sponsored links
TED2012

Jonathan Haidt: Religion, evolution, and the ecstasy of self-transcendence

ジョナサン・ハイト: 宗教、進化、そして自己超越の恍惚

February 29, 2012

心理学者ジョナサン・ハイトは、シンプルですが難しい質問をします: なぜ私たちは自己超越を求めるのか? なぜ私たちは自己を失うことを試みるのか? 集団選択による進化の科学を見て廻り、彼は刺激的な答えを提案します。

Jonathan Haidt - Social psychologist
Jonathan Haidt studies how -- and why -- we evolved to be moral. By understanding more about our moral roots, his hope is that we can learn to be civil and open-minded. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
I have a question for you:
1つ質問があります:
00:15
Are you religious?
皆さんは宗教的ですか?
00:18
Please raise your hand right now
手をあげてください、
00:20
if you think of yourself as a religious person.
自分のことを宗教的だと思う人は。
00:22
Let's see, I'd say about three or four percent.
えーと、3、4パーセントでしょうか。
00:25
I had no idea there were so many believers at a TED Conference.
知りませんでした、TEDカンファレンスにこんなに多くの信者がいるとは。
00:28
(Laughter)
(笑)
00:31
Okay, here's another question:
わかりました、別の質問です。
00:33
Do you think of yourself as spiritual
自分のことをスピリチュアルだと思う人は?
00:35
in any way, shape or form? Raise your hand.
どんな方法、姿、形であってもです、手をあげてください。
00:37
Okay, that's the majority.
わかりました、こちらが大多数です。
00:39
My Talk today
今日の私のトークは、
00:42
is about the main reason, or one of the main reasons,
その主な理由、またはその理由の1つについてですが、
00:44
why most people consider themselves
なぜほとんどの人が自分のことを
00:46
to be spiritual in some way, shape or form.
何らかの方法、姿、形でスピリチュアルだと考えるのか、です。
00:48
My Talk today is about self-transcendence.
今日の私のトークは、自己超越についてです。
00:50
It's just a basic fact about being human
まさに人間であることの基本的事実なのです、
00:53
that sometimes the self seems to just melt away.
時に自我がただ溶け去るように思えるのは。
00:56
And when that happens,
そして、それが起こると、
00:59
the feeling is ecstatic
恍惚を感じ、
01:01
and we reach for metaphors of up and down
私たちはこうした感じを説明するのに
01:04
to explain these feelings.
上下の比喩に向かいます。
01:06
We talk about being uplifted
私たちは、高められたとか、
01:08
or elevated.
高揚したといいます。
01:10
Now it's really hard to think about anything abstract like this
ここで、このような抽象的なことを、具体的なうまい比喩もなく
01:12
without a good concrete metaphor.
考えるのは本当に大変です。
01:15
So here's the metaphor I'm offering today.
そこで、私が今日提案する比喩はこれです。
01:17
Think about the mind as being like a house with many rooms,
こう考えてくさい、心とはたくさんの部屋がある家のようなもので、
01:20
most of which we're very familiar with.
その部屋のほとんどをよく知っていると。
01:23
But sometimes it's as though a doorway appears
しかし時に、あたかも戸口が
01:26
from out of nowhere
何もないところから現れて
01:29
and it opens onto a staircase.
階段に通じているようです。
01:31
We climb the staircase
階段を昇ると
01:34
and experience a state of altered consciousness.
意識変容の状態を経験します。
01:36
In 1902,
1902年に、
01:40
the great American psychologist William James
偉大なアメリカの心理学者ウィリアム・ジェームスは
01:42
wrote about the many varieties of religious experience.
多種多様な宗教的体験をまとめました。
01:44
He collected all kinds of case studies.
彼はあらゆる種類の事例を集めました。
01:47
He quoted the words of all kinds of people
あらゆる種類の人々の言葉を引用しました、
01:49
who'd had a variety of these experiences.
