11:13
TEDxDU 2011

Ramona Pierson: An unexpected place of healing

ロマーナ・パイアーソン:思いもよらない回復の地

Filmed:

ロマーナ・パイアーソンが22歳の時、彼女は飲酒運転の車にはねられ、18か月もこん睡状態になりました。TED×DUで彼女は、老人ホームで集められた技と知恵によって達成された、自身の驚異的な回復についての物語を語ります。

- Education innovator
Ramona Pierson develops tools to revolutionize learning management and assessment systems -- her fourth career after aviation, neuropsychology and software development. Full bio

I'm actually going to share something with you
この話は10年以上誰にも話していませんが、
00:15
I haven't talked about probably in more than 10 years.
お話ししたいと思います。
00:17
So bear with me
なので、この物語が終わるまで
00:20
as I take you through this journey.
ご清聴ください。
00:22
When I was 22 years old,
その時私は22歳で
00:24
I came home from work, put a leash on my dog
仕事から帰り、犬と一緒に
00:26
and went for my usual run.
ランニングに行くところでした。
00:29
I had no idea that at that moment
その時はまだ、私の人生が永遠に
00:32
my life was going to change forever.
変わってしまうなんて思ってもいませんでした。
00:34
While I was preparing my dog for the run,
犬の準備をしている時、
00:36
a man was finishing drinking at a bar,
ある男性が飲み屋を出て、
00:39
picked up his car keys, got into a car
車のカギを取り、車に乗り込み、
00:43
and headed south,
どこか知りませんが
00:45
or wherever he was.
どこかに行こうとしていました。
00:47
I was running across the street,
私が通りを横切ろうとした時、
00:49
and the only thing that I actually remember
頭の中で爆弾が爆発したかのような
00:51
is feeling like a grenade went off in my head.
感じがしました。
00:53
And I remember putting my hands on the ground
そして地面に手をつき、
00:56
and feeling my life's blood
首や口など体中から
01:00
emptying out of my neck
血が流れていたことだけ
01:02
and my mouth.
覚えています。
01:04
What had happened
何が起こったかというと、その男性が
01:07
is he ran a red light and hit me and my dog.
信号を無視して、私と犬を轢いたのです。
01:09
She ended up underneath the car.
その犬は車の下で息絶えました。
01:12
I flew out in front of the car,
私は車の前に吹き飛ばされ、
01:15
and then he ran over my legs.
彼は私の足を轢きました。
01:17
My left leg got caught up in the wheel well --
左足が車輪に絡まってしまったので、
01:19
spun it around.
ぐるぐる回りました。
01:21
The bumper of the car hit my throat,
車のバンパーは私の首をかすめ、
01:25
slicing it open.
ぱっくりと切れてしまいました。
01:28
I ended up with blunt chest trauma.
胸も激しく打ちつけました。
01:30
Your aorta comes up behind your heart.
大動脈は心臓の裏に行ってしまい、
01:33
It's your major artery, and it was severed,
重要な血管が切れてしまっていたので、
01:35
so my blood was gurgling out of my mouth.
口からどくどくと血が流れていました。
01:38
It foamed,
泡立つくらい激しく、
01:41
and horrible things were happening to me.
最悪の事態が起ころうとしていました。
01:43
I had no idea what was going on,
何が起こったかはわかりませんが、
01:47
but strangers intervened,
近くにいた人が心臓を
01:49
kept my heart moving, beating.
動かし続けてくれました。
01:52
I say moving because it was quivering
心臓は震えるくらいだったので、
01:55
and they were trying to put a beat back into it.
再び動くようにしてくれていました。
01:57
Somebody was smart and put a Bic pen in my neck
また他の人は、ボールペンを喉に刺し、
02:00
to open up my airway so that I could get some air in there.
呼吸できるよう気道を確保してくれました。
02:03
And my lung collapsed,
肺もダメになっていたので、
02:06
so somebody cut me open and put a pin in there as well
肺を切り開いてピンを差し込んで、大惨事が
02:08
to stop that catastrophic event from happening.
起こらないようにしてくれました。
02:11
Somehow I ended up at the hospital.
どうにか病院に運ばれ、
02:18
I was wrapped in ice
氷で包まれ、最終的に
02:20
and then eventually put into a drug-induced coma.
薬漬けのこん睡状態に陥りました。
02:22
18 months later I woke up.
18か月後、目を覚ましました。
02:26
