sponsored links
TEDxBoston 2011

Jay Bradner: Open-source cancer research

ジェイ・ブラッドナー「癌研究のオープンソース化」

May 26, 2011

癌細胞は、自身が癌細胞であることをどうやって記憶するのか。ジェイ・ブラッドナーの研究室では、この問いの鍵を握るJQ1という化合物を見つけました。そして、特許を取得する代わりに、研究を進めるために、研究成果と化合物のサンプルを40の研究施設と共有しました。オープンソース手法を活用した医学研究の将来を、ここに垣間見ます。

Jay Bradner - Research scientist
In his lab, Jay Bradner, a researcher at Harvard and Dana Farber in Boston, works on a breakthrough approach for subverting cancer .. and he’s giving the secret away. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
I moved to Boston 10 years ago, from Chicago,
私は癌と化学の研究をするために
00:15
with an interest in cancer and in chemistry.
10年前にシカゴからボストンに移り住みました
00:19
You might know that chemistry is the science of making molecules --
化学は化合物を作る学問だとお考えかもしれません
00:22
or to my taste, new drugs for cancer.
しかし 私にとっては”化学=癌の新薬”です
00:25
And you might also know that, for science and medicine,
科学者と医療研究者にとって ボストンは
00:29
Boston is a bit of a candy store.
何でもあるおもちゃ屋のようにわくわくする場所です
00:32
You can't roll a stop sign in Cambridge
車でどこの交差点を通っても
00:35
without hitting a graduate student.
必ず大学院生を見かけます
00:38
The bar is called the Miracle of Science.
バーも「科学の奇跡」という店名です
00:40
The billboards say "Lab Space Available."
「研究室 空きあります」の看板も見かけます
00:42
And it's fair to say that in these 10 years,
さて この10年の間
00:46
we've witnessed absolutely the start
ゲノム医学という科学的革命が
00:48
of a scientific revolution -- that of genome medicine.
始まったと言っても過言ではないでしょう
00:51
We know more about the patients that enter our clinic now
診察室に訪れる患者のことが
00:54
than ever before.
今まで以上に詳しく分かります
00:56
And we're able, finally, to answer the question
患者の「なぜ癌になったのか?」という
00:58
that's been so pressing for so many years:
長年誰も答えることができなかった問いに
01:00
why do I have cancer?
答えることができるようになりました
01:03
This information is also pretty staggering.
ここに驚くようなデータがあります
01:06
You might know that,
ゲノム創薬は始まったばかりですが
01:08
so far in just the dawn of this revolution,
すでに次のことが分かっています――
01:10
we know that there are perhaps 40,000 unique mutations
約40,000種の異なる遺伝子変異が
01:12
affecting more than 10,000 genes,
10,000以上の遺伝子に影響を与えている
01:15
and that there are 500 of these genes
そのうち500の遺伝子が
01:18
that are bona-fide drivers,
癌の真の因子であり
01:20
causes of cancer.
原因なのです
01:22
Yet comparatively,
しかし標的治療薬は
01:24
we have about a dozen targeted medications.
まだ12種類ほどしか存在しません
01:26
And this inadequacy of cancer medicine
癌の治療薬の不足は
01:29
really hit home when my father was diagnosed
父親が膵臓癌と診断されたとき
01:32
with pancreatic cancer.
痛感しました
01:34
We didn't fly him to Boston.
ボストンでの治療や
01:37
We didn't sequence his genome.
遺伝子検査は行いませんでした
01:39
It's been known for decades
それはこの悪性腫瘍の因子が
01:41
what causes this malignancy.
何十年も前から知られているからです
01:43
It's three proteins --
Ras・Myc・P53という
01:45
Ras, Myc and P53.
3種類のタンパク質が引き起こします
01:47
This is old information we've known since about the 80s,
1980年代からこのことは知られていました
01:50
yet there's no medicine I can prescribe
3種類のタンパク質は
01:53
to a patient with this
様々な固形腫瘍を引き起こします
01:55
or any of the numerous solid tumors
しかし この腫瘍を患う患者に
01:57
caused by these three horsemen
投与できる薬はまだありません
01:59
of the apocalypse that is cancer.
死を呼ぶ Ras・Myc・P53に効く薬は
02:01
There's no Ras, no Myc, no P53 drug.
まだ存在しないのです
02:04
And you might fairly ask: why is that?