様々なこうした体験をした人々です。
01:51
One of the most exciting to me
私にとって最も刺激的だった事例の一つは、
01:53
is this young man, Stephen Bradley,
ステファン・ブラッドリーという若者が
01:55
had an encounter, he thought, with Jesus in 1820.
1820年にイエスと遭遇した、と思ったことです。
01:57
And here's what Bradley said about it.
ブラッドリーはそれについてこう言ったのです。
02:00
(Music)
(音楽)
02:06
(Video) Stephen Bradley: I thought I saw the savior in human shape
(ビデオ)ステファン・ブラッドリー:救世主が人間の姿で
02:09
for about one second in the room,
約1秒ほど部屋にいるのを見たと思いました、
02:12
with arms extended,
両腕を広げて、
02:14
appearing to say to me, "Come."
「来なさい」と私に言ったように思われました。
02:16
The next day I rejoiced with trembling.
次の日、私は身悶えして喜びました。
02:19
My happiness was so great that I said I wanted to die.
私の幸福感は大変なもので、死にたいと言ったほどです。
02:22
This world had no place in my affections.
この世には愛着がありません。
02:25
Previous to this time,
以前は、
02:28
I was very selfish and self-righteous.
私は非常にわがままで自分本位でした。
02:30
But now I desired the welfare of all mankind
しかし今は、全人類の幸福を望み、
02:32
and could, with a feeling heart,
思いやりのある心で、
02:35
forgive my worst enemies.
最悪の敵を赦すことができます。
02:37
JH: So note
JH: 注目してください、
02:41
how Bradley's petty, moralistic self
どのようにブラッドリーの小さな道徳的な自我が
02:43
just dies on the way up the staircase.
まさに階段の途上で死んだのかに。
02:45
And on this higher level
そして、この高いレベルで
02:47
he becomes loving and forgiving.
彼は愛し赦す人になったのです。
02:49
The world's many religions have found so many ways
世界の多くの宗教が、多くの方法を見つけています、
02:53
to help people climb the staircase.
人々がこの階段を昇る方法です。
02:55
Some shut down the self using meditation.
ある人たちは、自我を瞑想により遮断します。
02:57
Others use psychedelic drugs.
別の人たちは幻覚剤を使います。
02:59
This is from a 16th century Aztec scroll
これは16世紀のアステカ族の巻物であり
03:01
showing a man about to eat a psilocybin mushroom
ある男がサイロシビンを含むキノコを食べようとし
03:05
and at the same moment get yanked up the staircase by a god.
それと同時に、神によって階段の上に引っ張られます。
03:08
Others use dancing, spinning and circling
他の人たちは踊り、回転し、旋回することによって
03:12
to promote self-transcendence.
自己超越にまい進しています。
03:14
But you don't need a religion to get you through the staircase.
でも、階段を通過するのに、宗教心は必要ありません。
03:16
Lots of people find self-transcendence in nature.
多くの人が自然に自己超越を見出しています。
03:19
Others overcome their self at raves.
別の人たちはレイブで自我を克服しています。
03:22
But here's the weirdest place of all:
しかし、すべてのなかで最も変わった境遇は:
03:25
war.
戦争です。
03:28
So many books about war say the same thing,
戦争に関する非常に多くの本が同じことを言っています。
03:30
that nothing brings people together
戦争ほど人々を一つにするものは
03:32
like war.
ありません、と。
03:34
And that bringing them together opens up the possibility
そして、人々を一つにすると、並外れた
03:36
of extraordinary self-transcendent experiences.
自己超越の体験の可能性を開きます。
03:39
I'm going to play for you an excerpt
皆さんにグレン・グレイによる本からの
03:42
from this book by Glenn Gray.
抜粋を再現しましょう。
03:44
Gray was a soldier in the American army in World War II.
