16:47
TED2012

Vijay Kumar: Robots that fly ... and cooperate

ヴィージェイ・クーマー 「協力し合う飛行ロボット」

Filmed:

ペンシルベニア大学のヴィージェイ・クーマーの研究室で開発しているクワッドローター型の小さく敏捷な飛行ロボットは、群れを作り、互いの存在を認識し、臨機応変にチームを組んで、建設や災害時の調査やその他様々なことをこなします。

- Roboticist
As the dean of the University of Pennsylvania's School of Engineering and Applied Science, Vijay Kumar studies the control and coordination of multi-robot formations. Full bio

Good morning.
おはようございます
00:20
I'm here today to talk
今日お話しするのは
00:22
about autonomous, flying beach balls.
自律的に飛行するビーチボールについてです
00:24
No, agile aerial robots like this one.
違った こういう自律的で敏捷な飛行ロボットについてです
00:27
I'd like to tell you a little bit about the challenges in building these
このようなものを作る難しさと
00:31
and some of the terrific opportunities
この技術の応用にどれほどの可能性があるかお話しします
00:34
for applying this technology.
この技術の応用にどれほどの可能性があるかお話しします
00:36
So these robots
このロボットは
00:38
are related to unmanned aerial vehicles.
無人航空機と似ています
00:40
However, the vehicles you see here are big.
しかし無人航空機はずっと大きいものです
00:43
They weigh thousands of pounds,
何千キロもの重さがあって
00:46
are not by any means agile.
とても敏捷とは言えず
00:48
They're not even autonomous.
自律的でさえありません
00:50
In fact, many of these vehicles
無人航空機の多くは実際
00:52
are operated by flight crews
人間によって遠隔操作されていて
00:54
that can include multiple pilots,
複数のパイロット
00:56
operators of sensors
センサのオペレータ
00:59
and mission coordinators.
作戦指揮官などが関わっています
01:01
What we're interested in is developing robots like this --
私たちが興味を持っているのは
01:03
and here are two other pictures --
私の手にあるようなロボットの開発で
01:05
of robots that you can buy off the shelf.
左の写真の2つは実際 お店で買うことができます
01:07
So these are helicopters with four rotors
これはローターが4つのヘリコプターで
01:10
and they're roughly a meter or so in scale
大きさは1メートル前後
01:13
and weigh several pounds.
重さも数キロ程度です
01:17
And so we retrofit these with sensors and processors,
私たちはそれにセンサやプロセッサを後付けして
01:19
and these robots can fly indoors
GPSなしで屋内を
01:22
without GPS.
飛べるようにしています
01:24
The robot I'm holding in my hand
私が今
01:26
is this one,
手にしているロボットは
01:28
and it's been created by two students,
私の学生アレックスとダニエルが
01:30
Alex and Daniel.
作ったものです
01:33
So this weighs a little more
重さは
01:35
than a tenth of a pound.
50グラムほど
01:37
It consumes about 15 watts of power.
消費電力は15ワットで
01:39
And as you can see,
見ての通り
01:41
it's about eight inches in diameter.
直径20センチほどの大きさです
01:43
So let me give you just a very quick tutorial
このようなロボットの仕組みを
01:45
on how these robots work.
簡単にご説明しましょう
01:48
So it has four rotors.
4つのローターが
01:50
If you spin these rotors at the same speed,
すべて同じ速さで回っているとき
01:52
the robot hovers.
ロボットは空中で静止します
01:54
If you increase the speed of each of these rotors,
4つのローターの回転速度を上げると
01:56
then the robot flies up, it accelerates up.
上に加速し 上昇します
01:59
Of course, if the robot were tilted,
ロボットが傾いていれば当然
02:02
inclined to the horizontal,
その傾いた方向に
02:04
then it would accelerate in this direction.
進むことになります
02:06
So to get it to tilt, there's one of two ways of doing it.
