16:00
TEDMED 2011

Charles Limb: Building the musical muscle

チャールズ・リム「音楽芸術のための聴力回復」

Filmed:

チャールズ・リムは聴力を失った人が会話を聞けるように、人工内耳移植手術を行っています。その一方で、リムは演奏者としての立場から移植に何が欠けているか考え、「移植は完璧に音楽を楽しめるようにすることはできないと教えてくれます。(身の毛がよだつような例が出てきます)。 TEDMED にて、リムは美に対する最先端と未来をご紹介します。

- Researcher
Charles Limb is a doctor and a musician who researches the way musical creativity works in the brain. Full bio

Now when we think of our senses,
それでは始めましょう 私たちが五感のことを考えるとき
00:15
we don't usually think of the reasons
なぜその感覚が発達したのか 生物学的観点から
00:20
why they probably evolved, from a biological perspective.
考えることはおそらくないでしょう
00:22
We don't really think of the evolutionary need
私たちは感覚による護身が
00:24
to be protected by our senses,
進化に必要だったとはあまり考えません
00:27
but that's probably why our senses really evolved --
しかしおそらく安全に生きていく
00:29
to keep us safe, to allow us to live.
護身の為に五感が進化してきたのでしょう
00:31
Really when we think of our senses,
私たちが五感について あるいは
00:34
or when we think of the loss of the sense,
五感の1つを失うと考えるとき
00:36
we really think about something more like this:
実際にはこんな能力を考えています
00:38
the ability to touch something luxurious, to taste something delicious,
触って感じる気持ちよさ 食べて感じるおいしさ
00:40
to smell something fragrant,
嗅いで感じるいい香り 見て感じる美しさ
00:43
to see something beautiful.
それらを感じることができる能力です
00:45
This is what we want out of our senses.
感覚にこの能力を私たちは求めるのです
00:47
We want beauty; we don't just want function.
つまり単なる機能ではなく美しさを感じる能力を求めているのです
00:49
And when it comes to sensory restoration,
しかし五感の回復に関しては
00:52
we're still very far away from being able to provide beauty.
今もなお 美しさを感じるには程遠い状態です
00:54
And that's what I'd like to talk to you a little bit about today.
それが今日私がみなさんにお話しするテーマです
00:57
Likewise for hearing.
聴覚回復も同じように程遠いです
01:00
When we think about why we hear,
聞く能力が何の為なのか考えると
01:02
we don't often think about the ability to hear an alarm or a siren,
大切であるにも関わらずアラームやサイレンを聞く能力を
01:04
although clearly that's an important thing.
想像する人はめったにいないでしょう
01:07
Really what we want to hear is music.
私たちが本当に聞きたいものは何か それは音楽です
01:09
(Music)
(音楽)
01:12
So many of you know that that's Beethoven's Seventh Symphony.
ご存じのようにベートーベンの交響曲7番です
01:27
Many of you know that he was deaf, or near profoundly deaf,
彼はこの交響曲を書いた時 耳がほとんど聞こえない
01:29
when he wrote that.
深刻な状況にありました
01:32
Now I'd like to impress upon you
さて音楽を理解できるのが
01:34
how unusual it is that we can hear music.
いかに並はずれた事か印象付けたいと思います
01:36
Music is just one of the strangest things that there is.
音楽というのはこの世界で最も不思議なもののひとつです
01:39
It's acoustic vibrations in the air,
空気に伝わったエネルギーの波が鼓膜を刺激するのです
01:42
little waves of energy in the air that tickle our eardrum.
音楽は空気中を伝わる音の振動なのです
01:45
Somehow in tickling our eardrum
鼓膜が刺激されると鼓膜は
01:48
that transmits energy down our hearing bones,
エネルギーを中耳から奥に骨導して伝え
01:50
which get converted to a fluid impulse inside the cochlea
そのエネルギーが蝸牛の中で流動性の波動へと変換されます
01:52
and then somehow converted into an electrical signal in our auditory nerves
そしてそれが電気信号として聴神経に伝えられ
01:55
that somehow wind up in our brains
やがて歌や美しい旋律の音楽として脳に届いて
01:58
as a perception of a song or a beautiful piece of music.
