sponsored links
TEDGlobal 2011

Annie Murphy Paul: What we learn before we're born

アニー・マーフィー・ポール:私たちが生まれてくる前に学ぶこと

July 12, 2011

クイズです:人間はいつから学習し始めますか?答えは、私たちが生まれる前からです。サイエンスライターのアニー・マーフィー・ポールが、母国語の学習から私たちが将来好きになる食べ物の味の学習まで、母胎の中で行なわれる胎児の学習の新発見について、お話します。

Annie Murphy Paul - Science author
Annie Murphy Paul investigates how life in the womb shapes who we become. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
My subject today is learning.
今日の私のトピックは学習です
00:15
And in that spirit, I want to spring on you all a pop quiz.
「学習」ですから ここでみなさんにクイズを出します
00:18
Ready?
準備は良いですか?
00:21
When does learning begin?
学習はいつ始まりますか?
00:23
Now as you ponder that question,
この質問を聞いて
00:26
maybe you're thinking about the first day of preschool
初めてクラスに入り先生から教育を受ける
00:28
or kindergarten,
保育園や幼稚園の初日のことを
00:30
the first time that kids are in a classroom with a teacher.
思い浮かべたかもしれません
00:32
Or maybe you've called to mind the toddler phase
もしくは 幼児期に歩き始めたり
00:35
when children are learning how to walk and talk
話し始めたり フォークを使い始めた頃を
00:38
and use a fork.
思い浮かべたかもしれません
00:41
Maybe you've encountered the Zero-to-Three movement,
もしくは「zerotothree.org」をご存知の方なら
00:43
which asserts that the most important years for learning
人間の学習の中では人生の最初の数年が
00:46
are the earliest ones.
重要だと思うかもしれません
00:49
And so your answer to my question would be:
そうであれば あなたの答えは
00:51
Learning begins at birth.
学習は誕生と共に始まる ですね
00:54
Well today I want to present to you
ここで今日 お伝えするアイデアは
00:56
an idea that may be surprising
とても驚きで または ありえない
00:58
and may even seem implausible,
と思われるかもしれないですが
01:01
but which is supported by the latest evidence
最新の心理学と生物学の実験により
01:04
from psychology and biology.
証明されていることなのです
01:06
And that is that some of the most important learning we ever do
この考えとは 私たちの一番大切な学習は
01:09
happens before we're born,
私たちが生まれてくる以前に
01:12
while we're still in the womb.
母胎の中で行なわれているという事です
01:14
Now I'm a science reporter.
私は科学レポーターで
01:17
I write books and magazine articles.
数々の本や雑誌の記事を書いています
01:19
And I'm also a mother.
そして私は一人の母親です
01:21
And those two roles came together for me
私のこの二つの役割が「オリジンズ(起源)」という
01:23
in a book that I wrote called "Origins."
本を執筆していた時に交わりました
01:26
"Origins" is a report from the front lines
「オリジンズ」は胎児起源という
01:29
of an exciting new field
新しい分野から出た最先端の結果を
01:32
called fetal origins.
まとめた一冊です
01:34
Fetal origins is a scientific discipline
胎児起源とは科学的な専門分野で
01:36
that emerged just about two decades ago,
20年ぐらい前に発足され
01:39
and it's based on the theory
人間の寿命や健康状態は
01:42
that our health and well-being throughout our lives
胎児が母胎で過ごす9ヶ月間に
01:45
is crucially affected
大きく左右される
01:48
by the nine months we spend in the womb.
という仮説に基づいています
01:50
Now this theory was of more than just intellectual interest to me.
この理論は私の知的好奇心をくすぐっただけではありませんでした
01:53
I was myself pregnant
この本の下調べをしていた間
01:57
while I was doing the research for the book.
私は妊娠していました
01:59
And one of the most fascinating insights
この仕事をして分かったのは
02:02
I took from this work
私たちは ある世界に突入する前から
02:04
is that we're all learning about the world
その世界について学習している
02:06
even before we enter it.
ということです
02:09
When we hold our babies for the first time,
初めて我が子を抱いている時
02:12
we might imagine that they're clean slates,
彼らはまだ何にも書かれていない
02:14
unmarked by life,
白紙の状態だと思いがちですが
02:17
when in fact, they've already been shaped by us
でも実際には「私たち」と「私たちを取り囲む世界」で
02:19
and by the particular world we live in.
