08:59
Mission Blue Voyage

Daniel Pauly: The ocean's shifting baseline

ダニエル・ポーリー: 人類の思い描く海の変遷

Filmed:

海洋の荒廃は人間の一生という時間の長さでも起こっています。魚の平均体長の縮小からも明らかです。われわれがそれでもなお自分たちの新しい基準を「ノーマル」だと呼ぶ姿を、ダニエル・ポーリーがミッションブルーのステージで示します。いつ私たちは基準を下げ続けるのを止めるのでしょうか。

- Fisheries biologist
Daniel Pauly is the principal investigator at the Sea Around Us Project, which studies the impact of the world's fisheries on marine ecosystems. The software he's helped develop is used around the world to model and track the ocean. Full bio

I'm going to speak
これから お話しするのは
00:12
about a tiny, little idea.
とてもちいさなアイディアです
00:14
And this is about shifting baseline.
それは「ベースライン」の変化についてです
00:17
And because the idea can be explained in one minute,
でも このアイディアは
1分ほどで説明できてしまうので
00:21
I will tell you three stories before
その前に 3つのお話で
00:25
to fill in the time.
時間を稼ごうと思います
00:28
And the first story
最初のお話は
00:30
is about Charles Darwin, one of my heroes.
私が憧れる
チャールズ・ダーウィンについてです
00:32
And he was here, as you well know, in '35.
ご存知のように 1835年
彼はガラパゴス諸島を訪れました
00:35
And you'd think he was chasing finches,
フィンチばかり追っていたように
00:38
but he wasn't.
思われるかもしれませんが
00:40
He was actually collecting fish.
実際は魚類を収集していました
00:42
And he described one of them
そして ある魚を
00:44
as very "common."
とても「一般的」な魚だと報告しました
00:46
This was the sailfin grouper.
ハタ科の セイルフィングルーパー です
00:48
A big fishery was run on it
大規模な漁業による捕獲が
00:50
until the '80s.
1980年代まで続いた結果
この魚は現在
00:52
Now the fish is on the IUCN Red List.
国際自然保護連合の
レッドリストに載っています
00:55
Now this story,
この様な話は
00:58
we have heard it lots of times
良く耳にします
01:00
on Galapagos and other places,
ガラパゴスに限らず 他の地域も同じです
01:03
so there is nothing particular about it.
なにも特別な事では ありません
01:05
But the point is, we still come to Galapagos.
問題なのは
今もガラパゴスを訪れる人々が
01:08
We still think it is pristine.
いまだにそこを
昔の通りだと思っている点です
01:11
The brochures still say
旅行案内のパンフレットでは
いまだにガラパゴスを
01:14
it is untouched.
「手つかずの地」 と宣伝します
01:17
So what happens here?
これはどういうことでしょうか
01:19
The second story, also to illustrate another concept,
2つ目のお話ですが
この写真を見ると
01:22
is called shifting waistline.
私の「ウエストライン」も変化しています(笑)
01:25
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:27
Because I was there in '71,
1971年 私はアフリカ西部で
01:30
studying a lagoon in West Africa.
ラグーンを研究していました
01:32
I was there because I grew up in Europe
ヨーロッパに育った私は
01:34
and I wanted later to work in Africa.
アフリカで仕事をしたかったのです
01:37
And I thought I could blend in.
現地に溶け込めると
思っていましたが
01:39
And I got a big sunburn,
しかしそこで
ひどく日焼けしてしまい
01:41
and I was convinced that I was really not from there.
ここの生まれではないと
納得させられました
01:43
This was my first sunburn.
あんな日焼けは
初めてでした
01:46
And the lagoon
ラグーンは
01:48
was surrounded by palm trees,
ヤシの木に囲まれていて
01:51
as you can see, and a few mangrove.
マングローブも見えますね
01:53
And it had tilapia
20センチ程の
01:55
about 20 centimeters,
ティラピアがいました
01:57
a species of tilapia called blackchin tilapia.
ブラックチン・ティラピア です
01:59
And the fisheries for this tilapia
漁場はこの魚に恵まれ
02:01
sustained lots of fish and they had a good time
そこの漁師たちは この魚を獲ることで
02:03
and they earned more than average
ガーナの平均収入よりも
02:06
in Ghana.
稼いでいました