認識することができます 音が聞こえるまでの過程は
02:01
That process is entirely abstract and very, very unusual.
とても難解で非常に興味深いものです
02:04
And we could discuss that topic alone for days
どのようにして音は聞こえるのか
02:07
to really try to figure out, how is it that we hear something that's emotional
どうして私たちは単なる空気中の振動を音として感じることができるのか
02:10
from something that starts out as a vibration in the air?
何日も何日も議論できるほどこれは複雑な話なのです
02:14
Turns out that if you have hearing loss,
人が聴力を失う時
02:17
most people that lose their hearing
たいていそれは耳の奥にある
02:19
lose it at what's called the cochlea, the inner ear.
蝸牛と呼ばれる部位の問題によっておこります
02:21
And it's at the hair cell level that they do this.
有毛細胞レベルでの問題ということです
02:24
Now if you had to pick a sense to lose,
もし仮にあなたが失う感覚を1つ選ぶことになったら
02:27
I have to be very honest with you
正直なところ「医療は他のどの感覚よりも
02:29
and say, we're better at restoring hearing
聞く能力つまり聴力を最も
02:31
than we are at restoring any sense that there is.
回復できる」と伝えます
02:33
In fact, nothing even actually comes close
回復度合いではその他の感覚回復は
02:35
to our ability to restore hearing.
聴力回復の足元にもおよばないのです
02:37
And as a physician and a surgeon, I can confidently tell my patients
もし仮に私の患者が失う感覚を1つ選ぶことになったら
02:39
that if you had to pick a sense to lose,
内科医そして外科医としての視点から
02:42
we are the furthest along medically and surgically with hearing.
聴力は内科的にも外科的にも最も回復が見込める感覚だと自信を持って患者に伝えます
02:44
As a musician, I can tell you
しかし私自身演奏者なので もし
02:48
that if I had to have a cochlear implant,
人工内耳を埋め込むことになったら
02:50
I'd be heartbroken. I'd just be plainly heartbroken,
私はひどく深く傷つくことでしょう
02:52
because I know that music would never sound the same to me.
二度と以前と同じようには音楽が聴こえないと知っていますから
02:54
Now this is a video that I'm going to show you
これから 生まれつき耳が聞こえない少女のビデオを
02:58
of a girl who's born deaf.
みなさんにお見せしようと思います
03:01
She's in a very supportive environment.
彼女はとても恵まれた環境にいます
03:03
Her mother's doing everything she can.
母親はできる限りのことを彼女にしています
03:05
Okay, play that video please.
ではご覧ください
03:07
(Video) Mother: That's an owl.
(ビデオ)母親:あれはフクロウよ
03:09
Owl, yeah.
そうよフクロウよ
03:11
Owl. Owl.
フクロウフクロウ
03:18
Yeah.
そうよそうよ
03:21
Baby. Baby.
これはかわいい赤ちゃん
03:28
You want it?
持ってみる?
03:31
(Kiss)
(キス)
03:34
Charles Limb: Now despite everything going for this child
この少女は家族に全面的に支えられ
03:37
in terms of family support
学習に力を注いでもらえました
03:39
and simple infused learning,
しかし世の中には依然として
03:41
there is a limitation to what a child who's deaf, an infant who was born deaf,
聾者の子供や聾者として生まれてきた幼児が直面する
03:43
has in this world
限界が存在します
03:46
in terms of social, educational, vocational opportunities.
社会的教育的職業的な機会が限られるのです
03:48
I'm not saying that they can't live a beautiful, wonderful life.
素晴らしい楽しい人生が送れないと言っているのではありません
03:51
I'm saying that they're going to face obstacles
私がここで言いたいのは一般の聴力であれば
03:54
that most people who have normal hearing will not have to face.
