12:46
TEDGlobal 2011

Justin Hall-Tipping: Freeing energy from the grid

ジャスティン・ホール・ティピング:送電網を必要としないエネルギーを

Filmed:

窓ガラスで発電が出来たとしたら世界はどうなるでしょう?事業家ジャスティン・ホール・ティピングが、これを実現する素材や、いかに「通常」という概念を問うことが類稀な飛躍的進歩に繋がるかについて説明する心を打つ講演です。

- Science entrepreneur
Justin Hall-Tipping works on nano-energy startups -- mastering the electron to create power. Full bio

Why can't we solve these problems?
なぜこれらの問題を解決できないのでしょう?
00:16
We know what they are.
問題が何かは分かっています
00:21
Something always seems to stop us.
いつも何か障害があるようです
00:24
Why?
なぜでしょう?
00:28
I remember March the 15th, 2000.
2000年3月15日のことですが
00:31
The B15 iceberg broke off the Ross Ice Shelf.
B15 氷山がロス棚氷より分離しました
00:35
In the newspaper it said
新聞にはこう書かれていました
00:39
"it was all part of a normal process."
「これは全て通常の過程によるものです」
00:42
A little bit further on in the article
その記事を読み進めていくと今度は
00:45
it said "a loss that would normally take
「崩壊したのは 元の大きさに戻るには
00:48
the ice shelf 50-100 years to replace."
通常50~100年ほどかかる氷棚でした」
00:51
That same word, "normal,"
同じ「通常」という言葉が
00:58
had two different,
二つ別々の
01:01
almost opposite meanings.
ほとんど逆の意味で用いられています
01:03
If we walk into the B15 iceberg
今日このあとに
01:06
when we leave here today,
B15氷山を訪れたとしたら
01:09
we're going to bump into something
このようなものを目にするでしょう
01:12
a thousand feet tall,
高さ 300 メートル
01:15
76 miles long,
長さ 122 キロメートル
01:17
17 miles wide,
横幅 27 キロメートル
01:21
and it's going to weigh two gigatons.
そして重さ2ギガトンの氷山です
01:24
I'm sorry, there's nothing normal about this.
そこに「通常」なんてないでしょう
01:27
And yet I think it's this perspective of us
でも人間は世界をこのような観点で
01:30
as humans to look at our world
「通常」というメガネを通して
01:33
through the lens of normal
見ています
01:36
is one of the forces
これが障害の一つとなり
01:38
that stops us developing real solutions.
真の解決法を生み出せないのだと思うのです
01:40
Only 90 days after this,
それからたった 90 日後に
01:46
arguably the greatest discovery
20世紀最大とも言える
01:49
of the last century occurred.
発見がなされました
01:51
It was the sequencing for the first time
それは史上初の
01:53
of the human genome.
ヒトゲノムの解読です
01:55
This is the code that's in every single one
これは人間の細胞50兆個の一つ一つに
01:58
of our 50 trillion cells
含まれているコードであり
02:02
that makes us who we are and what we are.
私たちの在り方を決定しています
02:04
And if we just take one cell's worth
細胞一つ分のコードを取り出し
02:08
of this code and unwind it,
拡げてみると
02:10
it's a meter long,
長さ1メートル
02:15
two nanometers thick.
厚さ2ナノメートルになります
02:19
Two nanometers is 20 atoms in thickness.
2ナノメールとは原子20個分の厚さです
02:21
And I wondered,
そこで思いました
02:25
what if the answer to some of our biggest problems
私たちの抱えるいくつかの重大問題の答えが
02:27
could be found in the smallest of places,
ミクロの世界にあるとしたら?
02:30
where the difference between what is
有益・無益の差が
02:33
valuable and what is worthless
ほんの数個の原子が
02:35
is merely the addition or subtraction
あるかないかで決まる世界に
02:37
of a few atoms?
あるとしたら?
02:39
And what
さらにもし
02:41
if we could get exquisite control
エネルギーそのものである
02:43
over the essence of energy,
電子を
02:46
the electron?
精密に制御できたとしたら?
02:48
So I started to go around the world
そこで私は世界中を巡り
02:51
finding the best and brightest scientists
できる限り優秀な科学者たちを
02:53
I could at universities
大学で探しました
02:55
whose collective discoveries have the chance
今しがた述べた考えを
02:57
to take us there,
実現しうるメンバーをです
02:59
and we formed a company to build
そして彼らの並外れたアイデアを
03:01
on their extraordinary ideas.
推し進める会社を設立しました
03:03
Six and a half years later,
6年半にわたる
03:05
a hundred and eighty researchers,
180名の研究者の努力の結果
03:07
they have some amazing developments
研究所は数々の
03:09
in the lab,
驚くような開発をしました
03:11
and I will show you three of those today,
今日はそのうちの三つを紹介します
03:13
such that we can stop burning up our planet
地球の資源を使い尽くすのを止め
03:15
and instead,
代わりに
03:18
we can generate all the energy we need
必要なエネルギーの全てが
03:20
right where we are,
その場で