ロボットを傾けるには 2つの方法があります
02:09
So in this picture
この写真で
02:12
you see that rotor four is spinning faster
4番ローターは速く
02:14
and rotor two is spinning slower.
2番ローターは遅く回っています
02:16
And when that happens
そうするとロボットを
02:18
there's moment that causes this robot to roll.
「ローリング」させる力が働きます
02:20
And the other way around,
一方
02:23
if you increase the speed of rotor three
3番ローターの回転を速く
02:25
and decrease the speed of rotor one,
1番ローターの回転を遅くすると
02:28
then the robot pitches forward.
ロボットは手前側に「ピッチング」します
02:30
And then finally,
最後に
02:33
if you spin opposite pairs of rotors
向かい合った2つのローターを
02:35
faster than the other pair,
他の2つより速く回転させると
02:37
then the robot yaws about the vertical axis.
垂直軸を中心に「ヨーイング」します
02:39
So an on-board processor
オンボードプロセッサは
02:41
essentially looks at what motions need to be executed
行うべき動作に対して必要となる
02:43
and combines these motions
これらの方法の組み合わせを求め
02:46
and figures out what commands to send to the motors
モーターに対して 毎秒600回送る命令を
02:48
600 times a second.
決めています
02:51
That's basically how this thing operates.
それがこの基本的な仕組みです
02:53
So one of the advantages of this design
この設計が有利な点は
02:55
is, when you scale things down,
サイズを小さくするほど
02:57
the robot naturally becomes agile.
ロボットの動きが敏捷になることです
02:59
So here R
ここでRは
03:02
is the characteristic length of the robot.
ロボットの大きさを表す数字で
03:04
It's actually half the diameter.
実際には半径です
03:06
And there are lots of physical parameters that change
Rを小さくすると 様々な物理的パラメータが
03:09
as you reduce R.
変わります
03:12
The one that's the most important
中でも一番重要なのは 慣性
03:14
is the inertia or the resistance to motion.
すなわち動きに対する抵抗力です
03:16
So it turns out,
回転運動を支配する
03:18
the inertia, which governs angular motion,
慣性の大きさは
03:20
scales as a fifth power of R.
Rの5乗に比例します
03:23
So the smaller you make R,
ですからRを小さくすると
03:26
the more dramatically the inertia reduces.
慣性は劇的に減るのです
03:28
So as a result, the angular acceleration,
結果として ここでギリシャ文字の
03:31
denoted by Greek letter alpha here,
αで表している角加速度は
03:34
goes as one over R.
1/Rになります
03:36
It's inversely proportional to R.
Rに反比例するのです
03:38
The smaller you make it the more quickly you can turn.
小さくするほど速く回ることができるようになります
03:40
So this should be clear in these videos.
ビデオを見ると そのことがよく分かります
03:43
At the bottom right you see a robot
右下の映像でロボットが
03:45
performing a 360 degree flip
360度宙返りを
03:48
in less than half a second.
0.5秒未満で行っています
03:50
Multiple flips, a little more time.
連続宙返りにはもう少し時間がかかります
03:52
So here the processes on board
オンボードプロセッサは
03:55
are getting feedback from accelerometers
加速度計やジャイロからの
03:57
and gyros on board
フィードバックを受け取って
03:59
and calculating, like I said before,
計算をし
04:01
commands at 600 times a second
ロボットを安定させるために
04:03
to stabilize this robot.
毎秒600回命令を出しています
04:05
So on the left, you see Daniel throwing this robot up into the air.
左下の映像では ダニエルがロボットを宙に放り投げています
04:07
And it shows you how robust the control is.
制御能力がいかに強いか分かるでしょう
04:10
No matter how you throw it,
どんな風に放り投げても
04:12
the robot recovers and comes back to him.
ロボットは体勢を立て直して戻ってきます
04:14
So why build robots like this?
このようなロボットを作る
04:18
Well robots like this have many applications.