直面することのない困難に聾の子供たちは直面するということです
03:56
Now hearing loss and the treatment for hearing loss
聴力を失うこととそれに対する処置は
03:59
has really evolved in the past 200 years.
過去200年間にわたって発展してきました
04:01
I mean literally,
スライドを見てもわかるように
04:03
they used to do things like stick ear-shaped objects onto your ears
昔は耳のような形をしたスティックを耳の中にいれ
04:05
and stick funnels in.
さらに漏斗型のものを入れました
04:08
And that was the best you could do for hearing loss.
当時はこれが精いっぱいでした
04:10
Back then you couldn't even look at the eardrum.
鼓膜を見ることさえできませんでした
04:12
So it's not too surprising
この状況では聴力回復に有効な治療法が
04:14
that there were no good treatments for hearing loss.
無くてもみなさんもさほど驚かないでしょう
04:16
And now today we have the modern multi-channel cochlear implant,
今日では外科的な処置である
04:18
which is an outpatient procedure.
多重チャンネル蝸牛のインプラントがあります
04:20
It's surgically placed inside the inner ear.
その蝸牛は手術で内耳に埋め込まれます
04:22
It takes about an hour and a half to two hours, depending on where it's done,
埋込部位によって異なりますが 全身麻酔で
04:24
under general anesthesia.
1時間半から2時間の手術時間です
04:26
And in the end, you achieve something like this
結果として電極列を内耳内に埋め込んだ
04:28
where an electrode array is inserted inside the cochlea.
状態になります 説明したいと思います
04:30
Now actually, this is quite crude
この技術は通常の人間の内耳と比べると
04:33
in comparison to our regular inner ear.
比較的開発途上であるといえます
04:35
But here is that same girl who is implanted now.
しかし見てください 先ほどの少女はインプラントを受けました
04:37
This is her 10 years later.
10年後の彼女の姿を見てみましょう
04:40
And this is a video that was taken
このビデオはジョン・ニパーコ医師撮影です
04:42
by my surgical mentor, Dr. John Niparko, who implanted her.
彼は指導医で執刀医でした
04:44
If we could play this video please.
ではビデオをお願いします
04:46
(Video) John Niparko: So you've written two books?
(ビデオ)本を2冊書いたんだって?
04:49
Girl: I have written two books. (Mother: Was the other one a book or a journal entry?)
少女:ええそうよ(母:1冊は本というか日記って感じじゃない?)
04:51
Girl: No, the other one was a book. (Mother: Oh, okay.)
少女:違うわあれも本だわ(母:あらそうなのね)
04:54
JN: Well this book has seven chapters,
医師:えーっとこの本には7章あって
04:58
and the last chapter
最後のチャプターの名前は
05:01
is entitled "The Good Things About Being Deaf."
「耳が聞こえないからよいところ」だね
05:04
Do you remember writing that chapter?
このチャプターを書いたことを覚えているかな?
05:08
Girl: Yes I do. I remember writing every chapter.
少女:ええ覚えているわ全部の章をちゃんと覚えてる
05:11
JN: Yeah.
医師:それから?
05:14
Girl: Well sometimes my sister can be kind of annoying.
少女:時々ね妹がイライラすることしても
05:16
So it comes in handy to not be annoyed by her.
イラつかなくてすむの 便利なのよ
05:20
JN: I see. And who is that?
医師:なるほどねところでこれは誰かな?
05:24
Girl: Holly. (JN: Okay.)
少女:ホーリーだよ(医師:そうなんだ)
05:27
Mother: Her sister. (JN: Her sister.) Girl: My sister.
母:妹です(医師:なるほど) 少女:そう私の妹
05:29
JN: And how can you avoid being annoyed by her?
医師:どうやって妹のちょっかいをかわすんだい?
05:31
Girl: I just take off my CI, and I don't hear anything.
