18:52
TEDxUIUC

Christoph Adami: Finding life we can't imagine

クリストフ・アダミ: 私たちの想像を超える生命の探求

Filmed:

地球外生命体が、私たちの知識をはるかに超えたものだとしたら、どうやって探せばいいでしょうか?TEDxUIUCでクリストフ・アダミが解説するのは、人工生命、つまり自己複製するコンピュータプログラムに関する研究を応用して、生命の徴候である「バイオマーカー」を見つける方法です。そしてバイオマーカーは、生命に対する私たちの先入観を超えたものなのです。

- Artificial life researcher
Christoph Adami works on the nature of life and evolution, trying to define life in a way that is as free as possible from our preconceptions. Full bio

私の経歴は一風変わったものです
00:15
So I have a strange career.
例えば私の同僚も 私のところへやって来て
00:17
I know it because people come up to me, like colleagues,
「君の経歴は変わっているね」と
00:20
and say, "Chris, you have a strange career."
言ってくるくらいですから
00:22
(Laughter)
それに 私には彼らの言いたいことが分かります
00:24
And I can see their point,
というのも 私は
00:26
because I started my career
理論核物理学者として
キャリアを始めたからです
00:28
as a theoretical nuclear physicist.
私が考えていたのはクォークやグルーオン
00:30
And I was thinking about quarks and gluons
重イオン衝突についてでした
00:32
and heavy ion collisions,
まだ私がほんの14歳の頃のことです
00:34
and I was only 14 years old.
というのは冗談ですがね
00:36
No, no, I wasn't 14 years old.
しかしその後
00:40
But after that,
計算論的神経科学部の中に
00:42
I actually had my own lab
自分の研究室を持ったのです
00:44
in the computational neuroscience department,
ただし神経科学については
何もしていませんでした
00:46
and I wasn't doing any neuroscience.
そしてその後は進化遺伝学と
00:48
Later, I would work on evolutionary genetics,
システムズバイオロジーを研究していました
00:51
and I would work on systems biology.
ただ今日皆さんには
別の話をします
00:53
But I'm going to tell you about something else today.
皆さんにお話しするのは
00:56
I'm going to tell you
生命について私が学んだことです
00:58
about how I learned something about life.
私は実はロケット科学者でした
01:00
And I was actually a rocket scientist.
厳密にはロケット科学者ではありませんでしたが
01:04
I wasn't really a rocket scientist,
私が働いていたのは
01:06
but I was working
温暖なカリフォルニアにある
01:08
at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory
ジェット推進研究所で
01:10
in sunny California where it's warm;
今住んでいる
01:13
whereas now I'm in the mid-West,
寒い中西部とは大違いですが
01:15
and it's cold.
とても刺激的な経験でした
01:17
But it was an exciting experience.
ある日 NASAの部長が
01:20
One day a NASA manager comes into my office,
私のオフィスにやって来て
腰を下ろしてこう言ったのです
01:23
sits down and says,
「地球外生命体を探し出す方法を
01:26
"Can you please tell us,
教えてくれないか?」と
01:28
how do we look for life outside Earth?"
私は大変驚きました
01:30
And that came as a surprise to me,
なぜなら私の仕事は
01:32
because I was actually hired
量子計算の研究でしたから
01:34
to work on quantum computation.
でも いい答えを思いつきました
01:36
Yet, I had a very good answer.
「見当もつきません」と
01:38
I said, "I have no idea."
彼は こう言いました
「バイオシグネチャーだよ
01:41
And he told me, "Biosignatures,
バイオシグネチャーを探すんだ」
01:44
we need to look for a biosignature."
「それは一体何ですか?」と私が聞くと
01:46
And I said, "What is that?"
彼はこう言いました
01:48
And he said, "It's any measurable phenomenon
「生命の存在を示す
01:50
that allows us to indicate
測定可能な現象のことだよ」
01:52
the presence of life."
「本当ですか?
01:54
And I said, "Really?
だって それって簡単なことでしょう?
01:56
Because isn't that easy?
私たちの周りには生命がありますよね
01:58
I mean, we have life.
生命の定義を当てはめては?
02:00
Can't you apply a definition,
最高裁の決定みたいに
絶対的な定義を」
02:02
like for example, a Supreme Court-like definition of life?"
そして少し考えてから
言い直しました
02:06
And then I thought about it a little bit, and I said,
「いや 簡単じゃないかもしれませんね
02:08
"Well, is it really that easy?
だって 例えばこんなものを見て
02:10
Because, yes, if you see something like this,
『よし 間違いない これを生命と呼ぼう』
02:13
then all right, fine, I'm going to call it life --
そう言ったとしても
02:15
no doubt about it.
