13:17
TEDxWomen 2011

Gayle Tzemach Lemmon: Women entrepreneurs, example not exception

ゲイル・スマク・レモン:特別な存在ではない女性起業家

Filmed:

女性達は決して小さな存在ではありません。一方で、なぜ彼女達にはマイクロローンの審査しか通らないのでしょうか?TEDxWomenで、ゲイル・スマク・レモンはあらゆる会社を運営する女性達―家内経営から大規模な工場まで―彼女達こそ見過ごされている経済発展の鍵を握る存在だと語ります。

- Reporter
Gayle Tzemach Lemmon writes about women around the world living their lives at war and in conflict zones. Full bio

We do not invest in victims,
死者に投資はできません
00:15
we invest in survivors.
投資を受けるのは生き残りだけです
00:18
And in ways both big and small,
多かれ少なかれ
00:20
the narrative of the victim
犠牲者と言えば
00:23
shapes the way we see women.
女性を思い浮かべます
00:25
You can't count what you don't see.
見えざる者は評価されず
00:27
And we don't invest in what's invisible to us.
見えざる者に投資はされません
00:30
But this is the face
しかしながら 復興とは
00:33
of resilience.
こういう顔をしてます
00:35
Six years ago,
6年前
00:38
I started writing about women entrepreneurs
紛争終結前後における
00:40
during and after conflict.
女性起業家について書きはじめました
00:42
I set out to write a compelling economic story,
主人公は出そろっていましたが
00:44
one that had great characters, that no one else was telling,
誰も手を付けていなかった 経済について
00:46
and one that I thought mattered.
刺激的な話を書くことにしました
00:49
And that turned out to be women.
その主人公は他でもない女性でした
00:51
I had left ABC news and a career I loved at the age of 30
全く畑違いのビジネススクールに行くため
00:54
for business school,
30歳にして 大好きだった
00:57
a path I knew almost nothing about.
ABCニュースの仕事を辞めました
00:59
None of the women I had grown up with in Maryland
メリーランドの女友達にはビジネススクールはおろか
01:01
had graduated from college,
大学を卒業した子も
01:04
let alone considered business school.
一人としていませんでした
01:06
But they had hustled to feed their kids
それでも彼女らは懸命に
01:08
and pay their rent.
子を養い 家賃を払っています
01:10
And I saw from a young age
安定した収入が得られれば
01:12
that having a decent job and earning a good living
貧しい家庭の生活でさえ
01:14
made the biggest difference
一変するということは
01:16
for families who were struggling.
小さいときから知っていました
01:18
So if you're going to talk about jobs,
さて 仕事の話をするなら
01:20
then you have to talk about entrepreneurs.
起業家の話は避けられません
01:22
And if you're talking about entrepreneurs
さらに紛争中 紛争終結後における
01:25
in conflict and post-conflict settings,
起業家を語る上で
01:27
then you must talk about women,
女性は見逃せません
01:29
because they are the population you have left.
なにせ 女性しか残ってないんですから
01:31
Rwanda in the immediate aftermath of the genocide
大虐殺直後のルワンダでは
01:34
was 77 percent female.
総人口の77%は女性でした
01:38
I want to introduce you
これまでに出会った
01:41
to some of those entrepreneurs I've met
そうした起業家たちから
01:43
and share with you some of what they've taught me over the years.
学んだことをご紹介します
01:45
I went to Afghanistan in 2005
2005年 仕事で訪れた
01:48
to work on a Financial Times piece,
アフガニスタンで
01:51
and there I met Kamila,
カミラに出会いました
01:53
a young women who told me she had just turned down
若いのに つい最近
01:55
a job with the international community
月給2千ドルの国際団体の仕事を
01:57
that would have paid her nearly $2,000 a month --
断ったって言うんです
01:59
an astronomical sum in that context.
現地では この金額は破格なんですよ
02:02
And she had turned it down, she said,
起業家育成カウンセリングの
02:05
because she was going to start her next business,
新事業を立ち上げるために
02:07
an entrepreneurship consultancy
オファーを断ったそうです
02:10
that would teach business skills
アフガン中の人々に
02:12
to men and women all around Afghanistan.
