09:06
TED2011

Kate Hartman: The art of wearable communication

ケイト・ハートマン 「身に着けられる情報伝達の芸術」

Filmed:

芸術家ケイト・ハートマンは装着型電子工学を使って人間同士での情報伝達の方法、そして人間と世界との情報伝達の方法を探究しています。気まぐれで示唆に富む話の中で、ハートマンは「自分と話す帽子」「エアーハート」「氷河抱擁スーツ」など予測不可能な器具を紹介します。

- Artist and technologist
Kate Hartman creates devices and interfaces for humans, houseplants, and glaciers. Her work playfully questions the ways in which we relate and communicate. Full bio

My name is Kate Hartman.
私の名前はケイト・ハートマン
00:15
And I like to make devices
人と触れあったり
00:22
that play with the ways
意思疎通をして楽しめる
00:24
that we relate and communicate.
器具を作るのが趣味です
00:26
So I'm specifically interested in how we, as humans,
特に人としての対人コミュニケーションや
00:28
relate to ourselves, each other
世界との関わり方について
00:31
and the world around us.
関心を寄せています
00:33
(Laughter)
(笑)
00:43
So just to give you a bit of context,
少し私の経歴を紹介します
00:47
as June said, I'm an artist, a technologist and an educator.
私は芸術家・技術者・教育者を兼ねています
00:49
I teach courses in physical computing
物理的コンピューティングと
00:52
and wearable electronics.
装着型電子工学を教えていて
00:54
And much of what I do is either wearable
主に装着できるものや
00:56
or somehow related to the human form.
人体に関わるものを扱っています
00:58
And so anytime I talk about what I do,
私の仕事を紹介する時は
01:01
I like to just quickly address
常に人体の重要性を
01:03
the reason why bodies matter.
手短に説明するよう心がけています
01:05
And it's pretty simple.
答えはとても簡単です
01:07
Everybody's got one -- all of you.
誰もが備えているからです
01:10
I can guarantee, everyone in this room,
お洒落な椅子に座っている方も
01:12
all of you over there, the people in the cushy seats,
最上段でPCを使っている方も
01:14
the people up top with the laptops --
この部屋の皆さんは疑いなく
01:16
we all have bodies.
身体を持っています
01:18
Don't be ashamed.
恥じないで下さい
01:20
It's something that we have in common
身体は万人に共通してあるもので
01:22
and they act as our primary interfaces for the world.
世界のインターフェースの役割をします
01:24
And so when working as an interaction designer,
コミュニケーション・デザイナーあるいは
01:27
or as an artist who deals with participation --
参画を扱う芸術家として
01:30
creating things that live on, in or around the human form --
人体と共生する物を作る仕事は
01:32
it's really a powerful space to work within.
非常にやりがいがあります
01:36
So within my own work,
私の作品には
01:39
I use a broad range of materials and tools.
様々な素材や道具を使います 例えば
01:41
So I communicate through everything from radio transceivers
情報伝達のためにラジオ受信機・じょうご
01:44
to funnels and plastic tubing.
・チューブ等を使います
01:47
And to tell you a bit about the things that I make,
私の作品を紹介をするなら
01:49
the easiest place to start the story
まずは
01:51
is with a hat.
帽子の話がいいでしょう
01:53
And so it all started several years ago,
全ての始まりは数年前
01:56
late one night when I was sitting on the subway, riding home,
夜遅くに帰宅途中の地下鉄で
01:58
and I was thinking.
考え事をしていた時でした
02:01
And I tend to be a person who thinks too much and talks too little.
私には考えすぎて言葉が出なくなる癖があります
02:03
And so I was thinking about how it might be great
当時もある事を考えていました
02:06
if I could just take all these noises --
もし 頭の中の考え事という
02:08
like all these sounds of my thoughts in my head --
雑音を物理的に取り出し
02:10
if I could just physically extricate them
それらを他人と
02:12
and pull them out in such a form
共有できる形にできれば
02:14
that I could share them with somebody else.
どんなに素晴らしいかと考えていました
02:16
And so I went home, and I made a prototype of this hat.
帰宅後 この帽子の試作品を作りました
02:19
And I called it the Muttering Hat,
名前は「ボソボソ帽子」です
