14:31
TEDGlobal 2011

Hasan Elahi: FBI, here I am!

ハサン・エラヒ:FBIのみなさん!僕はここだよ!

Filmed:

全くの誤解からFBIに監視されることになったハサン・エラヒ。FBIのエージェントから旅行をする際は逐一報告するように言われます。彼は言われたとおりに報告します...言われた以上に、いやいや、もっともっとそれ以上に。

- Privacy artist
In 2002, American artist Hasan Elahi’s name was added (by mistake) to the US government’s watch list. Full bio

Hi there. I'm Hasan. I'm an artist.
僕はハサン
00:15
And usually when I tell people I'm an artist,
アーティストです するとよく聞かれるのが
00:17
they just look at me and say, "Do you paint?"
「画家さんですか?」とか
00:20
or "What kind of medium do you work in?"
「どの芸術領域ですか?」とか
00:22
Well most of my work that I work with
僕の作品のほとんどは
00:25
is really a little bit about methodologies of working
ある決まった方法や手法ではなく
00:27
rather than actually a specific discipline
作品への取り組み方それ自体-
00:30
or a specific technique.
ですので
00:33
So what I'm really interested in is creative problem solving.
想像力を発揮した問題解決が好きです
00:35
And I had a little bit of a problem a few years ago.
ちょっと前に ある問題が発生しました
00:38
So let me show you a little of that.
それをご紹介します
00:41
So it started over here.
すべてはここから始まりました
00:43
And this is the Detroit airport in June 19th of 2002.
デトロイト空港 2002年6月19日
00:45
I was flying back to the U.S. from an exhibition overseas.
国外の展示会から
00:49
And as I was coming back,
アメリカに戻ったところで
00:52
well I was taken by the FBI, met by an FBI agent,
FBIに出迎えられました
00:54
and went into a little room
小さな部屋に通され
00:57
and he asked me all sorts of questions --
あれこれ尋問されました-
00:59
"Where were you? What were you doing? Who were you talking with?
「どこで何してんだ?」「誰と話してたんだ?」
01:01
Why were you there? Who pays for your trips?" --
「誰が旅費を払ったんだ?」-
01:03
all these little details.
細々したことです
01:05
And then literally just out of nowhere,
すると 突然 聞かれました
01:07
the guy asks me, "Where were you September 12th?"
「9月12日はどこにいたんだ?」
01:09
And when most of us get asked, "Where were you September 12th?"
多くの人はこう聞かれれば
01:12
or any date for that fact,
どんな日だって
01:14
it's like, "I don't exactly remember, but I can look it up for you."
「ちょっと調べてみます」となるでしょう
01:16
So I pulled out my little PDA,
PDAを確認して言いました
01:19
and I said, "Okay, let's look up my appointments for September 12th."
「9月12日の予定は...」
01:21
I had September 12th -- from 10:00 a.m. to 10:30 a.m., I paid my storage bill.
10:30 am 倉庫代を払って
01:24
From 10:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m., I met with Judith who was one of my graduate students at the time.
10:30 am - 12:00 p.m. ジュディスと会い
01:27
From 12:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m., I taught my intro class,
12:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. 教室でクラス
01:30
3:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m., I taught my advanced class.
3:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. 上級クラス
01:32
"Where were you the 11th?" "Where were you the 10th?"
「じゃあ11日は?」「あと10日は?」
01:34
"Where were you the 29th? the 30th?"
「29日は?」「30日は?」
01:36
"Where were you October 5th?"
「10月5日は?」
01:38
We read about six months of my calendar.
半年分のカレンダーを読み上げました
01:40
And I don't think he was expecting me to have such detailed records
FBIもこんなに詳細な記録があるとは
01:43
of what I did.
思ってなかったでしょう
01:46
But good thing I did,
記録があってよかった
01:48
because I don't look good in orange.
金髪頭じゃ
01:50
(Laughter)
よく見られないですから
01:52
So he asked me --
そして-
01:54
(Applause)
(拍手)
01:56
"So this storage unit that you paid the rent on,
「倉庫代を支払ったと-
01:58
what did you have in it?"