こんなのもいますよ」
02:17
But here's something."
「わかってるさ それも生命だ」と
彼は言いました
02:19
And he goes, "Right, that's life too. I know that."
もし皆さんの中で
02:22
Except, if you think life is also defined
生命とはいつか死ぬものである
と捉える人がいるなら
02:24
by things that die,
こいつには当てはまりません
02:26
you're not in luck with this thing,
本当に奇妙な生物だからです
02:28
because that's actually a very strange organism.
この生物は 成長して成熟段階に入り
02:30
It grows up into the adult stage like that
ベンジャミン・バトンのように
若返りの段階を経て
02:32
and then goes through a Benjamin Button phase,
最後はまた小さな胚のようになるまで
02:35
and actually goes backwards and backwards
どんどん若返ります
02:37
until it's like a little embryo again,
まるでヨーヨーが伸び縮みするように
成長と若返りを繰り返し
02:39
and then actually grows back up, and back down and back up -- sort of yo-yo --
決して死ぬことがありません
02:42
and it never dies.
だから これは生命ですが
02:44
So it's actually life,
私たちが考えるような
02:46
but it's actually not
生命体とは異なりますよね
02:48
as we thought life would be.
それからこんな物もあります
02:51
And then you see something like that.
部長は「これはどんな生物だ?」と
驚いていました
02:53
And he was like, "My God, what kind of a life form is that?"
分かる人はいますか?
02:55
Anyone know?
実はこれは生物ではなく結晶です
02:57
It's actually not life, it's a crystal.
また さらに小さなものを
03:00
So once you start looking and looking
よくよく観察した結果
03:02
at smaller and smaller things --
この発見者は
03:04
so this particular person
一本の論文を書き上げ
「これはバクテリアだ」と言いました
03:06
wrote a whole article and said, "Hey, these are bacteria."
ただし もう少し詳細に検討すれば
03:09
Except, if you look a little bit closer,
バクテリアにしては
小さすぎることが分かります
03:11
you see, in fact, that this thing is way too small to be anything like that.
彼は生き物だと確信していましたが
03:14
So he was convinced,
納得しない人がほとんどでした
03:16
but, in fact, most people aren't.
その後 ご存知の通り
03:18
And then, of course,
NASAでも大きな発表があって
03:20
NASA also had a big announcement,
クリントン大統領が
03:22
and President Clinton gave a press conference,
火星隕石に生命が存在したという
03:24
about this amazing discovery
素晴らしい発見について
記者会見を開きました
03:26
of life in a Martian meteorite.
しかし 近頃はこれについて
異議が唱えられています
03:29
Except that nowadays, it's heavily disputed.
これらの写真からお気付きでしょうが
03:33
If you take the lesson of all these pictures,
生命体であるかどうか区別するのは
簡単ではないのです
03:36
then you realize, well actually maybe it's not that easy.
私に必要なのは
03:38
Maybe I do need
そんな区別をするための
03:40
a definition of life
生命の定義です
03:42
in order to make that kind of distinction.
では生命の定義は可能でしょうか?
03:44
So can life be defined?
どう取り掛かればいいのでしょうか?
03:46
Well how would you go about it?
それはもちろん
03:48
Well of course,
分厚いブリタニカ百科辞典の
Lのページを開けば…
03:50
you'd go to Encyclopedia Britannica and open at L.
いえ そうではないですよね
じゃあグーグルで調べてみましょうか
03:52
No, of course you don't do that; you put it somewhere in Google.
そうしたらきっと何かしらの
答えが見つかるでしょう
03:55
And then you might get something.
しかし そこで得られるような
03:58
And what you might get --
おなじみの事しか書いていないものは
04:00
and anything that actually refers to things that we are used to,
役に立ちません
04:02
you throw away.
そこで このようなものを思いつくかもしれません
04:04
And then you might come up with something like this.
何か複雑で
04:06
And it says something complicated
たくさんの概念が書かれています
04:08
with lots and lots of concepts.
いったい誰がこんな
04:10
Who on Earth would write something
複雑で難解で意味のないものを
04:12
as convoluted and complex
書いたのでしょうか?
04:14
and inane?
あぁでも これは実は
本当に重要な概念を集めたものなのです
04:17
Oh, it's actually a really, really, important set of concepts.
重要な単語をいくつか
抜き出して
04:21
So I'm highlighting just a few words
説明しましょう
04:24
and saying definitions like that
この定義は
04:26
rely on things that are not based
アミノ酸とか 木の葉といった
04:28
on amino acids or leaves
耳慣れたものではなく
04:31
or anything that we are used to,
プロセスに基づく定義なのです
04:33
but in fact on processes only.