I was blind, I couldn't speak,
目も見えず、話すこともできず、
02:30
and I couldn't walk.
歩くことさえできませんでした。
02:32
I was 64 lbs.
当時の体重は64lbsでした。
02:34
The hospital really has no idea
病院側も、こんな患者には
02:40
what to do with people like that.
何をしていいかわかりませんでした。
02:42
And in fact, they started to call me a Gomer.
実は、彼らは私のことを心気症患者と呼んでいました。
02:44
That's another story we won't even get into.
これは別の話なので言及しませんが。
02:47
I had so many surgeries to put my neck back together,
首をくっつけ、心臓を治すために、何度も何度も
02:51
to repair my heart a few times.
手術を受けました。
02:54
Some things worked, some things didn't.
上手くいくときもあり、ダメなときもありました。
02:56
I had lots of titanium put in me,
人工的なものを体に入れたり、
02:58
cadaver bones
足がちゃんと動くように
03:00
to try to get my feet moving the right way.
死んだ人の骨を移植したりもしました。
03:02
And I ended up with a plastic nose, porcelain teeth
最終的には、プラスティックの鼻や義歯などを
03:05
and all kinds of other things.
とにかくいろいろ移植しました。
03:07
But eventually I started to look human again.
でも、人間のように見えるようになりました。
03:09
But it's hard sometimes to talk about these things,
こういったことについて話すのは、つらい時もありますが、
03:18
so bear with me.
我慢してください。
03:20
I had more than 50 surgeries.
50回以上も手術を受けました。
03:23
But who's counting?
誰も数えてないと思いますが。
03:25
So eventually, the hospital decided
病院は、ついに私は退院できると
03:28
it was time for me to go.
判断しました。
03:30
They needed to open up space
誰か他に治療が必要な
03:32
for somebody else that they thought could come back
患者さんを面倒見るために、ベッドを
03:34
from whatever they were going through.
空けなければいけなかったのでしょう。
03:38
Everybody lost faith in me being able to recover.
誰も、私が回復するなんて思っていなかったのです。
03:41
So they basically put a map up on the wall, threw a dart,
彼らは壁に地図を掛け、ダーツを投げ
03:44
and it landed at a senior home here in Colorado.
その矢はここコロラドの老人ホームに当たりました。
03:47
And I know all of you are scratching your head:
「老人ホーム?なんでそんなとこに行く必要がある?」
03:52
"A senior citizens' home? What in the world are you going to do there?"
と、みなさん不思議に思うかもしれません。
03:54
But if you think about
でも、今この部屋の中にある
03:57
all of the skills and talent that are in this room right now,
技や知恵といったものが、老人ホームには
03:59
that's what a senior home has.
存在しているのです。
04:02
So there were all these skills and talents
老人ホームには、ご老人の方々が持つ
04:04
that these seniors had.
技や知恵が集まっていました。
04:06
The one advantage that they had over most of you
彼らが私たちよりも優れているのは、彼らが
04:09
is wisdom,
長い人生で
04:11
because they had a long life.
培った知恵を持っているからです。
04:13
And I needed that wisdom at that moment in my life.
当時、私にはその知恵が必要でした。
04:16
But imagine what it was like for them
でも、私が彼らの前に現れた時
04:18
when I showed up at their doorstep?
彼らは何と思ったでしょう。
04:20
At that point, I had gained four pounds,
その時、私は68lbsまで体重が
04:23
so I was 68 lbs.
戻っていました。
04:25
I was bald.
髪は生えておらず、
04:27
I was wearing hospital scrubs.
入院着を身に付けていて、
04:29
And somebody donated tennis shoes for me.
誰かがくれたテニスシューズを履いていました。
04:31
And I had a white cane in one hand
片手には白い杖を持ち、もう片方には
04:34
and a suitcase full of medical records in another hand.
医療書類でいっぱいのスーツケースを持っていました。
04:37
And so the senior citizens realized
そこで、ご老人の方々は、
04:40
that they needed to have an emergency meeting.
緊急会議を開く必要がある、と気が付きました。
04:43
(Laughter)
(笑)
04:45
So they pulled back and they were looking at each other,
彼らはいったん裏に戻り、お互いを見つめあい、
04:47
and they were going, "Okay, what skills do we have in this room?
「それじゃあ、私たちはこの子に何ができるかしら?
