15:01
TEDGlobal 2011

Malcolm Gladwell: The strange tale of the Norden bombsight

マルコム・グラッドウェル 「ノルデン爆撃照準器の奇妙な話」

Filmed:

ストーリーテリングの名手マルコム・グラッドウェルが、第二次世界大戦における画期的な発明品であったノルデン爆撃照準機とそれがもたらした予想外の結末について聞かせてくれます。

- Writer
Detective of fads and emerging subcultures, chronicler of jobs-you-never-knew-existed, Malcolm Gladwell's work is toppling the popular understanding of bias, crime, food, marketing, race, consumers and intelligence. Full bio

Thank you.
どうも
00:15
It's a real pleasure to be here.
お招きいただいて光栄です
00:17
I last did a TEDTalk
私が以前
00:19
I think about seven years ago or so.
この場で講演したのは 7年前のことで
00:21
I talked about spaghetti sauce.
スパゲティソースの話をしました
00:25
And so many people, I guess, watch those videos.
多くの人がそのビデオを見てくれたようで
00:28
People have been coming up to me ever since
それ以来 会う人会う人に
00:31
to ask me questions about spaghetti sauce,
スパゲティソースについて聞かれるようになりました
00:33
which is a wonderful thing in the short term --
一時のこととしては結構なんですが・・・
00:35
(Laughter)
(笑)
00:38
but it's proven to be less than ideal
7年ともなると
00:40
over seven years.
必ずしも好ましくありません
00:42
And so I though I would come
それでスパゲティの話はお終いにしようと
00:44
and try and put spaghetti sauce behind me.
ここへ来ることにしました
00:46
(Laughter)
(笑)
00:49
The theme of this morning's session is Things We Make.
今朝のセッションのテーマは「我々が作るもの」です
00:51
And so I thought I would tell a story
それで その当時としては
00:54
about someone
最も貴重なあるものを
00:56
who made one of the most precious objects
作った人について
00:58
of his era.
話をしようと思いました
01:00
And the man's name is Carl Norden.
その人の名はカール・ノルデン
01:02
Carl Norden was born in 1880.
1880年生まれの
01:05
And he was Swiss.
スイス人です
01:07
And of course, the Swiss can be divided
スイス人というのは大まかに
01:09
into two general categories:
2種類に分けられます
01:11
those who make small, exquisite,
小さく精巧で高価なものを
01:13
expensive objects
作る人々と
01:15
and those who handle the money
小さく精巧で高価なものを
01:17
of those who buy small, exquisite,
買う人たちのお金を
01:19
expensive objects.
扱う人々です
01:22
And Carl Norden is very firmly in the former camp.
ノルデンは明らかに前者に属していました
01:24
He's an engineer.
彼は技術者であり
01:27
He goes to the Federal Polytech in Zurich.
チューリッヒ工科大学に行きました
01:29
In fact, one of his classmates is a young man named Lenin
クラスメートだったレーニンという若者は
01:32
who would go on
後に
01:35
to break small, expensive, exquisite objects.
小さく精巧で高価なものを破壊する活動をすることになります
01:37
And he's a Swiss engineer, Carl.
ノルデンはどこからどう見ても
01:41
And I mean that in its fullest sense of the word.
スイス人技術者でした
01:44
He wears three-piece suits;
三つ揃いのスーツを着て
01:47
and he has a very, very small, important mustache;
厳めしい小さな口ひげを生やし
01:49
and he is domineering
傲慢で
01:54
and narcissistic
自己中心的で
01:56
and driven
活力的な
01:58
and has an extraordinary ego;
エゴの塊でした
02:00
and he works 16-hour days;
そして日に16時間仕事し
02:02
and he has very strong feelings about alternating current;
交流に強い思いを持っていて
02:05
and he feels like a suntan is a sign of moral weakness;
日焼けなど精神の弱さを示すものだと見なし
02:08
and he drinks lots of coffee;
コーヒーを山ほど飲み
02:12
and he does his best work
そしてチューリッヒにある
02:14
sitting in his mother's kitchen in Zurich for hours
母親のキッチンで 何時間も
02:16
in complete silence
静寂の中 計算尺だけを頼りに
02:18
with nothing but a slide rule.
最高の仕事をしたのです
02:20
In any case,
何にせよ
02:22
Carl Norden emigrates to the United States
ノルデンは第一次世界大戦の直前に
02:24
just before the First World War
アメリカに移住し
02:27
and sets up shop on Lafayette Street
マンハッタンのダウンタウンにある
02:29
in downtown Manhattan.
ラファイエット通りに工場を開きました
02:31
And he becomes obsessed with the question
そして飛行機から爆弾を
02:33
of how to drop bombs from an airplane.
どう落とすかという問題に取り付かれるようになりました
02:35