ここでもう一度先ほどの文章に戻ってみると
04:35
And if you take a look at that,
実はこれは
人工生命に関する私の著書の一節なのです
04:37
this was actually in a book that I wrote that deals with artificial life.
そもそもNASAの部長が
04:40
And that explains why
私のオフィスにやってきたのはこのためでした
04:42
that NASA manager was actually in my office to begin with.
というのも こういった概念に基づいて
04:45
Because the idea was that, with concepts like that,
生命体を作り出せるかもしれないと
04:48
maybe we can actually manufacture
部長は考えたからです
04:50
a form of life.
というわけで もし皆さんが
04:52
And so if you go and ask yourself,
「一体 人工生命って何だ?」と
お思いなら
04:55
"What on Earth is artificial life?",
その研究の生い立ちを
04:57
let me give you a whirlwind tour
駆け足で説明しましょう
04:59
of how all this stuff came about.
事の始まりは 1990年
05:01
And it started out quite a while ago
初めてコンピュータウィルスが
05:04
when someone wrote
作られたときまで遡ります
05:06
one of the first successful computer viruses.
当時を知らない若い方々には
05:08
And for those of you who aren't old enough,
このウィルスがどう感染したか
想像もつかないでしょう
05:11
you have no idea how this infection was working --
感染経路はフロッピーディスクでした
05:14
namely, through these floppy disks.
コンピュータウィルス感染に関して
興味深いのは
05:16
But the interesting thing about these computer virus infections
次のような点です
05:19
was that, if you look at the rate
感染の発生数をグラフにすると
05:21
at which the infection worked,
このように先の尖った
05:23
they show this spiky behavior
インフルエンザの
発生数のようなグラフになります
05:25
that you're used to from a flu virus.
実はこの原因となっているのは
05:28
And it is in fact due to this arms race
ハッカーとOS開発者の間の
05:30
between hackers and operating system designers
いたちごっこの開発競争です
05:33
that things go back and forth.
その結果 ウィルスの
05:35
And the result is kind of a tree of life
系統図のようなものができました
05:37
of these viruses,
この系統図は
05:39
a phylogeny that looks very much
一般的なウィルスの系統図と
ほぼ一致するものです
05:42
like the type of life that we're used to, at least on the viral level.
ではこれは生命でしょうか?
いいえ そうではないでしょう
05:45
So is that life? Not as far as I'm concerned.
コンピュータウィルスは
自力では進化しないからです
05:48
Why? Because these things don't evolve by themselves.
ハッカーが進化させていますからね
05:51
In fact, they have hackers writing them.
しかしすぐに
このアイディアをより発展させた人がいました
05:53
But the idea was taken very quickly a little bit further
サンタフェ研究所で働く
ある科学者が こう考えたのです
05:57
when a scientist working at the Scientific Institute decided,
「この小さなウィルスたちを
06:00
"Why don't we try to package these little viruses
コンピュータ内の人工の世界で
06:03
in artificial worlds inside of the computer
勝手に進化させたらどうだろう?」
06:05
and let them evolve?"
その科学者が
スティーン・ラスムセンです
06:07
And this was Steen Rasmussen.
彼はこのシステムを設計しましたが
うまくいきませんでした
06:09
And he designed this system, but it really didn't work,
彼のウィルスたちは
絶えず殺し合っていたからです
06:11
because his viruses were constantly destroying each other.
しかし このシステムを見ていた
ある生態学者は
06:14
But there was another scientist who had been watching this, an ecologist.
「自分ならこのシステムを
修正できる」と言って
06:17
And he went home and says, "I know how to fix this."
ティエラシステムを作りあげました
06:20
And he wrote the Tierra system,
これが私の本の中における最初の
06:22
and, in my book, is in fact one of the first
本物の人工生命システムの1つです
06:25
truly artificial living systems --
ただ これらのプログラムは
複雑化しませんでした
06:27
except for the fact that these programs didn't really grow in complexity.
このシステムを見て
少し研究した後で
06:30
So having seen this work, worked a little bit on this,
私が登場したわけです
06:33
this is where I came in.
私はシステムを作ることにしました
06:35
And I decided to create a system
複雑化することができる
06:37
that has all the properties that are necessary
あらゆる必要な性質を備え
06:39
to see the evolution of complexity,
より複雑な問題が
絶え間なく展開するようなシステムです
06:42
more and more complex problems constantly evolving.
私はコードの書き方を知らないので
人の助けを借りました
06:45
And of course, since I really don't know how to write code, I had help in this.