03:23
cleanly, safely, and cheaply.
安全かつクリーンに低コストで賄えます
03:25
Think of the space that we spend
私たちがほとんどの時間を過ごす
03:28
most of our time.
空間について考えてください
03:30
A tremendous amount of energy
太陽から膨大なエネルギーが
03:32
is coming at us from the sun.
私たちのもとに届きます
03:34
We like the light that comes into the room,
部屋を照らす光は良いのですが
03:36
but in the middle of summer,
夏の暑い盛りには
03:38
all that heat is coming into the room
涼しく保ちたい部屋に
03:40
that we're trying to keep cool.
熱となって射し込んできます
03:42
In winter, exactly the opposite is happening.
冬はその逆です
03:44
We're trying to heat up
空間を
03:46
the space that we're in,
暖かくしたいのに
03:47
and all that is trying to get out through the window.
熱は窓から逃げてしまいます
03:49
Wouldn't it be really great
必要に応じて窓が
03:51
if the window could flick back the heat
外に逃げる熱を内に反射したり
03:55
into the room if we needed it
入ってくる熱を外に反射できたら
03:57
or flick it away before it came in?
素晴らしいとは思いませんか?
03:59
One of the materials that can do this
これを実現できる素材の一つは
04:01
is a remarkable material, carbon,
優れた物質である炭素が化学反応で形を変えたものです
04:03
that has changed its form in this incredibly beautiful reaction
このとても美しい化学反応は
04:08
where graphite is blasted by a vapor,
蒸気を吹き付けられたグラファイトが
04:11
and when the vaporized carbon condenses,
蒸気化した炭素となり それが凝縮すると
04:16
it condenses back into a different form:
別の形状になることで起こります
04:20
chickenwire rolled up.
六角形模様の網が丸められた形状です
04:23
But this chickenwire carbon,
この六角形網の炭素は
04:26
called a carbon nanotube,
カーボンナノチューブと呼ばれ
04:28
is a hundred thousand times smaller
皆さんの髪の毛一本の
04:30
than the width of one of your hairs.
十万分の一の太さです
04:32
It's a thousand times
銅に比べ 千倍
04:35
more conductive than copper.
伝導性があります
04:37
How is that possible?
このようなことがどうして可能なのでしょう?
04:40
One of the things about working at the nanoscale
ナノスケールの作業において一つ言えるのは
04:45
is things look and act very differently.
状態や作用が通常と大きく異なることです
04:49
You think of carbon as black.
炭素は黒いと思うでしょうが
04:52
Carbon at the nanoscale
ナノスケールにおいては
04:58
is actually transparent
実は透明で
05:01
and flexible.
柔軟なのです
05:04
And when it's in this form,
またこの形状の炭素は
05:09
if I combine it with a polymer
ポリマーと組み合わせて
05:11
and affix it to your window
窓に付けると
05:14
when it's in its colored state,
完全な着色状態の時には
05:17
it will reflect away all heat and light,
全ての熱と光を反射し
05:20
and when it's in its bleached state
完全な消色状態の時には
05:23
it will let all the light and heat through
全ての熱と光を通します
05:25
and any combination in between.
着消色の度合いはどのようにも変えられます
05:28
To change its state, by the way,
ちなみに状態を変えるのに必要なのは
05:31
takes two volts from a millisecond pulse.
1ミリ秒間流す2ボルトの電流です
05:34
And once you've changed its state, it stays there
一旦状態を変えるとそれが
05:37
until you change its state again.
また次に変えるまで保たれます
05:40
As we were working on this incredible
私たちがフロリダ大学で
05:43
discovery at University of Florida,
この驚きの発見に取り組んでいた時
05:45
we were told to go down the corridor
通路の向こうの
05:47
to visit another scientist,
別の科学者を訪ねるよう言われました
05:50
and he was working
するとその科学者は
05:52
on a pretty incredible thing.
非常に目覚しい研究していました
05:54
Imagine
想像してみてください
05:56
if we didn't have to rely
人工照明に頼らず
05:58
on artificial lighting to get around at night.
夜を過ごすことができたらどうでしょう?
06:00
We'd have to see at night, right?
夜でも物が見えなくては駄目ですよね?
06:06
This lets you do it.
これがそれを可能にします
06:12
It's a nanomaterial, two nanomaterials,
二つのナノ物質でできています
06:14
a detector and an imager.
検知する物質と描画する物質です
06:17
The total width of it
最終的な厚さは
06:20
is 600 times smaller
「点」の
06:22
than the width of a decimal place.
6百分の一です
06:24
And it takes all the infrared available at night,
夜間の赤外線を取り込み
06:27
converts it into an electron
二つの小さなフィルムの間で
06:31
in the space of two small films,
電子に変換し
06:34
and is enabling you to play an image
透かして見える画像を
06:37
which you can see through.
映し出せるようになっています
06:40
I'm going to show to TEDsters,