何が入ってるんだ?」
02:00
This was in Tampa, Florida,
倉庫はフロリダのタンパにあります
02:03
so I was like, "Winter clothes that I have no use for in Florida.
「フロリダには不要な冬服とか
02:05
Furniture that I can't fit in my ratty apartment.
部屋に入りきらない家具
02:08
Just assorted garage sale junk,
そういったガラクタです
02:11
because I'm a pack rat."
よく旅行するもんで」
02:14
And he looks at me really confused and says, "No explosives?"
FBIは困惑した表情で 「爆弾はないのか?」
02:16
(Laughter)
(笑)
02:19
I was like, "No, no. I'm pretty certain there were no explosives.
「爆弾なんてありませんよ
02:21
And if there were, I would have remembered that one."
あったら しっかり覚えてますって」
02:23
And he's still a little confused,
まだ困惑してるようでした
02:26
but I think that anyone who talks to me for more than a couple of minutes
誰でも僕と数分話せば
02:28
realizes I'm not exactly a terrorist threat.
テロリストじゃないって分かります
02:30
And so we're sitting there,
こうして一時間半程経って
02:33
and eventually after about an hour, hour and a half of just going back and forth,
話がいったりきたりした後
02:36
he says, "Okay, I have enough information here.
ついに 「よろしい
02:40
I'm going to pass this onto the Tampa office. They're the ones who initiated this.
この情報をタンパ支局に送る
02:42
They'll follow up with you, and we'll take care of it."
そこが君を担当する」
02:44
I was like, "Great."
「分かりました」
02:46
So I got home and the phone rings,
家に帰ると 電話が鳴り
02:48
and a man introduced himself.
現地のFBIからの電話でした
02:51
Basically this is the FBI offices in Tampa
こちらがFBIのタンパオフィス
02:53
where I spent six months of my life --
6ヶ月程過ごした場所です-
02:56
back and forth, not six months continuously.
ずっとではなく 出たり入ったりで
02:58
By the way, you folks know that in the United States,
ところで アメリカでは
03:00
you can't take photographs of federal buildings,
政府の建物で写真はNGって知ってました?
03:02
but Google can do it for you.
グーグルでは公開されてます
03:04
So to the folks from Google, thank you.
どうもありがとう
03:06
(Applause)
(拍手)
03:08
So I spent a lot of time in this building.
ここで長い時間過ごしました
03:11
Questions like:
尋問内容は
03:13
"Have you ever witnessed or participated in any act
「今まで アメリカもしくは諸外国を
03:15
that may be detrimental to the United States or a foreign nation?"
害するような行為を目撃ないし参加したことは?」
03:18
And you also have to consider the state of mind you're in
こういう場合 自分の心の動きも
03:22
when you're doing this.
よく考えないと
03:24
You're basically face-to-face with someone
面と向かって質問され
03:26
that essentially decides life or death.
しかも生死を決める問題ですから
03:28
Or questions such as -- actually, during the polygraph,
ウソ発見器 これを
03:31
which was how it finally ended after nine consecutive of them --
9回も受け続けましたが-
03:33
one of the polygraph questions was ...
聞かれた内容はと言うと
03:36
well the first one was, "Is your name Hasan?" "Yes."
まずは「君はハサンか?」 「はい」
03:38
"Are we in Florida?" "Yes." "Is today Tuesday?" "Yes."
「フロリダ在住か?」 「はい」 「今日は火曜か?」    「はい」
03:41
Because you have to base it on a yes or no.
「はい」 か 「いいえ」で答えるわけです
03:44
Then, of course, the next question is:
お次はもちろん
03:46
"Do you belong to any groups that wish to harm the United States?"
「アメリカに害をもたらす組織に属していたか?」
03:48
I work at a university.
大学で教えてます
03:51
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:53
So I was like, "Maybe you want to ask some of my colleagues that directly."
「大学の同僚に直接聞いてもらうといいかも」
03:55
But they said, "Okay, aside from what we had discussed,
「それは後にして アメリカに
03:59
do you belong to any groups that wish to harm the United States?"
害をもたらす組織に属していたか?」
04:02
I was like, "No."