「なぜ?」と思われるかもしれません
02:07
And the very unsatisfying, yet scientific, answer
答えは「難しすぎるから」です 全く納得できませんが
02:09
is it's too hard.
これが科学的な答えです
02:12
That for whatever reason,
そのためこれらのタンパク質は 専門用語で
02:14
these three proteins have entered a space in the language of our field
創薬につながる可能性が低い「アンドラッガブル遺伝子」
02:16
that's called the undruggable genome --
と呼ばれるようになりました
02:19
which is like calling a computer unsurfable
これはあきらめを表す酷い業界用語です
02:21
or the Moon unwalkable.
パソコンでネットを見ることや
02:23
It's a horrible term of trade.
月に行くことをあきらめるようなものです
02:25
But what it means
でも 現状はこういうことなのです――
02:27
is that we fail to identify a greasy pocket in these proteins,
タンパク質の鍵穴を見つけ
02:29
into which we, like molecular locksmiths,
鍵を開け そこに薬効のある
02:31
can fashion an active, small, organic molecule
小さな有機化合物を入れることに
02:34
or drug substance.
失敗したということです
02:37
Now as I was training in clinical medicine
さて 私が臨床医学・血液学・腫瘍学---
02:39
and hematology and oncology
幹細胞移植の研修を受けている間に
02:41
and stem cell transplantation,
起こったのは
02:43
what we had instead,
ヒ素やサリドマイド
02:45
cascading through the regulatory network at the FDA,
そしてナイトロジェンマスタードといった
02:47
were these substances --
物質が
02:50
arsenic, thalidomide
米国FDAの承認過程を
02:52
and this chemical derivative
経て 抗がん剤として
02:54
of nitrogen mustard gas.
承認されたことです
02:56
And this is the 21st century.
21世紀なのにまだその段階なのです
02:58
And so, I guess you'd say, dissatisfied
これらの治療薬の効果と質に
03:01
with the performance and quality of these medicines,
疑問を抱いたため
03:03
I went back to school in chemistry
化学の研究のために大学に戻ったとも言えます
03:05
with the idea
創薬化学のやり方を理解して
03:08
that perhaps by learning the trade of discovery chemistry
オープンソースやクラウドソーシングそして
03:10
and approaching it in the context of this brave new world
大学ならではの協業ネットワークを活用する方法で
03:13
of the open-source,
抗体医薬を研究するために
03:16
the crowd-source,
大学に戻りました
03:18
the collaborative network that we have access to within academia,
新時代の研究方法を用いることで
03:20
that we might more quickly
強力な分子標的治療法を
03:23
bring powerful and targeted therapies
もっと早く医療現場に
03:25
to our patients.
届けられるかもしれないのです
03:27
And so please consider this a work in progress,
ただ この方法はまだ一般的でないとご理解ください
03:29
but I'd like to tell you today a story
今日はこれから
03:32
about a very rare cancer
大変稀な扁平上皮性癌と
03:34
called midline carcinoma,
その原因でありアンドラッガブルな
03:36
about the protein target,
標的タンパク質BRD4 そして
03:38
the undruggable protein target that causes this cancer,
JQ1いう化合物についてお話します
03:40
called BRD4,
JQ1は
03:42
and about a molecule
ダナファーバー癌研究所の
03:44
developed at my lab at Dana Farber Cancer Institute
私の研究室で開発しました
03:46
called JQ1, which we affectionately named for Jun Qi,
愛着を込めて この化合物を作った化学者である
03:48
the chemist that made this molecule.
Jun Qi氏のイニシャルを使いました
03:51
Now BRD4 is an interesting protein.
さて BRD4は興味深いタンパク質です
03:54
You might ask yourself, with all the things cancer's trying to do to kill our patient,
癌は様々な方法で患者の体を蝕もうとしますが どうやって---
03:57
how does it remember it's cancer?
自分が癌だと記憶しているのでしょうか
04:00
When it winds up its genome,
ゲノムを複製し細胞分裂するとき
04:02
divides into two cells and unwinds again,
また癌細胞になるのはなぜか?
04:04
why does it not turn into an eye, into a liver,
目や肝臓をつくるための
04:06
as it has all the genes necessary to do this?
遺伝子は揃っているのに そうはなりません
04:08
It remembers that it's cancer.