少女:ただCI(人工内耳)をはずすだけよそうしたら何も聞こえないわ
05:34
(Laughter)
(笑)
05:37
It comes in handy.
これってとっても役に立つの
05:39
JN: So you don't want to hear everything that's out there?
医師:ということは周りの音を全部聞きたいわけではないんだね?
05:41
Girl: No.
少女:ええ
05:44
CL: And so she's phenomenal.
リム:彼女での成果は驚異的です
05:46
And there's no way that you can't look at that as an overwhelming success.
この彼女の姿を誰もが素晴らしい成功例だとみるでしょう
05:48
It is. It's a huge success story in modern medicine.
そうです これは現代医学の偉大なる成功談です
05:51
However, despite this incredible facility
しかしながらこのように使用者が言語を認識できるようになる
05:54
that some cochlear implant users display with language,
こんな素晴らしい人工内耳でさえも
05:57
you turn on the radio and all of a sudden they can't hear music almost at all.
ラジオをつけて音楽を聴こうとすると使用者は音楽を全く楽しめません
05:59
In fact, most implant users really struggle
実際人工内耳使用者は音楽がひどい音に聞こえて
06:03
and dislike music because it sounds so bad.
音楽を聴くのに大変苦労し音楽を嫌います
06:05
And so when it comes to this idea
このように誰かの人生に美しさを
06:08
of restoring beauty to somebody's life,
取り戻すという点では音楽を楽しめる
06:10
we have a long way to go when it comes to audition.
様になるにはまだ多くの克服が必要です
06:12
Now there are a lot of reasons for that.
多くの理由があります 先ほども述べたように
06:14
I mentioned earlier the fact
音楽は難解で抽象的で特殊な能力です
06:16
that music is a different capacity because it's abstract.
一方言語は全く異なります
06:18
Language is very different. Language is very precise.
言語はとてもはっきりしています 実際
06:20
In fact, the whole reason we use it
狭義に具体的な意味を伝える為にこそ
06:22
is because it has semantic-specificity.
私たちは言語を使用します
06:24
When you say a word,
人間が単語を発するときは 単語を
06:26
what you care is that word was perceived correctly.
正しく認識してもらうことが大切です
06:28
You don't care that the word sounded pretty
その単語がきれいに聞こえるかどうかは
06:30
when it was spoken.
気にならないのです
06:32
Music is entirely different.
ところが音楽はまったく違います
06:34
When you hear music, if it doesn't sound good, what's the point?
もしきれいでないなら何のための音楽でしょうか?
06:36
There's really very little point in listening to music
もし音楽が快適に聴こえないとしたら
06:38
when it doesn't sound good to you.
それはもはや音楽を聴く意味がありません
06:40
The acoustics of music are much harder than those of language.
音楽の音というのは言語内の音よりもはるかに難しいものです
06:42
And you can see on this figure,
この分析図を見てください
06:45
that the frequency range
これは音楽と言語の周波数幅と
06:47
and the decibel range, the dynamic range of music
音圧のデシベル範囲です 音楽は
06:49
is far more heterogeneous.
格段に幅広い周波数と音圧です
06:51
So if we had to design a perfect cochlear implant,
もし完璧な人工内耳を設計するならば
06:53
what we would try to do
私たちは音楽が伝達できるように
06:55
is target it to be able to allow music transmission.
努力をしなければなりません
06:57
Because I always view music as the pinnacle of hearing.
私は常に音楽を聴力の最高峰であると位置づけているので
07:00
If you can hear music,
もし音楽を聴くことができるとすれば
07:03
you should be able to hear anything.
どんなものでも聴けるということです
07:05
Now the problems begin first with pitch perception.
この問題はまずピッチつまり音程の認識から始まります
07:07
I mean, most of us know that pitch is a fundamental building block of music.
ピッチは音楽において基本的な構成要素です
07:10
And without the ability to perceive pitch well,
ですからピッチをうまく感じられないと
07:13
music and melody is a very difficult thing to do --
音楽やメロディーを感じることは非常に難しくなります
07:15
forget about a harmony and things like that.