02:22
because it emitted these muttering noises
理由はこの帽子があなたを縛るような
02:24
that were kind of tethered to you,
ボソボソ音を出すからですが
02:27
but you could detach them
これらの雑音を取り出して
02:29
and share them with somebody else.
他人と共有できるのです
02:31
(Laughter)
(笑)
02:35
So I make other hats as well.
他の帽子もあります
02:40
This one is called the Talk to Yourself Hat.
これは「自分と話す帽子」です
02:42
(Laughter)
(笑)
02:44
It's fairly self-explanatory.
説明は要りませんね
02:46
It physically carves out conversation space for one.
物理的な会話スペースを作ってくれます
02:48
And when you speak out loud,
大声で話せば
02:52
the sound of your voice is actually channeled back into your own ears.
その声が実際にあなたの耳に帰ってきます
02:54
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:00
And so when I make these things,
こういった物を作ると
03:02
it's really not so much about the object itself,
物体自体ではなく それを取り囲む
03:04
but rather the negative space around the object.
負のスペースが問題だと分かります
03:07
So what happens when a person puts this thing on?
これを人間に装着すると何が起こるのか
03:10
What kind of an experience do they have?
どんな体験をするのか
03:13
And how are they transformed by wearing it?
そして どのような影響を与えるのか
03:15
So many of these devices
こういった器具の多くは
03:21
really kind of focus on the ways in which we relate to ourselves.
自分自身と上手く関われるように作られました
03:23
So this particular device is called the Gut Listener.
この特別な器具は「内臓聴診器」です
03:26
And it is a tool
これを使えば
03:29
that actually enables one
内臓の音を
03:31
to listen to their own innards.
自分自身で聴き取れます
03:33
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:36
And so some of these things
いくつかの器具は意思表現や情報伝達に
03:43
are actually more geared toward expression and communication.
大きな重点を置いています
03:46
And so the Inflatable Heart
「エアーハート」は
03:48
is an external organ
身につけることで
03:50
that can be used by the wearer to express themselves.
自己表現ができる外部臓器です
03:52
So they can actually inflate it and deflate it
感情次第でエアーハートを膨らませたり
03:55
according to their emotions.
萎ませたりできます
03:58
So they can express everything from admiration and lust
つまり 感嘆・渇望から心配・懸念までの
04:00
to anxiety and angst.
全ての感情を表現できます
04:03
(Laughter)
(笑)
04:06
And some of these are actually meant
幾つかの器具は経験を
04:08
to mediate experiences.
仲介するために作られました
04:10
So the Discommunicator is a tool for arguments.
「相互不達装置」は口論用です
04:12
(Laughter)
(笑)
04:15
And so actually it allows for an intense emotional exchange,
実際に激しい感情の交換を可能にしますが
04:17
but is serves to absorb
飛び交う言葉の攻撃性を
04:20
the specificity of the words that are delivered.
和らげる役割を果たしています
04:22
(Laughter)
(笑)
04:25
And in the end,
最後に これらの幾つかは
04:31
some of these things just act as invitations.
誘因の役割をします
04:33
So the Ear Bender literally puts something out there
「耳傾け器」には突出物が付いていて
04:35
so someone can grab your ear
人が耳を掴んで言いたい事を
04:38
and say what they have to say.
言えるようになっています
04:40
So even though I'm really interested in the relationship
私は対人関係に興味を
04:42
between people,
もっていますが
04:44
I also consider the ways
人々と周辺環境との関わりにも
04:46
in which we relate to the world around us.
興味があります
04:48
And so when I was first living in New York City a few years back,
数年前に初めてNYに住んでいた頃
04:50
I was thinking a lot about
ある事をしばしば考えていました
04:53
the familiar architectural forms that surrounded me
馴染みの深い建築様式と
04:55
and how I would like to better relate to them.
それとのより良い関わり方についてです
04:57
And I thought, "Well, hey!
考えました「よし
05:00