ビジネススキルを伝授するのです
02:14
Business, she said,
彼女によると ビジネスは
02:16
was critical to her country's future.
国際社会から長らく孤立を続けた
02:18
Because long after this round of internationals left,
アフガニスタンが安全で平和な
02:20
business would help keep her country
社会を維持するために
02:23
peaceful and secure.
必要不可欠なものなのです
02:25
And she said business was even more important for women
収入は敬意を 資産は力を生みます
02:28
because earning an income earned respect
このためビジネスは女性にとって
02:31
and money was power for women.
一層 重要なのです
02:34
So I was amazed.
驚きました
02:37
I mean here was a girl who had never lived in peace time
平和なんて体験したことない女の子が
02:39
who somehow had come to sound like a candidate from "The Apprentice."
まるでバリバリのビジネスパーソン
02:42
(Laughter)
みたいなことを言うんですから (笑)
02:45
So I asked her, "How in the world do you know this much about business?
「なぜそんなにビジネスに詳しいの?」
02:47
Why are you so passionate?"
「その情熱はどこからくるの?」
02:50
She said, "Oh Gayle, this is actually my third business.
「ゲイル ビジネスはもう三度目なの
02:52
My first business was a dressmaking business
最初はタリバン政権下で
02:56
I started under the Taliban.
服飾ビジネスだったわ
02:58
And that was actually an excellent business,
実際 近所の女性達に仕事を提供できたし
03:00
because we provided jobs for women all around our neighborhood.
あのビジネスは成功と言ってもいいわね
03:02
And that's really how I became an entrepreneur."
あれが起業家人生の始まりだったの」
03:05
Think about this:
想像してください
03:10
Here were girls who braved danger
外出さえ危険であった時期に
03:12
to become breadwinners
身の危険を冒してまで
03:14
during years in which they couldn't even be on their streets.
稼ぎを得ようとしていた女性がいたのです
03:16
And at a time of economic collapse
経済が破綻し
03:19
when people sold baby dolls and shoe laces
生き残るために
03:22
and windows and doors
人形 靴紐 窓 ドア
03:24
just to survive,
あるものは何でもを売り払った時代です
03:27
these girls made the difference
彼女らの稼ぎこそが
03:30
between survival and starvation
多くの人の生死を
03:32
for so many.
左右したのでした
03:34
I couldn't leave the story, and I couldn't leave the topic either,
この トピックを見て見ぬ振りはできませんでした
03:36
because everywhere I went I met more of these women
どこに行ってもそうした無名の
03:39
who no one seemed to know about,
むしろ無視された
03:42
or even wish to.
女性達に会ったからです
03:44
I went on to Bosnia,
ボスニアでは
03:46
and early on in my interviews I met with an IMF official
あるIMFの職員にインタビューしました
03:48
who said, "You know, Gayle,
「なあ ゲイルさん ボスニアには
03:51
I don't think we actually have women in business in Bosnia,
ビジネスをしてる女性なんていないんじゃないかな
03:53
but there is a lady selling cheese nearby
まあ 路上でチーズを売ってる
03:55
on the side of the road.
女性を一人知ってるけど
03:57
So maybe you could interview her."
彼女と話してみてはどうだろう?」
03:59
So I went out reporting
そうすることにして
04:02
and within a day I met Narcisa Kavazovic
その日のうちにナルシサ・カヴァゾヴィッチに会いました
04:04
who at that point was opening a new factory
当時彼女はサラエボのかつての戦線に
04:07
on the war's former front lines in Sarajevo.
新しい工場を開くところでした
04:09
She had started her business
彼女は放置された
04:12
squatting in an abandoned garage,
ガレージでビジネスを始め
04:14
sewing sheets and pillow cases
シーツや枕カバーを縫って
04:16
she would take to markets all around the city
街中で行商をしました
04:18
so that she could support
彼女には
04:20
the 12 or 13 family members
養わなきゃならない
04:22
who were counting on her for survival.
13人程の家族がいました
04:24
By the time we met, she had 20 employees,
出会った頃 20人程の従業員を抱えており
04:27
most of them women,
ほとんどが女性で
