22:05
TED2002

Frank Gehry: A master architect asks, Now what?

フランク・ゲーリー: フランク・ゲーリーが問う、「それで何?」

Filmed:

リチャード・ソウル・ワーマンと、建築家フランク・ゲーリーの、自由奔放で面白おかしい討論です。TEDの観客に向けて、失敗の力、彼の手がけた世界的に有名な近年の建築物、そして彼の創作にとって最も重要なファクター「それで何?」について、語ります。

- Architect
A living legend, Frank Gehry has forged his own language of architecture, creating astonishing buildings all over the world, such as the Guggenheim in Bilbao, the Walt Disney Concert Hall in LA, and Manhattan's new IAC building. Full bio

フランク・ゲーリー:今朝のことなんだけど
00:15
Frank Gehry: I listened to this scientist this morning.
マリス博士が実験について喋るのを聞いて
00:17
Dr. Mullis was talking about his experiments,
僕は思い出したんだ
一度 科学者になろうとした事がある
00:22
and I realized that I almost became a scientist.
14歳の時に 両親が
化学実験セットを買ってくれて
00:25
When I was 14 my parents bought me a chemistry set
僕は水を作る事にしたんだ
00:32
and I decided to make water.
(笑)
00:34
(Laughter)
それで 水素発生器と 酸素発生器を作って
00:43
So, I made a hydrogen generator and I made an oxygen generator,
ビーカーに それぞれの管を2本入れて
00:48
and I had the two pipes leading into a beaker
マッチを擦って投げ入れた
00:50
and I threw a match in.
(笑)
00:52
(Laughter)
で ガラスがね―
00:54
And the glass -- luckily I turned around --
幸運にも僕は背を向けて
背中側で受けたし
00:57
I had it all in my back
5メートルほど離れていたんだ
00:59
and I was about 15 feet away.
壁中 破片で覆われ―
爆発が起きたんだ
01:02
The wall was covered with ...
壁中 破片で覆われ―
爆発が起きたんだ
01:04
I had an explosion.
リチャード・ワーマン:本当に?
01:06
Richard Saul Wurman: Really?
ゲーリー:通りの人が ドアをノックして
様子を見に来たんだよ
01:07
FG: People on the street came and knocked on the door
01:08
to see if I was okay.
01:10
RSW: ... huh. (Laughter)
ワーマン:...へえ
(笑)
さて このセッションを
改めて始めようと思います
01:17
I'd like to start
さて このセッションを
改めて始めようと思います
01:19
this session again.
僕の隣にいる彼は有名な
いえ あまりに有名な
01:22
The gentleman to my left is the very famous, perhaps overly famous,
フランク・ゲーリーです
01:27
Frank Gehry.
(笑)(拍手)
01:29
(Laughter)
(笑)(拍手)
01:30
(Applause)
そして フランク―
君は人生で驚くべき所に達した
01:31
And Frank, you've come to a place in your life, which is astonishing.
つまり 芸術家 建築家として
生きている間に 象徴や伝説となるとは
01:35
I mean it is astonishing for an artist, for an architect,
つまり 芸術家 建築家として
生きている間に 象徴や伝説となるとは
01:40
to become actually an icon and a legend in their own time.
君は笑うかもしれない 何と言うか…
おかしくて不思議な感じだから
01:42
I mean you have become, whether you can giggle at it
君は笑うかもしれない 何と言うか…
おかしくて不思議な感じだから
01:45
because it's a funny ... you know, it's a strange thought,
君の建物そのものが象徴だから―
その建物の小さな絵を描けば それが広告にさえなり
01:48
but your building is an icon --
君の建物そのものが象徴だから
その建物の小さな絵を描けば それが広告にさえなり
01:50
you can draw a little picture of that building, it can be used in ads --
ロックスター程ではないが
セレブのステータスを得て
01:53
and you've had not rock star status, but celebrity status
自分のやりたい事だけを ほぼ一生涯やって だ
01:58
in doing what you wanted to do for most of your life.
そして その道が凄く険しかったのを
僕は知っている
02:03
And I know the road was extremely difficult.
目に見えずとも 少なくとも君の成功は
何であれ 大したものだよ
02:08
And it didn't seem, at least, that your sell outs,
目に見えずとも 少なくとも君の成功は
何であれ 大したものだよ
02:12
whatever they were, were very big.
誰かの為に働くことで
前進し続けてきた
02:16
You kept moving ahead in a life where you're dependent
誰かの為に働くことで
前進し続けてきた
02:22
on working for somebody.
でもこれはクリエイティブな人としては
興味深いことだね
02:25
But that's an interesting thing for a creative person.
我々の多くが 誰かのために働いて
その手中に収まっている
02:28
A lot of us work for people;
我々の多くが 誰かのために働いて
その手中に収まっている
02:30
we're in the hands of other people.