TED の皆さんに史上初めて
06:47
the first time, this operating.
この仕組みをお見せします
06:50
Firstly I'm going to show you
まず
06:52
the transparency.
透明性をお見せします
06:54
Transparency is key.
透明性は重要です
06:57
It's a film that you can look through.
透かして見ることができるフィルムです
07:01
And then I'm going to turn the lights out.
そして照明を消します
07:04
And you can see, off a tiny film,
すると小さなフィルムを通して見ることができます
07:07
incredible clarity.
驚きの鮮明度です
07:10
As we were working on this, it dawned on us:
これに取り組んでいて閃きました
07:14
this is taking infrared radiation, wavelengths,
これは赤外線を取り込み
07:18
and converting it into electrons.
電子に変換しています
07:22
What if we combined it
ではこれを
07:25
with this?
これと組み合わせたら?
07:31
Suddenly you've converted energy
突如
07:34
into an electron on a plastic surface
窓に貼り付けられるプラスチックの表面で
07:37
that you can stick on your window.
エネルギーを電子に変換できることになります
07:41
But because it's flexible,
また柔軟であるため
07:44
it can be on any surface whatsoever.
どんな表面にでも貼り付けることができます
07:46
The power plant of tomorrow
未来の発電所とは
07:50
is no power plant.
発電所がなくなることです
07:53
We talked about generating and using.
発電とその利用についてお話ししました
08:00
We want to talk about storing energy,
次はエネルギーの貯蔵についてです
08:03
and unfortunately
あいにく
08:05
the best thing we've got going
現在使用されている一番のものは
08:07
is something that was developed in France
150 年前に
08:09
a hundred and fifty years ago,
フランスで開発された
08:11
the lead acid battery.
鉛蓄電池です
08:13
In terms of dollars per what's stored,
対費用面に関しては
08:15
it's simply the best.
これはとにかく最高です
08:17
Knowing that we're not going to put fifty of
でも人々が蓄電のために家の地下室に
08:19
these in our basements to store our power,
これを50個置くわけないですから
08:21
we went to a group at University of Texas at Dallas,
テキサス大学ダラス校の科学者を訪ね
08:23
and we gave them this diagram.
この図を渡しました
08:25
It was in actually a diner
実際はダラス・フォートワース空港の
08:27
outside of Dallas/Fort Worth Airport.
外にある食堂でのことでした
08:29
We said, "Could you build this?"
「これを作れますか?」と尋ねると
08:31
And these scientists,
科学者たちに
08:33
instead of laughing at us, said, "Yeah."
あっさりと「できるよ」と言われました
08:35
And what they built was eBox.
そうして彼らが作ったのが eBox です
08:37
EBox is testing new nanomaterials
eBoxは新しいナノ物質を使い
08:40
to park an electron on the outside,
外側で電子を一時的に置き
08:42
hold it until you need it,
必要になったら
08:45
and then be able to release it and pass it off.
放出し徐々に送り出せるか試しています
08:48
Being able to do that means
これができれば
08:51
that I can generate energy
発電できるということです
08:55
cleanly, efficiently and cheaply
クリーンに 効率的に 安く
08:58
right where I am.
その場でです
09:01
It's my energy.
自分の電気ですから
09:03
And if I don't need it, I can convert it
必要なければ
09:06
back up on the window
窓で光に再変換して
09:08
to energy, light, and beam it,
直線上にある
09:10
line of site, to your place.
他の人のところへビームできます
09:12
And for that I do not need
そしてその時
09:15
an electric grid between us.
電線は必要ありません
09:18
The grid of tomorrow is no grid,
未来の送電網とは送電網がなくなることで
09:21
and energy, clean efficient energy,
クリーンで効率の良いエネルギーは
09:25
will one day be free.
いつか無償になるでしょう
09:29
If you do this, you get the last puzzle piece,
以上を経て パズルの最後の一片に辿り着きます
09:36
which is water.
水です
09:40
Each of us, every day,
私たちは皆 毎日
09:46
need just eight glasses of this,
グラス八杯の水が要ります
09:51
because we're human.
人間だからです
09:56
When we run out of water,
水がなくなると―
09:59
as we are in some parts of the world
現に既に枯渇した地域もあり
10:01
and soon to be in other parts of the world,
他の地域でもその恐れがあります
10:03
we're going to have to get this from the sea,
海水から真水を得なくてはなりません
10:05
and that's going to require us to build desalination plants.
それには淡水化プラントが必要になります
10:08
19 trillion dollars is what we're going to have to spend.
建設費用は 19 兆ドルです
10:11
These also require tremendous amounts of energy.
膨大なエネルギーも必要となります
10:14
In fact, it's going to require twice the world's
実際 世界の石油供給量の二倍の
10:16
supply of oil to run the pumps