私はカリフォルニア工科大学で
06:48
I had two undergraduate students
2人の学部生と一緒に研究をしていました
06:50
at California Institute of Technology that worked with me.
左がチャールズ・オフリアで
右がタイタス・ブラウンです
06:53
That's Charles Offria on the left, Titus Brown on the right.
今では2人ともミシガン州立大学の
06:56
They are now actually respectable professors
立派な教授です
06:59
at Michigan State University,
ただ当時は立派なチームとは
07:01
but I can assure you, back in the day,
言えないことは確かでした
07:03
we were not a respectable team.
私たち3人が一緒にいる写真が
07:05
And I'm really happy that no photo survives
残っておらず 一安心です
07:07
of the three of us anywhere close together.
さて これはどんなシステムでしょう?
07:10
But what is this system like?
ここで詳しく説明することはできませんが
07:12
Well I can't really go into the details,
少し中身を説明しましょう
07:15
but what you see here is some of the entrails.
焦点を当てたいのは
07:17
But what I wanted to focus on
このような集団の構造です
07:19
is this type of population structure.
ここには約1万個のプログラムがあります
07:21
There's about 10,000 programs sitting here.
異なる系統のプログラムは
異なる色で区別されていて
07:24
And all different strains are colored in different colors.
それぞれが増殖するので
ご覧のとおり
07:27
And as you see here, there are groups that are growing on top of each other,
集団が重なりあって成長します
07:30
because they are spreading.
どんなときも あるプログラムが
07:32
Any time there is a program
この世界で生き抜くのにより適した性質を
07:34
that's better at surviving in this world,
何らかの突然変異で身に付けた場合
07:36
due to whatever mutation it has acquired,
そのプログラムは
他のプログラムを絶滅に追いやるでしょう
07:38
it is going to spread over the others and drive the others to extinction.
それではここで起こることをお見せしましょう
07:41
So I'm going to show you a movie where you're going to see that kind of dynamic.
こういった実験は
私たちが自作した
07:44
And these kinds of experiments are started
プログラムを使って始めました
07:47
with programs that we wrote ourselves.
独自のものを何度も作りました
07:49
We write our own stuff, replicate it,
私たちの自信作です
07:51
and are very proud of ourselves.
このプログラムを
システムに入力すると
07:53
And we put them in, and what you see immediately
すぐに新種が
どんどん出てきます
07:56
is that there are waves and waves of innovation.
ところで これは時間を短縮しています
07:59
By the way, this is highly accelerated,
1,000世代を
1秒にまとめたようなものです
08:01
so it's like a thousand generations a second.
このシステムはすぐに
こう反応します
08:03
But immediately the system goes like,
「この馬鹿げたコードは何なんだ?
08:05
"What kind of dumb piece of code was this?
こんなもの あらゆる方法で
08:07
This can be improved upon in so many ways
あっという間に改良できる」
08:09
so quickly."
新しい種の波が
08:11
So you see waves of new types
他の種にとって代わっていきます
08:13
taking over the other types.
プログラムが最も重要で
シンプルなものを獲得するまで
08:15
And this type of activity goes on for quite awhile,
このような活動がしばらく続きます
08:18
until the main easy things have been acquired by these programs.
ここでは停滞状態がみられますが
08:22
And then you see sort of like a stasis coming on
システムは待機しているだけで
08:26
where the system essentially waits
このように新種が生じると
08:28
for a new type of innovation, like this one,
それが拡大し
08:31
which is going to spread
以前は新種だったものを飲み込み
08:33
over all the other innovations that were before
それまで存在していた遺伝子を全て消し去り
08:35
and is erasing the genes that it had before,
より複雑性を増した
新しいプログラムが完成します
08:38
until a new type of higher level of complexity has been achieved.
このプロセスは永遠に続くのです
08:42
And this process goes on and on and on.
このシステムは
08:45
So what we see here
生命と全く同じように
08:47
is a system that lives
展開していることがわかります
08:49
in very much the way we're used to life [going.]
一方でNASAの人々が
知りたがっていたことがあります
08:51
But what the NASA people had asked me really
「このプログラムには
08:55
was, "Do these guys
バイオシグネチャーはあるか?
08:57
have a biosignature?
この種の生命を捉えられるか?
08:59
Can we measure this type of life?
仮に出来るとすれば
09:01
Because if we can,
アミノ酸のような物質の有無に
惑わされることなく
09:03
maybe we have a chance of actually discovering life somewhere else
地球外生命体を
09:06
without being biased
発見できるかもしれない」
09:08
by things like amino acids."
そこで私が提案したのは
09:10
So I said, "Well, perhaps we should construct
普遍的なプロセスとしての生命に基づいて
09:13
a biosignature
バイオシグネチャーを構築することでした
09:15
based on life as a universal process.