それが大きなジレンマのひとつだ―
今回はクリエイティビティに関する会だからね―
02:32
And that's one of the great dilemmas -- we're in a creativity session --
クリエイティビティにおける 大きなジレンマのひとつだよ
02:36
it's one of the great dilemmas in creativity:
大きい仕事をいかに大衆的で安っぽくならないようにこなすか
02:38
how to do work that's big enough and not sell out.
君はそれをやってのけた
02:42
And you've achieved that
それが君の成功を
2倍も 3倍も 大きくしたんだ
02:44
and that makes your win doubly big, triply big.
いまいち質問らしくないけど
02:49
It's not quite a question but you can comment on it.
コメントもらえるかな
大きなテーマだから
02:50
It's a big issue.
ゲーリー:そうだな 僕はいつも―
02:53
FG: Well, I've always just ...
特に仕事を探しに行ったことがないんだ
02:55
I've never really gone out looking for work.
いつも待ってたんだ
頭にピンと来るようなものを
03:00
I always waited for it to sort of hit me on the head.
それで 初めの頃は
03:03
And when I started out,
建築はサービス業だと思っていた
03:06
I thought that architecture was a service business
クライアントを喜ばせなきゃいけない とかね
03:09
and that you had to please the clients and stuff.
ある時 気付いたんだ
ミーティングに参加した時
03:12
And I realized when I'd come into the meetings
波状の金属やチェーンなんかを持って行ったら
03:16
with these corrugated metal and chain link stuff,
みんな僕のことを
火星からやって来たかのように見ていた
03:21
and people would just look at me
みんな僕のことを
火星からやって来たかのように見ていた
03:24
like I'd just landed from Mars.
でも僕には他の手法がなかった
03:26
But I couldn't do anything else.
当時 人々に対する対応はそんなだった
03:29
That was my response to the people in the time.
そんなにお金もなく 余裕のない
クライアントへの対応だった
03:32
And actually, it was responding to clients that I had
そんなにお金もなく 余裕のない
クライアントへの対応だった
03:36
who didn't have very much money, so they couldn't afford very much.
状況を考慮の上で だったと思う
03:39
I think it was circumstantial.
家に辿り着いて 今度は
僕の妻がクライアントになるまでの事だ
03:41
Until I got to my house, where the client was my wife.
僕らはサンタモニカの
小さなバンガローを買った
03:46
We bought this tiny little bungalow in Santa Monica
5万ドルくらいで 傍に小さな家を建てた
03:49
and for like 50 grand I built a house around it.
周りの人が興奮していたよ
03:52
And a few people got excited about it.
芸術家のマイケル・ハイザーを訪ねに
ラスベガス辺の砂漠へ行ったんだ
03:56
I was visiting with an artist, Michael Heizer,
芸術家のマイケル・ハイザーを訪ねに
ラスベガス辺の砂漠へ行ったんだ
03:59
out in the desert near Las Vegas somewhere.
彼は大きなコンクリートの建物を作っていて
04:02
He's building this huge concrete place.
あれは夜遅く 僕らは大分飲んで
僕らだけで砂漠に立っていて
04:05
And it was late in the evening. We'd had a lot to drink.
あれは夜遅く 僕らは大分飲んで
僕らだけで砂漠に立っていて
04:08
We were standing out in the desert all alone and,
自分の家の事を考えていたら
彼が…
04:11
thinking about my house, he said,
「もっと永久的なものを建てて 2000年も経てば…
04:13
"Did it ever occur to you if you built stuff more permanent,
誰かが気に入るだろうって考えたことある?」と言ったんだ
04:18
somewhere in 2000 years somebody's going to like it?"
(笑)
04:23
(Laughter)
それで思ったんだ 「あぁそれはいい考えかも」って
04:27
So, I thought, "Yeah, that's probably a good idea."
幸運な事に もう少しお金を持った
クライアントが増え始めていたので
04:32
Luckily I started to get some clients that had a little more money,
建築がもっと長持ちするものになった
04:36
so the stuff was a little more permanent.
でも この世界は
そんなに長く持たないって事が分かった
04:39
But I just found out the world ain't going to last that long,
先日 ある人にそう言われたんだよ
04:42
this guy was telling us the other day.
じゃあ どうしたらいい?
04:44
So where do we go now?
立ち返ったんだ 全てが一時的な世界にね
04:47
Back to -- everything's so temporary.
そう?君が言うようには僕は感じないけどね
04:49
I don't see it the way you characterized it.
僕にとっては 毎日が新鮮だ
04:55
For me, every day is a new thing.
どのプロジェクトも
「新たな不安感」をもって取りかかる
04:59
I approach each project with a new insecurity,
まるで 僕の初めてのプロジェクトのようにね
05:04
almost like the first project I ever did,
冷汗をかいて
05:06
and I get the sweats,
どこに行き着くか分からずとも 働き始める
05:10
I go in and start working, I'm not sure where I'm going --
行き着く先が分かっていたら やらないな
05:12
if I knew where I was going, I wouldn't do it.
