sponsored links
TED2002

David Kelley: Human-centered design

デイヴィッド・ケリー: 人間中心のデザイン

February 2, 2002

IDEOのデイヴィッド・ケリーは、プロダクトデザインはハードウエア自体よりもユーザー体験をより重視するようになっていると語る。そして、この新しく幅広い手法を、プラダのニューヨーク店での映像をはじめとするビデオで紹介する。

David Kelley - Designer, educator
David Kelley’s company IDEO helped create many icons of the digital generation -- but what matters even more to him is unlocking the creative potential of people and organizations to innovate routinely. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
There's a lot of exciting things happening in the design world
この1年 デザインの世界やIDEOでは
00:25
and at IDEO this past year,
わくわくする事がたくさん起きています
00:27
and I'm pleased to get a chance to share some of those with you.
みなさんにそのいくつかをご紹介できることを嬉しく思います
00:29
I didn't attend the first TED back in 1984
1984年の最初のTEDには私は参加していません
00:35
but I've been to a lot of them since that time.
けれど その後は何度も参加しています
00:39
I thought it [would] kind of be interesting to think back to that time
リチャードがすべてを始めた当時に思いをはせるのは
00:41
when Richard got the whole thing started. Thank you very much, Richard;
なかなか興味深いことです 本当にありがとう リチャード
00:45
it's been a big, enjoyable part of my life, coming here.
ここへ来るのは人生の中でとても重要で楽しいことでした
00:48
And so thinking back, I was thinking
そして思い返せば
00:51
those of us in Silicon Valley were really focused on products or objects --
我々シリコンバレーの人間は非常に製品や物に --
00:54
certainly technological objects.
特にハイテク製品に注目していました
01:00
And so it was great fun in those days, and some of those of you
当時はとても楽しくて
私のクライアントだった方は みなさんの中にも
01:02
who are in the audience were my clients.
何人かいらっしゃいます
01:07
We'd come in with some prototype underneath a black cloth
黒い布でおおった試作品を持ってきて
01:09
and we'd put it on the conference table,
壇上のテーブルに置き
01:13
and we'd pull off the black cloth and everybody would "ooh" and "ah."
黒い布を外すと みんなが "おぉ" "わぁ" と声をあげました
01:15
That was a really good time.
本当にいい時代でした
01:19
And so we'll continue to focus on products, as we always have.
これまでそうしてきたように
私たちは製品に力を入れていきます
01:21
And if you were here last year,
去年ここに参加した方は
01:25
I probably wrestled you to the floor and tried to show you my new EyeModule 2,
私に無理やり新作の Eyemodule 2 を見せられたでしょう
01:29
which was a camera that plugged into the Handspring.
Handspring社のデバイスに接続するカメラでした
01:34
And I took a lot of pictures last year;
去年はたくさん写真を撮りました
01:38
very few people knew what I was up to, but I took a lot of pictures.
あまり気づかれなかったようですが
写真をたくさん撮りました
01:40
This year -- maybe you could show the slides --
今年は -- スライドを出してもらいましょう --
01:43
this year we're carrying this Treo, which we had a lot to do with
今年はこのTreoを持ってきました これには深く関わって
01:48
and helped Handspring design it.
Handspring社のデザインに協力しました
01:51
Also, though we designed it a few years ago --
これは数年前に我々がデザインしたもので
01:53
it's just become ubiquitous in the last year or so --
ここ数年でいたる所に広まった救命具の
01:56
this Heartstream defibrillator which is saving lives.
自動体外式除細動器(AED)です
01:58
Maybe you've seen them in the airports? They seem to be everywhere now.
空港で見た事がありませんか? 今ではどこにでもあります
02:00
Lots of lives are being saved by those.
たくさんの命がこれで救われているのです
02:03
And, we're just about to announce the Zinio Reader product
まもなくZinio Reader という製品を発表しますが
02:05
that I believe will make magazines even more enjoyable to read.