「いいえ」
04:04
So at the end of six months of this
こうして 半年後
04:06
and nine consecutive polygraphs,
9回に及ぶウソ発見器の後
04:08
they said, "Hey, everything's fine."
「問題ないようだ」
04:10
I was like, "I know. That's what I've been trying to tell you guys all along.
「そりゃそうでしょ
04:12
I know everything's fine."
ずっとそう言ってますって」
04:14
So they're looking at me really odd.
FBIは困った顔してました
04:16
And it's like, "Guys, I travel a lot."
「僕 出張が多いんですよね」
04:19
This is with the FBI.
相手はFBIです
04:21
And I was like, "All we need is Alaska not to get the last memo,
「必要なのは行き先であって 手がかりをもとに
04:23
and here we go all over again."
延々と尋問することじゃない」
04:25
And there was a sincere concern there.
切実な問題なんです
04:27
And he was like, "You know, if you get into trouble,
「何か問題が起こったら 連絡をくれ
04:29
give us a call -- we'll take care of it."
対応するから」
04:31
So ever since then, before I would go anywhere, I would call the FBI.
その後 外出の度 FBIに連絡しました
04:33
I would tell them, "Hey guys, this is where I'm going. This is my flight.
電話して「これからこの飛行機に乗ります-
04:36
Northwest flight seven coming into Seattle
ノースウェストのシアトル行き
04:39
on March 12th" or whatever.
3月12日」とかなんとか
04:42
A couple weeks later, I'd call again, let them know.
数週間後 また電話して連絡
04:44
It wasn't that I had to, but I chose to.
義務じゃなく そうすることにしました
04:46
Just wanted to say, "Hey guys.
「FBIのみなさん
04:49
Don't want to make it look like I'm making any sudden moves."
怪しいことはありませんよ ほらね」
04:51
(Laughter)
(笑)
04:53
"I don't want you guys to think that I'm about to flee.
「逃亡する気なんてありませんから
04:55
Just letting you know. Heads up."
こうして連絡してるわけです」
04:58
And so I just kept doing this over and over and over.
こうして何度も連絡して
05:00
And then the phone calls turned into emails,
そのうち電話がメールになり
05:02
and the emails got longer and longer and longer ...
そしてメールはどんどん長くなり
05:04
with pictures,
写真もつけて
05:06
with travel tips.
旅のヒントもおまけに
05:08
Then I'd make websites.
こうしてサイトを立ち上げました
05:10
And then I built this over here. Let me go back to it over here.
始まりはというと
05:12
So I actually designed this back in 2003.
スタートは2003年
05:14
So this kind of tracks me at any given moment.
いつでも僕の居場所が分かります
05:17
I wrote some code for my mobile phone.
携帯用のプログラムを作りました
05:20
Basically, what I decided is okay guys, you want to watch me, that's cool.
FBIが僕を監視したいなら むしろ
05:22
But I'll watch myself. It's okay.
自分で監視してやるってことです
05:25
You don't have to waste your energy or your resources.
ムダな経費を使わないよう
05:27
And I'll help you out.
お助けします
05:29
So in the process, I start thinking, well what else might they know about me?
他にFBIは何が知りたいだろ?
05:32
Well they probably have all my flight records,
飛行機の便名は知りたいでしょうから
05:35
so I decided to put all my flight records from birth online.
生まれてからこれまでの便名を公開しました
05:37
So you can see, Delta 1252
ほら デルタ1252便
05:42
going from Kansas City to Atlanta.
カンザスからアトランタ行き
05:45
And then you see, these are some of the meals that I've been fed on the planes.
こちらは機内食です
05:47
This was on Delta 719
デルタ719便
05:52
going from JFK to San Francisco.
JFKからサンフランシスコ行き
05:54
See that? They won't let me on a plane with that,
これを僕に渡しちゃいけません
05:58
but they'll give it to me on the plane.
でも 出されちゃうんですよね
06:01
(Laughter)
(笑)
06:03
These are the airports that I hang out in,
こちらは空港の写真です
06:05
because I like airports.
空港はお気に入りの場所
06:07
That's Kennedy airport, May 19th, Tuesday.
ケネディ空港 5月19日(火)
06:09
This is in Warsaw.