Now if you think about it,
考えてください
02:38
in the age before GPS and radar,
GPSもレーダーもない時代のことです
02:40
that was obviously a really difficult problem.
本当に難しい問題だったのです
02:43
It's a complicated physics problem.
複雑な物理学の問題でした
02:45
You've got a plane that's thousands of feet up in the air,
数千メートルの上空を
02:47
going at hundreds of miles an hour,
時速数百キロで飛ぶ飛行機から
02:50
and you're trying to drop an object, a bomb,
静止している標的に向かって
02:52
towards some stationary target
爆弾を落とすわけですが
02:55
in the face of all kinds of winds and cloud cover
風や 視野を遮る雲など あらゆる障害がある中
02:57
and all kinds of other impediments.
それを行うのです
03:00
And all sorts of people,
第一次世界大戦中や
03:02
moving up to the First World War and between the wars,
2つの大戦の間の時期に
03:04
tried to solve this problem,
多くの人がこの問題に取り組みましたが
03:06
and nearly everybody came up short.
みんな期待はずれな結果に終わりました
03:08
The bombsights that were available
当時の爆撃照準器は
03:10
were incredibly crude.
まったく未熟なものだったのです
03:12
But Carl Norden is really the one who cracks the code.
しかしノルデンは糸口を見つけ
03:14
And he comes up with this incredibly complicated device.
非常に複雑な装置を考案しました
03:17
It weighs about 50 lbs.
重さが20キロ以上もあり
03:20
It's called the Norden Mark 15 bombsight.
ノルデン・マーク15爆撃照準器と名付けられました
03:22
And it has all kinds of levers and ball-bearings
あらゆるレバーやボールベアリングや
03:26
and gadgets and gauges.
機械や計器が組み込まれた
03:28
And he makes this complicated thing.
その装置を彼は作り上げたのです
03:31
And what he allows people to do
爆撃手は
03:34
is he makes the bombardier take this particular object,
この照準器を使って
03:36
visually sight the target,
標的を目視します
03:40
because they're in the Plexiglas cone of the bomber,
爆撃手は爆撃機のプレキシガラス製の突端の中にいます
03:42
and then they plug in the altitude of the plane,
飛行機の高度
03:46
the speed of the plane, the speed of the wind
速度 風の速さ
03:49
and the coordinates
標的の座標を
03:52
of the target.
入力すると
03:54
And the bombsight will tell him when to drop the bomb.
爆撃照準器が爆弾をいつ落とせばよいか教えてくれるのです
03:56
And as Norden famously says,
ノルデンは豪語していました
04:00
"Before that bombsight came along,
爆撃照準器のなかった頃は
04:03
bombs would routinely miss their target
爆撃でしょっちゅう
04:05
by a mile or more."
的を何キロも外していたが
04:07
But he said, with the Mark 15 Norden bombsight,
ノルデン・マーク15爆撃照準器があれば
04:09
he could drop a bomb into a pickle barrel
高度6千キロから爆弾を
04:12
at 20,000 ft.
漬物桶に入れることだってできる
04:14
Now I cannot tell you
このノルデン爆撃照準器の話に
04:16
how incredibly excited
米軍が
04:18
the U.S. military was
どれほど喜んだことか
04:20
by the news of the Norden bombsight.
わかりません
04:22
It was like manna from heaven.
まるで天からの贈り物です
04:25
Here was an army
彼らが体験してきた
04:27
that had just had experience in the First World War,
第一次世界大戦では
04:29
where millions of men
何百万という人々が
04:31
fought each other in the trenches,
塹壕の中で戦い合い
04:33
getting nowhere, making no progress,
膠着状態を続けていたのです
04:35
and here someone had come up with a device
そこへきて
04:37
that allowed them to fly up in the skies
敵陣のはるか上空から
04:41
high above enemy territory
何でもピンポイントに
04:43
and destroy whatever they wanted
破壊できる装置が
04:45
with pinpoint accuracy.
発明されたというのです
04:47
And the U.S. military
米軍はその装置の開発に
04:49
spends 1.5 billion dollars --
15億ドルを投じました
04:51
billion dollars in 1940 dollars --
1940年当時のお金でです
04:53
developing the Norden bombsight.
それがどれほどの額かというと
04:56
And to put that in perspective,
マンハッタン計画にかかったお金でさえ
04:58
the total cost of the Manhattan project
トータルで
05:01
was three billion dollars.
30億ドルです
05:03
Half as much money was spent on this Norden bombsight
ノルデン爆撃照準器には
05:05
as was spent on the most famous military-industrial project
近代の軍産分野における最も有名なプロジェクトの
05:08
of the modern era.
半分に相当する資金が投じられたのです