雑誌を読むのがもっと楽しくなるはずです
02:11
So, we really will continue to focus on products.
このように我々は製品に注力し続けるつもりです
02:15
But something's happened in the last 18 years since Richard started TED,
ですが リチャードがTEDをはじめてからの18年間にあることが起きました
02:18
and that's that people like us --
我々のような人間は --
02:22
I know people in other places have caught onto this for a long time,
もちろん他の所ではこういったことに
長く関わっている人々もいますが
02:24
but for us, we've really just started ... we've kind of
私たちにとってはまだ始まったばかりで...
02:27
climbed Maslow's hierarchy a little bit --
マズローの欲求段階を少し上って --
02:33
and so we're now focused more and more on human-centered design,
もっと人間を中心としたデザインに
注目するようになってきたのです
02:36
human-centeredness in an approach to design.
デザインをする上での人間中心主義です
02:40
That really involves designing behaviors and personality into products.
実際に人の行動や個性のデザインを製品に取り入れるのです
02:45
And I think you're starting to see that,
皆さんも もう目にしているはずです
02:50
and it's making our job even more enjoyable.
そして我々の仕事もさらに楽しいものになりました
02:52
Interestingly enough, we used to primarily build 3-D models --
おもしろいことに 我々はいつもまず立体模型や --
02:55
you know, you've seen some today -- and 3-D renderings.
今日もいくつかお見せしましたね -- 3D画像を作っていました
03:01
Then we'd go and we'd show those as communicating our ideas.
我々のアイディアを伝えるのにそれらを見せていたのです
03:05
But firms like ours are having to move to a point where
ですが我々のような会社が次にすべきことは
03:09
we get those objects that we're designing and get them in motion,
デザインした物ができたら動かして
03:12
showing how they'll be used.
使い方を見せるということです
03:16
And so in order to do that we've been forming
そのために我々は
03:18
internal video-production groups
社内に映像制作部門をつくりました
03:22
in order to make these kind of experience prototypes
経験モデルを作って
03:25
that show just what we mean about the man-machine relationship.
人間と機械がどう関わるかを見せるのです
03:28
And it's a much better way to see.
これは分かりやすくてとてもいい方法です
03:32
It's kind of like architects who show people in their houses,
建築家が空っぽの家ではなく
03:34
as opposed to them being empty.
人がいるところを見せるようなものです
03:37
So I thought that I would show you a few videos
ここで皆さんにビデオをいくつかお見せしようと思います
03:39
to show off this new, broader definition
製品やサービス そして環境における
03:43
of design in products and services and environments.
新しく広い意味でのデザインをお見せします
03:50
I have a few of them -- they're no more than a minute
何本かあるのですが -- それぞれ1分弱か
03:54
or a minute-and-a-half apiece --
1分半ぐらいのものですが --
03:57
but I thought you might be interested in seeing some of our
この1年の我々の仕事が どんなふうに動くか
03:59
work over the last year, and how it responds in video.
ビデオで見るのはおもしろいと思いますよ
04:02
So, Prada New York: we were asked by Rem Koolhaas
プラダ ニューヨーク店です レム・コールハースとOMAから
04:07
and OMA to help us conceive the technology
ニューヨークのショップのために
04:10
that's in their retail store in New York.
新しい技術を考案するよう依頼されました
04:14
He wanted a new kind of store -- a new one --
求められたのは新しいタイプの店
ー その新しさとは
04:17
a store that had a cultural role as well as a retail one.
販売店としてだけでなく文化的役割を担うような店です
04:19
And that meant actually designing custom technology
つまり 棚から商品を買って使うだけの店ではなく
04:24
as opposed to just buying things off the shelf and putting them to use.
特別な技術をデザインするということでした
04:28
So, there're lots of things. Everything has RF tags:
たくさんの商品があり 全てにRFタグを付けました
04:33
there's RF tags on the user, on the cards,
お客さんもカードにRFタグがついていて
04:35
there's the staff devices that are all around the store.