「それなら 私が展開した
09:18
In fact, it should perhaps make use
この概念を用いて
09:20
of the concepts that I developed
シンプルな生命のシステムが
09:22
just in order to sort of capture
どんなものかを捉えられるでしょう」
09:24
what a simple living system might be."
そこで私は思いついたのですが ―
09:26
And the thing I came up with --
まずはアイディアを
説明しなければなりませんね
09:28
I have to first give you an introduction about the idea,
私が思いついたのは
生命の存在そのものを
探知しようとするというよりは
09:32
and maybe that would be a meaning detector,
生命が持つ「意味」を
捉えるということです
09:35
rather than a life detector.
ではどのように「意味」を捉えるのか
09:38
And the way we would do that --
手始めに100万匹の猿が書いた文章と
09:40
I would like to find out how I can distinguish
本に書いてある文章を
09:42
text that was written by a million monkeys,
区別する方法を
探ることにしましょう
09:44
as opposed to text that [is] in our books.
しかも書かれている言語を
09:47
And I would like to do it in such a way
読む必要がないようにしたいのです
09:49
that I don't actually have to be able to read the language,
すべて読むのは無理ですからね
09:51
because I'm sure I won't be able to.
アルファベットのようなものが
あることさえ分かればいいんです
09:53
As long as I know that there's some sort of alphabet.
そこでこのようなグラフが得られました
09:55
So here would be a frequency plot
これは どれだけ頻繁に
09:58
of how often you find
アルファベットの26文字それぞれが
10:00
each of the 26 letters of the alphabet
猿の文章に使われているかを示しています
10:02
in a text written by random monkeys.
ご覧の通り それぞれの文字は
10:05
And obviously each of these letters
概ね同じ回数使われています
10:07
comes off about roughly equally frequent.
ところが 今度は英語で書かれた文章から
同じグラフを作成してみると
10:09
But if you now look at the same distribution in English texts,
このようになります
10:13
it looks like that.
本当ですよ
英語の文章ではこんなに特徴が現れるのです
10:15
And I'm telling you, this is very robust across English texts.
フランス語の文章であれば
グラフはやや異なります
10:18
And if I look at French texts, it looks a little bit different,
イタリア語やドイツ語でもね
10:20
or Italian or German.
それぞれの言語には
特有の頻度のパターンがありますから
10:22
They all have their own type of frequency distribution,
でも必ず 特徴が現れます
10:25
but it's robust.
内容が政治であろうが科学であろうが
10:27
It doesn't matter whether it writes about politics or about science.
詩であろうが
10:30
It doesn't matter whether it's a poem
数学的な文章であろうが
10:33
or whether it's a mathematical text.
必ず 特徴があるのです
10:36
It's a robust signature,
しかも 同じパターンの特徴がね
10:38
and it's very stable.
その文章が英語で書かれている限りは
10:40
As long as our books are written in English --
私たちは文章の書き直しや
写し直しを繰り返すわけですから
10:42
because people are rewriting them and recopying them --
同じパターンが現れます
10:45
it's going to be there.
ここに発想を得た私は
10:47
So that inspired me to think about,
このアイディアを使ってみようと思ったのです
10:49
well, what if I try to use this idea
意味のある文章の中から
10:52
in order, not to detect random texts
ランダムに書かれた文を探すためではなく
10:54
from texts with meaning,
そこになんらかの「意味」が存在する
という事実を
10:56
but rather detect the fact that there is meaning
たくさんの生体分子の中から
見つけ出すためにです
11:00
in the biomolecules that make up life.
でもそのためにはまず
11:02
But first I have to ask:
文章におけるアルファベットのような
構成要素を突き止める必要があります
11:04
what are these building blocks, like the alphabet, elements that I showed you?
さて そういった構成要素には
候補がたくさんあることが
11:07
Well it turns out, we have many different alternatives
分かってきました
11:10
for such a set of building blocks.
アミノ酸が使えるかもしれないし
11:12
We could use amino acids,
核酸やカルボン酸
脂肪酸が使えるかもしれません
11:14
we could use nucleic acids, carboxylic acids, fatty acids.
実際 化学物質は実に多様で
私たちの体にはその多くが使われているので
11:17
In fact, chemistry's extremely rich, and our body uses a lot of them.
アイディアを検証するために
11:20
So that we actually, to test this idea,
まずはアミノ酸と
いくつかのカルボン酸を調べました
11:23
first took a look at amino acids and some other carboxylic acids.
これがその結果です
11:26
And here's the result.