ハーモニーや他の音楽要素は当然分かりません
07:18
Now this is a MIDI arrangement of Rachmaninoff's Prelude.
これはMIDI演奏のラフマニノフ前奏曲です
07:20
Now if we could just play this.
お聞きください
07:23
(Music)
(音楽)
07:25
Okay, now if we consider
次に 人工内耳で聞く場合音楽のピッチが
07:49
that in a cochlear implant patient
高低に2オクターブ狂って
07:52
pitch perception could be off as much as two octaves,
聞こえることを考えて 同じ曲を
07:54
let's see what happens here
無作為に1半音だけずらして
07:57
when we randomize this to within one semitone.
どう聞こえるのか見てみましょう
07:59
We would be thrilled if we had one semitone pitch perception in cochlear implant users.
人工内耳使用者が 聞いている半音ずれた音が聞こえたら震えるでしょう
08:01
Go ahead and play this one.
では流してみます
08:04
(Music)
(音楽)
08:06
Now my goal in showing you that
私がお見せした理由は 音楽が
08:29
is to show you that music is not robust to degradation.
強固でなく劣化することを示す為です
08:31
You distort it a little bit, especially in terms of pitch, and you've changed it.
特にピッチは 少し歪めただけで音楽の良さが変わってしまうのです
08:33
And it might be that you kind of like that.
ひょっとして気に入るかもしれませんね
08:37
That's kind of hypnotic.
催眠術のようですね
08:39
But it certainly wasn't the way the music was intended.
しかしもともとの意図と違うのは確かです
08:41
And you're not hearing the same thing
普通の聴力を持つ人が聴くのと同じようには
08:43
that most people who have normal hearing are hearing.
その音楽を聴けていないのです
08:45
Now the other issue comes with,
もう一つの問題はピッチのずれ
08:47
not just the ability to tell pitches apart,
だけではなく 音そのものの違いが
08:49
but the ability to tell sounds apart.
分からないのです
08:51
Most cochlear implant users cannot tell the difference between an instrument.
ほとんどの人口内耳使用者は楽器を聴き分けられません
08:53
If we could play these two sound clips in succession.
2種類の楽器を続けて聴いてみましょう
08:56
(Trumpet)
(トランペット)
08:58
The trumpet.
トランペットですね
09:00
And the second one.
そしてもう1つは
09:02
(Violin)
(バイオリン)
09:04
That's a violin.
バイオリンです
09:05
These have similar wave forms. They're both sustained instruments.
波形が似ています 継続音を持つ楽器です
09:07
Cochlear implant users cannot tell the difference
人工内耳を使っている人には
09:09
between these instruments.
この楽器の違いを感じられません
09:11
The sound quality, or the sound of the sound
音の質や音の聞こえ方
09:13
is how I like to describe timbre, tone color --
一般に音色といわれるものを
09:15
they cannot tell these things whatsoever.
まったく感じることができないのです
09:17
This implant is not transmitting
人工内耳は音楽に温かさを加えるような
09:19
the quality of music that usually provides things like warmth.
音の要素を伝えることはできません
09:22
Now if you look at the brain of an individual who has a cochlear implant
ここで人工内耳使用者の脳の状態を見ましょう
09:25
and you have them listen to speech,
スピーチを聴く時 韻律を聴く時
09:28
have them listen to rhythm and have them listen to melody,
音楽を聴く時を見ましょう
09:30
what you find is that the auditory cortex
スピーチを聴く時は聴覚皮質が
09:32
is the most active during speech.
最も活発に働いているのがわかります
09:34
You would think that because these implants are optimized for speech,
人工内耳がスピーチ用に最適化され
09:36
they were designed for speech.
設計されたとお考えかもしれません
09:38
But actually if you look at melody,
ところが メロディを聴く時は
09:40
what you find is that there's very little cortical activity
一般的な聴力を持つ人と比べて
09:42
in implant users compared with normal hearing controls.