04:50
This kid needs a lot of work."
これは一大事だわ」と話し合いました。
04:54
So they eventually started
彼らは、彼らの持つ知恵や技を
04:57
matching their talents and skills
私に合うように組み合わせ
04:59
to all of my needs.
始めました。
05:01
But one of the first things they needed to do
しかし、彼らが最初にしなければいけなかったことは
05:03
was assess what I needed right away.
何をすべきか見極めることでした。
05:05
I needed to figure out
私は、普通の人間のように
05:07
how to eat like a normal human being,
食べる方法を学ぶ必要がありました。
05:09
since I'd been eating through a tube in my chest
というのも、当時私は胸の管から血管を通じて
05:11
and through my veins.
栄養を摂っていたからです。
05:14
So I had to go through trying to eat again.
なので、食べ方を学ぶ必要がありました。
05:16
And they went through that process.
彼らは、そのやり方を教えてくれました。
05:19
And then they had to figure out:
そして彼らは、「この子には
05:21
"Well she needs furniture.
家具が必要だわ。だってこの子、
05:23
She is sleeping in the corner of this apartment."
部屋の隅っこで寝ているじゃない」と気が付きました。
05:25
So they went to their storage lockers
そこで彼らは倉庫に向かい、
05:28
and all gathered their extra furniture --
余った家具を集め、ポットや
05:30
gave me pots and pans, blankets,
フライパン、ブランケットなどの全てを私に
05:32
everything.
くれました。
05:35
And then the next thing that I needed
次に私が学ぶ必要があったのは、
05:38
was a makeover.
おしゃれでした。
05:40
So out went the green scrubs
緑の入院着は脱ぎ、代わりに
05:43
and in came the polyester and floral prints.
花柄の洋服を着ることになりました。
05:45
(Laughter)
(笑)
05:48
We're not going to talk about the hairstyles that they tried to force on me
髪が戻った時、彼らが私に無理やりやろうとした髪型については
05:53
once my hair grew back.
語るつもりはありません。
05:56
But I did say no to the blue hair.
でも、青色にすることだけは断りました。
05:58
(Laughter)
(笑)
06:00
So eventually what went on
いろいろあった後、彼らは私に
06:04
is they decided that, well I need to learn to speak.
話し方を教えようと決めました。
06:07
So you can't be an independent person
話したり、見ることができなかったら
06:10
if you're not able to speak and can't see.
一人の人間として生きていくことはできません。
06:12
So they figured not being able to see is one thing,
見ることはさておいて、とにかく私は話すことができるように
06:15
but they need to get me to talk.
なる必要がありました。
06:18
So while Sally, the office manager,
オフィスマネージャーのサリーが
06:20
was teaching me to speak in the day --
日中私の面倒を見てくれました。
06:23
it's hard, because when you're a kid,
しかし、子どものように無意識のうちに
06:25
you take things for granted.
学ぶことができないので、
06:27
You learn things unconsciously.
それはとても大変でした。
06:29
But for me, I was an adult and it was embarrassing,
大人の私は学ぶことを恥ずかしいと思っていました。
06:31
and I had to learn how to coordinate
しかも、どうやって新しい喉と舌、新しい歯と唇を
06:34
my new throat with my tongue
調整するかだけでなく、息を吸い込み
06:36
and my new teeth and my lips,
言葉を発する方法を
06:38
and capture the air and get the word out.
学ばなければいけませんでした。
06:41
So I acted like a two-year-old
私は子どものようにふるまい、
06:44
and refused to work.
学ぶことを拒否しました。
06:46
But the men had a better idea.
しかし、妙案をもっている人がいました。
06:48
They were going to make it fun for me.
彼らは、学ぶことを楽しくしようとしました。
06:51
So they were teaching me cuss word Scrabble at night,
そこで彼らは、夜は私に汚い言葉を教えてくれました。
06:53
(Laughter)
(笑)
06:57
and then, secretly,
実は、船乗りのように
07:01
how to swear like a sailor.
罵る方法も教えてくれました。
07:03
So I'm going to just leave it to your imagination
サリーが、私はもう回復したと判断できた
07:06
as to what my first words were
私の最初の一言については、あなたたちの
07:10
when Sally finally got my confidence built.
ご想像にお任せします。
07:14
(Laughter)
(笑)
07:17
So I moved on from there.
全ては、そこから始まりました。
07:19