グレイは第二次世界大戦のアメリカ陸軍の兵士でした。
03:46
And after the war he interviewed a lot of other soldiers
そして彼は、戦争の後、多くの他の兵士にインタヴューし
03:49
and wrote about the experience of men in battle.
戦いにおける男たちの体験をまとめました。
03:52
Here's a key passage
これが、重要な一節です。
03:54
where he basically describes the staircase.
彼が階段をおおむね記述した一節です。
03:56
(Video) Glenn Gray: Many veterans will admit
(ビデオ)グレン・グレイ: 多くの退役軍人によれば
04:01
that the experience of communal effort in battle
戦いにおける共同活動の経験は
04:03
has been the high point of their lives.
人生の最高の時であったと認めるでしょう。
04:06
"I" passes insensibly into a "we,"
「私」は無意識に「私たち」に移り、
04:09
"my" becomes "our"
「私の」は「私たちの」になり、
04:12
and individual faith
個人的信条は
04:14
loses its central importance.
その中心的重要性を失います。
04:16
I believe that it is nothing less
これは、不死の保証に
04:19
than the assurance of immortality
ほかならないと思います。
04:21
that makes self-sacrifice at these moments
そうした瞬間に自己犠牲を
04:24
so relatively easy.
それほど相対的に容易にさせるでしょう。
04:27
I may fall, but I do not die,
私は倒れるかもしれないが、死にはしない、
04:30
for that which is real in me goes forward
私の中の本物であるものが
04:33
and lives on in the comrades
生き続けるからです、
04:36
for whom I gave up my life.
命をささげた仲間の中で。
04:38
JH: So what all of these cases have in common
JH: これらの事例のすべてに共通するのは、
04:42
is that the self seems to thin out, or melt away,
自我が少なくなるか、溶け去り、
04:45
and it feels good, it feels really good,
そして気持ちよく、本当に気持ちよくなり、
04:48
in a way totally unlike anything we feel in our normal lives.
その感じ方は普段の生活とは全く異なるのです。
04:50
It feels somehow uplifting.
何か高められたように感じます。
04:53
This idea that we move up was central in the writing
上昇するというこの観念は、偉大なフランスの社会学者
04:56
of the great French sociologist Emile Durkheim.
エミール・デュルケームの書物の中心的なものです。
04:59
Durkheim even called us Homo duplex,
デュルケームは、私たちのことをホモ・デュプレックス、
05:02
or two-level man.
すなわち 2-レベルの人間とさえ考えています。
05:04
The lower level he called the level of the profane.
彼のいう下位レベルは俗のレベルです。
05:06
Now profane is the opposite of sacred.
ここで、俗は聖の反対です。
05:09
It just means ordinary or common.
まさに普通とか平凡を意味します。
05:12
And in our ordinary lives we exist as individuals.
私たちは、普段の生活では個々人として存在しています。
05:14
We want to satisfy our individual desires.
私たちは個人的な欲求を満たしたい。
05:17
We pursue our individual goals.
私たちは個人的な目標を追求します。
05:20
But sometimes something happens
しかし、時に何かが起こり
05:22
that triggers a phase change.
相変化を引き起こします。
05:24
Individuals unite
個々人が一体化します、
05:26
into a team, a movement or a nation,
1つのチーム、1つの運動、1つの国家に
05:28
which is far more than the sum of its parts.
そして、部分の合計をはるかに超えます。
05:31
Durkheim called this level the level of the sacred
デュルケームはこのレベルを聖のレベルと考えています。
05:34
because he believed that the function of religion
というのは、彼は確信したからです、宗教の機能は
05:37
was to unite people into a group,
人々を1つの集団、
05:39
into a moral community.
1つの道徳上のコミュニティに一体化するものであると。
05:41
Durkheim believed that anything that unites us
デュルケームは、私たちを一体化するものはなんであれ
05:44
takes on an air of sacredness.
