18:39
TED2003

Tierney Thys: Swim with the giant sunfish

ティアニー・ティス: 巨大マンボウと過ごすとき

Filmed:

海洋生物学者のティアニー・ティスが私達を海へといざない、モラモラと呼ばれる巨大マンボウの世界を紹介します。ひなたぼっこをしたり、クラゲを食べたり、マッサージを楽しむこの巨大生物は、大海原の命に関する鍵を握っています。

- Marine biologist
Tierney Thys is a marine biologist and science educator. She studies the behavior of the Mola mola, or giant ocean sunfish -- and works with other scientists to make films that share the wonders they see. Full bio

I'd like to start tonight by something completely different,
今夜は独特の内容から始めたいと思います
00:25
asking you to join me by stepping off the land
少しの間 私と一緒に陸から離れて
00:29
and jumping into the open ocean for a moment.
海の中へ飛び込んでください
00:33
90 percent of the living space on the planet is in the open ocean,
地球上の生命圏の9割は海であり
00:38
and it's where life -- the title of our seminar tonight -- it's where life began.
今夜の演題である命は そこから始まりました
00:43
And it's a lively and a lovely place,
活気があって 美しい場所です
00:48
but we're rapidly changing the oceans with our --
しかし乱獲や 無責任な漁法や
00:51
not only with our overfishing, our irresponsible fishing,
農地で使う化学肥料のような汚染物質を垂れ流すことで
00:55
our adding of pollutants like fertilizer from our cropland,
急速に海を変化させています
01:00
but also, most recently, with climate change,
最近は気候変動も問題です
01:05
and Steve Schneider, I'm sure, will be going into greater detail on this.
シュナイダー氏が詳細を明かしてくれるでしょう
01:07
Now, as we continue to tinker with the oceans,
海に手を加え続けることで
01:10
more and more reports are predicting that the kinds of seas that we're creating
クラゲやバクテリアのような低エネルギー生物が支配する海が
01:13
will be conducive to low-energy type of animals, like jellyfish and bacteria.
作られると予想するリポートが増えています
01:18
And this might be the kind of seas we're headed for.
私達はこんな海に向かっているかもしれません
01:23
Now jellyfish are strangely hypnotic and beautiful,
クラゲはうっとりするほど美しく
01:26
and you'll see lots of gorgeous ones at the aquarium on Friday,
金曜日には水族館で優美なクラゲがたくさん見られるでしょう
01:30
but they sting like hell, and jellyfish sushi and sashimi
でも クラゲに刺されると大変で クラゲの寿司や刺身は
01:35
is just not going to fill you up.
お腹の足しにはなりません
01:40
About 100 grams of jellyfish equals four calories.
クラゲ100gは4カロリーなんです
01:42
So it may be good for the waistline,
ウエスト周りには良いかも知れませんが
01:47
but it probably won't keep you satiated for very long.
腹持ちはおそらく良くないでしょう
01:49
And a sea that's just filled and teeming with jellyfish
そして クラゲだらけの海は
01:52
isn't very good for all the other creatures that live in the oceans,
他の海洋生物にも都合が良くありません
01:57
that is, unless you eat jellyfish.
でも クラゲを食べるなら別です
02:00
And this is this voracious predator launching a sneak attack
これはカツオノカンムリというクラゲに
02:03
on this poor little unsuspecting jellyfish there, a by-the-wind sailor.
不意打ちを食わせる捕食動物です
02:07
And that predator is the giant ocean sunfish, the Mola mola,
その捕食動物とは主にクラゲを食べる―
02:11
whose primary prey are jellyfish.
巨大マンボウのモラモラです
02:17
This animal is in "The Guinness World Book of Records"
世界一重たい硬骨魚として
02:20
for being the world's heaviest bony fish.
ギネスブックに載っています
02:22
It reaches up to almost 5,000 pounds -- on a diet of jellyfish, primarily.
