかなかったら
06:26
then I could make a statement
声明を出せばよかったんです
06:29
about how unwilling the global community is to unite --
地球社会が団結に対しいかに無関心だったのか―
06:31
until, it was in Somalia, picking up that young girl.
でもある時 ソマリアで小さな女の子に出会いました
06:33
And this young child
彼女は 消毒薬も使わず
06:36
who'd taken about an inch and a half out of her leg with no antiseptic,
足を4センチ切り取ったのです
06:38
and that young boy who was a child soldier,
そして、この男の子は子供の戦士で
06:41
who told me he'd killed people -- he was about 12 --
12歳位でしょうか - 人を殺したと私に言いました
06:43
these things made me realize
これらの経験を通じて 私は 自分が行っていることは
06:46
that this was not a film that I could just stop.
いつでも止められるただの映画ではないと気づきました
06:49
And that actually, at that moment something happened to me,
何かが私に起きたのです そして
06:52
which obviously made me go, "I'm going to document.
「ドキュメンタリーを撮ろう もしこれが
06:55
If this is the only film that I ever make,
自分の唯一の映画になるとしても
06:57
I'm going to document until this becomes a reality."
現実となるまで撮り続けよう」と決めました
06:59
Because we've got to stop, we've got to do something
私たちは戦争を止めさせ 政治や宗教から離れた場所で
07:02
where we unite --
団結するための
07:05
separate from all the politics and religion
行動を取らなければならないのです
07:07
that, as a young person, is confusing me.
若い人間として、これには困惑しました
07:09
I don't know how to get involved in that process.
どうやって始めればよいかわかりませんでした
07:11
And then on the seventh of September, I was invited to New York.
そして、9月7日、私はニューヨークに招かれました
07:13
The Costa Rican government and the British government
コスタリカ政府と、英国政府が
07:16
had put forward to the United Nations General Assembly,
国連総会でこの事を提案し
07:18
with 54 co-sponsors,
54の共同提案国とともに
07:20
the idea of the first ever Ceasefire Nonviolence Day,
毎年9月21日を世界初の
07:22
the 21st of September, as a fixed calendar date,
停戦・非暴力の日にしようと提案し
07:25
and it was unanimously adopted by every head of state in the world.
満場一致で世界の首脳達に受け入れられました
07:28
(Applause)
(拍手)
07:31
Yeah, but there were hundreds of individuals, obviously, who made that a reality.
何百人もの人たちが これを実現するのに力を貸してくれました
07:38
And thank you to all of them.
彼ら全員に感謝しています
07:42
That was an incredible moment.
本当に素晴らしい瞬間でした
07:44
I was at the top of the General Assembly just looking down into it and seeing it happen.
私は総会の壇上でこれを眺めていただけでした
07:46
And as I mentioned, when it started,
先ほども言いましたが これが始まった時
07:48
we were at the Globe, and there was no press.
グローブには記者が誰も来ませんでした
07:50
And now I was thinking, "Well, the press it really going to hear this story."
そして今 私は「メディアがこの話を聞くのだ」と考えていました
07:52
And suddenly, we started to institutionalize this day.
突然 その日に向けた準備が始まりました
07:55
Kofi Annan invited me on the morning of September the 11th
コフィ・アナンは2001年9月11日の朝、
07:58
to do a press conference.
記者会見を行うために私を招待しました
08:00
And it was 8:00 AM when I stood there.
朝8時に私は会見場に立ち
08:02
And I was waiting for him to come down, and I knew that he was on his way.
コフィ・アナンが来るのを待っていました
08:04
And obviously he never came down. The statement was never made.
もちろん彼は来ませんでしたし 声明もありませんでした
08:07
The world was never told there was a day of global ceasefire and nonviolence.
停戦・非暴力の日は 世界に伝えられることがなかったのです
08:10
And it was obviously a tragic moment
9.11とそれに続く出来事は
08:13
for the thousands of people who lost their lives,
世界中で命を失った何千もの人々にとって
08:15
there and then subsequently all over the world.
悲劇的な出来事でした
08:17
It never happened.
かつて起きたことのない事件でした
08:20
And I remember thinking,
私はこう考えたのを覚えています
08:22
"This is exactly why, actually,
「だからこそ
08:24
we have to work even harder.
私たちはもっと頑張らなくてはいけない
08:26
And we have to make this day work.
そしてこの日を実現させなくてはならない
08:29
It's been created; nobody knows.