店中にスタッフ用の端末があります
04:38
You pick them up, and once you see something that you're interested in,
商品を選んで 気に入ったものが見つかったら
04:41
the staff person can scan them in
スタッフが商品をスキャンし
04:44
and then they can be shown on any screen throughout the store.
店内のどのスクリーンにでも商品を表示できます
04:46
You can look at color, and sizes, and how it appeared on the runway, or whatever.
色やサイズ ファッションショーの様子などを見ることができるのです
04:49
And so then the object -- the merchandise that you're interested in --
そしてこれを -- 気に入った商品を --
04:55
can be scanned. It's taken into the dressing room,
スキャンして 試着室に持って行きます
04:59
and in the dressing room there are scanners
試着室にはスキャナーがあって
05:02
so that we know exactly what clothing you have in the dressing room.
試着室にどの服があるかがわかります
05:04
We can put that up on a touch screen
タッチスクリーンに商品が表示されるので
05:09
and you can play with that, and get more information
気に入った商品を試着しながら
05:12
about the clothing that you're interested in as you're trying it on.
より詳しい情報を見ることができます
05:14
It's been used a lot of places, but I particularly like the use here
液晶ディスプレイはいろいろな所で使いましたが
05:19
of liquid crystal displays in the changing room.
私は特にこの試着室での使い方が気に入っています
05:23
The last time I went to see this store,
前回 私が店を見に行ったときには
05:27
there was a huge buzz about people standing outside and wondering,
試着室の前の人たちが不思議がってざわざわしていました
05:29
"Am I going to actually get to see the people changing clothes here?"
"着替えている人が見えてしまうんじゃないか?"
05:32
But if you push the button, of course, the whole wall goes dark.
もちろん ボタンを押せば壁は暗くなります
05:35
So you can try to get approval, or not, for whatever you're wearing.
似合うかどうか見せてもいいし
見せなくてもいいのです
05:40
And then one of my favorite features of the technology
そして私のお気に入りの機能が
05:48
is the magic mirror, where you put on the clothes.
試着室のマジックミラーです
05:51
There's a big display in the mirror, and you can turn around --
鏡には大きなディスプレイがあって
くるりと回ると
05:53
but there's a three second delay.
映像が3秒遅れで表示されます
05:57
So you can see what you look like from the back or all the way around, as you look.
ですから自分の後ろやあらゆる角度からの姿を
見ることができるのです
05:59
(Applause)
(拍手)
06:03
About a year and a half ago we were asked to design
1年半ほど前 ある博物館のインスタレーションの
06:26
an installation in the museum --
デザインを依頼されました
06:30
this is a new wing of the Science Museum in London,
ロンドンのサイエンス・ミュージアムの新館で
06:32
and it's primarily about digital and biomedical issues.
主にデジタルと生物医学をテーマとしています
06:35
And a group at Itch, which is now part of IDEO,
今はIDEOの一部となっているItchのグループが
06:39
designed this interactive wall that's about four stories tall.
インタラクティブな4階分の高さの壁をデザインしました
見た人はいますか?
06:43
I don't know if anybody's seen this --
インタラクティブな4階分の高さの壁をデザインしました
見た人はいますか?
06:46
it's pretty spectacular in the room.
なかなか壮観です
06:47
Anyway, it's based on the London subway system.
ともかく これはロンドンの地下鉄をベースにしています
06:49
And so you can see that
ごらんの通り
06:51
the goal is to bring some of the feedback
これがやろうとしていることは
06:54
that the people who had gone to the museum were giving,
博物館に来た人からのフィードバックの一部を
06:56
and get it up on the wall so everybody could see. Just for everybody to see.
壁に表示してみんなが見られるようにすることです 
誰でも見られるように
06:59
So you enter your information. Then, like the London tube system,
情報を入力するとロンドンの地下鉄のように
07:02
the little trains go around with what you're thinking about.