予想だとか 計画できるような事はやらない
05:15
When I can predict or plan it, I don't do it.
放棄するね
05:18
I discard it.
だから 同じ緊張をもって取り組むんだ
05:20
So I approach it with the same trepidation.
もちろん時と共に もっと自信が付いてきたよ
05:23
Obviously, over time I have a lot more confidence
きっと大丈夫だ ってね
05:28
that it's going to be OK.
僕は一種の事業をやっているけど
05:31
I do run a kind of a business --
120人雇っていて 給料を払わなきゃいけない
05:34
I've got 120 people
120人雇っていて 給料を払わなきゃいけない
05:36
and you've got to pay them,
だから大きな責任がある訳だ
05:38
so there's a lot of responsibility involved --
でも実際にプロジェクトをやる時には
05:40
but the actual work on the project is with,
「健全な不安感」を持ってやる
05:44
I think, a healthy insecurity.
先日 劇作家の言葉で共感したのは
05:46
And like the playwright said the other day -- I could relate to him:
「我々には解らない」
05:53
you're not sure.
ビルバオが完成して見上げた時
05:55
When Bilbao was finished and I looked at it,
間違えたところが 全て目についた
いや 「間違え」じゃなくて…
05:59
I saw all the mistakes, I saw ...
間違えたところが 全て目についた
いや 「間違え」じゃなくて…
06:01
They weren't mistakes;
変えるべきだったものが目に入り
全て恥ずかしく思えた
06:03
I saw everything that I would have changed
変えるべきだったものが目に入り
全て恥ずかしく思えた
06:05
and I was embarrassed by it.
恥ずかしさを感じたんだよ
「何でこうしてしまったんだ?
06:08
I felt an embarrassment -- "How could I have done that?
あんな形やあんな事まで
どうして やってしまったんだ?」
06:11
How could I have made shapes like that or done stuff like that?"
数年経って あの建物と自分を
切り離して見てみると
06:15
It's taken several years to now look at it detached and say --
ある場所の 角を曲がると
それが その道と良い関係性があるのを見て
06:21
as you walk around the corner and a piece of it works with the road
ある場所の 角を曲がると
それが その道と良い関係性があるのを見て
06:26
and the street, and it appears to have a relationship --
やっと好きになり始めたよ
06:30
that I started to like it.
ワーマン:ニューヨークのプロジェクトはどう?
06:32
RSW: What's the status of the New York project?
ゲーリー:よく知らないね
06:35
FG: I don't really know.
トム・クレンズが 一緒に ビルバオに来て
全部説明してくれたんだけど
06:37
Tom Krens came to me with Bilbao and explained it all to me,
彼はおかしいと思った
06:41
and I thought he was nuts.
自分のしている事が解ってない
06:43
I didn't think he knew what he was doing,
でも彼は完成させたんだ
06:45
and he pulled it off.
イカロスでもあり 同時に
不死鳥でもあるようなヤツだ
06:47
So, I think he's Icarus and Phoenix all in one guy.
(笑)
06:51
(Laughter)
彼は空に昇って落ちて... こう 戻ってくる
06:53
He gets up there and then he ... comes back up.
まだ 彼らは議論中だけど…
07:00
They're still talking about it.
9.11 は 関心を引いたんだよ
07:02
September 11 generated some interest
あの建物を グラウンドゼロの上に動かすと
07:08
in moving it over to Ground Zero,
僕は絶対反対だ
07:12
and I'm totally against that.
グラウンドゼロに関して 話すのも
何かを建てるのも 嫌な気分だ
07:17
I just feel uncomfortable talking about or building anything on Ground Zero
長いことね
07:25
I think for a long time.
ワーマン:スクリーンの写真は…
07:29
RSW: The picture on the screen,
これはディズニー?
07:31
is that Disney?
ゲーリー:そうだよ
07:33
FG: Yeah.
ワーマン:どれぐらい進んでて
いつ完成するんだい?
07:34
RSW: How much further along is it than that,
ワーマン:どれぐらい進んでて
いつ完成するんだい?
07:36
and when will that be finished?
ゲーリー:2003年の9月か10月かな
07:37
FG: That will be finished in 2003 -- September, October --
キュー ハービー ヨーヨーがみんな来て
みんなと遊んでくれるのを願ってるよ
07:44
and I'm hoping Kyu, and Herbie, and Yo-Yo and all those guys
キュー ハービー ヨーヨーがみんな来て
みんなと遊んでくれるのを願ってるよ
07:51
come play with us at that place.
運良く 最近一緒に仕事をしている人は
大好きな人ばかりなんだ
07:55
Luckily, today most of the people I'm working with are people I really like.