クラゲを主食として 約2300kgまで成長します
02:24
And I think it's kind of a nice little cosmological convergence here
宇宙につながる素敵な出会いがあるんです
02:31
that the Mola mola -- its common name is sunfish --
モラモラの英名はサン(太陽)フィッシュで
02:35
that its favorite food is the moon jelly.
大好物は月クラゲです
02:38
So it's kind of nice, the sun and the moon getting together this way,
太陽と月がこうやって一緒になるなんて素敵
02:42
even if one is eating the other.
片方が食べられてしまってもね
02:46
Now this is typically how you see sunfish,
これはよく見かけられる姿で
02:51
this is where they get their common name.
名前の由来はここにあります
02:54
They like to sunbathe, can't blame them.
日光浴好きなので もっともですね
02:56
They just lay out on the surface of the sea
ただ海面に横たわるようにして
02:58
and most people think they're sick or lazy, but that's a typical behavior,
病気か怠け者と思われがちですが
03:01
they lie out and bask on the surface.
日光浴は典型的な習性です
03:05
Their other name, Mola mola, is -- it sounds Hawaiian,
別名モラモラは ハワイ語のように聞こえますが
03:08
but it's actually Latin for millstone,
由来は石臼を意味するラテン語です
03:11
and that's attributable to their roundish, very bizarre, cut-off shape.
丸くて パツンと切られたような風変わりな形で
03:14
It's as if, as they were growing, they just forgot the tail part.
まるで成長期に尾を忘れたかのよう
03:20
And that's actually what drew me to the Mola in the first place,
私がマンボウに興味を持ち始めたのも
03:24
was this terribly bizarre shape.
このとっぴな形のためでした
03:28
You know, you look at sharks, and they're streamlined, and they're sleek,
サメは流線形で なめらかですね
03:31
and you look at tuna, and they're like torpedoes --
マグロは魚雷のようで 目的が明確です
03:36
they just give away their agenda. They're about migration and strength,
いかにも回遊と力を見せる体つきです
03:39
and then you look at the sunfish.
そしてマンボウを見るわけです
03:43
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:46
And this is just so elegantly mysterious, it's just --
これは何というか…上品なほど…神秘的で
03:48
it really kind of holds its cards a lot tighter than say, a tuna.
マグロほど手のうちを見せません
03:55
So I was just intrigued with what -- you know, what is this animal's story?
それで どんな生き物かと魅せられました
04:02
Well, as with anything in biology, nothing really makes sense
生物の世界は進化論に沿わないと
04:08
except in the light of evolution.
きちんとした説明はつきません
04:11
The Mola's no exception.
マンボウも例外ではありません
04:13
They appeared shortly after the dinosaurs disappeared,
6500万年前 恐竜が絶滅した後
04:15
65 million years ago, at a time when whales still had legs,
間もなくして現れました クジラにまだ足があった時代です
04:19
and they come from a rebellious little puffer fish faction --
反抗的なフグの仲間から来ています
04:23
oblige me a little Kipling-esque storytelling here.
キップリングの話のようですね
04:29
Of course evolution is somewhat random, and you know,
もちろん進化は行きあたりばったりですが
04:32
about 55 million years ago there was this rebellious little puffer fish faction
約5500万年前 反抗的なフグの仲間がいて
04:35
that said, oh, the heck with the coral reefs --
こんな珊瑚礁なんて嫌だから
04:39
we're going to head to the high seas.
外洋に出るんだ と言いました
04:41
And lots of generations, lots of tweaking and torquing,
何世代にも渡って あれこれあった後に
04:43
and we turn our puffer into the Mola.
フグをマンボウに変えたのです
04:48
You know, if you give Mother Nature enough time, that is what she will produce.
大自然に充分な時間を与えると こんなものが生まれます
04:50
They look -- maybe they look
マンボウの見た目は
04:58
kind of prehistoric and unfinished, abridged perhaps,
生きた化石のようで 中途半端に 略された感じですが
05:00
but in fact, in fact they are the --
実のところ マンボウは大自然に
05:04
they vie for the top position of the most evolutionarily-derived fish in the sea,
順応して進化した魚の第一位を カレイ目の魚類と
05:08
right up there with flat fish.