皮質の働きが圧倒的に少ないということがわかります
09:44
So for whatever reason,
ここまで見てくると何かの理由によって
09:47
this implant is not successfully stimulating auditory cortices
メロディ認識プロセスで 人工内耳は聴力皮質を
09:49
during melody perception.
正しく刺激していないと分かります
09:52
Now the next question is,
では次の質問に移りましょう
09:55
well how does it really sound?
人工内耳使用者にはどう聞こえるのでしょうか
09:57
Now we've been doing some studies
人工内耳の利用者にとって音の質は
09:59
to really get a sense of what sound quality is like for these implant users.
どの程度かを調べるためいくつかの研究をしてきました
10:01
I'm going to play you two clips of Usher,
Usherの2つのクリップを再生します
10:04
one which is normal
1つは通常バージョン
10:06
and one which has almost no high frequencies, almost no low frequencies
もう1つは高音域と低音域そして中音域が
10:08
and not even that many mid frequencies.
ほとんど含まれていません
10:10
Go ahead and play that.
では聴いてみましょう
10:12
(Music)
(音楽)
10:14
(Limited Frequency Music)
(音域に制限がある音楽)
10:18
I had patients tell me that those sound the same.
使用者に聴いてもらうと どちらも同じ音だと彼らは答えました
10:24
They cannot differentiate sound quality differences
クリップ間の音の違いを使用者たちは
10:27
between those two clips.
感じることができません
10:30
Again, we are very, very far away in just getting to where we want to get to.
繰り返しますが私たちが到達したいところまでは本当に長い道のりです
10:32
Now the question comes to mind: Is there any hope?
そしてここでこんな疑問がわきあがってくるでしょう 希望はあるのか?
10:35
And yes, there is hope.
私はこう答えましょう 希望はありますと
10:38
Now I don't know if anybody knows who this is.
これが誰か知っている人はいるでしょうか
10:40
This is ... does somebody know?
これは.. 誰かご存知ですか?
10:42
This is Beethoven.
これはベートーベンです
10:44
Now why would we know what Beethoven's skull looks like?
なぜ私たちはベートーベンの頭蓋骨と分かるのでしょうか?
10:47
Because his grave was exhumed.
なぜなら彼の墓を掘り出したからです
10:50
And it turns out that his temporal bones were harvested when he died
彼の死後耳が聞こえなくなった原因を探るために
10:52
to try to look at the cause of his deafness,
側頭部が摘出されていたことが分かりました
10:55
which is why he has molding clay
これが頭蓋骨が粘土で成形されていて
10:57
and his skull is bulging out on the side there.
側頭部が膨らんでいた理由です
10:59
But Beethoven composed music
しかし彼は聴力を失った後も長期間
11:01
long after he lost his hearing.
音楽を作曲していたのです
11:03
What that suggests is that, even in the case of hearing loss,
これで何がわかるのかと言えばたとえ聴力を失ったとしても
11:05
the capacity for music remains.
音楽が分かる能力はまだ残っているということです
11:08
The brains remain hardwired for music.
脳は音楽回路を持ち続けているのです 私は非常に光栄なことに
11:10
I've been very lucky to work with Dr. David Ryugo
デイビットリューゴ医師と共に働いていました
11:14
where I've been working on deaf cats that are white
耳の聞こえない白ネコの研究をしてネコに蝸牛の移植を
11:16
and trying to figure out what happens when we give them cochlear implants.
施した場合に何が起こるのかを調べていました
11:19
This is a cat that's been trained to respond to a trumpet for food.
このネコはトランペットの音がなると食べ物もらえるとトレーニングされています
11:22
(Music)
(音楽)
11:27
Text: Beethoven doesn't excite her.
ベートーベンではネコは起きません
11:41
(Music)
(音楽)
11:44
The "1812 Overture" isn't worth waking for.