Maybe if I want to better relate to walls,
壁と仲良くなりたいなら
05:02
maybe I need to be more wall-like myself."
私自身が壁みたいにならなきゃ」
05:04
So I made a wearable wall
そこで私はリュックのように
05:06
that I could wear as a backpack.
背負える壁を作りました
05:08
And so I would put it on
これを背負えば なんとなく
05:10
and sort of physically transform myself
物理的な変化が起こって
05:12
so that I could either contribute to or critique
自分を取り巻いていた空間を
05:14
the spaces that surrounded me.
賞賛あるいは批判できるんです
05:16
(Laughter)
(笑)
05:18
And so jumping off of that,
これがきっかけで人工的な環境を超えた
05:20
thinking beyond the built environment into the natural world,
自然界的な発想が生まれました
05:23
I have this ongoing project called Botanicalls --
「植物電話プロジェクト」が現在進行中です
05:26
which actually enables houseplants
これは室内用鉢植え植物から
05:29
to tap into human communication protocols.
人間への情報伝達を図る物です
05:31
So when a plant is thirsty,
植物が水を求めれば
05:33
it can actually make a phone call
電話をかけるか または
05:35
or post a message to a service like Twitter.
Twitterなどでメッセージを投稿します
05:37
And so this really shifts the human/plant dynamic,
これによって人間・植物間の力関係が変わります
05:40
because a single house plant
なぜなら一鉢の植物が実際
05:44
can actually express its needs
自己の要求を同時に
05:47
to thousands of people at the same time.
何千もの人々に伝えられるからです
05:49
And so kind of thinking about scale,
規模について考えるなら
05:52
my most recent obsession
私は最近氷河に
05:54
is actually with glaciers -- of course.
夢中になっています 素敵ですよね
05:56
And so glaciers are these magnificent beings,
氷河は壮大な存在です
06:00
and there's lots of reasons to be obsessed with them,
心を奪われる理由は多くありますが
06:03
but what I'm particularly interested in
特に興味があるのは
06:06
is in human-glacier relations.
人間と氷河の関係です
06:08
(Laughter)
(笑)
06:10
Because there seems to be an issue.
問題があるようだからです
06:12
The glaciers are actually leaving us.
実際に人間を離れつつあります
06:14
They're both shrinking and retreating --
氷河は沈んで融解されていき
06:16
and some of them have disappeared altogether.
一部はすっかり消えています
06:18
And so I actually live in Canada now,
実は今 カナダに住んでいて
06:20
so I've been visiting one of my local glaciers.
地元の氷河に通っています
06:23
And this one's particularly interesting,
この氷河は特に面白いです
06:25
because, of all the glaciers in North America,
というのも北米の氷河の中で
06:27
it receives the highest volume of human traffic in a year.
1年間に人々が最も訪れる所だからです
06:29
They actually have these buses that drive up and over the lateral moraine
実際に側堆石の向こうまで行くバスがあり
06:32
and drop people off on the surface of the glacier.
氷河の表面上に客を降ろしてくれます
06:35
And this has really gotten me thinking
私は氷河との最初の出会いを
06:38
about this experience of the initial encounter.
考えざるを得ませんでした
06:40
When I meet a glacier for the very first time,
初めて氷河を訪れた時
06:42
what do I do?
私は何をすればいいのか?
06:46
There's no kind of social protocol for this.
人間・氷河間の社会的慣習は何もありません
06:48
I really just don't even know
どうやって挨拶をしていいかも
06:52
how to say hello.
わかりませんでした
06:54
Do I carve a message in the snow?
雪にメッセージを彫ればいいのか?
06:56
Or perhaps I can assemble one
もしくは砕いた氷を並べて
06:59
out of dot and dash ice cubes --
モールス信号を
07:01
ice cube Morse code.
作るべきなのか?
07:03
Or perhaps I need to make myself a speaking tool,
あるいは氷面につけると
07:05
like an icy megaphone
自分の声を増幅できる
07:07
that I can use to amplify my voice
氷のメガホンのような
07:09
when I direct it at the ice.
器具を作る必要があるのか?
07:11
But really the most satisfying experience I've had
しかし最も快適だったのは
07:13
is the act of listening,
どんな関係を築くにも必要な
07:15