05:12
And there were people, strategists, within the U.S. military
米軍の戦略家の中には
05:14
who genuinely thought that this single device
この発明1つが
05:17
was going to spell the difference
ナチや日本との戦いの
05:19
between defeat and victory
明暗を分けることになると
05:21
when it came to the battle against the Nazis
真剣に考える
05:23
and against the Japanese.
人たちさえいました
05:25
And for Norden as well,
ノルデン自身にとっても
05:27
this device had incredible moral importance,
この装置には倫理的に大きな意味がありました
05:29
because Norden was a committed Christian.
ノルデンは敬虔なクリスチャンです
05:32
In fact, he would always get upset
彼は人々が爆撃照準器を
05:34
when people referred to the bombsight as his invention,
彼が創造したものとして語ることに腹を立てていました
05:36
because in his eyes,
彼からすると
05:39
only God could invent things.
物事を創造できるのは神だけです
05:41
He was simple the instrument of God's will.
彼は神の意志実現の道具に過ぎません
05:43
And what was God's will?
神の意志は何でしょう?
05:45
Well God's will was that the amount of suffering in any kind of war
神の意志は 戦争で被害を受ける人を
05:47
be reduced to as small an amount as possible.
できる限り少なくするということです
05:50
And what did the Norden bombsight do?
ノルデン爆撃照準器がすることは何でしょう?
05:53
Well it allowed you to do that.
まさにそういうことです
05:55
It allowed you to bomb only those things
爆撃する必要があるものだけに
05:57
that you absolutely needed and wanted to bomb.
爆弾を落とせるようになるのです
05:59
So in the years leading up to the Second World War,
第二次世界大戦までに米軍は
06:03
the U.S. military buys 90,000
ノルデン爆撃照準器を
06:06
of these Norden bombsights
1台1万4千ドルで
06:09
at a cost of $14,000 each --
9万台購入しました
06:11
again, in 1940 dollars, that's a lot of money.
1940年当時では相当なお金です
06:13
And they trained 50,000 bombardiers on how to use them --
そして5万人の爆撃手に使い方の訓練を施しました
06:16
long extensive, months-long training sessions --
何ヶ月にも及ぶ広範なトレーニングが必要でした
06:19
because these things are essentially analog computers;
照準器は実質アナログコンピュータで
06:23
they're not easy to use.
簡単に使えるものではなかったのです
06:25
And they make everyone of those bombardiers take an oath,
そして爆撃手たちは
06:27
to swear that if they're ever captured,
捕虜になっても決して
06:30
they will not divulge a single detail
敵に情報を漏らさないという
06:33
of this particular device to the enemy,
宣誓を求められました
06:35
because it's imperative the enemy not get their hands
この中核技術を敵の手に渡さないということが
06:37
on this absolutely essential piece of technology.
絶対条件だったからです
06:40
And whenever the Norden bombsight is taken onto a plane,
そしてノルデン爆撃照準器を飛行機に積み込むときには
06:42
it's escorted there by a series of armed guards.
武装した兵士が護衛に付き
06:45
And it's carried in a box with a canvas shroud over it.
箱に入れて布の覆いを掛けて運ばれ
06:48
And the box is handcuffed to one of the guards.
箱は護衛兵と手錠で繋がれていました
06:51
It's never allowed to be photographed.
写真を撮ることも禁じられていました
06:54
And there's a little incendiary device inside of it,
中には小型爆破装置が組み込まれ
06:56
so that, if the plane ever crashes, it will be destroyed
飛行機が墜落したときは破壊して
06:59
and there's no way the enemy can ever get their hands on it.
敵の手に渡らないようにしていました
07:02
The Norden bombsight
ノルデン爆撃照準器は
07:05
is the Holy Grail.
まさに聖杯だったのです
07:07
So what happens during the Second World War?
それで第二次世界大戦での成果はどうだったのでしょう?
07:10
Well, it turns out it's not the Holy Grail.
実のところ聖杯でもなんでもないことがわかりました
07:13
In practice, the Norden bombsight
完璧な条件下であれば
07:16
can drop a bomb into a pickle barrel at 20,000 ft.,
ノルデン爆撃照準器は 6千キロ上空から漬物桶に
07:18
but that's under perfect conditions.
爆弾を投下することができましたが
07:21
And of course, in wartime,
もちろん実戦においては
07:23
conditions aren't perfect.
完璧な条件なんてありはしません
07:25
First of all, it's really hard to use -- really hard to use.
第一に操作が非常に難しかったのです
07:27
And not all of the people
5万人の爆撃手がみんな