序曲1812年も起きるほどではありません
11:56
(Trumpet)
(トランペット)
12:01
But she jumps to action when called to duty!
しかしトランペットの音だとネコは飛び起きて反応します
12:11
(Trumpet)
(トランペット)
12:14
CL: Now I'm not suggesting
これはネコが私たちと同じように
12:18
that the cat is hearing that trumpet the way we're hearing it.
トランペットの音を聞いていることを示しているわけではありません
12:20
I'm suggesting that with training
私がここで言いたいのは訓練すれば
12:23
you can imbue a musical sound with significance,
ネコにでさえ音楽的な音の違いを植えつけることが
12:25
even in a cat.
できるということが言いたいのです
12:28
If we were to direct efforts
現在は音楽を楽しむ訓練に労力を向けず
12:30
towards training cochlear implant users to hear music --
音楽聴力回復方針もなく音楽能力を改善する技術面の
12:32
because right now there's virtually no effort put towards that,
飛躍的な革新もない状況ですから
12:35
no rehabilitative strategies,
もし人工内耳使用者が音楽を楽しむ為の
12:38
very little in the way of technological advances to actually improve music --
訓練に労力を傾けるなら障壁を乗り越え
12:40
we would come a long way.
多くのことを克服できるでしょう
12:43
Now I want to show you one last video.
次が最後のビデオです
12:45
And this is of a student of mine named Joseph
これは私が音楽指導するジョセフのビデオで
12:48
who I had the good fortune to work with for three years in my lab.
幸運なことに私は彼と3年間研究室で一緒に努力しています
12:50
He's deaf, and he learned to play the piano
彼は耳が聞こえませんが人工内耳の移植の後
12:53
after he received the cochlear implant.
ピアノを弾けるようになりました
12:56
And here's a video of Joseph.
ジョセフのビデオを見てください
12:58
(Music)
(音楽)
13:01
(Video) Joseph: I was born in 1986.
(ジョセフ)僕は1986年に生まれました
13:45
And at about four months old,
生後4か月になったころ
13:48
I was diagnosed with profoundly severe hearing loss.
僕は聴力がないと診断されました
13:50
Not long after,
それからしばらくして
13:52
I was fitted with hearing aids.
僕は補聴器を着けました
13:54
But although these hearing aids
その補聴器は当時
13:56
were the most powerful hearing aids on the market at the time,
もっとも有効な補聴器でしたが
13:58
they weren't very helpful.
実際はあまり役に立ちませんでした
14:00
So as a result, I had to rely on lip reading a lot,
結局僕は読唇術に頼らざるを得ませんでした みんなが何を言っているのか
14:02
and I couldn't really hear what people were saying.
僕には聞こえていなかったのです
14:07
When I was 12 years old,
12歳のとき
14:09
I was one of the first few people in Singapore
僕はシンガポールで最初に内耳埋め込み手術を受ける
14:11
who underwent cochlear implantation.
数人のうちの一人となりました
14:14
And not long after I got my cochlear implant,
僕は人工内耳を埋め込んで間もなく
14:17
I started learning how to play piano.
ピアノの演奏を学び始めました
14:21
And it was absolutely wonderful.
本当に素晴らしくて それからは
14:23
Since then, I've never looked back.
僕は過去を振り返らなくなりました
14:25
CL: Joseph is phenomenal. He's brilliant.
リム:ジョセフは本当に驚異的で素晴らしいです
14:27
He is now a medical student at Yale University,
現在彼はイエール大学の医学生です
14:29
and he's contemplating a surgical career --
外科医を志しています
14:31
one of the first deaf individuals to consider a career in surgery.
聾者が外科医を目指すのは彼が初めてでしょう
14:33
There are almost no deaf surgeons anywhere.
世界中どこを探しても聾者の外科医はほとんどいません
14:36
And this is really unheard of stuff, and this is all because of this technology.
前代未聞であり現代技術のおかげだと思います
14:39
And the fact that he can play the piano like that
彼がこのようにピアノを弾ける事実も
14:42
is a testament to his brain.