02:08
When I went there 27 years later,
27年後にそこを訪れると
02:10
the fish had shrunk to half of their size.
魚の大きさは
半分以下に縮んでいました
02:13
They were maturing at five centimeters.
成魚で5センチほどでした
02:16
They had been pushed genetically.
遺伝的に 圧迫されたのです
02:18
There were still fishes.
まだ漁師もいて
02:20
They were still kind of happy.
とりあえず幸せのようでしたし
02:22
And the fish also were happy to be there.
魚もそこにいて幸せのようでした
02:24
So nothing has changed,
何も 変わらないようで
02:29
but everything has changed.
全てが変わっていました
02:31
My third little story
3つ目のお話は
02:33
is that I was an accomplice
私も加担した
02:35
in the introduction of trawling
底引き網漁業の
02:37
in Southeast Asia.
東南アジアへの導入の話です
02:39
In the '70s -- well, beginning in the '60s --
1970年代に
- 開始は60年代でしたが -
02:41
Europe did lots of development projects.
ヨーロッパは
多くの開発事業を行いました
02:44
Fish development
「漁業開発」というのは
02:47
meant imposing on countries
実際「押し付け」です
02:49
that had already 100,000 fishers
数十万人もの漁師がいる国に
02:51
to impose on them industrial fishing.
産業的な漁業を押し付けます
02:54
And this boat, quite ugly,
調査船がまた
02:57
is called the Mutiara 4.
とても醜いもので
02:59
And I went sailing on it,
ムティアラ(真珠)4号という船で
03:01
and we did surveys
これに乗って 調査を行いました
03:03
throughout the southern South China sea
南シナ海南部から
03:06
and especially the Java Sea.
特に ジャワ海が中心でした
03:09
And what we caught,
当時は 海から引き上げたものが
03:11
we didn't have words for it.
何なのか わかっていませんでした
03:13
What we caught, I know now,
引き上げたのは
今ならわかるのですが
03:15
is the bottom of the sea.
海の底だったのです
03:18
And 90 percent of our catch
引き上げた内の
03:20
were sponges,
90%は海綿で
03:22
other animals that are fixed on the bottom.
残りは 海底に着生している生物でした
03:24
And actually most of the fish,
海底の堆積物の中に
03:27
they are a little spot on the debris,
ほんの少しだけ
03:29
the piles of debris, were coral reef fish.
サンゴ礁に住む魚がいました
03:31
Essentially the bottom of the sea came onto the deck
海の底を 甲板に引き上げては
03:34
and then was thrown down.
また投げ下ろしました
03:36
And these pictures are extraordinary
こちらの写真は とても希少なものです
03:38
because this transition is very rapid.
ごく短期間で 海が変化してしまったからです
03:41
Within a year, you do a survey
調査が始まってから 1年も待たずに
03:44
and then commercial fishing begins.
商業的な漁業が始まり
03:47
The bottom is transformed
海底の状況は一変しました
03:49
from, in this case, a hard bottom or soft coral
しっかりした海底や
柔らかい珊瑚から
03:51
into a muddy mess.
濁ったぐちゃぐちゃの状態に です
03:54
This is a dead turtle.
これは死んだウミガメですね
03:57
They were not eaten, they were thrown away because they were dead.
死後に捕獲されたため
食べられず 捨てられました
03:59
And one time we caught a live one.
あるとき1匹のウミガメが
04:02
It was not drowned yet.
生きたまま捕獲されました
04:04
And then they wanted to kill it because it was good to eat.
今度は食べられるので
殺す事になりました
04:06
This mountain of debris
このぐちゃぐちゃの海底から
引き上げられたものは
04:09
is actually collected by fishers
漁師により
海から引き上げられます
04:12
every time they go
初めて漁が行われる
04:15
into an area that's never been fished.
場所に行くたびにです
04:17
But it's not documented.
でも こういう事は記録されません
04:19
We transform the world,
人間は 世界を
変質させつつあるのに
04:21
but we don't remember it.
その事を記憶していません
04:23
We adjust our baseline
いつも 物事のベースラインを
04:25
to the new level,
新しい水準に調整して
04:28
and we don't recall what was there.
以前の水準を 思い出す事はありません