神聖さを帯びると信じています。
05:47
And once people circle around
人々が聖なる物や価値観を
05:49
some sacred object or value,
取り囲むと、
05:51
they'll then work as a team and fight to defend it.
彼らはチームとして働き、それを守るために戦うことになります。
05:53
Durkheim wrote
デュルケームは記しています、
05:56
about a set of intense collective emotions
一揃いの強烈な集合的感情について
05:58
that accomplish this miracle of E pluribus unum,
そして「多くから作られた一つ」という奇跡を成し遂げるのです、
06:00
of making a group out of individuals.
個々人から1つの集団が作られるという奇跡です。
06:03
Think of the collective joy in Britain
第二次世界大戦が終わった日の英国での
06:05
on the day World War II ended.
集団的な喜びを考えてみてください。
06:08
Think of the collective anger in Tahrir Square,
独裁者を倒したタハリール広場での、
06:11
which brought down a dictator.
集団的な怒りを考えてみてください。
06:14
And think of the collective grief
そして、9/11の後のアメリカ合衆国での
06:17
in the United States
集団的な悲しみ
06:19
that we all felt, that brought us all together,
私たちすべてが感じ、私たちを一つにした悲しみを
06:21
after 9/11.
考えてみてください。
06:24
So let me summarize where we are.
ここでまとめさせてください。
06:27
I'm saying that the capacity for self-transcendence
私が言っているのは、自己超越の能力は
06:30
is just a basic part of being human.
人間存在のまさに基本部分であるということです。
06:32
I'm offering the metaphor
私は、比喩を提案しています、
06:35
of a staircase in the mind.
心の階段についてです。
06:37
I'm saying we are Homo duplex
私たちは、ホモ・デュプレックスであるということです、
06:39
and this staircase takes us up from the profane level
この階段は、私たちを俗のレベルから
06:41
to the level of the sacred.
聖のレベルへ連れて行きます。
06:44
When we climb that staircase,
この階段を昇ると、
06:46
self-interest fades away,
自己の利益が薄れ、
06:48
we become just much less self-interested,
まさにそれほど自己本位でなくなり、
06:50
and we feel as though we are better, nobler
気分がよく、気高く
06:52
and somehow uplifted.
まるで何か高められたかように感じます。
06:54
So here's the million-dollar question
ここで私のような社会科学者にとっての
06:57
for social scientists like me:
難しい質問です:
07:00
Is the staircase
この階段は
07:02
a feature of our evolutionary design?
私たちの進化的設計の特徴なのでしょうか?
07:04
Is it a product of natural selection,
これは、自然淘汰の賜物なのでしょうか?
07:07
like our hands?
私たちの手のように?
07:10
Or is it a bug, a mistake in the system --
あるいは、システムのバグか、間違いでしょうか--
07:12
this religious stuff is just something
この宗教的なものは
07:15
that happens when the wires cross in the brain --
脳の配線が混線した際に起こる何かなのでしょうか--
07:17
Jill has a stroke and she has this religious experience,
ジルは脳卒中になり、このような宗教的経験をしましたが、
07:20
it's just a mistake?
あれは単なる間違いなのでしょうか?
07:22
Well many scientists who study religion take this view.
えー、宗教を研究する多くの科学者はこのように見ています。
07:24
The New Atheists, for example,
新無神論者は、例えば、
07:28
argue that religion is a set of memes,
宗教は一揃いのミームである主張しています、
07:30
sort of parasitic memes,
寄生ミームのようなものであり、
07:32
that get inside our minds
私たちの心の内側に入り
07:34
and make us do all kinds of crazy religious stuff,
私たちにあらゆる種類の常軌を逸した宗教的なこと、
07:36
self-destructive stuff, like suicide bombing.
自爆攻撃のような自己破壊的なことをさせます。
07:39
And after all,
結局、
07:41
how could it ever be good for us
一体どうして私たち自身を失うことが
07:43
to lose ourselves?
私たちにとっての善になり得るのでしょうか?