張り合っています
05:14
They're -- every single thing about that fish has been changed.
マンボウは何から何まで変化しました
05:17
And in terms of fishes --
5億年前からいる―
05:21
fishes appeared 500 million years ago, and they're pretty modern,
魚類の中で 5千年前に現れたマンボウは
05:23
just 50 million years ago, so --
かなり近代的な仲間です
05:29
so interestingly, they give away their ancestry as they develop.
面白いことに 成長する過程で祖先の面影が現れます
05:33
They start as little eggs,
マンボウの卵は小さくて
05:38
and they're in "The Guinness World Book of Records" again
地球上の脊椎動物で一番卵が多いことでも
05:40
for having the most number of eggs of any vertebrate on the planet.
ギネスブックに載っています
05:42
A single four-foot female had 300 million eggs,
1.2mの雌マンボウ一匹が3億個の卵を産みます
05:46
can carry 300 million eggs in her ovaries -- imagine --
卵巣に3億個の卵です
05:52
and they get to be over 10 feet long. Imagine what a 10 foot one has.
そして彼らは3m以上まで成長します 3mのマンボウが持つ卵を想像してみてください
05:55
And from that little egg,
小さな卵から
06:00
they pass through this spiky little porcupine fish stage, reminiscent of their ancestry,
先祖の面影が残るヤマアラシのようなトゲがある段階を経て
06:02
and develop -- this is their little adolescent stage.
このような青年期に成長します
06:07
They school as adolescents, and become behemoth loners as adults.
青年期には群れをなし 成魚になると巨大な一匹狼となります
06:10
That's a little diver up there in the corner.
右上にいるのはダイバーです
06:17
They're in "The Guinness World Book of Records" again
脊椎動物の中で成長する比率が一番大きいことでも
06:20
for being the vertebrate growth champion of the world.
ギネスブックにも載っています
06:23
From their little hatching size of their egg, into their little larval stage
小さな卵から孵り 幼生を経て
06:26
till they reach adulthood, they put on 600 million times an increase in weight.
成魚になるまで体重は6億倍も増加します
06:30
600 million. Now imagine if you gave birth to a little baby,
6億倍です 小さな赤ちゃんを産んだと想像して
06:36
and you had to feed this thing.
授乳するとしましょう
06:42
That would mean that your child, you would expect it to gain the weight of six Titanics.
その赤ちゃんがタイタニック6隻分まで増量するのと同じです
06:46
Now I don't know how you'd feed a child like that but --
どうやって育てればいいのでしょうね
06:53
we don't know how fast the Molas grow in the wild,
自然界でマンボウがどれだけ早く成長するのか知りませんが
06:56
but captive growth studies at the Monterey Bay Aquarium --
モンテレーベイ水族館は マンボウの飼育研究を
07:02
one of the first places to have them in captivity --
初めて行った場所の一つで
07:05
they had one that gained 800 lbs in 14 months.
14か月で360kg増量したマンボウがいました
07:07
I said, now, that's a true American.
アメリカはそうでなきゃ!と思いました
07:11
(Laughter)
(笑)
07:14
(Applause)
(拍手)
07:18
So being a loner is a great thing, especially in today's seas,
一匹狼は今日の海では特に良いことです
07:20
because schooling used to be salvation for fishes,
群れをなすのは魚にとって救いでありましたが
07:24
but it's suicide for fishes now.
今では自殺行為です
07:27
But unfortunately Molas, even though they don't school,
しかし不幸にもマンボウは群れをなさなくても
07:30
they still get caught in nets as by-catch.
混獲されてしまいます
07:32
If we're going to save the world from total jellyfish domination,
世界をクラゲだらけにしないためには
07:34
then we've got to figure out what the jellyfish predators --
マンボウのようなクラゲ捕食者の
07:39
how they live their lives, like the Mola.
生活を解明しなくてはいけません
07:41
And unfortunately, they make up a large portion of the California by-catch --
不幸にも彼らはカリフォルニアの混獲を大きく占め
07:43
up to 26 percent of the drift net.