癌であることを記憶しているのです
04:11
And the reason is that cancer, like every cell in the body,
それは 癌細胞が他の細胞と同じように
04:13
places little molecular bookmarks,
分子レベルの印を持っていて
04:16
little Post-it notes,
新しい細胞に「君は癌細胞だ――
04:18
that remind the cell "I'm cancer; I should keep growing."
増殖しないとだめだ」と記憶させるからです
04:20
And those Post-it notes
ブロモドメインを持つ
04:23
involve this and other proteins of its class --
BRD4や他のタンパク質類には
04:25
so-called bromodomains.
この分子レベルの印が存在します
04:27
So we developed an idea, a rationale,
私達は次のように考えました――
04:29
that perhaps, if we made a molecule
このタンパク質の根元にある
04:32
that prevented the Post-it note from sticking
小さなポケットに化合物を入れて
04:34
by entering into the little pocket
この印が結合することを
04:36
at the base of this spinning protein,
防ぐことができれば
04:38
then maybe we could convince cancer cells,
BRD4依存性の癌細胞に
04:40
certainly those addicted to this BRD4 protein,
癌であることを忘れさせることができるのではないかと考えたのです
04:42
that they're not cancer.
癌であることを忘れさせることができるのではないかと考えたのです
04:45
And so we started to work on this problem.
そうして私達の探求が始まりました
04:47
We developed libraries of compounds
化合物ライブラリーを構築し
04:49
and eventually arrived at this and similar substances
探していた物質であるJQ1と
04:51
called JQ1.
その類似物質にたどりついたのです
04:54
Now not being a drug company,
私達は製薬会社ではありませんから
04:56
we could do certain things, we had certain flexibilities,
製薬会社にとっては難しくて当然である
04:58
that I respect that a pharmaceutical industry doesn't have.
柔軟なアプローチを取ることができます
05:01
We just started mailing it to our friends.
私の研究室は小さいので
05:04
I have a small lab.
化合物の動態が知りたいと考え
05:06
We thought we'd just send it to people and see how the molecule behaves.
化合物を友人に郵送しました
05:08
And we sent it to Oxford, England
英オックスフォードの優秀な結晶学者チームは
05:10
where a group of talented crystallographers provided this picture,
ある画像を送ってきて この化合物が
05:12
which helped us understand
特定の標的タンパク質に対して
05:15
exactly how this molecule is so potent for this protein target.
とても有効である理由を教えてくれました
05:17
It's what we call a perfect fit
専門用語で形状相補性と言いますが
05:20
of shape complimentarity, or hand in glove.
ぴったりとはまったのです
05:22
Now this is a very rare cancer,
このBRD4依存性の癌は
05:24
this BRD4-addicted cancer.
とても珍しい癌です
05:26
And so we worked with samples of material
私達は ブリガム・アンド・ウィメンズ病院の
05:28
that were collected by young pathologists at Brigham Women's Hospital.
病理学者が集めた検体を使って調べました
05:31
And as we treated these cells with this molecule,
そして癌細胞をこの化合物で処理することで
05:34
we observed something really striking.
衝撃的な現象を観察できたのです
05:37
The cancer cells,
小さく丸みを帯びた形の
05:39
small, round and rapidly dividing,
増殖速度がとても速い
05:41
grew these arms and extensions.
その細胞が
05:43
They were changing shape.
腕のような突起を伸ばし始めたのです
05:45
In effect, the cancer cell
要するに細胞の形が変わったのです
05:47
was forgetting it was cancer
癌細胞であることを忘れ
05:49
and becoming a normal cell.
正常な細胞に変わっていたのです
05:51
This got us very excited.
この発見にはとても興奮しました
05:54
The next step would be to put this molecule into mice.
次のステップはマウスに化合物を注入することでしたが
05:57
The only problem was there's no mouse model of this rare cancer.
この稀な癌のマウスモデルがないという課題がありました
06:00
And so at the time that we were doing this research,
このとき私はコネチカット州出身の
06:03
I was caring for a 29 year-old firefighter from Connecticut
29歳の消防士を診ていました
06:06
who was very much at the end of life
このBRD4依存性の治療できない癌で 彼は
06:09
with this incurable cancer.
末期状態にありました
06:12
This BRD4-addicted cancer
癌は左肺に広がっていて
06:14
was growing throughout his left lung,
胸に通されたドレーンから
06:16
and he had a chest tube in that was draining little bits of debris.
胸水を抜いていました
06:18
And every nursing shift
そして看護師が巡回するたびに
06:20
we would throw this material out.