平和の日は作られたけれど 誰も知らない
08:31
But we have to continue this journey,
私たちはこの旅を続け
08:33
and we have to tell people,
平和の日のことを人々に語りかけ
08:35
and we have to prove it can work."
うまく行くことを証明しなくてはならない」
08:37
And I left New York freaked,
私は疲れきってニューヨークを離れましたが
08:39
but actually empowered.
新しい力を得ていました
08:41
And I felt inspired
平和の日が実現すれば
08:43
by the possibilities
もうこんな悲劇はなくなるかもしれない
08:45
that if it did, then maybe we wouldn't see things like that.
という可能性に 元気づけられていました
08:47
I remember putting that film out and going to cynics.
フィルムを取り出して皮肉屋のところに行きました
08:51
I was showing the film,
私はこのフィルムを見せたんです
08:53
and I remember being in Israel and getting it absolutely slaughtered
イスラエルでこの映画を見た何人かの人に
08:55
by some guys having watched the film --
酷評されたのを覚えています
08:57
that it's just a day of peace, it doesn't mean anything.
たった1日の平和な日、そんなの全く意味がないじゃないかと
08:59
It's not going to work; you're not going to stop the fighting in Afghanistan;
アフガニスタンの戦争を止めたりできないだろう
09:02
the Taliban won't listen, etc., etc.
タリバンが言うことを聞くはずがない などなど
09:04
It's just symbolism.
ただの象徴にすぎないと言うのです
09:07
And that was even worse
現実の状況は
09:09
than actually what had just happened in many ways,
その批判ほどひどくはありませんでした
09:11
because it couldn't not work.
私の計画が上手く行かないはずはなかったのです
09:13
I'd spoken in Somalia, Burundi, Gaza, the West Bank,
ソマリア、ブルンジ、ガザ、ヨルダン川西岸
09:18
India, Sri Lanka, Congo, wherever it was,
インド、スリランカ、コンゴ どこへでも行きました
09:20
and they'd all tell me, "If you can create a window of opportunity,
彼らは言いました「機会さえ作ってくれれば
09:22
we can move aid, we can vaccinate children.
援助団体を動かして子供たちにワクチンを打てる
09:24
Children can lead their projects.
子供たちはプロジェクトの推進力になる
09:26
They can unite. They can come together. If people would stop, lives will be saved."
彼らは団結し一つになれる 大人が争いをやめれば 命が助かるんだ」
09:28
That's what I'd heard.
私はそう聞かされました
09:31
And I'd heard that from the people who really understood what conflict was about.
対立とは何かを本当に理解する人から教えてもらったのです
09:33
And so I went back to the United Nations.
そして私は国連に戻り 撮影を続けて
09:36
I decided that I'd continue filming and make another movie.
もう1本映画を作ると心に決めました
09:38
And I went back to the U.N. for another couple of years.
私は数年間国連に籍を置き
09:40
We started moving around the corridors of the U.N. system,
いろいろな国連機関や
09:43
governments and NGOs,
政府 NGOを訪ねて
09:45
trying desperately to find somebody
私の計画を実現するために
09:47
to come forward and have a go at it,
協力してくれる人を
09:49
see if we could make it possible.
必死で探しました
09:51
And after lots and lots of meetings obviously,
そして 本当に数多くの打ち合わせを経て
09:53
I'm delighted that this man, Ahmad Fawzi,
私のヒーローであり指導者でもある
09:55
one of my heroes and mentors really,
アハメド・ファウジが
09:57
he managed to get UNICEF involved.
ユニセフの協力を取りつけてくれました
09:59
And UNICEF, God bless them, they said, "Okay, we'll have a go."
彼らは「よしやってみよう」と言ってくれました
10:01
And then UNAMA became involved in Afghanistan.
国連アフガニスタン支援派遣団(UNAMA)も参加してくれました
10:03
It was historical. Could it work in Afghanistan
歴史的なことです アフガニスタンで
10:05
with UNAMA and WHO
UNAMA WHOそして市民社会とともに
10:07
and civil society, etc., etc., etc.?
働くことができるんだろうか?
10:09
And I was getting it all on film and I was recording it,
私はこれを映画にしようと、撮影しながら
10:11
and I was thinking, "This is it. This is the possibility of it maybe working.
「これだ こうすれば上手く行くかもしれない
10:14
But even if it doesn't, at least the door is open
もしだめでも、少なくとも扉は開いた
10:17
and there's a chance."