07:30
who are of those 50,000 men who are bombardiers
アナログコンピュータを
07:32
have the ability to properly program an analog computer.
プログラミングする能力があったわけではありません
07:34
Secondly, it breaks down a lot.
第二に しょっちゅう故障しました
07:38
It's full of all kinds of gyroscopes and pulleys
ジャイロスコープに 滑車に 機械に
07:40
and gadgets and ball-bearings,
ボールベアリングが詰め込まれており
07:42
and they don't work as well as they ought to
実戦のさなかには
07:44
in the heat of battle.
期待したように機能しませんでした
07:46
Thirdly, when Norden was making his calculations,
第三に ノルデンが計算したときには
07:48
he assumed that a plane would be flying
飛行機が比較的低空を
07:51
at a relatively slow speed at low altitudes.
比較的低速で飛ぶことを想定していました
07:53
Well in a real war, you can't do that;
これは実戦では出来ない相談です
07:56
you'll get shot down.
撃ち落とされてしまいます
07:58
So they started flying them at high altitudes at incredibly high speeds.
だから高高度を非常に速いスピードで飛んでいました
08:00
And the Norden bombsight doesn't work as well
そのような条件ではノルデン爆撃照準器は
08:03
under those conditions.
あまりうまく機能しなかったのです
08:05
But most of all,
そして何よりも
08:07
the Norden bombsight required the bombardier
爆撃手が標的を視認できることを
08:09
to make visual contact with the target.
前提としていたということがあります
08:11
But of course, what happens in real life?
実際はどうでしょう?
08:14
There are clouds, right.
雲があります
08:16
It needs cloudless sky to be really accurate.
正確な爆撃には雲のない空が必要でした
08:19
Well how many cloudless skies
1940年から1945年の間の
08:22
do you think there were above Central Europe
中央ヨーロッパで
08:24
between 1940 and 1945?
雲ひとつない空というのがどれほどあったのか?
08:26
Not a lot.
そんなにはなかったでしょう
08:29
And then to give you a sense
ノルデン爆撃照準器の不正確さを
08:31
of just how inaccurate the Norden bombsight was,
お分かりいただける有名な例を挙げましょう
08:33
there was a famous case in 1944
1944年に連合軍は
08:35
where the Allies bombed a chemical plant in Leuna, Germany.
ドイツのロイナにある化学工場を爆撃しました
08:37
And the chemical plant comprised
工場は3平方キロの
08:41
757 acres.
広さがありました
08:43
And over the course of 22 bombing missions,
22回の爆撃作戦で
08:45
the Allies dropped 85,000 bombs
連合軍は8万5千発の爆弾を
08:48
on this 757 acre chemical plant,
3平方キロの化学工場に
08:53
using the Norden bombsight.
ノルデン爆撃照準器を使って投下しました
08:57
Well what percentage of those bombs
その爆弾の何パーセントが
09:00
do you think actually landed
実際に3平方キロの工場敷地内に
09:02
inside the 700-acre perimeter of the plant?
落ちたと思いますか?
09:04
10 percent. 10 percent.
10%です
09:07
And of those 10 percent that landed,
しかも落ちた10%のうちの
09:10
16 percent didn't even go off; they were duds.
16%は不発でした
09:12
The Leuna chemical plant,
ロイナ化学工場は
09:15
after one of the most extensive bombings in the history of the war,
第二次世界大戦中で最も徹底した爆撃を受けましたが
09:17
was up and running within weeks.
何週間かのちには復旧していたのです
09:20
And by the way, all those precautions
ところでナチの手に渡すまいとする
09:23
to keep the Norden bombsight out of the hands of the Nazis?
あの予防措置は有効だったのでしょうか?
09:25
Well it turns out
後にわかったことですが
09:28
that Carl Norden, as a proper Swiss,
生粋のスイス人だったノルデンは
09:30
was very enamored of German engineers.
ドイツ人の職人を気に入っていて
09:32
So in the 1930s, he hired a whole bunch of them,
1930年代にたくさん雇っていましたが
09:35
including a man named Hermann Long
その中の一人 ヘルマン・ロングという男が
09:37
who, in 1938,
1938年に
09:39
gave a complete set of the plans for the Norden bombsight to the Nazis.
ノルデン爆撃照準器の設計図一式をナチの手に渡していました
09:41
So they had their own Norden bombsight throughout the entire war --
だからドイツも大戦を通してノルデン爆撃照準器を持っていたのです
09:44
which also, by the way, didn't work very well.
それもまたあまり機能はしていませんでしたが
09:47
(Laughter)
(笑)
09:50
So why do we talk about the Norden bombsight?
ではなぜノルデン爆撃照準器なんかの話をしているのでしょう?
09:52
Well because we live in an age
私たちが生きているこの時代には
09:55