このようなグラフが得られるのは
11:28
Here is, in fact, what you get
例えば彗星や星間空間 あるいは
11:31
if you, for example, look at the distribution of amino acids
実験室で作った
生物が入っていないことが確実な
11:34
on a comet or in interstellar space
原始スープの
11:37
or, in fact, in a laboratory,
アミノ酸の頻度分布を
11:39
where you made very sure that in your primordial soup
調べた場合です
11:41
that there is not living stuff in there.
観察されるのはもっぱら
グリシンとアラニンであり
11:43
What you find is mostly glycine and then alanine
あとは その他のアミノ酸の
痕跡です
11:46
and there's some trace elements of the other ones.
同じような特徴が現れるのは
11:49
That is also very robust --
地球に似た環境で
11:52
what you find in systems like Earth
アミノ酸はあるけれど
11:55
where there are amino acids,
生命のないところです
11:57
but there is no life.
しかし地球上で
11:59
But suppose you take some dirt
泥を掘ってみたとして
12:01
and dig through it
その泥を分光計にかけると
12:03
and then put it into these spectrometers,
バクテリアだらけですし
12:06
because there's bacteria all over the place;
地球上 どこで水を採取しても
12:08
or you take water anywhere on Earth,
水は生命に溢れていますから
12:10
because it's teaming with life,
同じ分析をしてみると
12:12
and you make the same analysis;
全く異なるグラフが得られます
12:14
the spectrum looks completely different.
もちろん グリシンやアラニンはありますが
12:16
Of course, there is still glycine and alanine,
その他に分子量の大きなアミノ酸があるのです
12:20
but in fact, there are these heavy elements, these heavy amino acids,
このアミノ酸が生成されるのは
12:23
that are being produced
それが生物に欠かせない物質だからです
12:25
because these are valuable to the organism.
タンパク質を構成する
12:27
And some other ones
20種類のアミノ酸を除く
12:29
that are not used in the set of 20,
他のアミノ酸は
12:31
they will not appear at all
全く現れません
12:33
in any type of concentration.
つまり これも明確な特徴です
12:35
So this also turns out to be extremely robust.
どんな堆積物を使おうが
12:37
It doesn't matter what kind of sediment you're using to grind up,
それがバクテリアであろうが
植物であろうが動物であろうが
12:40
whether it's bacteria or any other plants or animals.
生命のあるところでは必ず
12:43
Anywhere there's life,
このような頻度分布が得られるのです
12:45
you're going to have this distribution,
こちらの分布ではなくてね
12:47
as opposed to that distribution.
そしてこれは
アミノ酸だけに言えることではありません
12:49
And it is detectable not just in amino acids.
次に「アヴィディアン」の場合を
12:52
Now you could ask:
見てみましょう
12:54
well, what about these Avidians?
アヴィディアンとは
コンピュータの中の生き物で
12:56
The Avidians being the denizens of this computer world
複製を繰り返し
複雑化していきます
13:00
where they are perfectly happy replicating and growing in complexity.
これは生命が存在しない時の
13:03
So this is the distribution that you get
分布を表しています
13:06
if, in fact, there is no life.
アヴィディアンは
28個ほどの命令群を持っています
13:08
They have about 28 of these instructions.
そして 命令が他のものと
交換可能なシステムでは
13:11
And if you have a system where they're being replaced one by the other,
その分布は
猿の文章の特徴に似たものになります
13:14
it's like the monkeys writing on a typewriter.
つまり これらの命令は
13:16
Each of these instructions appears
だいたい同じような頻度で現れるということです
13:19
with roughly the equal frequency.
しかし 先ほどのビデオのような環境で
13:22
But if you now take a set of replicating guys
複製をしていくと
13:26
like in the video that you saw,
分布はこのようになります
13:28
it looks like this.
命令の中にはアヴィディアンにとって
13:30
So there are some instructions
非常に重要なものがあり
13:32
that are extremely valuable to these organisms,
その命令が現れる頻度は高くなるのです
13:34
and their frequency is going to be high.
さらに一度しか使われない
13:37
And there's actually some instructions
命令すらあるのです
13:39
that you only use once, if ever.
そういう命令は有害なものか
13:41
So they are either poisonous
あるいは偶然よりも
低い確率で使われるべき命令で
13:43
or really should be used at less of a level than random.
この場合は頻度が低くなります
13:47
In this case, the frequency is lower.
これは確かな特徴と言えるでしょうか?
13:50
And so now we can see, is that really a robust signature?
そう言えるでしょう
なぜなら
13:53
I can tell you indeed it is,
文章の例やアミノ酸の例で見られたような
13:55
because this type of spectrum, just like what you've seen in books,
このようなタイプの分布は
13:58
and just like what you've seen in amino acids,
環境をどういうふうに変えたとしても
その環境にあわせて
14:00
it doesn't really matter how you change the environment, it's very robust;
ある特徴を示すからです
14:03
it's going to reflect the environment.