04:29
who were sending their boys and their girls to school.
彼女達は子供を学校に通わせていました
04:31
And she was just the start.
ナルシサに始まり
04:34
I met women running essential oils businesses,
エッセンシャルオイルのビジネス
04:36
wineries
ワイナリー そして
04:39
and even the country's largest advertising agency.
ボスニア最大の広告会社を経営する女性達にも会いました
04:41
So these stories together
こうした話は
04:44
became the Herald Tribune business cover.
ヘラルド・トリビューンの見出しにもなりました
04:46
And when this story posted,
掲載を見た私は
04:48
I ran to my computer to send it to the IMF official.
IMFの職員にメールしました
04:50
And I said, "Just in case you're looking for entrepreneurs
「もし次の投資会議の
04:52
to feature at your next investment conference,
目玉をお探しなら
04:55
here are a couple of women."
彼女達はいかがでしょう?」
04:58
(Applause)
(拍手)
05:00
But think about this.
しかしながら
05:05
The IMF official is hardly the only person
女性達を過小評価しているのは
05:07
to automatically file women under micro.
IMFの職員だけではもちろんありません
05:10
The biases, whether intentional or otherwise,
こうした偏見 間違ったイメージが
05:13
are pervasive,
故意であれ 無意識であれ
05:15
and so are the misleading mental images.
広く浸透してしまっているのです
05:17
If you see the word "microfinance,"
「マイクロファイナンス」
05:20
what comes to mind?
どんなイメージが浮かぶでしょう?
05:22
Most people say women.
多くは「女性」と答えます
05:25
And if you see the word "entrepreneur,"
対して「起業家」については
05:27
most people think men.
多くは「男性」と答えます
05:30
Why is that?
なぜ?
05:32
Because we aim low and we think small
志が低い スケールが小さいといった
05:34
when it comes to women.
誤った女性へのイメージのためです
05:37
Microfinance is an incredibly powerful tool
マイクロファイナンスは自給自足を可能にし
05:39
that leads to self-sufficiency and self-respect,
自尊心を向上する大変強力なツールです
05:41
but we must move beyond micro-hopes
女性達はとんでもない可能性を秘めており
05:44
and micro-ambitions for women,
マイクロな期待や志から
05:46
because they have so much greater hopes for themselves.
私達は脱却しなければなりません
05:48
They want to move from micro to medium and beyond.
マイクロからミディアムへそして更に大きなものに
05:51
And in many places,
世界各地で
05:54
they're there.
彼女達は活動しています
05:56
In the U.S., women-owned businesses
アメリカでは 女性がオーナーの
05:58
will create five and a half million new jobs by 2018.
ビジネスは 2018年までに550万もの雇用を創出するでしょう
06:00
In South Korea and Indonesia,
韓国そしてインドネシアでは
06:03
women own nearly half a million firms.
50万社程の企業は女性がオーナーで
06:06
China, women run 20 percent
中国の零細企業の数値は
06:09
of all small businesses.
驚愕の20%にのぼります
06:11
And in the developing world overall,
更には 世界的に発展途上国では
06:13
That figure is 40 to 50 percent.
比率は40%~50%にも上ります
06:15
Nearly everywhere I go,
世界中 どこに行っても
06:18
I meet incredibly interesting entrepreneurs
とんでもなく 魅力的な起業家達がいて
06:20
who are seeking access to finance, access to markets
投資や市場に食い込んで
06:22
and established business networks.
ビジネスを展開しようと奮闘しています
06:25
They are often ignored
しかし 大抵は女性起業家の支援は
06:27
because they're harder to help.
困難であると 却下されてしまいます
06:29
It is much riskier to give a 50,000 dollar loan
5万ドルを投資する場合のリスクは
06:31
than it is to give a 500 dollar loan.
500ドルの場合より遥かに高いですよね
06:34
And as the World Bank recently noted,
世界銀行が最近発表したように
06:37
women are stuck in a productivity trap.
女性は生産性のわなにかかっています
06:39
Those in small businesses
零細企業の女性オーナーも
06:42
can't get the capital they need to expand
事業拡大の資金を得られず
06:44
and those in microbusiness
マイクロビジネスの成長が
06:46
can't grow out of them.
阻害されてしまっています
06:48