小さな電車があなたの思考を乗せて走り回ります
07:06
And then when you get to a station, it's expanded so that you can actually read it.
駅に着くと大きくなって読むことができます
07:11
Then when you exit the IMAX theatre on the fourth floor --
それから4階にあるIMAXシアターを出ると --
07:16
mostly teenagers coming out of there --
出てくるのは多くが10代の子達ですが --
07:20
there's this big open space that has these tables in it
広いオープンスペースにこのようなテーブルがおいてあり
07:22
that have interactive games which are quite fun,
とても面白いインタラクティブゲームができます
07:26
also designed by Durrell [Bishop] and Andrew [Hirniak] of Itch.
これもItchのデュレルとアンドリューのデザインです
07:28
And the topics include things that the museum is about:
この博物館の扱う内容がテーマとなっています
07:30
male fertility, choosing the sex of your baby
男性の生殖能力や子供の生み分け
07:36
or what a driverless car might be like.
自動運転の車とはどんなものだろうかといったことです
07:39
There's lots of room, so people can come up
とても広いので ここへ来れば
07:43
and understand what it is before they get involved.
参加する前にそれが何であるか分かります
07:45
And also, it's not shown in the video, but these are very beautiful.
それにビデオには映っていませんがとても美しいです
07:49
They go to the top of the wall and when they reach all the way to the top,
壁を登って行き一番上まで着くと
07:51
after they've bounced around, they disperse into bits
跳ね返り 細かくなって散らばり
07:55
and go off into the atmosphere.
空中に消えて行くのです
07:58
The next video is not done by us.
次のビデオは我々が撮ったものではありません
08:04
This is CBS Sunday Morning that aired about two weeks ago.
二週間ほど前に放送されたCBS サンデーモーニングの映像です
08:06
Scott Adams ran into us
スコット・アダムスがやってきて
08:10
and asked us if we wouldn't help to design
ディルバートのために最高のオフィスの個室を
08:12
the ultimate cubicle for Dilbert,
デザインして欲しいというのです
08:14
which sounded like a fun thing and so we couldn't pass it up.
面白そうだったのでやらないわけにはいきませんでした
08:16
He's always been interested in technology in the future.
彼は常に未来のテクノロジーに興味を持っています
08:20
(Video: Scott Adams: I realized that at some point I might be
[スコット・アダムス] "私はある意味
08:23
the world's expert on what's wrong with cubicles.
個室の問題点に関する世界的権威かもしれないと思いました
08:25
So we thought, well, wouldn't it be fun to get together
そこで世界で一番かっこいいデザイナー達と一緒に
08:28
with some of the smartest design guys in the world
もっといい個室をつくれるか挑戦したら
08:30
and try to figure out if we could make the cubicle better?
面白いんじゃないかと思ったんです"
08:32
Narrator: Though they work in a wide-open office space
[ナレーター] "彼らはサンフランシスコのオークランドベイブリッジという
08:35
spectacularly set under San Francisco's Oakland Bay Bridge,
素晴らしい場所にある広いオフィスで
08:38
the team built their own little cubicles
チームで小さな個室を作りはじめましたが
08:43
to fully experience the problems.
さまざまな問題を経験することになりました"
08:45
Woman: A one-way mirror. I can look out; you can look at yourself.
[女性] "マジックミラーよ 私からは外が見えるけど外の人には自分の顔が見えるの"
08:48
Narrator: They took pictures.
[ナレーター] "写真を撮ります"
08:51
Woman: You feel so trapped, when someone kind of leans over
[女性] "誰かが寄りかかってくると 身動きが取れないような気がして
08:52
and you're sort of held captive there for a minute.
しばらく捕われたような感じになるでしょ"
08:55
SA: So far it's chaos, but a lot of people are doing stuff, so that's good.