形づくられているのです
02:22
Today I want to share with you some of the amazing things
今日は 科学者たちが解き明かしている
02:26
that scientists are discovering
胎児による学習に関する
02:28
about what fetuses learn
素晴らしい発見の数々について
02:30
while they're still in their mothers' bellies.
お話したいと思います
02:32
First of all,
まず胎児は
02:36
they learn the sound of their mothers' voices.
母親の声を覚えます
02:38
Because sounds from the outside world
外界の音は 母親の腹部組織を通り
02:41
have to travel through the mother's abdominal tissue
胎児を包む羊水を通して伝わってくるので
02:44
and through the amniotic fluid that surrounds the fetus,
胎児が4ヶ月目から
02:47
the voices fetuses hear,
聞こえる声は
02:51
starting around the fourth month of gestation,
とても抑えられた弱音で
02:53
are muted and muffled.
とても鈍い声です
02:56
One researcher says
ある研究者は 胎児が聞く声は
02:58
that they probably sound a lot like the the voice of Charlie Brown's teacher
アニメ「ピーナッツ」の中のチャーリー・ブラウンの
03:00
in the old "Peanuts" cartoon.
先生のような声だろう と言います
03:03
But the pregnant woman's own voice
しかし 母親の声は
03:06
reverberates through her body,
彼女の身体を通して反響し
03:09
reaching the fetus much more readily.
胎児にすぐ届きます
03:11
And because the fetus is with her all the time,
そして常に母親と一緒の胎児は
03:14
it hears her voice a lot.
母親の声を沢山聞いています
03:17
Once the baby's born, it recognizes her voice
赤ちゃんが生まれてからは
03:20
and it prefers listening to her voice
母親の声を認知し
03:23
over anyone else's.
他人の声よりも母親の声を好みます
03:25
How can we know this?
どのようにして調べたのでしょう?
03:27
Newborn babies can't do much,
生まれたばかりの乳児は
03:29
but one thing they're really good at is sucking.
できないことが多いですが吸うことは上手です
03:31
Researchers take advantage of this fact
研究者たちは この事実を取り入れて
03:34
by rigging up two rubber nipples,
ゴム製のおしゃぶりを二つ用意し
03:37
so that if a baby sucks on one,
一つのおしゃぶりを吸うと
03:40
it hears a recording of its mother's voice
ヘッドフォンから
03:42
on a pair of headphones,
母親の声が流れ
03:44
and if it sucks on the other nipple,
もう一つのおしゃぶりを吸うと
03:46
it hears a recording of a female stranger's voice.
他の女性の声が流れるように準備しました
03:48
Babies quickly show their preference
赤ちゃん達は すぐに一番目の
03:52
by choosing the first one.
おしゃぶりを選ぶのです
03:55
Scientists also take advantage of the fact
さらに研究者達は
03:58
that babies will slow down their sucking
赤ちゃんが何かに興味を示すと
04:01
when something interests them
吸う頻度を下げて
04:03
and resume their fast sucking
飽きると吸う頻度を上げる
04:05
when they get bored.
という事実を取り入れました
04:07
This is how researchers discovered
この実験条件のもとで 胎児の頃に
04:10
that, after women repeatedly read aloud
ドクター・スースの「ザ・キャット・イン・ザ・ハット」(アメリカの有名な絵本)
04:12
a section of Dr. Seuss' "The Cat in the Hat" while they were pregnant,
を読み聞かされた赤ちゃんは生まれてきてからも
04:15
their newborn babies recognized that passage
この絵本を読み聞かされると
04:19
when they hear it outside the womb.
聞き覚えがあると認知することを明らかにしました
04:22
My favorite experiment of this kind
このような実験の数々の中で
04:25
is the one that showed that the babies
私が最も気に入っているのは
04:28
of women who watched a certain soap opera
妊娠時に昼ドラを毎日見ると
04:30
every day during pregnancy
その新生児たちは
04:32
recognized the theme song of that show
昼ドラのテーマソングを認知した
04:35
once they were born.
という実験です
04:38
So fetuses are even learning
そして胎児は
04:41
about the particular language that's spoken
生まれてくる環境で話されている
04:43
in the world that they'll be born into.
言語も学習しているのです
04:46
A study published last year
昨年発表された論文では
04:48
found that from birth, from the moment of birth,
誕生時から赤ちゃんは
04:51
babies cry in the accent
母国語のアクセントがついた
04:54
of their mother's native language.