Recently I was at the State Department in Washington
この前 ワシントンの国務省に行った際
06:50
and I met an incredibly passionate entrepreneur from Ghana.
とてもパワフルなガーナ出身の起業家に出会いました
06:53
She sells chocolates.
チョコレートの商売をしており
06:56
And she had come to Washington,
ワシントンには 援助金や
06:58
not seeking a handout and not seeking a microloan.
マイクロローンの申請ではなく
07:00
She had come seeking serious investment dollars
チョコレートビジネス拡大目的の
07:03
so that she could build the factory
工場建設と機械購入のため
07:06
and buy the equipment she needs
大規模な投資を
07:08
to export her chocolates
呼び込もうとしていました
07:10
to Africa, Europe, the Middle East
商品をアフリカ ヨーロッパ 中東
07:12
and far beyond --
そして世界中に輸出するためです
07:14
capital that would help her to employ
それには 20人以上の
07:16
more than the 20 people
既存の従業員の枠を超えて
07:18
that she already has working for her,
雇用を拡大して 彼女の国の経済を
07:20
and capital that would fuel her own country's
活性化するための
07:23
economic climb.
投資が必要なのです
07:25
The great news is
幸いなことに
07:27
we already know what works.
もう方法は分かっているのです
07:29
Theory and empirical evidence
理論とその実践から
07:31
Have already taught us.
得られる経験から
07:33
We don't need to invent solutions because we have them --
解決策を発明する必要はありません―もうあるのですから
07:35
cash flow loans
資産ではなく
07:38
based in income rather than assets,
キャッシュ・フローに基づいたローン
07:40
loans that use secure contracts rather than collateral,
担保よりむしろ契約に基づくローン
07:42
because women often don't own land.
女性が土地を所有するケースは少ないですから
07:45
And Kiva.org, the microlender,
少額融資専門機関のKiva.orgは
07:48
is actually now experimenting with crowdsourcing
中小規模ローンにおいて
07:50
small and medium sized loans.
試験的にクラウドソースを導入しています
07:53
And that's just to start.
こうした試みはまだ始まったばかりです
07:55
Recently it has become very much in fashion
最近では 女性達を
07:58
to call women "the emerging market of the emerging market."
「新興市場の中の新興市場」と呼ぶのが流行りのようです
08:01
I think that is terrific.
すばらしい!
08:05
You know why?
なぜって?
08:07
Because -- and I say this as somebody who worked in finance --
金融業界の一員として言わせてもらうと―
08:09
500 billion dollars at least
過去10年の間 5千億ドルもが
08:13
has gone into the emerging markets in the past decade.
この新興市場につぎ込まれてきたからです
08:16
Because investors saw the potential for return
この不景気にあっても 投資家達は
08:19
at a time of slowing economic growth,
投資へのリターンを見込んでいるからです
08:22
and so they created financial products
こうしてこの新興市場に向けた
08:24
and financial innovation
金融商品や金融新製品が
08:26
tailored to the emerging markets.
開発されたのです
08:28
How wonderful would it be
ご託なんか並べてないで
08:31
if we were prepared to replace all of our lofty words
女性に5千億ドルでも投資して
08:34
with our wallets
彼女らの経済可能性を
08:36
and invest 500 billion dollars
実現することができれば
08:38
unleashing women's economic potential?
どれだけすばらしいことでしょうか
08:40
Just think of the benefits
想像してみてください
08:43
when it comes to jobs, productivity,
この投資がもたらす仕事 生産性
08:45
employment, child nutrition,
雇用 養育費
08:47
maternal mortality, literacy
産婦死亡率 識字率
08:49
and much, much more.
得られる恩恵の数々を!
08:51
Because, as the World Economic Forum noted,
世界経済フォーラムの発表では
08:55
smaller gender gaps are directly correlated
性差指数と経済競争力は
08:58
with increased economic competitiveness.
正比例の関係にあるそうです
09:01
And not one country in all the world
もちろん世界中のどこにも男女間に
09:03
has eliminated its economic participation gap --
経済活動参加率の格差のない国はありません
09:06
not one.
そんなことはありえません
09:09
So the great news