[スコット] "まだまとまりがありませんが たくさんの人が取り組んでいて いい感じです
08:57
We'll see what happens.
どうなるか楽しみですね"
09:01
Narrator: The first group builds a cubicle in which the walls are screens
[ナレーター] "はじめのグループが作った個室は 壁がスクリーンになっていて
09:03
for the computer and for family photos.
コンピューターの画面や家族の写真が映しだされます
09:07
In the second group's scenario, the walls are alive
二番目のグループのシナリオは 壁が生きているというものです
09:10
and actually give Dilbert a group hug.
ディルバートをみんなで抱きしめるのです"
09:14
(Laughter)
(笑い)
09:17
Behind the humor is the idea of making the cubicle more human.)
"このユーモアの背後にあるのは 個室をもっと人間らしくしようというアイディアです"
09:19
David Kelley: So here's the final thing, complete with orange lighting
こちらが最終的なものですが オレンジの光が
09:25
that follows the sun across -- that follows the tracks of the sun -- across the sky.
空を横切る太陽を追って -- 太陽の軌道に沿って -- 動きます
09:28
So you feel that in your cubicle.
個室で太陽を感じることができるのです
09:32
And my favorite feature, which is a flower in a vase
私が気に入っている機能は花瓶の花です
09:36
that wilts when you leave in disappointment,
人がいなくなるとしょんぼりしてしおれてしまいます
09:38
and then when you come back, it comes up to greet you, happy to see you.
戻ってくるとうれしくて起き上がって迎えてくれます
09:41
(SA: The storage is built right into the wall.)
[スコット] "壁に作り付けの収納です"
09:45
DK: You know, it has homey touches like a built-in fish tank in the walls,
壁に作り付けた水槽などは家庭的な感じを与えますよね
09:47
or something to be aggressive with to release tension.
ストレス解消のために攻撃できるものとか
09:52
(SA: Customizable for the boss of your choice.)
[スコット] "ボスの顔は好きなようにカスタマイズできます"
09:56
DK: And of course: a hammock for your afternoon nap
そしてもちろん午後のお昼寝用のハンモックが
09:59
that stretches across your cubicle.
個室に張られています
10:02
(SA: Life would be sweet in a cubicle like this.)
[スコット] "こんな個室だったら人生が幸せになるでしょうね"
10:04
DK: This next project, we were asked to design a pavilion to celebrate
次のプロジェクトではロンドンのミレニアムドームの
10:10
the recycling of the water on the Millennium Dome in London.
水リサイクルの素晴らしさを紹介するパビリオンの
デザインを依頼されました
10:15
The dome has an incredible amount of water that washes off of it,
ドームを洗うのに途方もない量の水を使い
10:19
as well as wastewater.
それだけ排水も出ます
10:22
So this building actually celebrates the water
パビリオンでは水処理を紹介します
10:24
as it comes out of the recycling plant and goes into the reed bed
リサイクルプラントから出た水を人工湿地に送り
10:27
so that it can be filtered for the final time.
最終的な濾過を行います
10:30
The pavilion's design goal was to be kind of quiet and peaceful.
パビリオンのデザインで目指したのは静けさと安らかさでした
10:35
In contrast to if you went inside the dome, where it's
ドームの中では逆に
10:39
kind of wild and crazy and everybody's
興奮して騒いだり
10:42
learning all kinds of things, or fooling around, or whatever they're doing.
あらゆることを学んだり ばか騒ぎをしたりしていますが
10:44
But it was intended to be quite quiet.
パビリオンはとても静かなものにしました
10:47
And then you would wander around and gather information,
歩き回って情報を集めれば
10:50
in a straightforward fashion, about the recycling process
リサイクルのプロセスについて 何が行われているのか
10:54
and what's being done, and how they're going to reuse the water
プラントを通った水がどのように再利用されるのか
10:58
once it comes through the plant.