07:45
How could it ever be adaptive
一体どうして自己の利益を克服することが
07:47
for any organism
何かの生命体にとって
07:49
to overcome self-interest?
適応であり得るのでしょうか?
07:51
Well let me show you.
では、お見せしましょう。
07:54
In "The Descent of Man,"
「人間の進化」において、
07:56
Charles Darwin wrote a great deal
チャールズ・ダーウィンは多くを割いています、
07:58
about the evolution of morality --
道徳の進化--
08:00
where did it come from, why do we have it.
その由来やその理由について。
08:02
Darwin noted that many of our virtues
ダーウィンは記しています、徳の多くが
08:05
are of very little use to ourselves,
私たち自身にはほとんど役に立たないが、
08:07
but they're of great use to our groups.
私たちの集団には大いに役に立つと。
08:09
He wrote about the scenario
彼は次のシナリオについて書いています、
08:11
in which two tribes of early humans
初期の人類の二つの部族が接触し
08:13
would have come in contact and competition.
競合したであろうシナリオです。
08:15
He said, "If the one tribe included
彼は言います、「一方の部族が
08:17
a great number of courageous, sympathetic
勇敢で思いやりがあり
08:20
and faithful members
信頼できる構成員を多く含み
08:22
who are always ready to aid and defend each other,
その構成員がいつも互いに助け、守り合うなら、
08:24
this tribe would succeed better
この部族は成功し
08:26
and conquer the other."
他方の部族に勝利したであろう」と。
08:28
He went on to say that "Selfish and contentious people
彼は続けて言います、「自己中心的で論争好きの人たちは
08:30
will not cohere,
一致団結せず、
08:32
and without coherence
一致団結がなければ
08:34
nothing can be effected."
何も成し遂げられない」と。
08:36
In other words,
言い換えれば、
08:38
Charles Darwin believed
チャールズ・ダーウィンは信じていたのです、
08:40
in group selection.
集団選択を。
08:42
Now this idea has been very controversial for the last 40 years,
ここで、この考えは過去40年間、議論の的になっていましたが、
08:44
but it's about to make a major comeback this year,
今年、見事な返り咲きを果たそうとしています、
08:47
especially after E.O. Wilson's book comes out in April,
特にE.O.ウィルソンの本が四月に出て、
08:50
making a very strong case
非常に強力な主張を唱えています、
08:53
that we, and several other species,
私たちや他のいくつかの種は、
08:55
are products of group selection.
集団選択の賜物である、と
08:57
But really the way to think about this
しかし、実際この考え方は
08:59
is as multilevel selection.
マルチレベル選択のとおりです。
09:01
So look at it this way:
では、このように見てみましょう:
09:03
You've got competition going on within groups and across groups.
集団内でも集団間でも競争が起こっているとします。
09:05
So here's a group of guys on a college crew team.
大学のクルー・チームに、ある集団の連中がいます。
09:08
Within this team
このチーム内で
09:11
there's competition.
競争があります。
09:13
There are guys competing with each other.
互いに競争している連中がいます。
09:15
The slowest rowers, the weakest rowers, are going to get cut from the team.
最も遅い漕ぎ手、最も弱い漕ぎ手は、チームから外されます。
09:17
And only a few of these guys are going to go on in the sport.
そして、少数の連中のみがスポーツを続けることになります。
09:20
Maybe one of them will make it to the Olympics.
ひょっとしたら、そのうちの一人はオリンピックに行けるかもしれません。
09:22
So within the team,
それで、チーム内では、
09:25
their interests are actually pitted against each other.
実際に彼らの利害は互いに対立します。
09:27
And sometimes it would be advantageous
そして、時には、有利になるでしょう、
09:30
for one of these guys
そのうちの一人にとって
09:32
to try to sabotage the other guys.
他の連中の妨害をすることが。
09:34
Maybe he'll badmouth his chief rival
ことによると、彼は最大のライバルの悪口を
09:36
to the coach.