理由は何かというと 多くの応用があるからです
04:20
You can send them inside buildings like this
例えばこのような建物内に送り込み
04:23
as first responders to look for intruders,
侵入者 生化学物質の漏洩 ガス漏れ等が—
04:26
maybe look for biochemical leaks,
あった際の 初動対応として
04:29
gaseous leaks.
調査を行わせることができます
04:32
You can also use them
建築のような作業に
04:34
for applications like construction.
使うこともできます
04:36
So here are robots carrying beams, columns
ここではロボットが梁や柱を運んで
04:38
and assembling cube-like structures.
四角い構造物を組み立てています
04:42
I'll tell you a little bit more about this.
これについては後ほど もう少し詳しくお話しします
04:45
The robots can be used for transporting cargo.
このロボットは貨物輸送にも使えます
04:48
So one of the problems with these small robots
小さなロボットは 運搬容量が
04:51
is their payload carrying capacity.
小さいという問題がありますが
04:54
So you might want to have multiple robots
複数のロボットで運ぶ—
04:56
carry payloads.
という手もあります
04:58
This is a picture of a recent experiment we did --
この写真は最近行った実験で・・・
05:00
actually not so recent anymore --
もうそんなに最近でもありませんが
05:02
in Sendai shortly after the earthquake.
震災直後の仙台で行ったものです
05:04
So robots like this could be sent into collapsed buildings
自然災害で崩れた建物や 核施設内にロボットを
05:07
to assess the damage after natural disasters,
送り込んで 状況の確認や
05:10
or sent into reactor buildings
放射能レベルのチェックを
05:12
to map radiation levels.
行わせることができます
05:15
So one fundamental problem
自律的なロボットが
05:19
that the robots have to solve if they're to be autonomous
解決すべき基本的な問題は
05:21
is essentially figuring out
1つの地点から別の地点へ
05:24
how to get from point A to point B.
移動する方法を見出すということです
05:26
So this gets a little challenging
これが簡単でないのは
05:28
because the dynamics of this robot are quite complicated.
このロボットの力学的特性が極めて複雑なためです
05:30
In fact, they live in a 12-dimensional space.
実際12次元空間で考える必要があり
05:33
So we use a little trick.
そのためちょっとしたトリックを使って
05:35
We take this curved 12-dimensional space
曲がった12次元空間を
05:37
and transform it
平らな4次元空間に
05:40
into a flat four-dimensional space.
変換しています
05:42
And that four-dimensional space
その4次元空間は
05:44
consists of X, Y, Z and then the yaw angle.
X, Y, Z座標とヨー角からなっています
05:46
And so what the robot does
そうするとロボットがするのは
05:49
is it plans what we call a minimum snap trajectory.
最小スナップ軌道を求めるということになります
05:51
So to remind you of physics,
物理学のおさらいですが
05:55
you have position, derivative, velocity,
位置の変化を微分していくと 速度
05:57
then acceleration,
加速度
05:59
and then comes jerk
ジャーク
06:01
and then comes snap.
スナップとなります
06:03
So this robot minimizes snap.
このロボットはスナップを最小化するようになっています
06:05
So what that effectively does
それは結果としてなめらかできれいな
06:08
is produces a smooth and graceful motion.
動作を生み出すことになります
06:10
And it does that avoiding obstacles.
また障害物の回避も行います
06:12
So these minimum snap trajectories in this flat space
この平らな空間における最小スナップ軌道を
06:15
are then transformed back
複雑な12次元空間へと
06:18
into this complicated 12-dimensional space,
逆変換して
06:20
which the robot must do
それによって制御や
06:22
for control and then execution.
動作の実行をするわけです
06:24
So let me show you some examples
最小スナップ軌道がどのようなものか
06:26
of what these minimum snap trajectories look like.
いくつか例をご覧にいれましょう
06:28
And in the first video,
最初のビデオでは
06:30
you'll see the robot going from point A to point B
ロボットが1つの地点から別な地点へ
06:32
through an intermediate point.