where there are lots and lots
たくさんのノルデン爆撃照準器が
09:57
of Norden bombsights.
あるからです
09:59
We live in a time where there are all kinds
非常に頭のいい連中が
10:01
of really, really smart people
そこら中を闊歩して
10:03
running around, saying that they've invented gadgets
世界を変えることになる
10:05
that will forever change our world.
装置を発明したと言っています
10:07
They've invented websites that will allow people to be free.
人々を自由にするWebサイトを作ったと言っています
10:09
They've invented some kind of this thing, or this thing, or this thing
彼らはこれを作ったんだ これを作ったんだと言い
10:12
that will make our world forever better.
それが世界を永遠に良くするのだと言います
10:16
If you go into the military,
軍事領域に目を向ければ たくさんの
10:19
you'll find lots of Carl Nordens as well.
カール・ノルデンたちを目にするでしょう
10:21
If you go to the Pentagon, they will say,
ペンタゴンで彼らはこう言っています
10:23
"You know what, now we really can
「今や我々は
10:25
put a bomb inside a pickle barrel
高度6千キロから
10:27
at 20,000 ft."
漬物桶の中に爆弾を投下できるのだ」
10:29
And you know what, it's true; they actually can do that now.
今ではそれが本当にできるようになったのです
10:31
But we need to be very clear
しかしその意味がどれほど小さなものか
10:34
about how little that means.
私たちは認識している必要があります
10:36
In the Iraq War, at the beginning of the first Iraq War,
イラク戦争の初期に
10:39
the U.S. military, the air force,
米空軍は
10:42
sent two squadrons of F-15E Fighter Eagles
F-15Eイーグル戦闘機の飛行隊2つを
10:44
to the Iraqi desert
イラクの砂漠に派遣し
10:47
equipped with these five million dollar cameras
それには砂漠の地表を見渡せる
10:49
that allowed them to see the entire desert floor.
5百万ドルのカメラが搭載されていました
10:51
And their mission was to find and to destroy --
彼らの目的はスカッドミサイルの発見と破壊です
10:54
remember the Scud missile launchers,
イラクが
10:57
those surface-to-air missiles
イスラエルに撃ち込んでいた
10:59
that the Iraqis were launching at the Israelis?
あの地対地ミサイルです
11:01
The mission of the two squadrons
2つの飛行隊の目的は
11:03
was to get rid of all the Scud missile launchers.
スカッドミサイルの発射台を一掃することでした
11:05
And so they flew missions day and night,
それで彼らはこの悩みの種を取り除くべく
11:08
and they dropped thousands of bombs,
昼となく夜となく
11:10
and they fired thousands of missiles
何千という爆弾を投下し
11:12
in an attempt to get rid of this particular scourge.
何千というミサイルを撃ち込みました
11:15
And after the war was over, there was an audit done --
戦争が終わって監査が行われました
11:18
as the army always does, the air force always does --
軍隊がいつもやることです
11:20
and they asked the question:
彼らの疑問は どれだけのスカッドが
11:22
how many Scuds did we actually destroy?
実際破壊されたのかということでした
11:24
You know what the answer was?
結果はどうだったと思います?
11:26
Zero, not a single one.
ゼロです
11:28
Now why is that?
どうしてだったのでしょう?
11:30
Is it because their weapons weren't accurate?
兵器の精度が低かったためでしょうか?
11:32
Oh no, they were brilliantly accurate.
いえ 極めて高精度でした
11:34
They could have destroyed this little thing right here
ここにある小さな箱を 上空7千5百メートルから
11:37
from 25,000 ft.
破壊することもできました
11:39
The issue was they didn't know where the Scud launchers were.
問題はスカッドの発射台がどこにあるのかわからなかったということです
11:41
The problem with bombs and pickle barrels
爆弾と漬物桶の問題で難しいのは
11:45
is not getting the bomb inside the pickle barrel,
爆弾を桶に入れることではなく
11:48
it's knowing how to find the pickle barrel.
漬物桶をどうやって見つけるかということなのです
11:50
That's always been the harder problem
戦争において難しいのは
11:53
when it comes to fighting wars.
いつもそういうことなのです
11:55
Or take the battle in Afghanistan.
アフガニスタンの戦闘はどうでしょう?
11:57
What is the signature weapon
北西パキスタンにおける
12:00
of the CIA's war in Northwest Pakistan?
CIAの戦争を代表する兵器は何でしょう?
12:02
It's the drone. What is the drone?
ドローンです ドローンとは何か?
12:04
Well it is the grandson of the Norden Mark 15 bombsight.
ノルデン・マーク15爆撃照準器の孫に当たるものです
12:07
It is this weapon of devastating accuracy and precision.