分かりやすく紹介されています
11:01
And then, if you saw,
そして見てみると
11:12
the panels actually rotate. So you can get the information
パネルが回転しています
11:14
on the front side, but as they rotate, you can see the actual
表では情報を学び パネルが回転すると
11:17
recycling plant behind, with all the machines as they actually process the water.
後ろに本物のリサイクルプラントが見え 機械が実際に水を処理しています
11:20
You can see: there's the plant.
見てください プラントです
11:30
These are all very low-budget videos, like quick prototypes.
これらのビデオはとても低予算の簡単な試作品です
11:41
And we're announcing a new product here tonight,
そこで今夜は新製品を発表します
11:45
which is the first time this has ever been shown in public.
公の場では初公開となります
11:47
It's called Spyfish, and it's a company called H2Eye,
これはspyfishといって 
ロンドンのナイジェル・ジャガーが設立した
11:50
started by Nigel Jagger in London.
H2Eyeという会社の製品です
11:55
And it's a company that's trying to bring the experience -- many people have boats,
この会社は経験をもたらそうとしています
多くの人がボートを持っていて
11:58
or enjoy being on boats, but a very small percentage of people
ボート遊びをしたりしますが ごく一部の人だけが
12:04
actually have the capability or the interest in going under the water
実際に水中に行くことができたり
水中に関心をもったり
12:09
and actually seeing what's there,
何があるのか見たりして
12:14
and enjoying what scuba divers do.
スキューバダイビングの楽しみを知っています
12:16
This product, it has two cameras.
この製品には2つのカメラがついています
12:18
You throw it over the side of your boat
ボートの横から投げ入れると
12:20
and you basically scuba dive without getting wet.
濡れずに簡単なスキューバダイビングができるのです
12:23
For us -- there's the object -- for us, it was two projects. One, to design the interface
我々には -- これが製品ですが --
2つのプロジェクトがありました
12:30
so that the interface doesn't get in your way.
1つは邪魔にならないインターフェースのデザインです
12:36
You could have that kind of immersive experience of being underwater --
水中の体験に
-- 自分が水の中にいるかのような感覚に --
12:38
of feeling like you're underwater -- seeing what's going on.
夢中になって見られるようにしました
12:41
And the other one was to design the object
もう1つは製品のデザインです
12:44
and make sure that it was a consumer product and not a research tool.
大事なのはこれは消費者向けの製品で
調査機器ではないということです
12:46
And so we spent a lot of time -- this has been going on for about
我々はこのプロジェクトに長い時間をかけ --
12:51
seven or eight years, this project --
7-8年くらいかかりましたが --
12:53
and [we're] just ready to start building them.
やっと製作を開始したところです
12:55
(Narrator: The Spyfish is a revolutionary subaquatic video camera.
[ナレーター] "spyfishは画期的な潜水ビデオカメラです
13:01
It can dive to 500 feet, to where sunlight does not penetrate,
太陽光の届かない500フィートまで潜ることができ
13:05
and is equipped with powerful lights.
強力なライトを搭載しています
13:08
It becomes your eyes and ears as you venture into the deep.
あなたの眼や耳となって深海を冒険します
13:11
The battery-powered Spyfish sends the live video-feed through a slender cable.)
spyfishはバッテリー式で 細いケーブルからライブビデオを送信します"
13:16
DK: This slender cable was a huge technological advancement
この細いケーブルは大変な技術の進歩です
13:20
and it allowed the whole thing to be the size that it is.
おかげでサイズがこれくらいですみました
13:23
(Narrator: And this central box connects the whole system together.
[ナレーター] "この中央のボックスが全システムを統合しています
13:25
Maneuvering the Spyfish is simple with the wireless remote control.
spyfishはワイヤレスリモコンで簡単に操縦できます
13:28
You watch the video with superimposed graphics
ビデオに表示したシンボルが
13:32
that indicate your depth and compass heading.