中間点を経由して移動します
06:34
So the robot is obviously capable
どんな曲線軌道でも問題なく
06:42
of executing any curve trajectory.
こなすことができます
06:44
So these are circular trajectories
これは円軌道で
06:46
where the robot pulls about two G's.
約2Gの加速度になります
06:48
Here you have overhead motion capture cameras on the top
ここでは上にあるモーションキャプチャカメラが
06:52
that tell the robot where it is 100 times a second.
ロボットに現在位置を毎秒100回伝えています
06:56
It also tells the robot where these obstacles are.
また障害物の位置も伝えています
06:59
And the obstacles can be moving.
障害物が動いていても対応できます
07:02
And here you'll see Daniel throw this hoop into the air,
ここではダニエルがフープを宙に投げていますが
07:04
while the robot is calculating the position of the hoop
ロボットはその位置を計算して
07:07
and trying to figure out how to best go through the hoop.
中を通り抜ける最適な経路を求めています
07:09
So as an academic,
私たちは学者として
07:13
we're always trained to be able to jump through hoops to raise funding for our labs,
いつも研究予算獲得という曲芸をさせられているので
07:15
and we get our robots to do that.
ロボットにも同様の曲芸をさせているわけです
07:18
(Applause)
(拍手)
07:21
So another thing the robot can do
このロボットにできる別なこととして
07:27
is it remembers pieces of trajectory
自分で見つけた軌道や プログラムされた軌道を
07:29
that it learns or is pre-programmed.
記憶するというのがあります
07:32
So here you see the robot
ここではロボットが
07:34
combining a motion
基本動作を組み合わせて
07:36
that builds up momentum
加速して 向きを変え
07:38
and then changes its orientation and then recovers.
元の所に戻るという一連の動作をしています
07:40
So it has to do this because this gap in the window
このようにする必要があるのは
07:43
is only slightly larger than the width of the robot.
通る隙間の幅がロボットよりわずかに広いだけだからです
07:46
So just like a diver stands on a springboard
そのため 飛び込み選手がするように
07:50
and then jumps off it to gain momentum,
飛び込み板からジャンプして勢いを付け
07:53
and then does this pirouette, this two and a half somersault through
つま先回転をして1/4宙返りをして通り抜け
07:55
and then gracefully recovers,
きれいに体制を立て直すという動作を
07:58
this robot is basically doing that.
このロボットはしているわけです
08:00
So it knows how to combine little bits and pieces of trajectories
ロボットにはこの難しいタスクをこなすために
08:02
to do these fairly difficult tasks.
軌道の断片をどう組み合わせれば良いのか分かっているのです
08:05
So I want change gears.
ちょっと話題を変えましょう
08:09
So one of the disadvantages of these small robots is its size.
このような小さなロボットの短所はその大きさです
08:11
And I told you earlier
そこで 先ほども言いましたように
08:14
that we may want to employ lots and lots of robots
大きさによる制限を克服するため
08:16
to overcome the limitations of size.
たくさんのロボットを使おうというわけです
08:18
So one difficulty
ここで難しいのは
08:21
is how do you coordinate lots of these robots?
たくさんのロボットをどうやって協調させるかです
08:23
And so here we looked to nature.
そこで私たちは自然に目を向けました
08:26
So I want to show you a clip
ご覧いただく映像は
08:28
of Aphaenogaster desert ants
スティーブン・プラット教授の研究室の
08:30
in Professor Stephen Pratt's lab carrying an object.
アシナガアリがものを運んでいる様子です
08:32
So this is actually a piece of fig.
イチジクの切れ端です
08:35
Actually you take any object coated with fig juice
実際どんなものでも
08:37
and the ants will carry them back to the nest.
イチジクの果汁を付けると アリたちは巣に運んでいきます
08:39
So these ants don't have any central coordinator.