そしてチャンスはある」と思ったんです
10:20
And so I went back to London,
そして私はロンドンに戻り
10:22
and I went and saw this chap, Jude Law.
ジュード・ロウに会いに行きました
10:24
And I saw him because he was an actor, I was an actor,
彼が俳優で、私も俳優だったから会ったんです
10:26
I had a connection to him,
私は彼とのコネクションがありました
10:28
because we needed to get to the press, we needed this attraction,
この計画にはメディアの参加が不可欠で
10:30
we needed the media to be involved.
メディアを呼ぶには売りが必要でした
10:32
Because if we start pumping it up a bit maybe more people would listen
そうして盛り上げることができれば
10:34
and there'd be more --
より多くの人が耳を傾けてくれるだろうし
10:37
when we got into certain areas,
ある特定の部門を引きつけることができたら
10:39
maybe there would be more people interested.
興味を持ってくれる人が増えるかもしれません
10:41
And maybe we'd be helped financially a little bit more,
そうすれば金銭面でも多少助かるでしょう
10:43
which had been desperately difficult.
私たちは本当に経済的に大変でした
10:45
I won't go into that.
詳しいところまではお話ししませんが
10:47
So Jude said, "Okay, I'll do some statements for you."
ジュードは「よし 声明文を作ろう」と言い
10:49
While I was filming these statements, he said to me, "Where are you going next?"
撮影中に「次はどうするの?」と聞いてきました
10:51
I said, "I'm going to go to Afghanistan." He said, "Really?"
「アフガンに行く」と答えると彼は「本当に?」
10:53
And I could sort of see a little look in his eye of interest.
彼の目に少し興味の色が浮かんだのが見えました
10:55
So I said to him, "Do you want to come with me?
そこで言いました「一緒に来ませんか?
10:58
It'd be really interesting if you came.
あなたが来たらとても面白いことになります
11:00
It would help and bring attention.
注目を集めるのに役立ちますし
11:02
And that attention
その注目は
11:04
would help leverage the situation,
状況を変える力になるだけでなく
11:06
as well as all of the other sides of it."
多くの面で役立ちます」
11:08
I think there's a number of pillars to success.
成功するためには多くの柱が必要です
11:10
One is you've got to have a great idea.
一つは素晴らしいアイデアを持つこと
11:12
The other is you've got to have a constituency, you've got to have finance,
もう一つは支持者と経済力
11:14
and you've got to be able to raise awareness.
そして 皆の意識を高める能力も必要です
11:17
And actually I could never raise awareness by myself, no matter what I'd achieved.
どんなに成功したとしても私1人で意識を高めることはできません
11:19
So these guys were absolutely crucial.
そのため、彼らは本当に重要だったんです
11:22
So he said yes,
ジュードが行くと言ったので
11:25
and we found ourselves in Afghanistan.
私たちはアフガニスタンに行きました
11:27
It was a really incredible thing that when we landed there,
私たちがアフガニスタンに到着した時、信じられないくらいでした
11:29
I was talking to various people, and they were saying to me,
多くの人々と話し こう言われました
11:32
"You've got to get everybody involved here.
「皆を巻き込まなくてはいけない
11:35
You can't just expect it to work. You have to get out and work."
ただ上手く行くことを期待したら駄目だ 外に出て活動しなくては」
11:37
And we did, and we traveled around,
私たちはそれを実行し 多くの地域を訪れ
11:40
and we spoke to elders, we spoke to doctors, we spoke to nurses,
お年寄り 医師 看護婦たちと話しました
11:43
we held press conferences, we went out with soldiers,
記者会見を開き 兵士たちと出かけたりもしました
11:46
we sat down with ISAF, we sat down with NATO,
国際治安支援部隊(ISAF)やNATO
11:49
we sat down with the U.K. government.
英国政府とも話しました
11:51
I mean, we basically sat down with everybody --
私たちは誰とでも話をしました
11:53
in and out of schools with ministers of education,
学校の内外で教育関係の閣僚と話をし
11:56
holding these press conferences,
記者会見も行いました
11:58
which of course, now were loaded with press, everybody was there.
もちろん、大勢の記者がいました
12:00
There was an interest in what was going on.