廃液は捨てられていました
06:22
And so we approached this patient
私達は彼に協力を依頼しました
06:24
and asked if he would collaborate with us.
マウスを使った臨床実験を行ない
06:26
Could we take this precious and rare cancerous material
薬のプロトタイプを作るために胸の管から抜かれている
06:28
from this chest tube
とても希少な癌細胞を
06:32
and drive it across town and put it into mice
使わせてもらえないかと
06:34
and try to do a clinical trial
研究の協力を依頼しました
06:36
and stage it with a prototype drug?
ヒトで試すことはもちろんできません
06:38
Well that would be impossible and, rightly, illegal to do in humans.
彼は癌細胞の提供に同意してくれました
06:40
And he obliged us.
そしてルーリーファミリーセンターにおいて
06:43
At the Lurie Family Center for Animal Imaging,
同僚のアンドリュー・カン氏が
06:46
my colleague, Andrew Kung, grew this cancer successfully in mice
基材への細胞接着を行なわずに マウスの体内で
06:48
without ever touching plastic.
癌細胞を培養することに成功しました
06:51
And you can see this PET scan of a mouse -- what we call a pet PET.
これはマウスのPET画像です
06:53
The cancer is growing
ペットのPETとでも言いましょうか
06:56
as this red, huge mass in the hind limb of this animal.
後ろ足にある赤く大きな塊が腫瘍です
06:58
And as we treat it with our compound,
私達が作った化合物を使うことで
07:01
this addiction to sugar,
癌細胞の活発な糖代謝と
07:03
this rapid growth, faded.
増殖速度が抑制されました
07:05
And on the animal on the right,
この右のマウスでは
07:07
you see that the cancer was responding.
化合物が癌に効いているのが分かります
07:09
We've completed now clinical trials
これまで4匹のマウスモデルを使った
07:12
in four mouse models of this disease.
実験を行ないました
07:14
And every time, we see the same thing.
実験の結果はいつも同じです
07:16
The mice with this cancer that get the drug live,
化合物を与えられたマウスは生き延び
07:18
and the ones that don't rapidly perish.
それ以外のマウスはすぐに死んでしまいます
07:20
So we started to wonder,
次に製薬会社であればどう動くか
07:25
what would a drug company do at this point?
製薬会社ならここから先は
07:27
Well they probably would keep this a secret
どうするだろうかと考えました
07:29
until they turn a prototype drug
たぶんプロトタイプを原薬にするまで
07:31
into an active pharmaceutical substance.
秘密にするだろうと思いましたので
07:33
And so we did just the opposite.
私達は製薬会社とは逆の行動をとりました
07:35
We published a paper
プロトタイプの早い段階で
07:37
that described this finding
この研究成果について
07:39
at the earliest prototype stage.
論文を発表したのです
07:41
We gave the world the chemical identity of this molecule,
通常は秘密にされる化合物の化学的特定名も
07:43
typically a secret in our discipline.
公開しました
07:46
We told people exactly how to make it.
化合物の作り方についても公開しました
07:48
We gave them our email address,
メールアドレスも公開し
07:50
suggesting that, if they write us,
連絡をもらえれば化合物のサンプルを
07:52
we'll send them a free molecule.
無料で提供すると伝えました
07:54
We basically tried to create
自分達にとってこれ以上ないほど
07:56
the most competitive environment for our lab as possible.
競争の激しい環境を作ろうとしたのです
07:58
And this was, unfortunately, successful.
残念ながら...結果は成功でした
08:00
(Laughter)
(笑)
08:02
Because now when we've shared this molecule,
昨年12月から
08:04
just since December of last year,
アメリカにある40の研究施設と
08:06
with 40 laboratories in the United States
ヨーロッパにある30の研究施設に
08:08
and 30 more in Europe --
私達が見つけた化合物を提供してきました
08:10
many of them pharmaceutical companies
その提供先の多くは
08:12
seeking now to enter this space,
この珍しい癌を狙って
08:14
to target this rare cancer
開発を試みている製薬会社です
08:16
that, thankfully right now,
業界で今この癌がターゲットとして
08:18
is quite desirable to study in that industry.
注目されているのは願っても無いことです
08:20
But the science that's coming back from all of these laboratories
これらの研究施設から戻ってきた
08:24
about the use of this molecule
化合物の用途に関する科学的知見は
08:27
has provided us insights
自分達だけでは得られなかった
08:29
that we might not have had on our own.