04:30
If you generalize this,
これを模式化すると
04:34
something like this happens.
このようになります
04:36
You have on the y axis some good thing:
縦軸は 何か望ましい事の値です
04:38
biodiversity, numbers of orca,
生物の多様性 オルカの生息数
04:41
the greenness of your country, the water supply.
国々の緑地面積 水の供給率
04:44
And over time it changes --
これらが 時間の経過によって
04:47
it changes
人為的に あるいは自然に
04:49
because people do things, or naturally.
変化するのです
04:51
Every generation
どんな世代であっても
04:53
will use the images
自分たちが物心ついた時点が
04:55
that they got at the beginning of their conscious lives
あたりまえの状態だという
04:57
as a standard
イメージを持っていて
05:00
and will extrapolate forward.
それを基準に未来を推定します
05:02
And the difference then,
現在と未来の状態に差があれば
05:04
they perceive as a loss.
失われたのだ とわかりますが
05:06
But they don't perceive what happened before as a loss.
現在と過去との違いはわかりません
05:08
You can have a succession of changes.
こうしてベースラインが変化し続ければ
05:11
At the end you want to sustain
最終的には わずかに残されたものを
05:13
miserable leftovers.
保護することになるでしょう
05:16
And that, to a large extent, is what we want to do now.
それが大体 今
行われていることです
05:19
We want to sustain things that are gone
ほとんど絶滅したものや
05:22
or things that are not the way they were.
本来の姿ではないものを
維持しようとしています
05:25
Now one should think
ここで考えるべきなのは
05:29
this problem affected people
これが人間にも確実に影響する事です
05:31
certainly when in predatory societies,
過去の狩猟社会では
05:33
they killed animals
動物を獲って生活していました
05:37
and they didn't know they had done so
数世代もすると
05:39
after a few generations.
それが行われていた事は
忘れられます
05:41
Because, obviously,
なぜなら 当たり前ですが
05:43
an animal that is very abundant,
とても数の多かった動物でも
05:46
before it gets extinct,
絶滅寸前には
05:51
it becomes rare.
とても数が減っている訳ですね
05:54
So you don't lose abundant animals.
つまり 数の多い動物は絶滅しません
05:57
You always lose rare animals.
常に 数の少ない動物が失われるのです
06:00
And therefore they're not perceived
そのため それが
06:02
as a big loss.
大きな喪失だとは思われません
06:04
Over time,
時間の経過を
06:06
we concentrate on large animals,
大きな動物に注目してたどると
06:08
and in a sea that means the big fish.
海の場合は 巨大な魚のことですが
06:10
They become rarer because we fish them.
漁業の結果
以前よりも稀な生物になってしまいました
06:12
Over time we have a few fish left
時間の経過とともに 数が減り
06:15
and we think this is the baseline.
それがベースラインだと思ってしまいます
06:17
And the question is,
では なぜ
06:20
why do people accept this?
それが受け入れられるのでしょうか
06:22
Well because they don't know that it was different.
それは 変化について知らないから です
06:27
And in fact, lots of people, scientists,
実際に 多くの人々 特に学者が
06:30
will contest that it was really different.
変化の存在に
06:33
And they will contest this
異議を唱えています
06:35
because the evidence
なぜかというと
06:37
presented in an earlier mode
昔の海に関する証拠は
06:39
is not in the way
現在 学者が欲しがる形では
06:44
they would like the evidence presented.
残っていないからです
06:47
For example,
例えば
06:49
the anecdote that some present,
昔 なにがし船長が ある海域で
06:51
as Captain so-and-so
巨大な魚群を見た という
06:53
observed lots of fish in this area
逸話があったとしても
06:55
cannot be used
その逸話は魚類学者には
06:58
or is usually not utilized by fishery scientists,
ほとんど役に立てられません
07:00
because it's not "scientific."
それが「非科学的」だからです
07:03
So you have a situation
こうしてわれわれは
07:05
where people don't know the past,