このアリたちには中央で指示を出す者は誰もいません
08:42
They sense their neighbors.
そばにいる他のアリを知覚しますが
08:45
There's no explicit communication.
明示的なコミュニケーションは行いません
08:47
But because they sense the neighbors
それでも他のアリと
08:49
and because they sense the object,
食料を知覚することで
08:51
they have implicit coordination across the group.
集団として暗黙の調整が行われるのです
08:53
So this is the kind of coordination
これはまさに私たちが
08:56
we want our robots to have.
ロボットに持たせたい調整方法です
08:58
So when we have a robot
ロボットが 他のロボットに
09:01
which is surrounded by neighbors --
囲まれているときに・・・
09:03
and let's look at robot I and robot J --
ロボットiとロボットjを見てください・・・
09:05
what we want the robots to do
ロボットにさせたいのは
09:07
is to monitor the separation between them
編隊飛行中の他のロボットとの距離を
09:09
as they fly in formation.
監視するということです
09:12
And then you want to make sure
そしてその距離を
09:14
that this separation is within acceptable levels.
許容範囲内に保とうとするわけです
09:16
So again the robots monitor this error
そのため ずれの大きさを監視して
09:18
and calculate the control commands
制御のための命令を
09:21
100 times a second,
毎秒100回算出し
09:23
which then translates to the motor commands 600 times a second.
それが毎秒600回のモーターへの命令に変換されます
09:25
So this also has to be done
これもまた分散的に
09:28
in a decentralized way.
行わせる必要があります
09:30
Again, if you have lots and lots of robots,
ロボットがたくさんある場合
09:32
it's impossible to coordinate all this information centrally
これらすべての情報の処理を中央から
09:34
fast enough in order for the robots to accomplish the task.
ロボットのタスク実行に必要な速さで行うのは無理です
09:38
Plus the robots have to base their actions
また ロボットは 近くのロボットを
09:41
only on local information,
感知することによる周辺情報のみで
09:43
what they sense from their neighbors.
行動する必要があります
09:45
And then finally,
最後に
09:47
we insist that the robots be agnostic
どのロボットが隣に来ても
09:49
to who their neighbors are.
構わないようにしてあり
09:51
So this is what we call anonymity.
これを匿名性と呼んでいます
09:53
So what I want to show you next
次にお見せする
09:56
is a video
映像では
09:58
of 20 of these little robots
20個の小さなロボットが
10:00
flying in formation.
編隊飛行しています
10:03
They're monitoring their neighbors' position.
互いに隣のロボットの位置を監視しながら
10:05
They're maintaining formation.
編隊を維持しています
10:08
The formations can change.
編隊の形を変えることもできます
10:10
They can be planar formations,
平面的な編隊を組むことも
10:12
they can be three-dimensional formations.
立体的な編隊を組むこともできます
10:14
As you can see here,
ご覧のように
10:16
they collapse from a three-dimensional formation into planar formation.
編隊が立体型から平面型に移行しています
10:18
And to fly through obstacles
障害物をよける際には
10:21
they can adapt the formations on the fly.
その場で編隊を変形して対応します
10:23
So again, these robots come really close together.
ロボットは互いにとても近い距離で飛んでいます
10:27
As you can see in this figure-eight flight,
8の字飛行をしていますが
10:30
they come within inches of each other.
互いに数センチまで近づいています
10:32
And despite the aerodynamic interactions
プロペラの空力的干渉が
10:34
of these propeller blades,
あるにもかかわらず
10:37
they're able to maintain stable flight.
安定した飛行を維持できます
10:39
(Applause)
(拍手)
10:41
So once you know how to fly in formation,
編隊飛行ができるようになれば
10:48
you can actually pick up objects cooperatively.
協力してものを運ぶこともできます
10:50
So this just shows
ご覧の通り
10:52
that we can double, triple, quadruple
近くのロボットとチームを組むことで
10:54
the robot strength
運ぶ力を2倍 3倍 4倍と
10:57
by just getting them to team with neighbors, as you can see here.