ワルシャワ空港
06:12
Singapore. You can see, they're kind of empty.
シンガポール空港 ガラガラですね
06:15
These images are shot really anonymously
こうした写真は
06:18
to the point where it could be anyone.
匿名で撮られました
06:20
But if you can cross-reference this with the other data,
こうしたデータで裏づけがとれるわけです
06:22
then you're basically replaying the roll of the FBI agent
FBIの仕事を代りにやって
06:25
and putting it all together.
情報をまとめられます
06:27
And when you're in a situation
こういった状況では
06:29
where you have to justify every moment of your existence,
いつ何時でも 裏づけが必要になり
06:31
you're put in the situation where you react in a very different manner.
普段とは違う行動様式になります
06:33
At the time that this was going on,
こうしたことが芸術作品に繋がるなんて
06:36
the last thing on my mind was "art project."
思ってもみませんでした
06:38
I was certainly not thinking, hey, I got new work here.
新しい仕事みっけ なんてね
06:41
But after going through this, after realizing, well what just happened?
こうした中で一体何が起こったのか?
06:44
And after piecing together this, this and this,
情報を繋いでいくと...
06:47
this way of actually trying to figure out what happened for myself
僕に起こった事が明らかになり
06:49
eventually evolved into this,
発展を続けて
06:52
and it actually became this project.
芸術作品になったわけです
06:54
So these are the stores that I shop in -- some of them --
これらは買い物したお店です
06:57
because they need to know.
FBIは必要としてますから
06:59
This is me buying some duck flavored paste
こちらはスープの素
07:01
at the Ranch 99 in Daly City
ダリーのランチ99にて
07:03
on Sunday, November 15th.
11月15日(日)のこと
07:05
At Coreana Supermarket
コリアナスーパーでは
07:07
buying my kimchi because I like kimchi.
好物のキムチをお買い物
07:09
And I bought some crabs too right around there,
その近所でカニも買いました
07:11
and some chitlins at the Safeway in Emoryville.
チタリンを少々 エモリービルにて
07:14
And laundry too. Laundry detergent at West Oakland --
洗剤を西...失礼
07:17
East Oakland, sorry.
東オークランドで
07:19
And then my pickled jellyfish
塩漬けのクラゲ
07:21
at the Hong Kong Supermarket on Route 18 in East Brunswick.
東ブランズウィックの香港のスーパーで
07:23
Now if you go to my bank records,
僕の銀行からも
07:26
it'll actually show something from there,
いろいろ情報が出てきます
07:28
so you know that, on May 9th,
5月9日
07:30
that I bought $14.79 in fuel from Safeway Vallejo.
$14.79でガソリンを入れました
07:32
So not only that I'm giving this information here and there,
ただ情報を垂れ流してるだけでなく
07:35
but now there's a third party,
こうすると第三者が
07:39
an independent third party, my bank,
独立した第三者 例えば銀行が
07:41
that's verifying that, yes indeed, I was there at this time.
照合できるわけです
07:44
So there's points, and these points are actually being cross-referenced.
こうして相互に照合します
07:46
And there's a verification taking place.
記録の中には
07:49
Sometimes they're really small purchases.
ほんと些細なものもあります
07:51
So 34 cents foreign transaction fee.
34セント 送金料
07:53
All of these are extracted directly from my bank accounts,
僕の銀行口座から直接情報が提供されます
07:55
and everything pops up right away.
タイムリーに出るんです
07:58
Sometimes there's a lot of information.
時には膨大な情報の時も
08:00
This is exactly where my old apartment in San Francisco was.
ここはかつての僕のサンフランシスコの住まい
08:02
And then sometimes you get this.
こういう情報も
08:06
Sometimes you just get this, just an empty hallway in Salt Lake City,
ソルトレイクの誰もいないホールとか
08:08
January 22nd.
1月22日
08:10
And I can tell you exactly who I was with, where I was,
どこで誰といたかも正確に
08:12
because this is what I had to do with the FBI.
FBIに報告しなきゃいけません
08:14
I had to tell them every little detail of everything.
全てを包み隠さず
08:16
I spend a lot of time on the road.