圧倒的なまでの精度と正確さを備えた兵器です
12:11
And over the course of the last six years
過去6年
12:15
in Northwest Pakistan,
北西パキスタンで
12:17
the CIA has flown hundreds of drone missiles,
CIAは何百というドローンミサイルを発射し
12:20
and it's used those drones
パキスタンやタリバンの
12:23
to kill 2,000 suspected
戦闘員と疑わしき
12:25
Pakistani and Taliban militants.
2千人を殺しました
12:27
Now what is the accuracy of those drones?
ドローンの精度はどれくらいだったのでしょう?
12:31
Well it's extraordinary.
すごいものです
12:34
We think we're now at 95 percent accuracy
ドローンの攻撃精度は
12:36
when it comes to drone strikes.
95%と目されています
12:39
95 percent of the people we kill need to be killed, right?
殺した相手の95%は殺すべき人間だということです
12:41
That is one of the most extraordinary records
近代戦争の歴史の中でも
12:44
in the history of modern warfare.
最も目覚ましい記録でしょう
12:46
But do you know what the crucial thing is?
しかし重要なことがひとつあります
12:48
In that exact same period
圧倒的な精度を持つドローンを
12:50
that we've been using these drones
米軍が使っていた
12:52
with devastating accuracy,
同じ時期に
12:54
the number of attacks, of suicide attacks and terrorist attacks,
アフガニスタンの米軍に対する
12:56
against American forces in Afghanistan
自爆攻撃やテロ攻撃の数は
12:59
has increased tenfold.
10倍にも増えたのです
13:01
As we have gotten more and more efficient
我々が彼らを殺す効率が
13:04
in killing them,
良くなればなるほど
13:06
they have become angrier and angrier
彼らはますます怒って
13:08
and more and more motivated to kill us.
我々を殺そうとする動機を強める結果になっているのです
13:11
I have not described to you a success story.
私がお話ししているのは成功談ではありません
13:14
I've described to you
私がお話ししているのは
13:17
the opposite of a success story.
成功談の反対です
13:19
And this is the problem
この問題は 私たちが作るものに対する
13:21
with our infatuation with the things we make.
思い上がりの結果です
13:23
We think the things we make can solve our problems,
私たちは自分の作ったもので問題が解決すると
13:25
but our problems are much more complex than that.
思っていますが 問題はもっと複雑なのです
13:28
The issue isn't the accuracy of the bombs you have,
問題は爆弾の精度ではなく
13:31
it's how you use the bombs you have,
爆弾をどう使うかということ
13:34
and more importantly,
さらに重要なのは
13:36
whether you ought to use bombs at all.
そもそも爆弾を使うべきなのかということです
13:38
There's a postscript
カール・ノルデンの
13:42
to the Norden story
見事な爆撃照準器の話には
13:44
of Carl Norden and his fabulous bombsight.
続きがあります
13:46
And that is, on August 6th, 1945,
1945年8月6日
13:49
a B-29 bomber called the Enola Gay
エノラ・ゲイというB-29爆撃機が
13:52
flew over Japan
日本へと飛んで
13:55
and, using a Norden bombsight,
ノルデン爆撃照準器を使って
13:57
dropped a very large thermonuclear device
広島に大きな
13:59
on the city of Hiroshima.
熱核反応装置を投下しました
14:02
And as was typical with the Norden bombsight,
ノルデン爆撃照準器ではいつものことですが
14:05
the bomb actually missed its target by 800 ft.
標的を250メートルほど外していました
14:08
But of course, it didn't matter.
しかしもちろんそれは問題ではありませんでした
14:11
And that's the greatest irony of all
ノルデン爆撃照準器にとって
14:14
when it comes to the Norden bombsight.
最大の皮肉と言えるでしょう
14:16
the air force's 1.5 billion dollar bombsight
米空軍が15億ドル投じた爆撃照準器が
14:19
was used to drop its three billion dollar bomb,
30億ドルの爆弾を投下するのに使われましたが
14:23
which didn't need a bombsight at all.
その爆弾にはそもそも爆撃照準器が必要なかったのです
14:27
Meanwhile, back in New York,
その頃ニューヨークでは
14:30
no one told Carl Norden
ノルデンに彼の爆撃照準器が
14:32
that his bombsight was used over Hiroshima.
広島で使われたことを伝える人はいませんでした
14:34
He was a committed Christian.
彼は敬虔なクリスチャンであり
14:37
He thought he had designed something
戦争の犠牲者を減らすものを
14:39
that would reduce the toll of suffering in war.
作ったと思っていたわけですから
14:41
It would have broken his heart.
知ればきっと心を痛めたことでしょう
14:44
(Applause)
(拍手)
14:47
Translated by Yasushi Aoki
Reviewed by Natsuhiko Mizutani