特に リチャード・コシャレックのお蔭で
ディズニー・ホールの話が来たと言える
07:59
Richard Koshalek is probably one of the main reasons
特に リチャード・コシャレックのお蔭で
ディズニー・ホールの話が来たと言える
08:02
that Disney Hall came to me.
長い事 彼は僕のチアリーダーだ
08:05
He's been a cheerleader for quite a long time.
建築と本当に関わってくれるクライアントは
そんなに多くないね
08:08
There aren't many people around that are really involved
建築と本当に関わってくれるクライアントは
そんなに多くないね
08:12
with architecture as clients.
世の中 考えてみると
08:14
If you think about the world,
この聴衆の中だけをとっても
08:18
and even just in this audience,
僕たちの殆どは 建物に関わってはいるが
08:20
most of us are involved with buildings.
建築には携わってないでしょう?
08:26
Nothing that you would call architecture, right?
だから 彼みたいな人を見つけたら
08:29
And so to find one, a guy like that,
離さない
08:34
you hang on to him.
彼はアートセンターのトップになった
08:36
He's become the head of Art Center,
そこには クレイグ・エルウッドの建物がある
08:39
and there's a building by Craig Ellwood there.
クレイグとは旧知の仲だし 尊敬している
08:43
I knew Craig and respected him.
彼らは そこに何かを付け足したいんだ
08:47
They want to add to it
加えるなんて難しい…だって
08:49
and it's hard to add to a building like that --
美しく ミニマルな 黒い鉄の建物に
08:50
it's a beautiful, minimalist, black steel building --
リチャードは図書館と
学生向けの施設を付け足したいし
08:54
and Richard wants to add a library and more student stuff
敷地面積も広いしね
09:04
and it's a lot of acreage.
別の建築家を招きたい と彼を説得し
09:06
I convinced him to let me bring in another architect
ポルトガルからアルヴァロ・シーザを呼んだ
09:10
from Portugal: Alvaro Siza.
ワーマン:何でそうしたいと思ったんだい?
09:13
RSW: Why did you want that?
ゲーリー:その質問をすると思っていたよ
09:15
FG: I knew you'd ask that question.
直感だ
09:18
It was intuitive.
(笑)
09:21
(Laughter)
アルヴァロ・シーザは
ポルトガルに生まれ育ち
09:24
Alvaro Siza grew up and lived in Portugal
ポルトガル建築界における
中心人物と言っていい
09:30
and is probably considered the Portuguese main guy in architecture.
数年前に彼を訪ねたとき
09:35
I visited with him a few years ago
初期の作品を見せてくれた
09:38
and he showed me his early work,
彼の初期の作品は
僕の初期のと似ていたんだ
09:40
and his early work had a resemblance to my early work.
僕は 大学を出てから
南カリフォルニア風のものをやろうとし
09:47
When I came out of college,
僕は 大学を出てから
南カリフォルニア風のものをやろうとし
09:50
I started to try to do things contextually in Southern California,
スパニッシュ・コロニアルのタイル屋根の
論理やなんかに傾倒した
09:54
and you got into the logic of Spanish colonial tile roofs
スパニッシュ・コロニアルのタイル屋根の
論理やなんかに傾倒した
10:00
and things like that.
僕はまず その論理を理解するために
そこをスタート地点としたんだ
10:02
I tried to understand that language as a beginning,
僕はまず その論理を理解するために
そこをスタート地点としたんだ
10:07
as a place to jump off,
でも 建設屋の指示に従うばかりで
つまらない事が沢山で こう…
10:09
and there was so much of it being done by spec builders
でも 建設屋の指示に従うばかりで
つまらない事が沢山で こう…
10:14
and it was trivialized so much that it wasn't ...
僕は止めたんだ
10:18
I just stopped.
チャールズ・ムーアはそういうのを沢山やってるけど
自分にはいいとは思えなかったんだ
10:20
I mean, Charlie Moore did a bunch of it,
チャールズ・ムーアはそういうのを沢山やってるけど
自分にはいいとは思えなかったんだ
10:22
but it didn't feel good to me.
一方シーザは ポルトガルで続けていたんだ
本物がある場所でね
10:26
Siza, on the other hand, continued in Portugal
一方シーザは ポルトガルで続けていたんだ
本物がある場所でね
10:29
where the real stuff was
あの歴史のある論理を
現代風のものに関連付けて発展させてね
10:32
and evolved a modern language that relates to that historic language.
彼は南カリフォルニアで
建築をやったらいいと いつも感じていたんだ
10:40
And I always felt that he should come to Southern California
10:46
and do a building.
何度か仕事を振ろうと試みたが上手く運ばなかった
10:47
I tried to get him a couple of jobs and they didn't pan out.
あんな人とコラボするのが好きなんだ
10:52
I like the idea of collaboration with people like that
自分を高めてくれるからね
10:59
because it pushes you.
クレス・オルデンバーグ や
リチャード・セラ と組んだ事があった
11:07
I've done it with Claes Oldenburg and with Richard Serra,
セラは建築がアートだとは思ってないんだ
11:12
who doesn't think architecture is art.