And a former teacher who happened to have Alzheimer's
偶然にもアルツハイマーを患っていた以前の先生が
07:21
took on the task of teaching me to write.
私に書き方を教えてくれました。
07:24
The redundancy was actually good for me.
こののんびりさが、実は私には良かったのです。
07:28
So we'll just keep moving on.
なので、次に進みたいと思います。
07:30
(Laughter)
(笑)
07:32
One of the pivotal times for me
私にとっての一番の鬼門は、
07:38
was actually learning to cross a street again
目が見えない人間として、再び信号を渡ることを
07:41
as a blind person.
学ぶことでした。
07:44
So close your eyes.
目を閉じてみてください。
07:46
Now imagine you have to cross a street.
あなたは、信号を渡らなければいけません。
07:49
You don't know how far that street is
道がどれくらいの幅か知らないし
07:51
and you don't know if you're going straight
まっすぐ進んでいるかも分からない。
07:55
and you hear cars whizzing back and forth,
車は絶え間なく行ったり来たりしており
07:58
and you had a horrible accident
あなたを死の淵に追いやった事故を
08:01
that landed you in this situation.
あなたはそこで経験しています。
08:03
So there were two obstacles I had to get through.
私は、2つの障害を乗り越えなければなりませんでした。
08:06
One was post-traumatic stress disorder.
1つは、心的外傷後ストレス障害。
08:09
And every time I approached the corner or the curb
当時私は、角やカーブに近づくたびに
08:12
I would panic.
パニックになっていました。
08:16
And the second one
もう1つは、どうやって
08:18
was actually trying to figure out how to cross that street.
信号を渡ればいいかを理解することでした。
08:20
So one of the seniors just came up to me,
そこで、あるご老人が私のもとに来て、
08:23
and she pushed me up to the corner and she said,
私を角まで押しやって、こう言いました。
08:26
"When you think it's time to go, just stick the cane out there.
「行けると思ったら杖を突きだしなさい。もしも
08:29
If it's hit, don't cross the street."
それが車に当たれば、道を渡っちゃダメよ」と。
08:32
(Laughter)
(笑)
08:34
Made perfect sense.
確かにその通りでした。
08:39
But by the third cane
しかし、3本目の杖が
08:42
that went whizzing across the road,
この試みでダメになってしまった時、
08:44
they realized that they needed to put the resources together,
彼らはあることに気が付きました。それは、私に目の見えない
08:47
and they raised funds
人間として生きられるように
08:50
so that I could go to the Braille Institute
点字学校で技を学ばせる必要があるということ。
08:52
and actually gain the skills
そして、私の人生を
08:54
to be a blind person,
変えてくれた盲導犬を
08:56
and also to go get a guide dog
私のために手に入れる
08:58
who transformed my life.
必要があるということでした。
09:00
And I was able to return to college
私を助けてくれたご老人たち、そして
09:02
because of the senior citizens who invested in me,
盲導犬や身に付けた技のおかげで、私は
09:04
and also the guide dog and skill set I had gained.
大学に戻ることができました。
09:08
10 years later I gained my sight back.
10年後、私の視力は回復しました。
09:12
Not magically.
魔法ではありません。
09:14
I opted in for three surgeries,
3つの手術を受け、そのうちの1つは
09:16
and one of them was experimental.
実験的なものでした。
09:19
It was actually robotic surgery.
実は、ロボットを使った手術でした。
09:21
They removed a hematoma from behind my eye.
私の目の裏側から、血腫が取り除かれました。
09:23
The biggest change for me
私にとっての最大の変化は、
09:27
was that the world moved forward,
世界は進歩して、私の知らないようなもの
09:29
that there were innovations
たとえば、携帯電話や
09:32
and all kinds of new things --
ノートパソコンなどのあらゆる種類の
09:34
cellphones, laptops,
技術革新が為されていた
09:36
all these things that I had never seen before.
ということでした。
09:38
And as a blind person,
目で見ることができなかったので、
09:41
your visual memory fades
視覚的な記憶は色あせ、
09:43
and is replaced with how you feel about things
どんな触感か、どんな音が聞こえるか、
09:45
and how things sound
どんな匂いがするかなどに
09:48
and how things smell.
記憶は置き換えられていました。
09:51
So one day I was in my room