泣き方で泣く と示しています
04:56
French babies cry on a rising note
フランス人の赤ちゃんのは音の高さが上昇し
04:59
while German babies end on a falling note,
ドイツ人の赤ちゃんでは音の高さが下がります
05:02
imitating the melodic contours
泣き方がそれぞれの母国語の
05:05
of those languages.
旋律輪郭に沿っているのです
05:07
Now why would this kind of fetal learning
さて このような胎児学習は
05:09
be useful?
何の役に立つのでしょう?
05:11
It may have evolved to aid the baby's survival.
赤ちゃんの生存を高める為に進化したのかもしれません
05:13
From the moment of birth,
生まれた瞬間から
05:16
the baby responds most to the voice
赤ちゃんは自分を大事に育ててくれる人
05:18
of the person who is most likely to care for it --
つまり母親の声に敏感に
05:20
its mother.
反応します
05:22
It even makes its cries
しかも母親が使う言語の旋律輪郭に
05:24
sound like the mother's language,
沿った泣き声まであげて
05:26
which may further endear the baby to the mother,
母親に赤ちゃんをますます愛おしくさせます
05:28
and which may give the baby a head start
これにより 赤ちゃんにとって
05:31
in the critical task
非常に大事な母国語の聞き取り
05:33
of learning how to understand and speak
そして話すことを一刻も早く学習できる
05:35
its native language.
環境にさせるのかもしれません
05:38
But it's not just sounds
しかし胎児が母胎で学習するのは
05:40
that fetuses are learning about in utero.
音だけではありません
05:42
It's also tastes and smells.
味わったり 匂うこともします
05:44
By seven months of gestation,
胎児が7ヶ月になる頃には
05:47
the fetus' taste buds are fully developed,
胎児の味蕾は完璧に発達しており
05:49
and its olfactory receptors, which allow it to smell,
匂いを嗅ぐために必要な嗅覚器も
05:51
are functioning.
機能しています
05:54
The flavors of the food a pregnant woman eats
妊婦が食する食べ物の味は
05:56
find their way into the amniotic fluid,
胎児が常時飲み込んでいる
05:59
which is continuously swallowed
羊水にも
06:01
by the fetus.
渡ります
06:03
Babies seem to remember and prefer these tastes
赤ちゃん達は この世に生まれてくると
06:05
once they're out in the world.
この味を覚えていて好むようです
06:08
In one experiment, a group of pregnant women
ある実験では 一つ目のグループの妊婦たちに
06:11
was asked to drink a lot of carrot juice
妊娠第三期に人参ジュースを
06:14
during their third trimester of pregnancy,
沢山飲んでもらい
06:16
while another group of pregnant women
もう一つのグループの妊婦たちには
06:19
drank only water.
水だけを飲んでもらいました
06:21
Six months later, the women's infants
6ヵ月後 この妊婦達の赤ちゃんに
06:23
were offered cereal mixed with carrot juice,
人参ジュースがかかったシリアルを与え
06:26
and their facial expressions were observed while they ate it.
食べている時の赤ちゃんの表情を観察しました
06:29
The offspring of the carrot juice drinking women
人参ジュースを飲んだ妊婦の子供は
06:33
ate more carrot-flavored cereal,
人参ジュース味のシリアルをもっと食べ
06:35
and from the looks of it,
顔を見てみると
06:37
they seemed to enjoy it more.
喜んで食べているように見えました
06:39
A sort of French version of this experiment
この実験のフランス版が
06:41
was carried out in Dijon, France
フランスのディジョン市で実施され
06:44
where researchers found
研究者達は
06:46
that mothers who consumed food and drink
カンゾウ風味のアニスを含んだ食べ物や飲み物を
06:48
flavored with licorice-flavored anise during pregnancy
よく口にした妊婦の子供たちは
06:51
showed a preference for anise
生まれたその当日でも
06:56
on their first day of life,
4日経っていても
06:58
and again, when they were tested later,
アニスの味を好んだ
07:00
on their fourth day of life.
と発表しました
07:02
Babies whose mothers did not eat anise during pregnancy
妊娠時にアニスを口にしなかった妊婦の乳児たちは
07:04
showed a reaction that translated roughly as "yuck."