しかし 良い面としては
09:11
is this is an incredible opportunity.
私たちに機会を提供してくれます
09:13
We have so much room to grow.
のびしろはまだまだあるのです
09:15
So you see,
お分かりでしょうか?
09:18
this is not about doing good,
これは単なる慈善ではなく
09:20
this is about global growth
世界的な経済成長と
09:22
and global employment.
雇用創出のチャンスなのです
09:24
It is about how we invest
どう投資をし
09:26
and it's about how we see women.
女性をどう捉えるか という話なのです
09:28
And women can no longer be
女性はもはや
09:30
both half the population
人口の半分 だとか
09:32
and a special interest group.
特別な利益を
09:34
(Applause)
追求する集団でもありえないのです (拍手)
09:36
Oftentimes I get into very interesting discussions with reporters
よくレポーターに言われます
09:43
who say to me, "Gayle, these are great stories,
「ゲイル とても興味深い話だが
09:46
but you're really writing about the exceptions."
君が扱ってるのは 例外的なものだね」
09:48
Now that makes me pause for just a couple reasons.
驚きに言葉を失ってしまいます
09:51
First of all, for exceptions,
まず 女性企業家の数は例外的という
09:54
there are a lot of them
域を超えています
09:56
and they're important.
彼女らの重要性も無視できません
09:58
Secondly, when we talk about men who are succeeding,
次に 成功した男性の話をすれば
10:01
we rightly consider them
彼らは決まって見習うべき
10:04
icons or pioneers or innovators
アイコンやパイオニア はたまた
10:06
to be emulated.
イノベーターとして認識されます
10:08
And when we talk about women,
対照的に女性はというと
10:10
they are either exceptions to be dismissed
例外扱いされるか
10:12
or aberrations to be ignored.
おかしな連中と無視されます
10:15
And finally,
最後に
10:18
there is no society anywhere in all the world
こういったマジョリティを除いて
10:20
that is not changed
社会的変化を経験してきた
10:23
except by its most exceptional.
国は世界中どこにもありません
10:25
So why wouldn't we celebrate and elevate
ならば 見過ごしてしまうのではなく
10:27
these change makers and job creators
変革者であり 雇用を創出する彼女達を称え
10:31
rather than overlook them?
伸ばしていこうではありませんか
10:33
This topic of resilience is very personal to me
こうした復興の話は私のプライベートに関わり
10:36
and in many ways has shaped my life.
多くの点で私の人生に影響を与えてきました
10:39
My mom was a single mom
私の母はシングルマザーで
10:42
who worked at the phone company during the day
日中は電話会社に勤め
10:44
and sold Tupperware at night
夜はタッパーを売っていました
10:47
so that I could have every opportunity possible.
すべて私の将来のためです
10:49
We shopped double coupons
節約するため
10:52
and layaway and consignment stores,
あらゆる手段をとりました
10:54
and when she got sick with stage four breast cancer
乳がんが末期まで進行して
10:56
and could no longer work,
働くことができなくなったときには
10:59
we even applied for food stamps.
食品割引切符も利用しました
11:01
And when I would feel sorry for myself
私はまだ9つか10くらいで
11:04
as nine or 10 year-old girls do,
自分を哀れに感じました
11:06
she would say to me, "My dear, on a scale of major world tragedies,
母は言いました「世界の大災害と比べれば
11:08
yours is not a three."
あなたの不幸なんて
11:11
(Laughter)
かわいいもんよ」
11:13
And when I was applying to business school
知り合いでビジネススクールに
11:15
and felt certain I couldn't do it
入学した人はおらず 私自身も
11:17
and nobody I knew had done it,
絶対無理と思いながら出願しました
11:19
I went to my aunt who survived years of beatings at the hand of her husband
私が相談したのは 数年に及ぶ家庭内暴力から
11:21
and escaped a marriage of abuse
自身の尊厳のために脱出した
11:24
with only her dignity intact.
叔母でした
11:26
And she told me,
彼女は言いました
11:28
"Never import other people's limitations."
「他人に限界を決めさせてはダメよ」
11:30
And when I complained to my grandmother,
ある時祖母にグチった時―
11:34
a World War II veteran
彼女は二次大戦の退役軍人で
11:36