文字を持っていながら
07:07
even though we live in literate societies,
過去を知らない状況に陥っています
07:10
because they don't trust
過去に信頼を
07:13
the sources of the past.
置くことができないのです
07:15
And hence, the enormous role
だからこそ 海洋保護地域が
07:18
that a marine protected area can play.
大きな役割を果たすでしょう
07:21
Because with marine protected areas,
海洋保護区では
07:23
we actually recreate the past.
昔の海を取り戻そうとしています
07:26
We recreate the past that people cannot conceive
ベースラインが下がった 現在からは
07:30
because the baseline has shifted
想像もできないような
07:33
and is extremely low.
過去を再構築するのです
07:35
That is for people
これは
07:37
who can see a marine protected area
海洋保護区を訪れる事が出来て
07:39
and who can benefit
そこから ベースラインを
07:44
from the insight that it provides,
リセットできるだけの
07:46
which enables them to reset their baseline.
見識を得られる人々の場合ですね
07:49
How about the people who can't do that
それが出来ない場合は どうか
07:53
because they have no access --
例えば海から遠く離れた
07:55
the people in the Midwest for example?
アメリカ中西部は どうでしょう
07:57
There I think
そこでは 私が思うに
08:00
that the arts and film
芸術や映画が
08:02
can perhaps fill the gap,
ギャップを埋めるでしょう
08:04
and simulation.
そして シミュレーションです
08:06
This is a simulation of Chesapeake Bay.
これはアメリカのチェサピーク湾の
シミュレーションです
08:08
There were gray whales in Chesapeake Bay a long time ago --
大昔 コククジラが生息していました
08:11
500 years ago.
500年前です
08:13
And you will have noticed that the hues and tones
画像の 色相や色合いが
08:15
are like "Avatar."
映画『アバター』 に似ていますね
08:18
(Laughter)
(笑)
08:20
And if you think about "Avatar,"
『アバター』はなぜ
08:22
if you think of why people were so touched by it --
あんなに感動的だったのか
08:24
never mind the Pocahontas story --
ポカホンタスそのままのストーリーは置くとして
08:27
why so touched by the imagery?
なぜ あの描写に感動させられるのか
08:31
Because it evokes something
それは 失われてしまった何かが
08:35
that in a sense has been lost.
呼び覚まされるからです
08:38
And so my recommendation,
私が1つだけ提案するのは
08:40
it's the only one I will provide,
監督のキャメロンに
08:42
is for Cameron to do "Avatar II" underwater.
『アバター2』では
海中を舞台にすべきだと言う事です
08:44
Thank you very much.
ありがとうございました
08:49
(Applause)
(拍手)
08:51
Translated by TSUKAWAKI KAZU 塚脇 和
Reviewed by Megumi Shimizu

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Daniel Pauly - Fisheries biologist
Daniel Pauly is the principal investigator at the Sea Around Us Project, which studies the impact of the world's fisheries on marine ecosystems. The software he's helped develop is used around the world to model and track the ocean.

Why you should listen

Daniel Pauly heads the Sea Around Us Project, based at the Fisheries Centre, at the University of British Columbia. Pauly has been a leader in conceptualizing and codeveloping software that’s used by ocean experts throughout the world. At the Sea Around Us and in his other work, he’s developing new ways to view complex ocean data.

Pauly’s work includes the Ecopath ecological/ecosystem modeling software suite; the massive FishBase, the online encyclopaedia of fishes; and, increasingly, the quantitative results of the Sea Around Us Project.

Read Mission Blue's interview with Daniel Pauly >>

More profile about the speaker
Daniel Pauly | Speaker | TED.com