次にお見せするのは私が行った実験ですが
14:05
So I'm going to show you now a little experiment that we did.
まずグラフの説明からすると
14:07
And I have to explain to you,
上のグラフは
14:09
the top of this graph
先ほどの頻度分布です
14:11
shows you that frequency distribution that I talked about.
生命がない場合の分布なので
14:14
Here, in fact, that's the lifeless environment
それぞれの命令が
14:17
where each instruction occurs
同じ頻度で現れます
14:19
at an equal frequency.
そして下のグラフは
14:21
And below there, I show, in fact,
その環境で突然変異の起こる確率です
14:24
the mutation rate in the environment.
普通ならば複製プログラムが機能して
14:27
And I'm starting this at a mutation rate that is so high
世界を埋め尽くすまで
14:30
that, even if you would drop
複製を続けるのでしょうが
14:32
a replicating program
突然変異が起きやすいように設定して
14:34
that would otherwise happily grow up
実験を始めると
14:36
to fill the entire world,
すぐに変異をして死んでしまうのです
14:38
if you drop it in, it gets mutated to death immediately.
変異の確率が高すぎると
14:42
So there is no life possible
生命は生きていけないのですね
14:44
at that type of mutation rate.
次に変異の確率をだんだん下げていって
14:47
But then I'm going to slowly turn down the heat, so to speak,
生存が可能になる閾値に達すると
14:51
and then there's this viability threshold
複製をして生き延びることが
14:53
where now it would be possible
できるようになりました
14:55
for a replicator to actually live.
この間も この世界に生命体を
14:57
And indeed, we're going to be dropping these guys
投入し続けます
15:00
into that soup all the time.
結果はこのようになります
15:02
So let's see what that looks like.
はじめは何も起きません
15:04
So first, nothing, nothing, nothing.
まだまだ変異率が高すぎます
15:07
Too hot, too hot.
ここで生存可能な閾値に達して
15:09
Now the viability threshold is reached,
頻度分布も
15:12
and the frequency distribution
大きく変化し そして 安定しました
15:14
has dramatically changed and, in fact, stabilizes.
次に私がしたことは
15:17
And now what I did there
すこし意地悪ですが
また変異率を上げていったのです
15:19
is, I was being nasty, I just turned up the heat again and again.
もちろん
また生存閾値に到達して無反応になります
15:22
And of course, it reaches the viability threshold.
もう一度お見せしましょう
すばらしい分布ですからね
15:25
And I'm just showing this to you again because it's so nice.
生存閾値に到達し 分布は
15:28
You hit the viability threshold.
「生きている」状態になります
15:30
The distribution changes to "alive!"
そしてまた生存閾値以上になると
15:32
And then, once you hit the threshold
変異率が高すぎるため
15:35
where the mutation rate is so high
自己複製を行うことが出来なくなります
15:37
that you cannot self-reproduce,
つまり遺伝情報をコピーして
15:39
you cannot copy the information
子孫に伝える際に
15:42
forward to your offspring
エラーが多くなりすぎて
15:44
without making so many mistakes
複製する能力が失われ
15:46
that your ability to replicate vanishes.
特徴のない分布となります
15:49
And then that signature is lost.
この実験から
15:52
What do we learn from that?
いくつものことを学ぶことができますね
15:54
Well, I think we learn a number of things from that.
一つは
15:58
One of them is,
生命とは何かを抽象的に考えることが
16:00
if we are able to think about life
できるようになれば ―
16:03
in abstract terms --
つまり 植物とか
16:05
and we're not talking about things like plants,
アミノ酸とか
16:07
and we're not talking about amino acids,
バクテリアについてではなく
16:09
and we're not talking about bacteria,
プロセスの点から考えると
16:11
but we think in terms of processes --
生命を地球上だけでなく
16:13
then we could start to think about life,
どこにでも存在しうるものとして
16:16
not as something that is so special to Earth,
考えることができるということです
16:18
but that, in fact, could exist anywhere.
生命と関係しているのは
16:21
Because it really only has to do
物理的な媒体に蓄えられた情報
16:23
with these concepts of information,
ただそれだけなのですから
16:25
of storing information
媒体となるのは
16:27
within physical substrates --
ビットだろうと 核酸だろうと
16:29
anything: bits, nucleic acids,
アルファベットになるものなら
何でもいいのです
16:31
anything that's an alphabet --
そしてその情報が消滅していかないよう
16:33
and make sure that there's some process
私たちが考えるよりもずっと長い間
16:35
so that this information can be stored
情報を蓄えておくための
16:37
for much longer than you would expect
何らかのプロセスが必要です
16:39
the time scales for the deterioration of information.