増やしていくことができます
10:59
One of the disadvantages of doing that
このようにすることの短所は
11:01
is, as you scale things up --
規模を大きくするにつれ
11:04
so if you have lots of robots carrying the same thing,
たくさんのロボットで
11:06
you're essentially effectively increasing the inertia,
1つのものを運ぶため 慣性が大きくなり
11:08
and therefore you pay a price; they're not as agile.
敏捷に動けなくなることです
11:11
But you do gain in terms of payload carrying capacity.
しかし運搬能力の面では増大します
11:14
Another application I want to show you --
もう1つお見せしたいのは
11:17
again, this is in our lab.
これも うちの研究室のものですが
11:19
This is work done by Quentin Lindsey who's a graduate student.
院生のクエンティン・リンゼイが
11:21
So his algorithm essentially tells these robots
取り組んでいます 彼のアルゴリズムは
11:23
how to autonomously build
桁のような部材から
11:26
cubic structures
四角い構造物を組み立てる作業を
11:28
from truss-like elements.
ロボットに自律的に行わせるものです
11:30
So his algorithm tells the robot
どのパーツを どの順に取り上げ
11:33
what part to pick up,
どこに置くかを
11:35
when and where to place it.
アルゴリズムが決めています
11:37
So in this video you see --
映像は 10倍から
11:39
and it's sped up 10, 14 times --
14倍早回ししています
11:41
you see three different structures being built by these robots.
ロボットが3種の構造物を組み立てています
11:43
And again, everything is autonomous,
ここでもすべてが自律的で
11:46
and all Quentin has to do
クエンティンがするのは
11:48
is to get them a blueprint
作りたい構造の
11:50
of the design that he wants to build.
設計図を与えるということだけです
11:52
So all these experiments you've seen thus far,
ここまでご覧いただいた実験はどれも
11:56
all these demonstrations,
モーションキャプチャシステムの
11:59
have been done with the help of motion capture systems.
助けを借りています
12:01
So what happens when you leave your lab
では実験室を離れ 外の
12:04
and you go outside into the real world?
現実の世界に出た場合はどうなるのでしょう?
12:06
And what if there's no GPS?
もしGPSもなかったとしたら?
12:09
So this robot
そこでこのロボットには
12:12
is actually equipped with a camera
Kinectカメラと
12:14
and a laser rangefinder, laser scanner.
レーザーレンジファインダーを搭載しています
12:16
And it uses these sensors
それらのセンサを使って
12:19
to build a map of the environment.
周囲の環境の地図を作ります
12:21
What that map consists of are features --
地図の内容は様々な目印になるもの
12:23
like doorways, windows,
ドアや 窓
12:26
people, furniture --
人間や 家具などで
12:28
and it then figures out where its position is
それらの目印に対する
12:30
with respect to the features.
自分の位置を把握します
12:32
So there is no global coordinate system.
グローバル座標系は使っていません
12:34
The coordinate system is defined based on the robot,
ロボットがどこにいて何を見ているかに基づいて
12:36
where it is and what it's looking at.
座標系を定義しています
12:39
And it navigates with respect to those features.
そしてそれらの目印を使って航行しているのです
12:42
So I want to show you a clip
フランク・シェンと
12:45
of algorithms developed by Frank Shen
ネイサン・マイケル教授が開発した
12:47
and Professor Nathan Michael
アルゴリズムの映像をご覧いただきましょう
12:49
that shows this robot entering a building for the very first time
ロボットが初めての建物に入り
12:51
and creating this map on the fly.
リアルタイムで地図を作っていきます
12:55
So the robot then figures out what the features are.
ロボットは目印になるものを把握し
12:58
It builds the map.