監督に言うかもしれません。
09:38
But while that competition is going on
しかし、その競争がボート内で
09:40
within the boat,
進行する一方で、
09:42
this competition is going on across boats.
この競争はボート間でも進行します。
09:44
And once you put these guys in a boat competing with another boat,
そして、別のボートと競争するボートにこの連中を乗せると、
09:47
now they've got no choice but to cooperate
協力するしか選択肢はなくなります。
09:50
because they're all in the same boat.
というのは、彼らはすべて運命共同体だからです。
09:52
They can only win
彼らがチームとして一団とならなければ
09:55
if they all pull together as a team.
勝つことはできないからです。
09:57
I mean, these things sound trite,
と言うか、こうしたことは古臭く聞こえますが、
09:59
but they are deep evolutionary truths.
これが深遠な進化の真相なのです。
10:01
The main argument against group selection
集団選択に対する主な反論は常に
10:03
has always been
よしわかった、
10:05
that, well sure, it would be nice to have a group of cooperators,
協力者の集団はいいが、
10:07
but as soon as you have a group of cooperators,
協力者の集団は途端に、
10:10
they're just going to get taken over by free-riders,
ただ乗り連中に占領されることになる、というものでした。
10:12
individuals that are going to exploit the hard work of the others.
他人の労力を搾取しようする個々人です。
10:15
Let me illustrate this for you.
皆さんに例示してみましょう。
10:18
Suppose we've got a group of little organisms --
小さな生命体の集団があると仮定します--
10:20
they can be bacteria, they can be hamsters; it doesn't matter what --
バクテリアでも、ハムスターでも; なんでもかまいません--
10:23
and let's suppose that this little group here, they evolved to be cooperative.
ここにいるこの小さな集団は協力するように進化しました。
10:26
Well that's great. They graze, they defend each other,
素晴らしいことですね。彼らは、食べ、互いに守り、
10:29
they work together, they generate wealth.
共に働き、富を生み出します。
10:31
And as you'll see in this simulation,
そして、このシミュレーションで分かるように、
10:34
as they interact they gain points, as it were, they grow,
彼らが互いに交流すると、ポイントを得て、言わば、成長し、
10:36
and when they've doubled in size, you'll see them split,
サイズが二倍になると、分裂するのが分かります。
10:39
and that's how they reproduce and the population grows.
そしてこれが、彼らが繁殖し、個体群が成長するやり方です。
10:41
But suppose then that one of them mutates.
ですが、その後、彼らの一つが突然変異するとします。
10:43
There's a mutation in the gene
遺伝子に突然変異があり
10:46
and one of them mutates to follow a selfish strategy.
彼らの一つが突然変異して利己的な戦略をとります。
10:48
It takes advantage of the others.
他人を利用します。
10:50
And so when a green interacts with a blue,
それで、緑が青と相互作用するとき、
10:52
you'll see the green gets larger and the blue gets smaller.
緑が大きくなり、青が小さくなるのが分かります。
10:55
So here's how things play out.
これが、展開の仕方です。
10:57
We start with just one green,
私たちはたった一つの緑でスタートし、
10:59
and as it interacts
相互作用すると
11:01
it gains wealth or points or food.
富、すなわちポイントや食料を得ます。
11:03
And in short order, the cooperators are done for.
そして迅速に、協力者はもう終わりです。
11:06
The free-riders have taken over.
ただ乗り連中が優勢になりました。
11:09
If a group cannot solve the free-rider problem
もし集団がただ乗りの問題を解決できないなら
11:12
then it cannot reap the benefits of cooperation
協力の恩恵を受けることができず
11:15
and group selection cannot get started.
集団選択は始まりもしません。
11:18
But there are solutions to the free-rider problem.
しかし、このただ乗り問題の解決策があります。
11:21
It's not that hard a problem.