who worked in film for 50 years
半世紀に渡り映像分野で働き
11:38
and who supported me from the age of 13,
私が13の時から養ってくれました―
11:40
that I was terrified
海外での念願のABCの仕事が
11:42
that if I turned down a plum assignment at ABC
却下されてしまったら
11:44
for a fellowship overseas,
やりたい仕事なんか他には
11:46
I would never ever, ever find another job,
見つかりっこないと嘆いていました
11:48
she said, "Kiddo, I'm going to tell you two things.
彼女は言いました「ねえ 2つ覚えておきなさい
11:51
First of all, no one turns down a Fulbright,
まず フルブライト奨学生を却下するようなヤツはいない
11:53
and secondly, McDonald's is always hiring."
次 マクドナルドはいつもバイト募集してるわよ」
11:56
(Laughter)
(笑)
11:59
"You will find a job. Take the leap."
「仕事ならいつでもある がんばりなさい!」
12:01
The women in my family
私の家族の女性達は
12:05
are not exceptions.
例外ではありません
12:07
The women in this room and watching in L.A.
この部屋の女性のみなさん そしてL.A. ひいては
12:09
and all around the world
世界中で聴いてくれてるみなさんは
12:11
are not exceptions.
例外ではありません
12:13
We are not a special interest group.
私達女性はニッチなどではなく
12:15
We are the majority.
私達こそマジョリティーなのです
12:18
And for far too long,
もう十分
12:20
we have underestimated ourselves
女性達は自分達を過小評価し
12:22
and been undervalued by others.
まわりにも軽んじられてきました
12:24
It is time for us to aim higher
今こそ 女性への期待を高く持ち
12:27
when it comes to women,
積極的な投資を通じて
12:29
to invest more and to deploy our dollars
世界中の女性達に
12:31
to benefit women all around the world.
恩恵を届けようではありませんか
12:34
We can make a difference,
女性は世界を変えられます
12:37
and make a difference, not just for women,
こうした変化は女性のみならず
12:39
but for a global economy
女性の力を必要とする
12:41
that desperately needs their contributions.
疲労した世界経済にも貢献するのです
12:43
Together we can make certain
力を合わせれば
12:47
that the so-called exceptions
いわゆる例外達こそが
12:49
begin to rule.
中心となるのです
12:51
When we change the way we see ourselves,
自らへの見方を変えれば
12:53
others will follow.
周りもそれに従います
12:56
And it is time for all of us
今こそ 男女の壁を越えて
12:58
to think bigger.
広い視野を持つべき時なのです
13:00
Thank you very much.
どうもありがとうございました
13:02
(Applause)
(拍手)
13:04
Translated by SHIGERU MASUKAWA
Reviewed by Takahiro Shimpo

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Gayle Tzemach Lemmon - Reporter
Gayle Tzemach Lemmon writes about women around the world living their lives at war and in conflict zones.

Why you should listen

Gayle Tzemach Lemmon never set out to write about women entrepreneurs. After leaving ABC News for MBA study at Harvard, she was simply looking for a great -- and underreported -- economics story. What she found was women entrepreneurs in some of the toughest business environments creating jobs against daunting obstacles. Since then her writing on entrepreneurship has been published by the International Herald Tribune and Financial Times along with the World Bank and the International Finance Corporation.

Now a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, Lemmon continues to travel the world reporting on economic and development issues with a focus on women. She is the author of Ashley's War: The Untold Story of a Team of Women Soldiers on the Special Ops Battlefield (2014), as well as the best seller The Dressmaker of Khair Khana (2011) about a young entrepreneur who supported her community under the Taliban.

More profile about the speaker
Gayle Tzemach Lemmon | Speaker | TED.com