あれ見たかい?
11:15
Did you see that thing?
ワーマン:いや、彼はなんて?
11:18
RSW: No. What did he say?
ゲーリー:彼は 建築を 「配管工事」 だって
11:20
FG: He calls architecture "plumbing."
(笑)
11:22
(Laughter)
まあいい シーザの話ね
11:25
FG: Anyway, the Siza thing.
こっちの方がいい経験になったよ
11:29
It's a richer experience.
キューが音楽家達とやっている感じかな
11:31
It must be like that for Kyu doing things with musicians --
想像するにそれに近いね
11:34
it's similar to that I would imagine --
何て言うか…君は?
11:36
where you ... huh?
聴衆:リキッド・アーキテクチャー
11:38
Audience: Liquid architecture.
ゲーリー:あそう リキッド・アーキテクチャーね
11:40
FG: Liquid architecture.
(笑)
11:42
(Laughter)
なんて言うか... ジャズみたいに
即興し 一緒に演奏する
11:43
Where you ... It's like jazz: you improvise, you work together,
お互いやるのさ 僕があるものを作り
11:47
you play off each other, you make something,
彼らも何かを作る
11:53
they make something.
思うんだけど
11:55
And I think
自分にとってこれは
「街」 を理解しようとする方法 そして…
11:58
for me, it's a way of trying to understand the city
「街」で何が起こり得るか
12:02
and what might happen in the city.
ワーマン:それは今のキャンパスの近く?
それとももっと...
12:04
RSW: Is it going to be near the current campus?
ワーマン:それは今のキャンパスの近く?
それとももっと...
12:07
Or is it going to be down near ...
ゲーリー:いや 今のキャンパスの近くだ
12:09
FG: No, it's near the current campus.
まあ 彼はそういう感じのパトロンなんだ
12:11
Anyway, he's that kind of patron.
彼の金じゃないけど 勿論
12:13
It's not his money, of course.
(笑)
12:15
(Laughter)
ワーマン:彼のスケジュールはどうなってるの?
12:18
RSW: What's his schedule on that?
ゲーリー:知らないよ
12:20
FG: I don't know.
リチャード スケジュールは?
12:21
What's the schedule, Richard?
リチャード・コシャレック: [不明瞭] が2004年のスタート
12:23
Richard Koshalek: [Unclear] starts from 2004.
ゲーリー:2004年ね
12:25
FG: 2004.
オープニングに来なよ 招待するから
12:28
You can come to the opening. I'll invite you.
それで…
民主主義下の市庁舎の課題は面白い
12:30
No, but the issue of city building in democracy is interesting
混沌を生むだろう?
12:38
because it creates chaos, right?
誰もが 自分勝手にやってると
すごい混沌とした状況を生むけど
12:41
Everybody doing their thing makes a very chaotic environment,
それぞれ何をやるか解りあえば
12:45
and if you can figure out how to work off each other --
それぞれの仕事を尊敬し 凌ぎを削るような
人が沢山いれば だけど
12:50
if you can get a bunch of people
それぞれの仕事を尊敬し 凌ぎを削るような
人が沢山いれば だけど
12:55
who respect each other's work and play off each other,
いいモデルを作れるかもしれない
12:59
you might be able to create models for
市街を作る時 1人の建築家に飲まれないよう…
ロックフェラーセンターのケースみたいにね
13:01
how to build sections of the city without resorting to the one architect.
市街を作る時 1人の建築家に飲まれないよう…
ロックフェラーセンターのケースみたいにね
13:09
Like the Rockefeller Center model,
ただし あれは違う時代の物だけれど
13:11
which is kind of from another era.
ワーマン:実に素晴らしいことに気付いたんだけど
13:14
RSW: I found the most remarkable thing.
ビルバオに対するぼくの予想はこうだった
素晴らしい建物で…
13:17
My preconception of Bilbao was this wonderful building,
中に入ると凄く大きな空間が現れる
13:22
you go inside and there'd be extraordinary spaces.
TEDで図面を紹介してるのを見たからね
13:24
I'd seen drawings you had presented here at TED.
じゃなくて ビルバオの目を見張る点は
街との関わり合い様だ
13:27
The surprise of Bilbao was in its context to the city.
川を渡るときの驚きや
13:32
That was the surprise of going across the river,
周りのハイウェイを走る感じ
13:34
of going on the highway around it,
街を歩いた時に見つけるのも
13:36
of walking down the street and finding it.
それが ビルバオの
正真正銘のサプライズだったよ
13:39
That was the real surprise of Bilbao.