彼の能力を示しています
14:44
Truth of the matter is you can play the piano without a cochlear implant,
実のところ人工内耳がなくてもピアノを弾けます
14:46
because all you have to do is press the keys at the right time.
ただタイミングよく鍵盤を押せばいいだけです
14:49
You don't actually have to hear it.
音を聞かなくても弾けます
14:51
I know he doesn't hear well, because I've heard him do Karaoke.
彼がよく聞こえていないのを知っています カラオケで聞いたことがありますから
14:53
(Laughter)
(笑)
14:56
And it's one of the most awful things --
本当にひどいものでしたよ
14:58
heartwarming, but awful.
心温まるのですがでもやっぱりひどい
15:01
(Laughter)
(笑)
15:03
And so there is certainly a lot of hope,
お話したように確かに大きな希望があります
15:05
but there's a lot more that needs to be done.
しかしまだまだ達成すべきことがあります
15:07
So I just want to conclude with the following words.
これを言ってこのスピーチをしめたいと思います
15:09
When it comes to restoration of hearing,
聴力の回復に関して長い長い道のりを
15:11
we have certainly come a long way, a remarkably long way.
非常に長い道のりをここまでやってきました
15:13
And we have a much longer way to go
そして完全な聴力の回復を求めると
15:16
when it comes to the idea of restoring perfect hearing.
まだまだ道のりは長く先へ先へと続きます
15:19
And let me tell you right now,
ここでみなさんに1つ言わせてください
15:21
it's fine that we would all be very happy with speech.
スピーチを聞く程度で満足できるなら構いません
15:23
But I tell you, if we lost our hearing,
しかしもし聴力を失ったとしたら
15:25
if anyone here suddenly lost your hearing,
自分が聴力を失ったとしたら 誰もが
15:27
you would want perfect hearing back.
完全な聴力を取り戻したいと思うことでしょう
15:29
You wouldn't want decent hearing, you would want perfect hearing.
そこそこの聴力ではなく完璧な聴力を望むでしょう
15:31
Restoration of basic sensory function is critical.
基本的な感覚的機能の回復は必須です
15:34
And I don't mean to understate
基本的な機能の回復の重要さを
15:37
how important it is to restore basic function.
軽視するつもりはありません
15:39
But it's really restoration of the ability to perceive beauty
しかし本当の意味での聴力の回復は感動するような
15:41
where we can get inspiring.
美しさを感じられることを示すのです
15:44
And I don't think that we should give up on beauty.
美しさをあきらめてはいけないと思うのです
15:46
And I want to thank you for your time.
ご清聴ありがとうございました
15:48
(Applause)
(拍手)
15:50
Translated by Maiko Nishi
Reviewed by Akinori Oyama

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Charles Limb - Researcher
Charles Limb is a doctor and a musician who researches the way musical creativity works in the brain.

Why you should listen

Charles Limb is the Francis A. Sooy, MD Professor and Chief of Otology/Neurotology and Skull Base Surgery at the University of California, San Francisco, and he's a Faculty Member at the Peabody Conservatory of Music. He combines his two passions to study the way the brain creates and perceives music. He's a hearing specialist and surgeon at Johns Hopkins who performs cochlear implantations on patients who have lost their hearing. And he plays sax, piano and bass.

In search of a better understanding of how the mind perceives complex auditory stimuli such as music, he's been working with Allen Braun to look at the brains of improvising musicians and study what parts of the brain are involved in the kind of deep creativity that happens when a musician is really in the groove.

Read our Q&A about hip-hop studies with Charles Limb on the TED Blog >>

Plus our quick catchup Q&A at TEDMED 2011 -- including his top 5 songs of all time >>

Read the 2014 paper "Neural Substrates of Interactive Musical Improvisation: An fMRI Study of ‘Trading Fours’ in Jazz" >>

More profile about the speaker
Charles Limb | Speaker | TED.com