深度や進行方向を示します
13:34
The fluid graphics and ambient sounds combine
水中の映像と周囲の音があいまって
13:38
to help you completely lose yourself underwater.)
まるで水中にいるかのような感覚を与えてくれます"
13:40
(Applause)
(拍手)
14:04
DK: And the last thing I'll talk about is ApproTEC,
最後にお話しするのはApproTECという
14:10
which is a project that I'm very excited about.
とてもわくわくするプロジェクトです
14:13
ApproTEC is a company started by Dr. Martin Fisher,
ApproTECは私の親友であるマーティン・フィッシャー博士の設立した会社です
14:16
who's a good friend of mine. He's a Ph.D. from Stanford.
彼はスタンフォードで博士号を取り
14:19
He found himself in Kenya on a Fulbright
フルブライトの奨学金を得てケニヤで起業しました
14:22
and he had a very interesting insight, which is that
彼のとても興味深い洞察はこうでした
14:25
he said, "There must be entrepreneurs in Kenya;
"ケニヤには起業家が必要だ
14:27
there must be entrepreneurs everywhere."
あらゆるところに起業家がいなくてはならない”
14:31
And he noticed that for weddings and funerals there
そして彼は ケニヤ人たちが結婚式と葬式の際に
14:33
they could find enough money to put something together.
何かを始めるだけのお金を集められることを知りました
14:36
So he decided to start manufacturing products in Kenya
そこで彼はケニヤでケニヤ人による製造業を始めることにしたのです
14:39
with Kenyan manufacturers -- designed by people like us, but taken there.
デザインは我々のような人間がしますが 製造は現地でします
14:43
And to this date -- he's been gone for only a few years --
そして今日までに
-- 彼がケニヤに行ってまだほんの数年なのですが --
14:48
he's started 19,000 companies.
彼は19,000の企業を設立しました
14:51
He's made 30,000 new jobs.
そして30,000の新しい雇用を生みました
14:55
And just the sales of the products -- this is a non-profit --
そして製品の売り上げだけで
-- これは非営利の活動なのですが --
14:58
the sales of these products is now .6% of the GDP of Kenya.
これらの製品の売り上げは
現在ケニヤのGDPの0.6%を占めています
15:03
This is one guy doing this. This is a pretty spectacular thing.
これは一人の男がしたことなのです 
本当に驚くべきことです
15:09
So we're in the process of helping them design
現在我々は 深い井戸用の
15:12
deep-well, low-cost manual pumps
安価な手動ポンプのデザインを手伝っていますが
15:15
in order for these people who have a quarter acre of land
人々が持っている¼エーカーの土地で
15:18
to be able to grow crops in the off-season.
オフシーズンでも作物を育てられるようになります
15:22
What they do now is: they can grow crops in the rainy season
現在は雨期には作物を育てられますが
15:24
but they can't grow them in the off-season.
オフシーズンには育てることができません
15:26
And so by doing that, the woman that you saw in the first thing --
これができるようになると
最初にお見せした女性
15:29
she's a school teacher -- always wanted to send her kids to college
彼女は学校の先生で
子供たちを大学に行かせたいといつも思っているのですが
15:33
and she's going to be able to do it because of these things.
このプロジェクトによってそれが可能になるのです
15:37
So with seed-squeezers, and pumps, and hay-balers and
我々は種搾り機・ポンプ・干し草圧縮機といった
15:39
very straightforward things that we're designing --
簡単な物をデザインしていて
15:42
my students are doing this as class projects
私の生徒達がクラスのプロジェクトとしてこれを行っていて
15:45
and IDEO has donated their time to do this kind of work --
IDEOはこのような仕事に時間を捧げてきましたが
15:47
it's really amazing to see his success, Martin's.
マーティンの成功は本当に驚くべきものです
15:50
We also were thinking about the experience of Richard,
リチャードの成してきたことについても忘れてはいません
15:54
and so --
そして(笑い)
15:59
(Laughter)
そして(笑い)
16:00
-- we designed this hat, because I knew I'd be the last one in the day
今日は私が最後だと分かっていたので
この帽子をデザインしました
16:01
and I needed to deal with him. So I just have one more thing to say.