流し網漁の26%までになります
07:48
And in the Mediterranean, in the swordfish net fisheries,
そして地中海のメカジキ漁では
07:50
they make up up to 90 percent.
9割を占めています
07:55
So we've got to figure out how they're living their lives.
ですから彼らが いかに生きているのか解明しなくてはいけません
07:59
And how do you do that?
研究するにも
08:02
How do you do that with an animal -- very few places in the world.
生息する場所も限られています
08:04
This is an open ocean creature. It knows no boundaries -- it doesn't go to land.
マンボウは外洋生物です 囲いはなく 陸には上がりません
08:07
How do you get insight?
どうやって調べましょうか
08:11
How do you seduce an open ocean creature like that to spill its secrets?
どういう手を使ったら外洋生物の秘密に近づけるでしょう
08:13
Well, there's some great new technology
最近登場したばかりの
08:18
that has just recently become available,
素晴らしい技術があって
08:21
and it's just a boon for getting insight into open ocean animals.
海洋生物を観察するには大いに役立ちます
08:23
And it's pictured right here, that little tag up there.
この写真で見えるように小さな発信機をつけます
08:27
That little tag can record temperature, depth and light intensity,
この札は水温 水深 明るさを時間と共に記録し
08:31
which is correlated with time, and from that we can get locations.
そこから場所を特定できるのです
08:36
And it can record this data for up to two years,
2年分のデータを記録でき
08:40
and keep it in that tag, release at a pre-programmed time,
指定した時間に札が外れて
08:44
float to the surface, upload all that data, that whole travelogue,
水面に浮上し 旅行記データが
08:48
to satellite, which relays it directly to our computers,
衛星経由で私達のコンピュータに直接届きます
08:52
and we've got that whole dataset. And we didn't even have --
そして完全なデータ一式が得られます
08:55
we just had to tag the animal and then we went home and you know, sat at our desks.
魚に札をつけたら 我達はオフィスで待つわけです
08:59
So the great thing about the Mola
好都合なことに
09:04
is that when we put the tag on them -- if you look up here --
こんな風に札をつけても
09:06
that's streaming off, that's right where we put the tag.
マンボウは気づきません
09:09
And it just so happens that's a parasite hanging off the Mola.
実はこれはマンボウに寄生する生物です
09:11
Molas are infamous for carrying tons of parasites.
マンボウは大量の寄生生物がいることで有名で
09:15
They're just parasite hotels; even their parasites have parasites.
寄生虫に寄生虫がいるほどで ダンがそんな詩を
09:18
I think Donne wrote a poem about that.
書いていた気がします
09:22
But they have 40 genera of parasites,
彼らには寄生虫が40種類もいるので
09:24
and so we figured just one more parasite won't be too much of a problem.
一つ増えても害はないだろうと判断しました
09:27
And they happen to be a very good vehicle for carrying oceanographic equipment.
彼らは海洋学装置を運ぶには非常に良い体をしています
09:31
They don't seem to mind, so far.
迷惑がってるようでもありません
09:36
So what are we trying to find out? We're focusing on the Pacific.
私達の研究は太平洋に着目し
09:39
We're tagging on the California coast, and we're tagging over in Taiwan and Japan.
カリフォルニア沿岸と台湾や日本で札付けをして
09:43
And we're interested in how these animals are using the currents,
マンボウが海流 水温 外洋をどのように
09:47
using temperature, using the open ocean, to live their lives.
生活の中で活用しているのか突きとめようとしています
09:50
We'd love to tag in Monterey.
モンテレーでも観測したいです
09:56
Monterey is one of the few places in the world where Molas come in large numbers.
モンテレーは世界でもマンボウがたくさん見られる珍しい場所の一つです
09:58
Not this time of year -- it's more around October.
この時季ではなく10月頃です
10:02
And we'd love to tag here -- this is an aerial shot of Monterey --
ここで観察したいのです これはモンテレーの航空写真ですが
10:05
but unfortunately, the Molas here end up looking like this
残念なことに ここのマンボウはこんな状態
10:08
because another one of our locals really likes Molas but in the wrong way.