「まずい!」とアニスに反応しました
07:08
What this means
これが何を意味しているかというと
07:12
is that fetuses are effectively being taught by their mothers
胎児は母親により何が安全で
07:14
about what is safe and good to eat.
良い食べ物なのかを教わっているのです
07:16
Fetuses are also being taught
そして胎児は
07:19
about the particular culture that they'll be joining
生まれてくる環境の文化を
07:21
through one of culture's most powerful expressions,
その文化を特別象徴する食文化を通して
07:24
which is food.
教わっているのです
07:27
They're being introduced to the characteristic flavors and spices
彼らの食文化には欠かせない
07:29
of their culture's cuisine
特有の味やスパイスを
07:32
even before birth.
生まれてくる前に紹介されているのです
07:34
Now it turns out that fetuses are learning even bigger lessons.
実は胎児は これ以上に重大なことを学んでいます
07:37
But before I get to that,
それに触れる前に
07:40
I want to address something that you may be wondering about.
あなたが不思議に思っている事についてお伝えします
07:42
The notion of fetal learning
胎児学習というコンセプトは
07:46
may conjure up for you attempts to enrich the fetus --
あなたに胎教を始めようと思わせるかもしれません
07:48
like playing Mozart through headphones
例えばヘッドフォンを妊婦のお腹につけて
07:51
placed on a pregnant belly.
モーツァルトを流してみたりです
07:53
But actually, the nine-month-long process
しかし妊娠9ヶ月間での
07:55
of molding and shaping that goes on in the womb
胎児を成形する過程は
07:58
is a lot more visceral and consequential than that.
もっと本能的で必然的なものです
08:01
Much of what a pregnant woman encounters in her daily life --
妊婦が日常生活で触れるもの ―
08:05
the air she breathes,
吸う空気
08:09
the food and drink she consumes,
口にする食べ物や飲み物
08:11
the chemicals she's exposed to,
さらされている化学物質
08:13
even the emotions she feels --
込み上げる感情まで ―
08:15
are shared in some fashion with her fetus.
全てが何らかの方法で胎児と共有されます
08:17
They make up a mix of influences
これら全ての影響が交じり合ったものは
08:20
as individual and idiosyncratic
その妊婦と同じくらい
08:23
as the woman herself.
個性的で特有なものです
08:25
The fetus incorporates these offerings
胎児はこれらを全て
08:27
into its own body,
自分の身体に取り入れ
08:29
makes them part of its flesh and blood.
自分の肉体と血の一部にします
08:31
And often it does something more.
そしてほとんどの場合それ以上の事をします
08:34
It treats these maternal contributions
胎児は母親から授かったものを
08:36
as information,
情報として捉えます ―
08:39
as what I like to call biological postcards
私はこれらを外界からの
08:41
from the world outside.
「生物的なハガキ」と呼んでいます
08:43
So what a fetus is learning about in utero
つまり胎児が胎内で学んでいるのは
08:46
is not Mozart's "Magic Flute"
モーツァルトの「魔笛」ではなく
08:49
but answers to questions much more critical to its survival.
生存することにとっても重要な知識なのです
08:51
Will it be born into a world of abundance
生まれてくる世界が
08:55
or scarcity?
裕福であるか貧困であるか
08:57
Will it be safe and protected,
安全で守られた環境なのか
08:59
or will it face constant dangers and threats?
それとも危険と脅迫が伴う環境なのか?
09:02
Will it live a long, fruitful life
長く実りある人生となるか
09:05
or a short, harried one?
短く悩ましい人生を送るのでしょうか?
09:07
The pregnant woman's diet and stress level in particular
妊婦の食生活とストレスレベルが
09:10
provide important clues to prevailing conditions
特に胎児の状態を
09:13
like a finger lifted to the wind.
読むための手がかりです
09:16
The resulting tuning and tweaking
妊婦の健康状態により
09:19
of a fetus' brain and other organs
胎児の脳や他の臓器が微調整され
09:21
are part of what give us humans
私たち人間に特有な
09:24
our enormous flexibility,
柔軟性 ー
09:26
our ability to thrive
田舎でも都会でも
09:28
in a huge variety of environments,
ツンドラでも砂漠でも
09:30
from the country to the city,
様々な環境に適応し
09:32
from the tundra to the desert.
生きていく能力を得るのです
09:34
To conclude, I want to tell you two stories
最後に 妊婦たちが
09:37
about how mothers teach their children about the world
まだ生まれていない子供たちに
09:39
even before they're born.