有益なものです
08:31
Leukemia cells treated with this compound
白血病細胞を化合物で処理すると
08:33
turn into normal white blood cells.
健康な白血球に戻ります
08:35
Mice with multiple myeloma,
この化合物は
08:38
an incurable malignancy of the bone marrow,
悪性骨髄腫瘍である多発性骨髄腫という
08:40
respond dramatically
不治の病を患うマウスに
08:43
to the treatment with this drug.
劇的な効果があります
08:45
You might know that fat has memory.
ご存じのとおり脂肪には記憶力があります
08:47
Nice to be able to demonstrate that for you.
残念なことに ここに実例がありますが...
08:49
And in fact, this molecule
この化合物は脂肪幹細胞の
08:53
prevents this adipocyte, this fat stem cell,
「脂肪をつくる」という記憶を妨げます
08:55
from remembering how to make fat
重大な健康問題を防ぐことができるのです
08:58
such that mice on a high fat diet,
私の地元シカゴの人々のように
09:01
like the folks in my hometown of Chicago,
脂肪分の多い食事をしているマウスでも
09:03
fail to develop fatty liver,
脂肪肝を発症しないのです
09:06
which is a major medical problem.
この研究を通して
09:08
What this research taught us --
私の研究室だけでなく
09:11
not just my lab, but our institute,
ハーバード大医学部全体が
09:13
and Harvard Medical School more generally --
学んだことがあります
09:15
is that we have unique resources in academia
学界には新薬の発見に役立つ
09:17
for drug discovery --
学界特有の資源があるということです
09:19
that our center
私が所属する研究施設では
09:21
that has tested perhaps more cancer molecules in a scientific way
どこよりも多くの抗癌化合物を
09:23
than any other,
科学的に研究してきましたが
09:25
never made one of its own.
開発はしてきませんでした
09:27
For all the reasons you see listed here,
ここに列挙した特徴を
09:29
we think there's a great opportunity for academic centers
教育研究機関は兼ね備えているので
09:31
to participate in this earliest, conceptually-tricky
創造性を必要とし概念的にやっかいなところのある
09:34
and creative discipline
まだ初期段階のプロトタイプ開発に参加するのは
09:37
of prototype drug discovery.
教育研究機関には大きなチャンスです
09:40
So what next?
それでは何を次に行うべきでしょうか?
09:44
We have this molecule, but it's not a pill yet.
化合物はありますが
09:46
It's not orally available.
まだ錠剤になっておらず経口薬として提供できません
09:48
We need to fix it, so that we can deliver it to our patients.
患者に使ってもらえるようにする必要があります
09:51
And everyone in the lab,
私の研究室の誰もが
09:54
especially following the interaction with these patients,
特に患者と直接関わって以来
09:56
feels quite compelled
この化合物を使った薬を世に出したいと
09:58
to deliver a drug substance based on this molecule.
強く感じています
10:00
It's here where I have to say
そこで皆さんにお願いです
10:02
that we could use your help and your insights,
力と知恵を貸してください
10:04
your collaborative participation.
そして取り組みを一緒に進めましょう
10:06
Unlike a drug company,
私達には製薬会社のように
10:08
we don't have a pipeline that we can deposit these molecules into.
化合物を加えるような新薬パイプラインはありません
10:10
We don't have a team of salespeople and marketeers
競合と比較して 市場で狙うべきポジションを
10:13
that can tell us how to position this drug against the other.
教えてくれる営業やマーケターもいません
10:16
What we do have is the flexibility of an academic center
私達の強みは教育研究機関としての柔軟性です
10:19
to work with competent, motivated,
薬のプロトタイプを共有できる状況を保ちながらも
10:21
enthusiastic, hopefully well-funded people
優秀でやる気に溢れそして贅沢を言えば資金力が豊かな人たちとも協業し
10:24
to carry these molecules forward into the clinic
優秀でやる気に溢れそして贅沢を言えば資金力が豊かな人たちとも協業し
10:27
while preserving our ability
新しい化合物を治療薬として
10:29
to share the prototype drug worldwide.
現場に届けることができる そんな柔軟性です
10:31
This molecule will soon leave our benches
私達が見つけた化合物は
10:34
and go into a small startup company
もうすぐ私達の下を離れテンシャ・セラピューティックスというベンチャー企業に移ります
10:36
called Tensha Therapeutics.