そこで起きていることに関心が集まっていました
12:03
This amazing woman, Fatima Gailani, was absolutely instrumental in what went on
このすばらしい女性、ファティマ・マガラニはこの現象で大きな役割を持っていました
12:05
as she was the spokesperson for the resistance against the Russians.
彼女はロシアの反政府グループの広報官だったのです
12:09
And her Afghan network
そして、彼女のアフガンのネットワークは
12:12
was just absolutely everywhere.
本当に細部まで行き渡っていました
12:14
And she was really crucial in getting the message in.
メッセージを伝えるのに本当に必要な人物でした
12:16
And then we went home. We'd sort of done it.
そして私たちはやるべきことを終え 帰国しました
12:18
We had to wait now and see what happened.
何が起こるか待たなくてはなりませんでした
12:20
And I got home,
家に着いた時
12:22
and I remember one of the team bringing in a letter to me
チームのメンバーの一人が手紙を持ってきたのを覚えています
12:24
from the Taliban.
タリバンからです
12:27
And that letter basically said, "We'll observe this day.
その手紙には「この日は休戦とする
12:29
We will observe this day.
我々は平和の日を順守する
12:32
We see it as a window of opportunity.
これをひとつの機会ととらえて
12:34
And we will not engage. We're not going to engage."
この日には交戦を止めることにする」とありました
12:36
And that meant that humanitarian workers
そしてこれは、慈善活動をしている人達が
12:39
wouldn't be kidnapped or killed.
人質に取られたり、殺されるという事がないということです
12:42
And then suddenly, I obviously knew at this point, there was a chance.
この時点で私ははっきりと チャンスはあると悟りました
12:45
And days later,
後には
12:48
1.6 million children were vaccinated against polio
160万の子供たちがポリオの予防接種を受けることができました
12:50
as a consequence of everybody stopping.
皆が停戦、非暴力をした結果です
12:53
(Applause)
(拍手)
12:55
And like the General Assembly,
国連総会の時と同じで
13:05
obviously the most wonderful, wonderful moment.
これは本当に本当にすばらしい瞬間でした
13:07
And so then we wrapped the film up and we put it together
その後私たちは撮影を終え 編集をしました
13:09
because we had to go back.
アフガニスタンに戻らなければなりませんでした
13:11
We put it into Dari and Pashto. We put it in the local dialects.
映画にダリ語とパシュトン語 現地の方言を入れ
13:13
We went back to Afghanistan,
アフガニスタンに戻りました
13:16
because the next year was coming, and we wanted to support.
年の瀬を迎え アフガンの人々を支援したかったのです
13:18
But more importantly, we wanted to go back,
でも実際は アフガニスタンの人たちが
13:21
because these people in Afghanistan were the heroes.
ヒーローだったから戻りたかったのです
13:23
They were the people who believed in peace
彼らは平和を信じ その可能性を信じ
13:25
and the possibilities of it, etc., etc. -- and they made it real.
それを現実のものとしました
13:28
And we wanted to go back and show them the film
彼らに映画を見せて伝えたかったのです
13:31
and say, "Look, you guys made this possible. And thank you very much."
「あなたたちのおかげで完成しました 本当にありがとう」と
13:33
And we gave the film over.
私たちはフィルムを彼らに渡しました
13:36
Obviously it was shown, and it was amazing.
もちろん上映しましたし、すばらしかったです
13:38
And then that year, that year, 2008,
そして、その年 2008年です
13:40
this ISAF statement from Kabul, Afghanistan, September 17th:
カブールのISAFは9月17日に声明を出しました
13:43
"General Stanley McChrystal,
「アフガニスタンの国際治安支援部隊司令官
13:46
commander of international security assistance forces in Afghanistan,
スタンリー・マクリスタル中将は
13:48
announced today ISAF will not conduct offensive military operations
ISAFは9月21日には軍事的な行動を加えないことを
13:50
on the 21st of September."
宣言した」
13:53
They were saying they would stop.
ISAFはやめると言っていたのです
13:55
And then there was this other statement
そして、他にも声明があります
13:57
that came out from the U.N. Department of Security and Safety
国連の安全保安局が出したものです
13:59
saying that, in Afghanistan,
それによると アフガニスタンでは
14:02
because of this work,
この活動のおかげで
14:04
the violence was down by 70 percent.
暴力行為が70%低下しました
14:06
70 percent reduction in violence on this day at least.
少なくとも平和の日には暴力が70%暴力が減ったのです
14:08
And that completely blew my mind
本当に驚きました
14:11
almost more than anything.