社会のことをどのように教えるかについてお話します
09:42
In the autumn of 1944,
1944年の秋
09:46
the darkest days of World War II,
暗い第二次世界大戦中
09:48
German troops blockaded Western Holland,
ドイツ軍は西オランダを封鎖し
09:51
turning away all shipments of food.
食糧の入荷が停止しました
09:54
The opening of the Nazi's siege
ナチスに包囲されたオランダは
09:57
was followed by one of the harshest winters in decades --
運河が凍るほど
09:59
so cold the water in the canals froze solid.
とてつもなく厳しい冬を迎えました
10:02
Soon food became scarce,
すぐに食糧は底をつき
10:06
with many Dutch surviving on just 500 calories a day --
オランダ人の大半は 以前摂取していた一日のカロリーの
10:08
a quarter of what they consumed before the war.
4分の1の500カロリーでしのいでいました
10:12
As weeks of deprivation stretched into months,
食糧不足は何ヶ月も続き
10:15
some resorted to eating tulip bulbs.
チューリップの球根を食べるほかありませんでした
10:18
By the beginning of May,
5月初旬の頃までには
10:21
the nation's carefully rationed food reserve
国が考えて配給していた食糧備蓄は
10:23
was completely exhausted.
完璧に底をつきました
10:25
The specter of mass starvation loomed.
大飢饉に見舞われました
10:27
And then on May 5th, 1945,
そして1945年5月5日
10:30
the siege came to a sudden end
ナチス包囲が突然終わりました
10:33
when Holland was liberated
オランダは同盟国により
10:35
by the Allies.
開放されたのです
10:37
The "Hunger Winter," as it came to be known,
「飢餓の冬」と呼ばれたこの冬に
10:39
killed some 10,000 people
1万人が飢え死にし
10:42
and weakened thousands more.
何千の人が病に落ちました
10:44
But there was another population that was affected --
ナチス包囲時には この他にも
10:46
the 40,000 fetuses
4万人の胎児が
10:49
in utero during the siege.
大きな影響を受けました
10:51
Some of the effects of malnutrition during pregnancy
妊娠時の栄養失調は
10:54
were immediately apparent
数多くの死産 先天性欠損
10:56
in higher rates of stillbirths,
低出生体重
10:58
birth defects, low birth weights
高い乳児死亡率などを
11:00
and infant mortality.
引き起こしました
11:02
But others wouldn't be discovered for many years.
そして何十年後に現れる影響もありました
11:04
Decades after the "Hunger Winter,"
「飢餓の冬」の数十年後
11:07
researchers documented
研究者たちは
11:09
that people whose mothers were pregnant during the siege
母親が飢餓の最中に妊娠していた人である場合
11:11
have more obesity, more diabetes
成長してから
11:15
and more heart disease in later life
肥満 糖尿病 そして心臓病を患う確率が
11:17
than individuals who were gestated under normal conditions.
とても高いということをみつけました
11:20
These individuals' prenatal experience of starvation
胎児期の飢えは この人たちの
11:23
seems to have changed their bodies
身体を大きく
11:27
in myriad ways.
様々な面で変えたのです
11:29
They have higher blood pressure,
血圧が高くなったり
11:31
poorer cholesterol profiles
コレストロール値の異常
11:33
and reduced glucose tolerance --
耐糖能の低下による
11:35
a precursor of diabetes.
糖尿病を引き起こしたりします
11:37
Why would undernutrition in the womb
なぜ母胎の中での栄養失調が
11:40
result in disease later?
後に病気を引き起こすのでしょう
11:42
One explanation
ある説では 胎児たちは最悪の状況下で
11:44
is that fetuses are making the best of a bad situation.
最善の努力を果たしていると言います
11:46
When food is scarce,
食糧不足の時
11:49
they divert nutrients towards the really critical organ, the brain,
大切な栄養分を最重要な器官である脳に送り
11:51
and away from other organs
心臓や肝臓など他の臓器には
11:54
like the heart and liver.
行き渡らないようにします
11:56
This keeps the fetus alive in the short-term,
これなら胎児はある一定の短い期間を
11:58
but the bill comes due later on in life
生き延びることができますが
12:01
when those other organs, deprived early on,
栄養を欠乏していた他の臓器は
12:04
become more susceptible to disease.