車での移動もよくします
08:18
This is a parking lot in Elko, Nevada
ネバダ エルコのパーキング
08:20
off of Route 80
ルート80外れの
08:22
at 8:01 p.m. on August 19th.
8月19日 8:01p.m.
08:24
I spend a lot of time in gas stations too -- empty train stations.
ガソリンスタンドや誰もいない駅にもよくいきます
08:26
So there's multiple databases.
こうして膨大な写真の
08:29
And there's thousands and thousands and thousands of images.
データベースが作り上げられました
08:31
There's actually 46,000 images right now on my site,
現在 46,000枚もの写真が格納されてます
08:34
and the FBI has seen all of them --
FBIは全部に目を通してる-
08:37
at least I trust they've seen all of them.
まあ そう願いたいもんですが
08:40
And then sometimes you don't get much information at all,
時にはなんの役にも立たない情報もあります
08:43
you just get this empty bed.
空っぽのベッドとか
08:46
And sometimes you get a lot of text information and no visual information.
写真無しの単なる文字情報の時もあります
08:48
So you get something like this.
例えばこんな感じ
08:51
This, by the way, is the location of my favorite sandwich shop in California --
カリフォルニアにあるお気に入りのサンドウィッチのお店の住所
08:53
Vietnamese sandwich.
ベトナム風サンドウィッチですよ
08:55
So there's different categorizations
外食のデータにもいくつかの
08:57
of meals eaten outside
カテゴリーがあります
08:59
empty train stations, empty gas stations.
誰もいない駅とガソリンスタンド
09:01
These are some of the meals that I've been cooking at home.
家で食事した時のデータもあります
09:04
So how do you know these are meals eaten at home?
さて なぜ家での食事と分かるでしょう?
09:06
Well the same plate shows up a whole bunch of times.
何度も同じお皿が登場するからです
09:08
So again, you have to do some detective work here.
ちょっと推理を働かせなきゃいけません
09:11
So sometimes the databases get so specific.
たまにデータが細かすぎることもあります
09:14
These are all tacos eaten in Mexico City
こちらはメキシコシティーで食べたタコス
09:17
near a train station
駅の近所のお店
09:19
on July fifth to July sixth.
7月5日から6日までの間
09:21
At 11:39 a.m. was this one.
11:39 a.m.はこちら
09:24
At 1:56 p.m. was this one. At 4:59 p.m. was this one.
1:56 p.m.はこちら 4:59 p.m.はこちら
09:26
So I time-stamp my life every few moments.
人生の全ての瞬間を記録したわけです
09:29
Every few moments I shoot the image.
事ある毎に写真を撮る
09:32
Now it's all done on my iPhone,
今では全部iPhoneでやってます
09:34
and it all goes straight up to my server,
直接サーバーに繋がってます
09:36
and my server does all the backend work
後はサーバーが全部やってくれます
09:38
and categorizes things and puts everything together.
分類してくれて 整理してくれます
09:40
They need to know where I'm doing my business,
FBIは僕がどこで何してるかしらなきゃならない
09:43
because they want to know about my business.
だって何をしてるか知りたいのだから
09:45
So on December 4th, I went here.
なので 12月4日 こちらにいました
09:48
And on Sunday, June 14th at 2009 --
2009年6月14日 日曜日-
09:51
this was actually about two o'clock in the afternoon
この時は午後2時でした
09:54
in Skowhegan, Maine -- this was my apartment there.
メイン州のかつての自宅
09:56
So what you're basically seeing here
ご覧いただいたのは
09:58
is all bits and pieces and all this information.
情報のほんの一部分です
10:01
If you go to my site, there's tons of things.
サイトにはもっと情報があります
10:03
And really, it's not the most user-friendly interface.
ユーザーに優しい情報と言えません
10:06
It's actually quite user-unfriendly.
むしろ厳しいと言っていいかも
10:09
And one of the reasons, also being part of the user-unfriendliness,
ユーザーに厳しい理由の一つは
10:13
is that everything is there,
全てがそこにある ことです
10:15
but you have to really work through it.
それらをなんとか整理しなくちゃならない
10:17
So by me putting all this information out there,
こうして情報を全部公開することで
10:19
what I'm basically telling you is I'm telling you everything.