リチャードについても話さなければなりません 
一言だけ言わせてください
16:06
(Laughter)
(笑い)
16:10
Can you read it?
読めますか? 
(リラックスして リチャード 終わったよ)
16:13
(Laughter)
(笑い)
16:15
Well, it's always kind of funny when he comes up and hovers.
いつも 彼が出てきてうろうろすると なんだか可笑しくなります
16:16
You know, you don't want to be rude to him and you don't want to feel guilty,
彼に失礼な態度を取って罪悪感を感じたくはないでしょう
16:19
and so I thought this would do it, where I just sit here.
これなら座っているだけだからいいと思ったんです
16:23
(Laughter)
(笑い)
16:26
(Applause)
(拍手)
16:27
So we saw a lot of interesting things being designed today in this session,
今回のセッションで それぞれの発表者から
16:35
and from all the different presenters.
たくさんの面白い物がデザインされているのを見てきました
16:39
And in my own practice, from product to ApproTEC,
私自身の活動では 製品からApproTECまで
16:42
it's really exciting that we're taking a more human-centered approach to design,
デザインにおいて より人間を中心としたアプローチをとって
16:46
that we're including behaviors and personalities in the things we do,
行動や個性を取り入れるのは とてもわくわくすることです
16:51
and I think this is great.
とても素晴らしいことです
16:54
Designers are more trusted and more integrated
デザイナーはより信頼され
16:56
into the business strategy of companies,
企業のビジネス戦略に参画するようになりました
16:58
and I have to say, for one, I feel very lucky at the progress that design
私もその一人として TEDが始まって以来 デザインがこのように進歩をとげてきたことを
17:00
has made since the first TED. Thanks a lot.
とても幸運に思っています ありがとうございました
17:06
Translator:Hiroko Kumagai
Reviewer:Natsuhiko Mizutani

sponsored links

David Kelley - Designer, educator
David Kelley’s company IDEO helped create many icons of the digital generation -- but what matters even more to him is unlocking the creative potential of people and organizations to innovate routinely.

Why you should listen

As founder of legendary design firm IDEO, David Kelley built the company that created many icons of the digital generation -- the first mouse, the first Treo, the thumbs up/thumbs down button on your Tivo's remote control, to name a few. But what matters even more to him is unlocking the creative potential of people and organizations so they can innovate routinely.

David Kelley's most enduring contributions to the field of design are a methodology and culture of innovation. More recently, he led the creation of the groundbreaking d.school at Stanford, the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design, where students from the business, engineering, medicine, law, and other diverse disciplines develop the capacity to solve complex problems collaboratively and creatively.

Kelley was working (unhappily) as an electrical engineer when he heard about Stanford's cross-disciplinary Joint Program in Design, which merged engineering and art. What he learned there -- a human-centered, team-based approach to tackling sticky problems through design -- propelled his professional life as a "design thinker."

In 1978, he co-founded the design firm that ultimately became IDEO, now emulated worldwide for its innovative, user-centered approach to design. IDEO works with a range of clients -- from food and beverage conglomerates to high tech startups, hospitals to universities, and today even governments -- conceiving breakthrough innovations ranging from a life-saving portable defibrillator to a new kind of residence for wounded warriors, and helping organizations build their own innovation culture.

Today, David serves as chair of IDEO and is the Donald W. Whittier Professor at Stanford, where he has taught for more than 25 years. Preparing the design thinkers of tomorrow earned David the Sir Misha Black Medal for his “distinguished contribution to design education.” He has also won the Edison Achievement Award for Innovation, as well as the Chrysler Design Award and National Design Award in Product Design from the Smithsonian’s Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum, and he is a member of the National Academy of Engineers.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.