それが確保できれば
16:43
And if you can do that,
生命が出現します
16:45
then you have life.
つまり 私たちはまず
16:47
So the first thing that we learn
プロセスだけを考えれば
16:49
is that it is possible to define life
生命を定義することが出来ます
16:52
in terms of processes alone,
この時 地球上の生命のような
16:55
without referring at all
私たちが大切にしているものを
16:57
to the type of things that we hold dear,
考える必要はありません
16:59
as far as the type of life on Earth is.
この発見は これまで私たちがしてきた
17:02
And that in a sense removes us again,
多くの科学的発見と同じように
17:05
like all of our scientific discoveries, or many of them --
「生命は特別な存在だ」という
17:08
it's this continuous dethroning of man --
私たちの考えを
覆しつつあると言えるでしょう
17:10
of how we think we're special because we're alive.
私たちはコンピュータの中に
生命を作ることができます
17:13
Well we can make life. We can make life in the computer.
当然 限界はあります
17:16
Granted, it's limited,
でも 生命を作りだすために
17:18
but we have learned what it takes
必要なものはわかっています
17:21
in order to actually construct it.
そして それがわかれば
難しい問題は
17:23
And once we have that,
なくなります
17:26
then it is not such a difficult task anymore
つまり
17:29
to say, if we understand the fundamental processes
特定の媒体に依らない
普遍的なプロセスさえ
理解してしまえば
17:33
that do not refer to any particular substrate,
地球外へ飛び出し
17:36
then we can go out
調査をして
17:38
and try other worlds,
どんな化学物質のアルファベットが
存在するかを知り
17:40
figure out what kind of chemical alphabets might there be,
その星の通常の化学的組成や
17:44
figure enough about the normal chemistry,
地質科学的性質を推測して
17:46
the geochemistry of the planet,
生命がいない場合の
17:49
so that we know what this distribution would look like
分布を知ることができます
17:51
in the absence of life,
その分布から大きく隔たる場合 ―
17:53
and then look for large deviations from this --
例えば ある物質が
17:56
this thing sticking out, which says,
目立つとしましょう
17:59
"This chemical really shouldn't be there."
それでもまだ
生命が存在するとは言えませんが
18:01
Now we don't know that there's life then,
少なくとも
18:03
but we could say,
その化学物質を詳しく調べて
何に由来するのかを
18:05
"Well at least I'm going to have to take a look very precisely at this chemical
確かめようとするでしょう
18:08
and see where it comes from."
この試みが 目に見えない生命を
18:10
And that might be our chance
発見する可能性を
18:12
of actually discovering life
私たちに与えてくれるのです
18:14
when we cannot visibly see it.
今日はこれだけは覚えて帰ってください
18:16
And so that's really the only take-home message
他の惑星で生命は
18:19
that I have for you.
どのように存在しているかを
18:21
Life can be less mysterious
考えてみれば 生命は
18:23
than we make it out to be
それほど神秘的でないと気付くでしょう
18:25
when we try to think about how it would be on other planets.
神秘的でないとわかれば
18:29
And if we remove the mystery of life,
私たちが生命たる所以や
人間がそれほど
18:32
then I think it is a little bit easier
特別な存在ではないということを
18:35
for us to think about how we live,
考えやすくなるのではないでしょうか
18:37
and how perhaps we're not as special as we always think we are.
これが私が伝えたかったことです
18:40
And I'm going to leave you with that.
どうもありがとうございました
18:42
And thank you very much.
(拍手)
18:44
(Applause)
Translated by Mizuhiro Suzuki
Reviewed by Masaki Yanagishita

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Christoph Adami - Artificial life researcher
Christoph Adami works on the nature of life and evolution, trying to define life in a way that is as free as possible from our preconceptions.

Why you should listen

Christoph Adami researches the nature of living systems, using 'artificial life' -- small, self-replicating computer programs. His main research focus is Darwinian evolution, which he studies at different levels of organization (from simple molecules to brains). He has pioneered theapplication of methods from information theory to the study of evolution, and designed the "Avida" system that launched the use of digital life as a tool for investigating basic questions in evolutionary biology.

He is Professor of Applied Life Sciences at the Keck Graduate Institute in Claremont, CA, and a Visiting Professor at the BEACON Center for the Study of Evolution in Action at Michigan State University. He obtained his PhD in theoretical physics from the State University of New York at Stony Brook. 

More profile about the speaker
Christoph Adami | Speaker | TED.com