もうすぐ私達の下を離れテンシャ・セラピューティックスというベンチャー企業に移ります
10:38
And really this is the fourth of these molecules
私達が見つけ
10:40
to kind of graduate from our little pipeline of drug discovery,
送り出していく化合物はこれで4つ目です
10:43
two of which -- a topical drug
その4つのうち
10:46
for lymphoma of the skin,
皮膚リンパ腫の局所薬と
10:49
an oral substance for the treatment of multiple myeloma --
多発性骨髄腫の経口薬の2つが
10:52
will actually come to the bedside
今年7月に患者の下に
10:55
for first clinical trial in July of this year.
臨床試験薬として届きます
10:57
For us, a major and exciting milestone.
これは素晴らしい 大きな一歩です
10:59
I want to leave you with just two ideas.
最後に2つお伝えしたいと思います
11:03
The first is
1つは
11:05
if anything is unique about this research,
今回の研究で独自な点があるとすれば
11:07
it's less the science than the strategy --
科学面というよりも戦略面にあります
11:10
that this for us was a social experiment,
新しい戦略の社会実験でした
11:12
an experiment in what would happen
創薬化学研究の最初のフェーズで
11:14
if we were as open and honest
可能な限りオープンにすると
11:17
at the earliest phase of discovery chemistry research
どうなるかを試す
11:20
as we could be.
実験でした
11:22
This string of letters and numbers
テキストメッセージや
11:24
and symbols and parentheses
ツイッターで
11:26
that can be texted, I suppose,
送ることができる
11:28
or Twittered worldwide,
この文字と数字と記号の羅列が
11:30
is the chemical identity of our pro compound.
私達の化合物の化学的特定名です
11:32
It's the information that we most need
製薬会社が一番欲しがるのは
11:35
from pharmaceutical companies,
創薬早期における
11:37
the information
プロトタイプ化合物の作用についての
11:39
on how these early prototype drugs might work.
情報なのです
11:41
Yet this information is largely a secret.
しかしこういった情報は秘密にされています
11:44
And so we seek really
そこで素晴らしい功績を出してきた
11:47
to download from the amazing successes
コンピュータサイエンス分野における
11:49
of the computer science industry two principles:
2つの原理原則を借りたいと考えます
11:51
that of opensource and that of crowdsourcing
オープンソースとクラウドソーシングの考え方です
11:54
to quickly, responsibly
これらに基づき責任を持って更に迅速に
11:57
accelerate the delivery of targeted therapeutics
分子標的治療法を癌患者の下に
12:01
to patients with cancer.
届けたいと思います
12:04
Now the business model involves all of you.
このビジネスモデルは皆さんも対象としています
12:06
This research is funded by the public.
研究は一般から資金を募って行っています
12:09
It's funded by foundations.
財団や基金が支援してくれています
12:11
And one thing I've learned in Boston
大変素晴らしいことですが
12:13
is that you people will do anything for cancer -- and I love that.
ボストンの皆さんは癌のためなら何でもします
12:15
You bike across the state. You walk up and down the river.
自転車での州横断や川沿いのチャリティーウォーク
12:17
(Laughter)
(笑)
12:20
I've never seen really anywhere
癌研究に対する
12:22
this unique support
このような形の支援は
12:24
for cancer research.
他では見たことがありません
12:26
And so I want to thank you
皆さんのご協力と参加に感謝します
12:28
for your participation, your collaboration
そして何よりも私達の考えを応援してくださり
12:30
and most of all for your confidence in our ideas.
ありがとうございます
12:33
(Applause)
(拍手)
12:36
Translator:Ken Minato
Reviewer:Akinori Oyama

sponsored links

Jay Bradner - Research scientist
In his lab, Jay Bradner, a researcher at Harvard and Dana Farber in Boston, works on a breakthrough approach for subverting cancer .. and he’s giving the secret away.

Why you should listen

A doctor and a chemist, Jay Bradner hunts for new approaches to solving cancer. As a research scientist and instructor in medicine at Harvard and Dana Farber Cancer Institute, he and his lab are working to subvert cancer's aggressive behavior by reprogramming the cell's fundamental identity. A molecule they're working on, JQ1, might do just that. (And he’s giving it away in order to spur faster open-source drug discovery.) If you're a researcher who'd like a sample of the JQ1 molecule, contact the Bradner Lab

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.