どんなことよりもです
14:13
And I remember being stuck in New York, this time because of the volcano,
私はニューヨークで足止めされていました 火山噴火のせいです
14:15
which was obviously much less harmful.
テロよりはずっと被害が少ないものです
14:18
And I was there thinking about what was going on.
何が起きているのかを考えていました
14:20
And I kept thinking about this 70 percent.
この70%についてずっと考えていたんです
14:22
70 percent reduction in violence --
70%も暴力行為が減った―
14:24
in what everyone said was completely impossible
誰もが絶対に無理だと言い
14:26
and you couldn't do.
達成もできなかったことです
14:28
And that made me think that, if we can get 70 percent in Afghanistan,
アフガニスタンで暴力を70%減らせるのならば
14:30
then surely we can get 70 percent reduction everywhere.
他のどんな場所でも同じだけ減らせるはずだと考えました
14:33
We have to go for a global truce.
世界的な停戦が必要です
14:38
We have to utilize this day of ceasefire and nonviolence
停戦・非暴力の日を活用して
14:40
and go for a global truce,
世界的な停戦を実現し
14:42
go for the largest recorded cessation of hostilities,
国内レベルでも国際レベルでも
14:44
both domestically and internationally, ever recorded.
史上最大規模の停戦を行うのです
14:47
That's exactly what we must do.
私たちはこれを行わなければなりません
14:50
And on the 21st of September this year,
そして今年9月21日、
14:52
we're going to launch that campaign at the O2 Arena
私たちはO2アリーナで
14:54
to go for that process,
史上最大の停戦・非暴力の日を作るための
14:56
to try and create the largest recorded cessation of hostilities.
プロセスを開始します
14:58
And we will utilize all kinds of things --
あらゆるものを利用します
15:01
have a dance and social media
ダンスやソーシャル・メディア、
15:03
and visiting on Facebook and visit the website, sign the petition.
そしてフェースブック、ウェブサイト、署名などです
15:05
And it's in the six official languages of the United Nations.
国連の公用語である6ヶ国語で展開します
15:08
And we'll globally link with government, inter-government,
世界各地の政府や国際機関 NGO
15:11
non-government, education, unions, sports.
組合やスポーツ機関と連携します
15:13
And you can see the education box there.
教育に関する写真もみえますね
15:15
We've got resources at the moment in 174 countries
私たちは現時点で174カ国に協力者がいて
15:17
trying to get young people to be the driving force
世界的な停戦というビジョンの
15:20
behind the vision of that global truce.
推進力として 若い人たちを呼び込もうとしています
15:22
And obviously the life-saving is increased, the concepts help.
もちろんこのコンセプトは人の命を救うことにも役立っています
15:25
Linking up with the Olympics --
オリンピックとつなげて―
15:28
I went and saw Seb Coe. I said, "London 2012 is about truce.
私はセブ・コーに会いに行き
15:30
Ultimately, that's what it's about."
「ロンドン五輪は停戦がテーマだよ」と言いました
15:32
Why don't we all team up? Why don't we bring truce to life?
なぜ私たちは協力し 停戦を実現しないのでしょう?
15:34
Why don't you support the process of the largest ever global truce?
史上最大の地球規模での停戦を応援しませんか?
15:36
We'll make a new film about this process.
私たちはこの過程を映画にします
15:39
We'll utilize sport and football.
スポーツやサッカーを活用します
15:41
On the Day of Peace, there's thousands of football matches all played,
平和の日に 何千ものサッカーの試合が行われるんです
15:43
from the favelas of Brazil to wherever it might be.
ブラジルの貧民街とかどこででもです
15:46
So, utilizing all of these ways
そして、これらすべてを活用して
15:48
to inspire individual action.
一人ひとりの行動をインスパイアするのです
15:50
And ultimately, we have to try that.
私たちはそれに取り組まないといけません
15:53
We have to work together.
力を合わせることが必要です
15:55
And when I stand here in front of all of you,
ここで皆さんに向けて話をし
15:57
and the people who will watch these things,
他の人もこの講演を見てくれるだろうと思うと
15:59
I'm excited, on behalf of everybody I've met,
ワクワクした気分になります
16:02
that there is a possibility that our world could unite,
一人ひとりの力が合わさって この世界が一つになり
16:04
that we could come together as one,
私たちが団結し
16:07
that we could lift the level of consciousness around the fundamental issues,
根本的な問題に対する意識のレベルを上げる
16:09
brought about by individuals.