ゲーリー:でもね リチャード
13:42
FG: But you know, Richard,
僕らの知ってる 多くの建築家は
作品のプレゼンをする時に…
13:43
most architects when they present their work --
13:45
most of the people we know,
13:46
you get up and you talk about your work,
13:49
and it's almost like you tell everybody you're a good guy
皆に 自分はいいヤツだと
言ってるようなもので
「ご覧なさいこの状況を
13:56
by saying, "Look, I'm worried about the context,
この街のことを心配してます
14:01
I'm worried about the city,
お客様のことが心配です
14:03
I'm worried about my client,
予算のことを心配してます
だから私は納期を守ります」
14:06
I worry about budget, that I'm on time."
とかなんとか うんぬん
14:08
Blah, blah, blah and all that stuff.
これは 自分を磨き上げて見せる事で
14:10
And it's like cleansing yourself so that you can ...
自分の作品は良いものだと
なんとか 言っている訳だよ
14:14
by saying all that, it means your work is good somehow.
僕も 皆も…
14:21
And I think everybody --
と言うか そんな事は重力のように明白な事実だ
14:24
I mean that should be a matter of fact, like gravity.
重力は否定できないでしょう
14:27
You're not going to defy gravity.
建設部門と一緒にやらなきゃいけない
14:30
You've got to work with the building department.
予算に収めないと 仕事は余りもらえない
14:32
If you don't meet the budgets, you're not going to get much work.
もし雨漏りでもしたら…
14:38
If it leaks --
ビルバオは漏れなかったよ
14:40
Bilbao did not leak.
すごく誇らしかったな
14:43
I was so proud.
(笑)
14:46
(Laughter)
MIT 企画の インタビューがあってね
14:48
The MIT project -- they were interviewing me for MIT
設備管理の人間を送って来て
14:51
and they sent their facilities people to Bilbao.
ビルバオで彼らに会ったんだ 3日も
14:54
I met them in Bilbao.
ビルバオで彼らに会ったんだ 3日も
14:56
They came for three days.
ワーマン:あのコンピュータのビルのこと?
14:58
RSW: This is the computer building?
ゲーリー:そう それ
15:00
FG: Yeah, the computer building.
15:01
They were there three days and it rained every day
3日間滞在して 毎日雨の中
彼らは歩き回り続けた―
15:03
and they kept walking around --
気付いたよ
彼らは下を覗いて 探してたんだよ
15:05
I noticed they were looking under things
15:07
and looking for things,
15:09
and they wanted to know where the buckets were hidden, you know?
どこにバケツが隠してあるか
知りたかったんだろうね
15:13
People put buckets out ...
僕は完璧 雨漏りなんてない
15:16
I was clean. There wasn't a bloody leak in the place,
素晴らしかった
15:18
it was just fantastic.
しかしね
15:20
But you've got to --
それまではどの建物も
全て雨漏りしたから―
15:22
yeah, well up until then every building leaked, so this ...
(笑)
15:26
(Laughter)
ワーマン:フランクは その―
15:31
RSW: Frank had a sort of ...
ゲーリー:ミリアムに聞いてみてよ
15:33
FG: Ask Miriam!
―あの建物で ロスでしばらく有名人だったね
15:34
RW: ... sort of had a fame. His fame was built on that in L.A. for a while.
(笑)
15:39
(Laughter)
ゲーリー:フランク・ロイド・ライトの話は知ってる?
15:42
FG: You've all heard the Frank Lloyd Wright story,
女性が電話してきてね
「ライトさん 私ソファに座っていて 頭に―
15:45
when the woman called and said,
女性が電話してきてね
「ライトさん 私ソファに座っていて 頭に―
15:47
"Mr. Wright, I'm sitting on the couch
水が垂れてくるの」って
15:52
and the water's pouring in on my head."
「奥様 椅子を動かしてください」って (笑)
15:54
And he said, "Madam, move your chair."
「奥様 椅子を動かしてください」って (笑)
15:56
(Laughter)
それで 数年後にノートン・サイモンの
海辺の家を建てていた時
16:00
So, some years later I was doing a building,
それで 数年後にノートン・サイモンの
海辺の家を建てていた時
16:04
a little house on the beach for Norton Simon,
そしたら やり手の女性秘書が
電話で言うんだ
16:06
and his secretary, who was kind of a hell on wheels type lady,
そしたら やり手の女性秘書が
電話で言うんだ
16:10
called me and said,
「サイモン氏がデスクに座ってて
頭に水が垂れて来てます」って
16:13
"Mr. Simon's sitting at his desk
「サイモン氏がデスクに座ってて
頭に水が垂れて来てます」って
16:16
and the water's coming in on his head."
で 彼女にフランク・ロイド・ライトの話をした
16:18
And I told her the Frank Lloyd Wright story.
ワーマン:ウケなかったでしょ
16:20
RSW: Didn't get a laugh.
ゲーリー:うん 今と同じ
16:22
FG: No. Not now either.
(笑)
16:24
(Laughter)
僕が言いたいのは「それで?」ってこと
僕は問題を解決した
16:31
But my point is that ... and I call it the "then what?"