僕の全てを公開してることになります
10:23
But in this barrage of noise
一方で こうした
10:26
that I'm putting out,
情報の洪水のおかげで
10:28
I actually live an incredibly anonymous and private life.
実際にはかなりプライベートを守っていることになります
10:30
And you know very little about me actually.
僕のことについて何も分からない
10:34
And really so I've come to the conclusion
僕が得た結論は
10:38
that the way you protect your privacy,
プライバシーを守るには
10:41
particularly in an era where everything is cataloged
特に現代のように情報が整理され
10:43
and everything is archived and everything is recorded,
蓄積され そして記録される時代には
10:45
there's no need to delete information anymore.
情報を規制する必要なんて無いということです
10:47
So what do you do when everything is out there?
情報が全て公開されているとしたら?
10:50
Well you have to take control over it.
うまく整理しなくちゃなりません
10:53
And if I give you this information directly,
こうした情報を直接与えることで
10:55
it's a very different type of identity
小出しに出された情報から
10:58
than if you were to try to go through and try to get bits and pieces.
推測される人物像とは異なる像が浮かびます
11:01
The other thing that's also interesting that's going on here
もう一つ興味深いのは
11:04
is the fact that intelligence agencies --
諜報機関-
11:07
and it doesn't matter who they are --
どんな組織でもいいんですが-
11:09
they all operate in an industry
この業界では情報が
11:12
where their commodity is information,
情報 または限定された情報が
11:14
or restricted access to information.
商品となっています
11:16
And the reason their information has any value
彼らの情報に価値があるのは
11:18
is, well, because no one else has access to it.
誰もその情報にアクセスできないからです
11:21
And by me cutting out the middle man
僕が仲介をなくして
11:24
and giving it straight to you,
直接情報を公開することで
11:26
the information that the FBI has has no value,
FBIの情報はその価値を失います
11:29
so thus devaluing their currency.
商品価値が落ちるわけです
11:32
And I understand that, on an individual level,
個人でのこうした活動は
11:35
it's purely symbolic.
パフォーマンスに過ぎません
11:37
But if 300 million people in the U.S.
でも もし3億人ものアメリカ人が
11:39
started doing this,
はじめたとしたら
11:41
we would have to redesign the entire intelligence system
諜報のシステムを一から
11:43
from the ground up.
作り直さないとなりません
11:45
Because it just wouldn't work if everybody was sharing everything.
だって みんなが情報を持っていたら 成り立たない業界ですから
11:47
And we're getting to that.
しかも 今 そうなりつつあります
11:50
When I first started this project,
このプロジェクトを始めた頃
11:52
people were looking at me and saying,
みんなが言いました
11:54
"Why would you want to tell everybody what you're doing, where you're at?
「なんで自分の居場所を公開するようなことをするんだい?
11:56
Why are you posting these photos?"
写真なんか掲載しちゃって?」
11:59
This was an age before people were Tweeting everywhere
ツイッターが登場する前の話です
12:01
and 750 million people
7億5千万もの人々が
12:05
were posting status messages
メッセージを掲載して
12:08
or poking people.
連絡し合う前
12:10
So in a way, I'm glad that I'm completely obsolete.
ある意味 これが時代遅れになってよかった
12:12
I'm still doing this project, but it is obsolete,
プロジェクトは継続中ですが もはや時代遅れ
12:15
because you're all doing it.
だってみんながやってるんですから
12:18
This is something that we all are doing on a daily basis,
みんなが日常やってることです
12:20
whether we're aware of it or not.
気づいてか気づかずか
12:22
So we're creating our own archives and so on.
各々が自分のアーカイブを築きあげています
12:24
And you know, some of my friends have always said,
友達が言ってました
12:27
"Hey, you're just paranoid. Why are you doing this?
「なあ おかしいんじゃないか? こんなことして
12:30
Because no one's really watching.
誰も見ていないさ それに
12:32
No one's really going to bother you."
誰も気にしちゃいないし」
12:34
So one of the things that I do
サーバーのアクセスログを
12:36
is I actually look through my server logs very carefully.
注意深くみていくと-
12:38
Because it's about surveillance.