マンボウを悪い意味で好む生き物がいるからです
10:12
The California sea lion takes the Molas as soon as they come into the bay,
カリフォルニアトドはマンボウが湾に入って来るなり
10:16
rips off their fins, fashions them into the ultimate Frisbee, Mola style,
ヒレをちぎってフリスビーのようにもて遊び
10:20
and then tosses them back and forth.
あっちこっちへと投げるのです
10:25
And I'm not exaggerating, it is just --
大袈裟に言っているのではなく
10:27
and sometimes they don't eat them, it's just spiteful.
必ずしも食べる訳ではないので意地悪です
10:30
And you know, the locals think it's terrible behavior,
地元住民は酷い行為だと思っています
10:33
it's just horrible watching this happen, day after day.
毎日毎日 こんな事が起こるのを見るのはたまりません
10:38
The poor little Molas coming in, getting ripped to shreds,
マンボウはやって来て ズタズタにやられるのですから
10:43
so we head down south, to San Diego.
私達はサンディエゴまで南下しました
10:46
Not so many California sea lions down there.
そこにはトドはあまりいません
10:50
And the Molas there, you can find them with a spotter plane very easily,
そこにいるマンボウは観測機だと簡単に見つけられ
10:52
and they like to hang out under floating rafts of kelp.
浮かんでいる海藻の下でのんびりするのを好みます
10:55
And under those kelps -- this is why the Molas come there
海藻の下に行くのは
10:58
because it's spa time for the Molas there.
マンボウには保養だからです
11:01
As soon as they get under those rafts of kelp, the exfoliating cleaner fish come.
海藻の下に行くとすぐに 掃除魚がやって来ます
11:05
And they come and give the Molas --
彼らがやってくると
11:09
you can see they strike this funny little position that says,
マンボウはこんな面白い格好をして言うんです
11:11
"I'm not threatening, but I need a massage."
“ねぇねぇ マッサージお願い”
11:14
(Laughter)
(笑)
11:16
And they'll put their fins out and their eyes go in the back of their head,
ヒレを開いて 白目をむくと
11:20
and the fish come up and they just clean, clean, clean --
魚がやってきて お掃除します
11:24
because the Molas, you know, there's just a smorgasbord of parasites.
沢山の寄生虫が食べ放題のバイキングです
11:28
And it's also a great place to go down south
また 南下すると水も温かく
11:32
because the water's warmer, and the Molas are kind of friendly down there.
気持ちが良くて マンボウも人懐こいのです
11:34
I mean what other kind of fish, if you approach it right,
近づいて行くと “なでてちょうだい” なんて言う魚は
11:38
will say, "Okay, scratch me right there."
いないでしょう
11:41
You truly can swim up to a Mola -- they're very gentle --
とても大人しいので マンボウに近づけます
11:43
and if you approach them right, you can give them a scratch and they enjoy it.
そばまで行って なでてあげると喜びます
11:46
So we've also tagged one part of the Pacific;
太平洋のこちら側でも
11:52
we've gone over to another part of the Pacific,
あちら側でも観測をしました
11:54
and we've tagged in Taiwan, and we tagged in Japan.
台湾と日本です
11:56
And over in these places, the Molas are caught in set nets that line these countries.
そこでは 沿岸の定置網で捕まえると
12:00
And they're not thrown back as by-catch, they're eaten.
混獲として海に返されず食用にされます
12:05
We were served a nine-course meal of Mola after we tagged.
私達は観測の後にマンボウの9品コース料理を出されました
12:08
Well, not the one we tagged!
私たちが観測したものではありません
12:13
And everything from the kidney, to the testes, to the back bone,
腎臓に睾丸 背骨 ヒレの筋肉まで
12:16
to the fin muscle to -- I think that ís pretty much the whole fish -- is eaten.