僕が言いたいのは「それで?」ってこと
僕は問題を解決した
16:35
OK, you solved all the problems,
全部終え 素敵に仕上げて
16:37
you did all the stuff, you made nice,
クライアントを愛して
16:40
you loved your clients,
街を愛した
16:42
you loved the city,
実に良い人間だ
16:44
you're a good guy, you're a good person ...
でも 「それで何?」
16:46
and then what?
果たして僕は何に貢献したんだろう?
16:48
What do you bring to it?
それが僕がいつも興味を持っていること
個人の表現というか
16:50
And I think that's what I've always been interested in,
それが僕がいつも興味を持っていること
個人の表現というか
16:54
is that -- which is a personal kind of expression.
思うに ビルバオは
17:06
Bilbao, I think, shows that you can have
この「個人の表現」をする事が出来て―
17:10
that kind of personal expression
同時に 街に溶けこむって言う
必要条件も踏まえつつね
17:12
and still touch all the bases that are necessary
同時に 街に溶けこむって言う
必要条件も踏まえつつね
17:16
of fitting into the city.
ビルバオはこれを思い出させるんだ
17:18
That's what reminded me of it.
そして これは課題でもあるんだよ
17:23
And I think that's the issue, you know;
この「それで何?」のために建築家は雇われるべき
17:25
it's the "then what" that most clients who hire architects --
―だけど殆どの場合 クライアントはそうは思ってない
17:29
most clients aren't hiring architects for that.
予算通りに仕事を終えるために雇い
礼儀正しくさせて
17:34
They're hiring them to get it done, get it on budget,
予算通りに仕事を終えるために雇い
礼儀正しくさせて
17:38
be polite,
彼らは建築家の本当の価値を見逃しているよ
17:41
and they're missing out on the real value of an architect.
ワーマン:数年前 マイケル・グレイヴスが流行ったころ
ティーポットの前―
17:53
RSW: At a certain point a number of years ago, people --
ワーマン:数年前 マイケル・グレイヴスが流行ったころ
ティーポットの前―
17:55
when Michael Graves was a fashion, before teapots ...
ゲーリー:僕もティーポットをやったけど
誰も買わなかったよ
18:03
FG: I did a teapot and nobody bought it.
(笑)
18:05
(Laughter)
ワーマン:水漏れでもしたの?
18:07
RSW: Did it leak?
ゲーリー:いや
18:09
FG: No.
(笑)
18:10
(Laughter)
ワーマン:皆 マイケル・グレイヴスの建物を望んだんだ
18:16
RSW: ... people wanted a Michael Graves building.
ビルバオみたいな建物を
人々が望むってのは呪縛かな?
18:24
Is that a curse, that people want a Bilbao building?
ゲーリー:そうだね
18:29
FG: Yeah.
ビルバオがオープンして
4、5年経ったかな
18:33
Since Bilbao opened, which is now four, five years,
クレンズも僕も呼ばれて
18:37
both Krens and I have been called
100以上もの機会を得たんだ―
中国 ブラジル スペインの他のエリアへ行って
18:42
with at least 100 opportunities --
100以上もの機会を得たんだ―
中国 ブラジル スペインの他のエリアへ行って
18:46
China, Brazil, other parts of Spain --
ビルバオ風の建物をやって欲しいって
18:53
to come in and do the Bilbao effect.
その中には そういう人もいた
18:56
And I've met with some of these people.
いつも仕事は すぐには断らない
18:59
Usually I say no right away,
いくつかは いい筋の紹介で来てるし
良い意図があるように聞こえて
19:01
but some of them come with pedigree
いくつかは いい筋の紹介で来てるし
良い意図があるように聞こえて
19:04
and they sound well-intentioned
1つや2つは ミーティングには駆り出される
19:07
and they get you for at least one or two meetings.
1度 チームと一緒に 遠くマラガに飛んだんだ
19:13
In one case, I flew all the way to Malaga with a team
書類には サインや 様々な公式の市の印章とか
沢山してあったから
19:18
because the thing was signed with seals and various
書類には サインや 様々な公式の市の印章とか
沢山してあったから
19:24
very official seals from the city,
港に建てる建築物を
僕にやって欲しいと言われてね
19:30
and that they wanted me to come and do a building in their port.
どういった建物なのか尋ねた
19:34
I asked them what kind of building it was.
「現地に着いたらご説明します」 うんぬん
19:36
"When you get here we'll explain it." Blah, blah, blah.
それで4人で行ったんだ
19:39
So four of us went.
そして立派なホテルに連れて行かれて
19:42
And they took us -- they put us up in a great hotel
僕らは湾を眺めた後
船に載せられて 海へ出たんだ
19:47
and we were looking over the bay,
僕らは湾を眺めた後
船に載せられて 海へ出たんだ
19:50
and then they took us in a boat out in the water
港のあらゆる景色を見せてくれた
19:53
and showed us all these sights in the harbor.