だって監視なんだから
12:40
I'm watching who's watching me.
誰が僕を監視してるか 監視しないと
12:42
And I came up with these.
これができました
12:45
So these are some of my sample logs.
こちらはログのサンプルです
12:47
And just little bits and pieces, and you can see some of the things there.
いくつかご覧いただきましょう
12:49
And I cleaned up the list a little bit so you can see.
見やすいように少し整理しました
12:52
So you can see that the Homeland Security likes to come by --
国土安全保障の方々も-
12:55
Department of Homeland Security.
国土安全保障省
12:58
You can see the National Security Agency likes to come by.
国家安全保障局の面々も
13:00
I actually moved very close to them. I live right down the street from them now.
実は近所に住んでるんです 通りを挟んだ直ぐ側に
13:02
Central Intelligence Agency.
CIA
13:06
Executive Office of the President.
大統領府
13:08
Not really sure why they show up, but they do.
なんでアクセスしたんですかね
13:12
I think they kind of like to look at art.
アートが好きなのかも?
13:15
And I'm glad that we have patrons of the arts in these fields.
こういう業界にパトロンができそうで良かった!
13:17
So thank you very much. I appreciate it.
どうもありがとう
13:21
(Applause)
(拍手)
13:23
Bruno Giussani: Hasan, just curious.
ハサン 聞きたいんだが
13:33
You said, "Now everything automatically goes from my iPhone,"
iPhoneから自動で全てのデータを送られるというけど
13:35
but actually you do take the pictures and put on information.
写真を撮ったり 情報を書き込んだりしてるわけだろ
13:38
So how many hours of the day does that take?
一日あたりどのくらい時間がかかるもんだい?
13:40
HE: Almost none.
ほとんどゼロ
13:43
It's no different
メールを
13:45
than sending a text.
送ったり
13:47
It's no different than checking an email.
読んだりするのと変わらないよ
13:49
It's one of those things, we got by just fine before we had to do any of those.
もう慣れちゃったからね
13:52
So it's just become another day.
生活の一部といった感じです
13:54
I mean, when we update a status message,
まあ情報をアップデートする時
13:56
we don't really think about how long that's going to take.
所要時間なんて考えません
13:58
So it's really just a matter of my phone clicking a couple of clicks,
だって ちょっと電話でトントンってタップして
14:01
send, and then it's done.
送って ハイ終わり
14:03
And everything's automated at the other end.
あとは全部向こうでやってくれるんだ
14:05
BG: On the day you are in a place where there is no coverage, the FBI gets crazy?
飛行中は連絡とれないだろ?FBIは焦らないかな?
14:07
HE: Well it goes to the last point that I was at.
まあ 最後に居たところは分かるから
14:10
So it holds onto the very last point.
少なくてもどこから居なくなったかは分かる
14:12
So if I'm on a 12-hour flight,
なので12時間のフライトなら
14:14
you'll see the last airport that I departed from.
出発地点の空港が分かるってわけです
14:16
BG: Hasan, thank you very much. (HE: Thank you.)
ハサン どうもありがとう
14:19
(Applause)
(拍手)
14:22
Translated by SHIGERU MASUKAWA
Reviewed by Takahiro Shimpo

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About the Speaker:

Hasan Elahi - Privacy artist
In 2002, American artist Hasan Elahi’s name was added (by mistake) to the US government’s watch list.

Why you should listen

That led to an intensive investigation by the FBI. After months of interrogations, Elahi was finally cleared of suspicions but advised to keep the FBI informed of his whereabouts. Which he did -- fully, by opening up just about every aspect of his life to the public. What started with a practicality grew into an open-ended art project, with Elahi posting photos of his minute-by-minute life online (hotel rooms, airports, meals, receipts, bathrooms), tracking himself on Google Maps, releasing communication records, banking transactions and transportation logs, and more. The project questions the consequences of living under constant surveillance, and it has been presented at Centre Pompidou in Paris and at the Venice Biennale, among others. He is an associate professor of Art at University of Maryland, roughly equidistant from the CIA, FBI and NSA headquarters.

More profile about the speaker
Hasan Elahi | Speaker | TED.com