可能性が生まれているからです
16:11
I was with Brahimi, Ambassador Brahimi.
私はブラヒミ大使と会ったことがあります
16:13
I think he's one of the most incredible men
アフガニスタンやイランなど 国際政治の場で
16:15
in relation to international politics -- in Afghanistan, in Iraq.
すばらしい業績を上げてきた方です
16:17
He's an amazing man.
とても立派な人です
16:20
And I sat with him a few weeks ago.
数週間前 彼と話す機会があり
16:22
And I said to him, "Mr. Brahimi, is this nuts, going for a global truce?
「世界規模の停戦というのは馬鹿げたことでしょうか?
16:24
Is this possible? Is it really possible that we could do this?"
本当に可能だと思いますか?」と聞きました
16:27
He said, "It's absolutely possible."
彼は「絶対に可能です」と言いました
16:29
I said, "What would you do?
そこで「あなたならどうしますか?
16:31
Would you go to governments and lobby and use the system?"
ロビー活動で政府を動かしますか?」と聞くと
16:33
He said, "No, I'd talk to the individuals."
「いや 個人的に人々と話をするよ」と答えました
16:35
It's all about the individuals.
全ては個人についてのことであり
16:37
It's all about you and me.
私とあなたの事なのです
16:39
It's all about partnerships.
全てはパートナーシップに関わることであり
16:41
It's about your constituencies; it's about your businesses.
支持基盤やビジネスに関わることなのです
16:43
Because together, by working together,
ともに働くことで
16:45
I seriously think we can start to change things.
物事を変えていくことができると 私は真剣に思っています
16:47
And there's a wonderful man sitting in this audience, and I don't know where he is,
この客席に素晴らしい人がいます どこにいるかはわかりませんが
16:50
who said to me a few days ago -- because I did a little rehearsal --
数日前 私がリハーサルをしている時にこう言われました
16:53
and he said, "I've been thinking about this day
「この日のことをずっと考えていました
16:56
and imagining it as a square
365の区画を持つ広場を
16:59
with 365 squares,
想像してみて下さい
17:01
and one of them is white."
そのうちの一つは白い色をしています」
17:03
And it then made me think about a glass of water, which is clear.
それを聞いて私は透明な水が入ったコップを想像しました
17:05
If you put one drop,
そこに一滴
17:08
one drop of something, in that water,
何かを垂らすと
17:10
it'll change it forever.
その水は永遠に変わるんです
17:12
By working together, we can create peace one day.
手を取り合うことで 平和が実現できます
17:15
Thank you TED. Thank you.
TEDありがとう
17:17
(Applause)
(拍手)
17:19
Thank you.
ありがとう
17:22
(Applause)
(拍手)
17:24
Thanks a lot.
ありがとう
17:28
(Applause)
(拍手)
17:30
Thank you very much. Thank you.
本当にありがとうございます
17:32
Translator:Mariko Imada
Reviewer:Wataru Narita

sponsored links

Jeremy Gilley - Peace activist
Filmmaker Jeremy Gilley founded Peace One Day to create an annual day without conflict. And ... it's happening. What will you do to make peace on September 21?

Why you should listen

A day of peace. It seems lovely and hopeful to those of us lucky enough to live in peace already. But to those living in war, a day of peace, a temporary cease-fire, is not only lovely, it's incredibly practical. On a day when no bullets fly, families can go to the clinic, mosquito nets can be given out, and kids who've known only war can learn what peace looks like, sounds like. In short, it's a window of opportunity to build peace. For the past 10 years, filmmaker Jeremy Gilley has been promoting September 21 as a true international day of ceasefire, a day to carry out humanitarian aid in the world's most dangerous zones. The practical challenge is huge, starting with: how to convince both parties in a conflict to put down their weapons and trust the other side to do the same? But Gilley has recorded successes. For instance, on September 21, 2008, some 1.85 million children under 5 years old, in seven Afghan provinces where conflict has previously prevented access, were given a vaccine for polio.

On September 21, 2011, Gilley will start the 365-day-long countdown to Truce 2012, a hoped-for global day of guns-down ceasefire and worldwide action toward peace.

He says: "The only logical progression is to work towards a global cessation of hostilities on Peace Day -- from violence in our homes and schools, through to armed conflict."

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.