どれもが美しさを競うような景色だった
19:56
Each one was more beautiful than the other.
それから市長とランチを取ってから
ディナーの予定だった
20:02
And then we were going to have lunch with the mayor
それから市長とランチを取ってから
ディナーの予定だった
20:06
and we were going to have dinner with
マラガの要人達とね
20:08
the most important people in Malaga.
市長とのランチの直前に
20:12
Just before going to lunch with the mayor,
港の監督官の所へ行ったんだ
20:16
we went to the harbor commissioner.
このカーペットくらい 長いテーブルがあって
20:18
It was a table as long as this carpet
港の監督官がそこに居て
20:21
and the harbor commissioner was here,
僕と 僕のチームも居た
20:23
and I was here, and my guys.
座って 水をのんで
20:25
We sat down, and we had a drink of water
皆黙りこくって
20:28
and everybody was quiet.
そしたら 監督官が こう僕に言ったんだ
20:30
And the guy looked at me and said,
「ゲーリーさん 何かご用でしょうか?」
20:32
"Now what can I do for you, Mr. Gehry?"
(笑)
20:35
(Laughter)
ワーマン:なんてこった
20:39
RSW: Oh, my God.
ゲーリー:だから僕は立ち上がって
20:41
FG: So, I got up.
チームに言ったんだ
20:43
I said to my team,
「もう出よう」 って
20:45
"Let's get out of here."
そして立ち去ったんだ
20:47
We stood up, we walked out.
ここまで連れて来た男が追っかけてきて―
20:48
They followed -- the guy that dragged us there followed us and he said,
「市長とのランチはいかがなさるので?」
20:51
"You mean you're not going to have lunch with the mayor?"
「無しだ」
20:53
I said, "Nope."
「では ディナーも?」
20:55
"You're not going to have dinner at all?"
彼らは その要人達を焚き付ける為に
僕らを呼んだんだ
20:57
They just brought us there to hustle this group,
分かるだろう プロジェクトを創り出すために
21:01
you know, to create a project.
こういうのは良くある
21:03
And we get a lot of that.
幸運にも 年取っているお蔭で
僕は旅行出来ないって言えるんだ
21:08
Luckily, I'm old enough that
幸運にも 年取っているお蔭で
僕は旅行出来ないって言えるんだ
21:11
I can complain I can't travel.
(笑)
21:14
(Laughter)
まだ 自家用ジェットは持っていないしね
21:16
I don't have my own plane yet.
ワーマン:では この辺りでまとめて
終わろうと思うんだが
21:21
RSW: Well, I'm going to wind this up and wind up the meeting
結構長くやったからね
21:24
because it's been very long.
2言3言付け加えようと思う
21:26
But let me just say a couple words.
ちょっと いいかい?
21:28
FG: Can I say something?
ゲーリー:それって僕のこと それとも君のこと?
21:31
Are you going to talk about me or you?
(笑)
21:34
(Laughter)
(拍手)
21:37
(Applause)
ワーマン:ダメなヤツは いつまでも経ってもダメだ!
21:40
RSW: Once a shit, always a shit!
ゲーリー:皆みたいに
スタンディングオベーションされたい
21:45
FG: Because I want to get a standing ovation like everybody, so ...
ワーマン:君にもあるよ!君にもあるって!
21:48
RSW: You're going to get one! You're going to get one!
(笑)
21:50
(Laughter)
君のためにやらせてみせるよ!
21:51
I'm going to make it for you!
ゲーリー:いやいや!ちょっと待って!
21:53
FG: No, no. Wait a minute!
(拍手)
21:54
(Applause)
Translated by Shiho Ottomo
Reviewed by Eriko T.

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Frank Gehry - Architect
A living legend, Frank Gehry has forged his own language of architecture, creating astonishing buildings all over the world, such as the Guggenheim in Bilbao, the Walt Disney Concert Hall in LA, and Manhattan's new IAC building.

Why you should listen

Frank Gehry is one of the world's most influential architects. His designs for the likes of the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao and the Walt Disney Concert Hall in LA are bold statements that have imposed a new aesthetic of architecture on the world at large, enlivening streetscapes and creating new destinations. Gehry has extended his vision beyond brick-and-mortar too, collaborating with artists such as Claes Oldenberg and Richard Serra, and designing watches, teapots and a line of jewelry for Tiffany & Co.

Now in his 80s, Gehry refuses to slow down or compromise his fierce vision: He and his team at Gehry Partners are working on a $4 billion development of the Atlantic Yards in Brooklyn, and a spectacular Guggenheim museum in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, which interprets local architecture traditions into a language all his own. Incorporating local architectural motifs without simply paying lip service to Middle Eastern culture, the building bears all the hallmarks of a classic Gehry design.

More profile about the speaker
Frank Gehry | Speaker | TED.com