マンボウ全体が食べられていると思います
12:19
So the hardest part of tagging, now, is
この観測で一番辛いのは
12:32
after you put that tag on, you have to wait, months.
札をつけた後 何か月も待たなくてはいけないことです
12:36
And you're just wondering, oh, I hope the fish is safe,
マンボウが無事でありますように と祈るだけです
12:41
I hope, I hope it's going to be able to actually live its life out
札が情報を記録している間
12:45
during the course that the tag is recording.
生き抜けるようにと願うわけです
12:49
The tags cost 3500 dollars each, and then satellite time is another 500 dollars,
札は一つ3500ドルで衛星タイムは500ドルなので
12:52
so you're like, oh, I hope the tag is okay.
札が無事でありますように と思うわけです
12:58
And so the waiting is really the hardest part.
待っている時間が一番大変です
13:01
I'm going to show you our latest dataset.
最新のデータをお見せします
13:04
And it hasn't been published, so it's totally privy information just for TED.
これはTEDが初公開となる未公開のデータです
13:06
And in showing you this, you know, when we're looking at this data,
私達がこのデータを見て思うのは
13:11
we're thinking, oh do these animals, do they cross the equator?
この生き物は赤道を越えるのかどうか?
13:15
Do they go from one side of the Pacific to the other?
彼らは太平洋の端から端まで行くのか?
13:18
And we found that they kind of are homebodies.
彼らはどちらかと言うと引きこもりがちです
13:20
They're not big migrators. This is their track:
それほど回遊しません ここで示したように
13:25
we deployed the tag off of Tokyo, and the Mola in one month
東京から後を追ってみたところ 一か月後
13:27
kind of got into the Kuroshio Current off of Japan and foraged there.
黒潮に乗って 沖合いで食糧探しを始め
13:31
And after four months, went up, you know, off of the north part of Japan.
4ヶ月後には 三陸はるか沖合に移動しました
13:36
And that's kind of their home range.
そこが行動圏です
13:40
Now that's important, though, because if there's a lot of fishing pressure,
もし漁が盛んだったらマンボウの生息数は
13:42
that population doesn't get replenished.
増えないので これは重要なんです
13:46
So that's a very important piece of data.
ですからこれは非常に重要なデータですが
13:49
But also what's important is that they're not slacker, lazy fish.
もう一つ重要なのは彼らは怠け者ではないということです
13:51
They're super industrious.
とても働き者です
13:57
And this is a day in the life of a Mola, and if we --
これはマンボウの一日を示したものです
13:59
they're up and down, and up and down, and up and down, and up
彼らは潜ったり上がったり 上下運動を一日に
14:02
and up and down, up to 40 times a day.
最大40回も繰り返します
14:06
As the sun comes up, you see in the blue, they start their dive.
青線のように 日の出からダイブを始めます
14:08
Down -- and as the sun gets brighter they go a little deeper, little deeper.
陽ざしが強くなると 少しずつ潜って行き
14:13
They plumb the depths down to 600 meters, in temperatures to one degree centigrade,
600mの深さまで潜ります 水温は1℃で
14:17
and this is why you see them on the surface -- it's so cold down there.
とても冷たいので海面で日光浴をするんです
14:23
They've got to come up, warm, get that solar power,
上がってきて太陽熱を得なくちゃいけません
14:27
and then plunge back into the depths, and go up and down and up and down.
そして再び上下運動を繰り返します
14:29
And they're hitting a layer down there; it's called the deep scattering layer --
深海音波散乱層という食べ物がたくさんいる
14:32
which a whole variety of food's in that layer.
層まで潜って行きます
14:35
So rather than just being some sunbathing slacker,
ただの日光浴をする怠け者ではなく
14:40
they're really very industrious fish that dance this wild dance
海面から 温度も違う海中深くまで
14:44
between the surface and the bottom and through temperature.
踊りを繰り返す実に働き者の魚です
14:47
We see the same pattern -- now with these tags
この札を使って 同様のパターンが
14:52
we're seeing a similar pattern for swordfishes, manta rays, tunas,
メカジキ マンタ マグロにも見られます
14:55
a real three-dimensional play.