エネルギーが
10:18
to generate the water.
淡水化ポンプを稼動するのに必要となります
10:20
We're simply not going to do that.
そんなことは到底無理です
10:23
But in a world where energy is freed
でもエネルギーが制限なく
10:25
and transmittable
簡単に低コストで
10:27
easily and cheaply, we can take any water
伝送できたら
10:29
wherever we are
どのような水をどこでも利用し
10:31
and turn it into whatever we need.
必要な形に変えることができます
10:33
I'm glad to be working with
非常に頭脳明快で理解のある
10:37
incredibly brilliant and kind scientists,
科学者たちと協力でき嬉しく思います
10:39
no kinder than
他の大勢の人たちより
10:41
many of the people in the world,
特に理解があるわけではありませんが
10:43
but they have a magic look at the world.
世界に対する素晴らしい視点を持っています
10:45
And I'm glad to see their discoveries
研究所での開発が
10:48
coming out of the lab and into the world.
世界で利用されるのを見れて嬉しく思います
10:50
It's been a long time in coming for me.
私にとって長い道のりでした
10:53
18 years ago,
18 年前
10:57
I saw a photograph in the paper.
新聞である写真を見ました
11:00
It was taken by Kevin Carter
ケヴィン・カーターによる写真です
11:04
who went to the Sudan
スーダンでの飢餓を
11:06
to document their famine there.
取材しに行ったときのものです
11:08
I've carried this photograph with me
その日以来 この写真を
11:10
every day since then.
肌身離さず持っています
11:12
It's a picture of a little girl dying of thirst.
喉が渇いて瀕死の少女の写真です
11:17
By any standard this is wrong.
どう見ても絶対に間違っています
11:27
It's just wrong.
起こり得ていいことではありません
11:32
We can do better than this.
何かやりようがあるでしょう
11:38
We should do better than this.
どうにかすべきです
11:41
And whenever I go round
ですから
11:44
to somebody who says,
誰かが
11:46
"You know what, you're working on something that's too difficult.
「あなたが取り組んでいる問題は
11:48
It'll never happen. You don't have enough money.
困難すぎて無理ですよ 資金も十分でなく
11:50
You don't have enough time.
時間も足りない 他にもっと
11:53
There's something much more interesting around the corner,"
面白い課題が身近にあるのでは」と言うたび
11:56
I say, "Try saying that to her."
私は「この子に向かって言ってみろ」と
11:59
That's what I say in my mind. And I just say
心の中で思うのです でも口では
12:01
"thank you," and I go on to the next one.
お礼を言って次の人にあたっていました
12:03
This is why we have to solve our problems,
これが問題を解決せねばならない意義です
12:06
and I know the answer as to how
そして私に分かっているのは
12:09
is to be able to get exquisite control
自然の構成要素であり
12:14
over a building block of nature,
生命の本質であるものを
12:18
the stuff of life:
精密に制御する方法です
12:21
the simple electron.
電子の制御です
12:23
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
12:25
(Applause)
(拍手)
12:27
Translated by Keiichi Kudo
Reviewed by Sawa Horibe

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Justin Hall-Tipping - Science entrepreneur
Justin Hall-Tipping works on nano-energy startups -- mastering the electron to create power.

Why you should listen

Some of our most serious planetary worries revolve around energy and power -- controlling it, paying for it, and the consequences of burning it. Justin Hall-Tipping had an epiphany about energy after seeing footage of a chunk of ice the size of his home state (Connecticut) falling off Antarctica into the ocean, and decided to focus on science to find new forms of energy. A longtime investor, he formed Nanoholdings  to work closely with universities and labs who are studying new forms of nano-scale energy in the four sectors of the energy economy: generation, transmission, storage and conservation.

Nanotech as a field is still very young (the National Science Foundation says it's "at a level of development similar to that of computer technology in the 1950s") and nano-energy in particular holds tremendous promise.

He says: "For the first time in human history, we actually have the ability to pick up an atom and place it the way we want. Some very powerful things can happen when you can do that."

More profile about the speaker
Justin Hall-Tipping | Speaker | TED.com