後に病気になりやすくなります
12:06
But that may not be all that's going on.
しかし それだけではないようです
12:09
It seems that fetuses are taking cues
胎児は母胎内部の
12:12
from the intrauterine environment
環境状況を察し
12:14
and tailoring their physiology accordingly.
自分の生理機能を合わせます
12:17
They're preparing themselves
胎児は母胎内で
12:19
for the kind of world they will encounter
生まれてくる環境に
12:21
on the other side of the womb.
備えているのです
12:23
The fetus adjusts its metabolism
胎児は新陳代謝や
12:25
and other physiological processes
様々な生理機能を
12:27
in anticipation of the environment that awaits it.
環境によって調整するのです
12:30
And the basis of the fetus' prediction
胎児は妊婦の食生活をもとに
12:33
is what its mother eats.
環境を推定します
12:36
The meals a pregnant woman consumes
妊婦が口にする食事は
12:38
constitute a kind of story,
お話のようなものを構成します -
12:40
a fairy tale of abundance
富裕に包まれたおとぎ話 もしくは
12:42
or a grim chronicle of deprivation.
飢饉を記す冷酷な年代記を
12:44
This story imparts information
このお話には胎児が身体と体内のシステムを
12:47
that the fetus uses
生まれてくる環境に適応し
12:50
to organize its body and its systems --
生存するために重要な
12:52
an adaptation to prevailing circumstances
調整に必要な情報が
12:54
that facilitates its future survival.
つまっています
12:57
Faced with severely limited resources,
資源が非常に欠乏した状況に直面した場合
13:00
a smaller-sized child with reduced energy requirements
身体の小さい子供は必要とするエネルギーが低く
13:03
will, in fact, have a better chance
成人になるまで
13:06
of living to adulthood.
生き延びる確率が高いのです
13:08
The real trouble comes
問題になるのは
13:10
when pregnant women are, in a sense, unreliable narrators,
お話のナレーターを務める妊婦が
13:12
when fetuses are led
妊娠時に栄養失調を経験したのに
13:15
to expect a world of scarcity
実際に生まれてきた環境が
13:17
and are born instead into a world of plenty.
栄養に満ち溢れたものだった場合です
13:19
This is what happened to the children of the Dutch "Hunger Winter."
「飢饉の冬」の子供たちは この問題に直面しました
13:22
And their higher rates of obesity,
肥満 糖尿病 心臓病の
13:25
diabetes and heart disease
高い発病率が
13:27
are the result.
その結果です
13:29
Bodies that were built to hang onto every calorie
カロリー一つ一つを大事に扱うように
13:31
found themselves swimming in the superfluous calories
適応された身体は 突然大戦後の
13:34
of the post-war Western diet.
飽食の時代に放り込まれたのです
13:36
The world they had learned about while in utero
胎児が推測していた環境は
13:39
was not the same
生まれてきた環境と
13:42
as the world into which they were born.
異なっていたのです
13:44
Here's another story.
次のお話に移ります
13:47
At 8:46 a.m. on September 11th, 2001,
2001年9月11日の午前8時46分
13:49
there were tens of thousands of people
何万人もの人が
13:53
in the vicinity of the World Trade Center
ニューヨークのワールドトレードセンター近辺
13:55
in New York --
にいました -
13:57
commuters spilling off trains,
地下鉄から溢れ出す通勤者
13:59
waitresses setting tables for the morning rush,
朝のラッシュで忙しくテーブルを用意するウェイトレス
14:01
brokers already working the phones on Wall Street.
忙しく電話をかけ仕事をするウォール街のブローカーたち
14:04
1,700 of these people were pregnant women.
そのうちの1700人が妊婦でした
14:08
When the planes struck and the towers collapsed,
飛行機が突撃し崩壊してから
14:11
many of these women experienced the same horrors
多くの妊婦たちは他の生存者と
14:14
inflicted on other survivors of the disaster --
同じような恐怖を体験しました -
14:17
the overwhelming chaos and confusion,
計り知れない困惑と混乱
14:20
the rolling clouds
空気中に舞う有毒な
14:22
of potentially toxic dust and debris,
埃や瓦礫
14:24
the heart-pounding fear for their lives.
恐怖や不安で震える心
14:28
About a year after 9/11,
9・11の一年後
14:30
researchers examined a group of women
当時妊婦だった人たちを
14:32
who were pregnant
研究者たちが
14:35
when they were exposed to the World Trade Center attack.