which is what we need in any good relationship.
聴く行為をした時でした
07:17
And I was really struck by how much it affected me.
聴く行為の凄さに感動したものです
07:19
This very basic shift in my physical orientation
自分の姿勢の根本的な変化によって
07:22
helped me shift my perspective
氷河に対する私の視点も
07:25
in relation to the glacier.
変えることができました
07:27
And so since we use devices
最近では世界との接し方を
07:29
to figure out how to relate to the world these days,
見つけるために私たちは器具を使っているので
07:31
I actually made a device called the Glacier Embracing Suit.
実際に「氷河抱擁スーツ」を作りました
07:35
(Laughter)
(笑)
07:38
And so this is constructed out of a heat reflected material
これは熱反射素材で作られていて
07:40
that serves to mediate the difference in temperature
人体と氷河との間の温度差を
07:43
between the human body and the glacial ice.
媒介する働きがあります
07:45
And once again, it's this invitation
繰り返しますが これは誘因であり
07:48
that asks people to lay down on the glacier
人々に氷河に横たわって
07:51
and give it a hug.
ハグをして欲しいと頼んでいます
07:55
So, yea, this is actually just the beginning.
これは単なるきっかけですが
07:58
These are initial musings for this project.
プロジェクト本来の目的なのです
08:00
And just as with the wall, how I wanted to be more wall-like,
壁を使って壁のようになりたかったように
08:02
with this project, I'd actually like to take more a of glacial pace.
このプロジェクトは氷河のようにゆっくりと進めたいです
08:05
And so my intent
私の思惑では
08:09
is to actually just take the next 10 years
この先10年を共同プロジェクトに使って
08:11
and go on a series of collaborative projects
芸術家・技術者・科学者など異なる分野の方たちと
08:15
where I work with people from different disciplines --
一緒にプロジェクトを進め
08:19
artists, technologists, scientists --
人間と氷河との関係を
08:21
to kind of work on this project
改善するための策を
08:23
of how we can improve human-glacier relations.
共に探っていくつもりです 最後に
08:25
So beyond that, in closing,
プロジェクトの紹介より重要なことを言います
08:29
I'd just like to say that we're in this era
私たちは情報伝達と器具まん延の時代にいて
08:32
of communications and device proliferation,
それは本当に強大で魅力や刺激もあります
08:35
and it's really tremendous and exciting and sexy,
しかし本当に重要なのは 私たちが使う器具や
08:38
but I think what's really important
世界との関わり方に対して
08:41
is thinking about how we can simultaneously
どうやったら感嘆と
08:43
maintain a sense of wonder and a sense of criticality
批評の念を同時に兼ね備えられるかを
08:45
about the tools that we use and the ways in which we relate to the world.
考えることだと私は思います
08:48
Thanks.
ありがとうございました
08:51
(Applause)
(拍手)
08:53
Translated by Naoki Funahashi
Reviewed by Takahiro Shimpo

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About the Speaker:

Kate Hartman - Artist and technologist
Kate Hartman creates devices and interfaces for humans, houseplants, and glaciers. Her work playfully questions the ways in which we relate and communicate.

Why you should listen
Kate Hartman, Professor of Wearable and Mobile Technology at the Ontario College of Art and Design, uses simple, open-source technology to build objects and do-it-yourself kits, such as her Inflatable Heart or Glacier Embracing Suit -- that allow for new modes of expression and communication.

She is the co-creator of Botanicalls, a system for letting plants tweet and call their owners when they need watering, or more sunlight. Aways mixing the whimsical with the thought provoking, Hartman and her work raise key questions about how we communicate with our environment, and with ourselves.
More profile about the speaker
Kate Hartman | Speaker | TED.com