三次元のパフォーマンスです
14:59
This is part of a much larger program called the Census of Marine Life,
これは「海洋生物のセンサス」と呼ばれるもっと大きな計画の一部です
15:04
where they're going to be tagging all over the world
世界中で行われている調査では
15:07
and the Mola's going to enter into that.
マンボウも対象に含まれます
15:10
And what's exciting -- you all travel, and you know
さて 旅で一番楽しい事は
15:12
the best thing about traveling is to be able to find the locals,
地元の人に出会い 素敵な所を
15:15
and to find the great places by getting the local knowledge.
教えてもらうことです
15:18
Well now with the Census of Marine Life, we'll be able to sidle up to all the locals
「海洋生物のセンサス」によって あらゆる場所の
15:21
and explore 90 percent of our living space, with local knowledge.
情報を集め 生命圏の9割を探査できるのです
15:25
It's never -- it's really never been a more exciting, or a vital time, to be a biologist.
生物学者になって こんなに感動したことはありません
15:30
Which brings me to my last point, and what I think is kind of the most fun.
最後のポイントは 私が一番楽しんでいることです
15:36
I set up a website because I was getting so many questions about Molas and sunfish.
マンボウに関する質問がたくさん寄せられるのでホームページを作りました
15:40
And so I just figured I'd have the questions answered,
質問に答えたり スポンサーに
15:48
and I'd be able to thank my funders, like National Geographic and Lindbergh.
お礼が言えると思ったからです
15:52
But people would write into the site with all sorts of,
すると この生き物に関する様々な話や
15:56
all sorts of stories about these animals
遺伝子分析のサンプルを得る
16:00
and wanting to help me get samples for genetic analysis.
手助けをしたいという書き込みがあるんです
16:03
And what I found most exciting is that everyone had a shared --
一番嬉しいのは 誰もが海に対する
16:07
a shared love and an interest in the oceans.
愛と興味を持っている事です
16:14
I was getting reports from Catholic nuns,
カトリック尼僧 ユダヤ教のラビ イスラム教徒
16:17
Jewish Rabbis, Muslims, Christians -- everybody writing in,
キリスト教徒から報告をもらい 誰もが
16:21
united by their love of life.
マンボウの命に対する愛で結びついています
16:26
And to me that -- I don't think I could say it any better than the immortal Bard himself:
シェークスピアが上手いことを言っています
16:30
"One touch of nature makes the whole world kin."
“自然との繋がりが世界を親密にする”
16:36
And sure, it may be just one big old silly fish, but it's helping.
ただの大きな魚かも知れませんが 役に立っています
16:40
If it's helping to unite the world, I think it's definitely the fish of the future.
世界の繋がりを助ける 将来性のある魚だと思います
16:44
Translated by Takako Sato
Reviewed by Natsuhiko Mizutani

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About the Speaker:

Tierney Thys - Marine biologist
Tierney Thys is a marine biologist and science educator. She studies the behavior of the Mola mola, or giant ocean sunfish -- and works with other scientists to make films that share the wonders they see.

Why you should listen

Marine biologist Tierney Thys has fallen head over heels for a big, goofy fish: the Mola mola, or giant ocean sunfish. In studying the mola -- where they go, what they eat, what eats them -- she's also hunting for clues to the behavior of all life in the open ocean. With their enormous, odd bodies, peaceful habits and lust for jellyfish, these giants can be key to understanding life in the open ocean. Thys and her team are tagging and tracking molas worldwide to learn about how they live, and how climate change may be affecting all ocean life.

Thys is a National Geographic Explorer with a passion for marine education. She was also past director of research at the Sea Studios Foundation, a team of scientists and filmmakers that makes media to raise awareness of environmental issues -- including the PBS series Strange Days on Planet Earth and targeted videos that influence policymakers and businesspeople. Sea Studios was also instrumental in helping eBay stop the trading of invasive species.

More profile about the speaker
Tierney Thys | Speaker | TED.com