調査しました
14:37
In the babies of those women
このうち
14:39
who developed post-traumatic stress syndrome, or PTSD,
心的外傷後ストレス障害(PTSD)を
14:41
following their ordeal,
患った女性の赤ちゃんたちに
14:44
researchers discovered a biological marker
PTSDの受け易さを持つ
14:46
of susceptibility to PTSD --
生物学的マーカーを発見しました -
14:49
an effect that was most pronounced
9・11事件当時、妊娠第3期に入っていた
14:51
in infants whose mothers experienced the catastrophe
胎児たちへの影響が
14:54
in their third trimester.
とても強いのです
14:57
In other words,
すなわち
14:59
the mothers with post-traumatic stress syndrome
PTSDを患っていた妊婦は
15:01
had passed on a vulnerability to the condition
PTSDを患い易い状態を
15:04
to their children while they were still in utero.
胎児へ引き継いだのです
15:07
Now consider this:
想像してみて下さい
15:10
post-traumatic stress syndrome
PTSDは
15:12
appears to be a reaction to stress gone very wrong,
ストレスへの過剰で異常な反応を引き起こし
15:14
causing its victims tremendous unnecessary suffering.
患者たちにとてつもない苦しみを与えます
15:17
But there's another way of thinking about PTSD.
しかし視点を変えてみると
15:21
What looks like pathology to us
病理にみえるこのプロセスは
15:24
may actually be a useful adaptation
場合によっては
15:27
in some circumstances.
役に立つ適応なのかもしれません
15:29
In a particularly dangerous environment,
非常に危険な環境の中では
15:31
the characteristic manifestations of PTSD --
PTSDの象徴的な行動 -
15:34
a hyper-awareness of one's surroundings,
身の回りへの機敏な配慮と緊張感
15:37
a quick-trigger response to danger --
危険事態に対する素早い反応 -
15:40
could save someone's life.
は命を救えるのです
15:43
The notion that the prenatal transmission of PTSD risk is adaptive
PTSDのリスク伝達に適応性が
15:46
is still speculative,
あるかは未だ不確かですが
15:50
but I find it rather poignant.
私の心にはとても強く響きました
15:52
It would mean that, even before birth,
もし事実だとすれば 生まれてくる前から
15:55
mothers are warning their children
母親は子供に騒々しい世の中に対して
15:57
that it's a wild world out there,
「気をつけなさい」と
15:59
telling them, "Be careful."
警告しているのです
16:01
Let me be clear.
はっきり言わせて下さい
16:04
Fetal origins research is not about blaming women
胎児起源の研究は妊婦に対し妊娠中に起きる様々な事を
16:06
for what happens during pregnancy.
非難するものではありません
16:09
It's about discovering how best to promote
どのようにして後世の健康状態を良くするか
16:11
the health and well-being of the next generation.
を探求するものです
16:14
That important effort must include a focus
胎児が9ヶ月間 母胎の中で
16:17
on what fetuses learn
何を学習するのかに
16:19
during the nine months they spend in the womb.
注意を向けることが大切です
16:21
Learning is one of life's most essential activities,
学習は人生の中で最も重要な行動であり
16:24
and it begins much earlier
実は私たちが想定していた以上に
16:27
than we ever imagined.
早い段階から始まるものだったのです
16:29
Thank you.
有難うございました
16:31
(Applause)
(拍手)
16:33
Translator:Lisa Akiyama
Reviewer:Takafusa Kitazume

sponsored links

Annie Murphy Paul - Science author
Annie Murphy Paul investigates how life in the womb shapes who we become.

Why you should listen

To what extent the conditions we encounter before birth influence our individual characteristics? It‘s the question at the center of fetal origins, a relatively new field of research that measures how the effects of influences outside the womb during pregnancy can shape the physical, mental and even emotional well-being of the developing baby for the rest of its life.

Science writer Annie Murphy Paul calls it a gray zone between nature and nurture in her book Origins, a history and study of this emerging field structured around a personal narrative -- Paul was pregnant with her second child at the time. What she finds suggests a far more dynamic nature between mother and fetus than typically acknowledged, and opens up the possibility that the time before birth is as crucial to human development as early childhood.

Read Annie Murphy Paul's essay on CNN.com>>

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.