地図を作成します
13:01
It figures out where it is with respect to the features
目印に対する
13:03
and then estimates its position
自分の位置の算出を
13:05
100 times a second
毎秒100回行い
13:07
allowing us to use the control algorithms
前に説明した制御アルゴリズムによる
13:09
that I described to you earlier.
制御を行います
13:11
So this robot is actually being commanded
このロボットはフランクが
13:13
remotely by Frank.
遠隔操作していますが
13:15
But the robot can also figure out
どこに行くかを
13:17
where to go on its own.
自分で決めることもできます
13:19
So suppose I were to send this into a building
どういう建物なのか分からない
13:21
and I had no idea what this building looked like,
建物の中に送り込もうという場合は
13:23
I can ask this robot to go in,
「中に入って地図を作り
13:25
create a map
戻って様子を教えてくれ」と
13:27
and then come back and tell me what the building looks like.
指示するだけでいいのです
13:29
So here, the robot is not only solving the problem,
ここでロボットは1つの地点から別な地点に行くという
13:32
how to go from point A to point B in this map,
問題を解決するだけでなく
13:35
but it's figuring out
最良の次の地点を見つけるという問題も
13:38
what the best point B is at every time.
絶えず解決しているのです
13:40
So essentially it knows where to go
基本的には 最も情報の少ない場所を
13:42
to look for places that have the least information.
次の目的地にします
13:45
And that's how it populates this map.
そうして地図を埋めていくのです
13:47
So I want to leave you
次にお見せするのが
13:50
with one last application.
最後の例になります
13:52
And there are many applications of this technology.
この技術には多くの応用があります
13:54
I'm a professor, and we're passionate about education.
教育者として私は教育に情熱がありますが
13:57
Robots like this can really change the way
このようなロボットは小中高の教育を
13:59
we do K through 12 education.
大きく変えうると思っています
14:01
But we're in Southern California,
しかし我々は今ロサンゼルスに近い
14:03
close to Los Angeles,
南カリフォルニアにいるので
14:05
so I have to conclude
エンターテインメント関係のもので
14:07
with something focused on entertainment.
締めくくることにしましょう
14:09
I want to conclude with a music video.
ミュージックビデオを用意しました
14:11
I want to introduce the creators, Alex and Daniel,
作者のアレックスとダニエルを
14:13
who created this video.
ご紹介します
14:16
(Applause)
(拍手)
14:18
So before I play this video,
ビデオをご覧いただく前に
14:25
I want to tell you that they created it in the last three days
彼らはクリスから直前に連絡をもらい この3日間で
14:27
after getting a call from Chris.
作り上げたことを言っておきたいと思います
14:30
And the robots that play the video
出てくるロボットは
14:32
are completely autonomous.
全く自律的に動いています
14:34
You will see nine robots play six different instruments.
9つのロボットが6種類の楽器を演奏します
14:36
And of course, it's made exclusively for TED 2012.
TED 2012のため特別に作ったものです
14:39
Let's watch.
ではご覧ください
14:43
(Music)
(音楽)
15:19
(Applause)
(拍手)
16:23
Translated by Yasushi Aoki
Reviewed by Sawa Horibe

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Vijay Kumar - Roboticist
As the dean of the University of Pennsylvania's School of Engineering and Applied Science, Vijay Kumar studies the control and coordination of multi-robot formations.

Why you should listen

At the General Robotics, Automation, Sensing and Perception (GRASP) Lab at the University of Pennsylvania, flying quadrotor robots move together in eerie formation, tightening themselves into perfect battalions, even filling in the gap when one of their own drops out. You might have seen viral videos of the quads zipping around the netting-draped GRASP Lab (they juggle! they fly through a hula hoop!). Vijay Kumar headed this lab from 1998-2004. He's now the dean of the School of Engineering and Applied Science at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, where he continues his work in robotics, blending computer science and mechanical engineering to create the next generation of robotic wonders.

More profile about the speaker
Vijay Kumar | Speaker | TED.com