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Malcolm Gladwell - Writer
Detective of fads and emerging subcultures, chronicler of jobs-you-never-knew-existed, Malcolm Gladwell's work is toppling the popular understanding of bias, crime, food, marketing, race, consumers and intelligence.

Why you should listen

Malcolm Gladwell searches for the counterintuitive in what we all take to be the mundane: cookies, sneakers, pasta sauce. A New Yorker staff writer since 1996, he visits obscure laboratories and infomercial set kitchens as often as the hangouts of freelance cool-hunters -- a sort of pop-R&D gumshoe -- and for that has become a star lecturer and bestselling author.

Sparkling with curiosity, undaunted by difficult research (yet an eloquent, accessible writer), his work uncovers truths hidden in strange data. His always-delightful blog tackles topics from serial killers to steroids in sports, while provocative recent work in the New Yorker sheds new light on the Flynn effect -- the decades-spanning rise in I.Q. scores.

Gladwell has written four books. The Tipping Point, which began as a New Yorker piece, applies the principles of epidemiology to crime (and sneaker sales), while Blink examines the unconscious processes that allow the mind to "thin slice" reality -- and make decisions in the blink of an eye. His third book, Outliers, questions the inevitabilities of success and identifies the relation of success to nature versus nurture. The newest work, What the Dog Saw and Other Adventures, is an anthology of his New Yorker contributions. 

He says: "There is more going on beneath the surface than we think, and more going on in little, finite moments of time than we would guess."
 

More profile about the speaker
Malcolm Gladwell | Speaker | TED.com