ある日私は部屋の中で、
09:54
and I saw this thing sitting in my room
あるものを見つけました。それはまるで
09:56
and I thought it was a monster.
化け物のような感じがしました。
09:58
So I was walking around it.
なので、その周りを回って、
10:00
And I go, "I'm just going to touch it."
「触るだけだよ」と言ってみて、
10:02
And I touched it and I went,
実際に触ってみたら、その正体がわかり
10:04
"Oh my God, it's a laundry basket."
「あらやだ。これは洗濯カゴじゃない」と言いました。
10:06
(Laughter)
(笑)
10:08
So everything is different
目が見える人にとっては、それは
10:12
when you're a sighted person
当然のことなので、ありとあらゆる物が
10:14
because you take that for granted.
異なって見えます。
10:16
But when you're blind,
しかし、目が見えなかったら
10:18
you have the tactile memory for things.
感覚で物を記憶することしかできません。
10:20
The biggest change for me was looking down at my hands
手を見ながら、10年もの私の人生が失われた
10:23
and seeing that I'd lost 10 years of my life.
ということに気が付きました。
10:26
I thought that time had stood still for some reason
何かしらの理由で、私の時は止まり、家族や友人の中だけで
10:30
and moved on for family and friends.
だけで時は動いていたと思っていました。
10:33
But when I looked down,
しかし、手を見ると
10:35
I realized that time marched on for me too
私の中でも時が経っていた、そして
10:37
and that I needed to get caught up,
追いつかなければいけないということに気が付き、
10:39
so I got going on it.
私は動き始めました。
10:41
We didn't have words like crowd-sourcing and radical collaboration
私が事故にあった時、クラウドソージングなどの言葉を
10:43
when I had my accident.
私たちは知りませんでした。
10:47
But the concept held true --
ただ、ある1つの事実、すなわち
10:49
people working with people to rebuild me;
私を立て直すため、そして再教育するために
10:51
people working with people to re-educate me.
みんなが協力してくれたことは確かな事実です。
10:54
I wouldn't be standing here today
もしも、みんなが協力してくれていなかったら
10:56
if it wasn't for extreme radical collaboration.
私はここにいることはできなかったでしょう。
10:58
Thank you so much.
ご清聴ありがとうございました。
11:02
(Applause)
(拍手)
11:04
Translated by Yuta Baba
Reviewed by Hidetoshi Yamauchi

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Ramona Pierson - Education innovator
Ramona Pierson develops tools to revolutionize learning management and assessment systems -- her fourth career after aviation, neuropsychology and software development.

Why you should listen

Ramona Pierson first built careers in aviation, neuropsychology and software development. While studying and examining and learning the details of such diverse disciplines, she became interested in the act of learning itself. She volunteered in a San Francisco school while working full-time in Silicon Valley and, just like that, a fourth career was born.

Pierson completed a master’s degree in education in California, then headed north to take the reins of the education technology department for Seattle Public Schools. She combined her passions and expertise to create software that, in a nutshell, helps teachers teach better. In 2007, Ramona launched a private company with the same goal. SynapticMash Inc. was launched to revolutionize the learning management and assessment systems in education.  

A self-described “data geek,” Pierson contemplated ways to push education and technology through a paradigm shift — to move from web 2.0 to web 3.0. Now the CEO of Declara, Ramona continues to study the act of learning and to explore ways to make our education system work better for students.

 

More profile about the speaker
Ramona Pierson | Speaker | TED.com