それほど難しい問題ではありません。
11:23
In fact, nature has solved it many, many times.
実際、自然はこの問題を何回も解決してきました。
11:25
And nature's favorite solution
そして、自然のお気に入りの解決策は
11:28
is to put everyone in the same boat.
みんなを同じボートに乗せることです。
11:30
For example,
例えば、
11:33
why is it that the mitochondria in every cell
なぜ全細胞のミトコンドリアは独自のDNAを
11:35
has its own DNA,
持っているのでしょうか?
11:38
totally separate from the DNA in the nucleus?
細胞核のDNAとは完全に分離した独自のDNAです。
11:40
It's because they used to be
それらはかつてミトコンドリアが
11:43
separate free-living bacteria
自由生活性のバクテリアであり
11:45
and they came together
一緒になって
11:47
and became a superorganism.
超個体となったからです。
11:49
Somehow or other -- maybe one swallowed another; we'll never know exactly why --
どうにかして--たぶん、あるものが他のものを飲み込んだのか; なぜかはわかりませんが--
11:51
but once they got a membrane around them,
彼らの周りに膜ができると、
11:54
they were all in the same membrane,
彼らは全員同じ膜の中にあり、
11:56
now all the wealth-created division of labor,
これですべての富は分業で創られ、
11:58
all the greatness created by cooperation,
すべての偉大さは協力によって創られ、
12:01
stays locked inside the membrane
膜の内部にこもり
12:03
and we've got a superorganism.
超個体となります。
12:05
And now let's rerun the simulation
そしてここでシミュレーションに戻り
12:08
putting one of these superorganisms
超個体の一つを
12:10
into a population of free-riders, of defectors, of cheaters
ただ乗り連中、離反者、詐欺師の集団に入れて
12:12
and look what happens.
何が起こるかを見てみましょう。
12:15
A superorganism can basically take what it wants.
超個体は、基本的にほしいものを取ることができます。
12:18
It's so big and powerful and efficient
大きくて、強くて、効率的なので
12:20
that it can take resources
資源をとることができます、
12:23
from the greens, from the defectors, the cheaters.
緑から、離反者、詐欺師からです。
12:25
And pretty soon the whole population
そして間もなく全集団は
12:29
is actually composed of these new superorganisms.
実際にこれらの超個体で構成されます。
12:31
What I've shown you here
ここで皆さんにお見せしたのは
12:34
is sometimes called a major transition
進化の歴史における主要な移行と
12:36
in evolutionary history.
呼ばれることがあります。
12:38
Darwin's laws don't change,
ダーウィンの法則は変わりませんが、
12:41
but now there's a new kind of player on the field
場に新種のプレーヤーが出現し
12:43
and things begin to look very different.
ものごとが全く変わって見え始めます。
12:46
Now this transition was not a one-time freak of nature
この遷移は、一回かぎりの自然の異常ではなかったのです、
12:49
that just happened with some bacteria.
一部のバクテリアで起こっただけではないのです。
12:51
It happened again
再び起こりました、
12:53
about 120 or a 140 million years ago
約一億二千万か一億四千万年前に
12:55
when some solitary wasps
一部の単生スズメバチが
12:57
began creating little simple, primitive
小さくて簡単で原始的な巣
13:00
nests, or hives.
すなわち群れを創り始めたときです。
13:02
Once several wasps were all together in the same hive,
いくつかのスズメバチが同じ群れで一つになると、
13:05
they had no choice but to cooperate,
協力するしかなくなります、
13:08
because pretty soon they were locked into competition
間もなく彼らは競争を余儀なくされるからです、
13:10
with other hives.
他の群れとの競争です。
13:12
And the most cohesive hives won,
そして、最も団結力のある群れが勝利します、
13:14
just as Darwin said.
まさにダーウィンの言うように。
13:16
These early wasps
これらの初期のスズメバチは
13:18
gave rise to the bees and the ants
ミツバチやアリにつながります、
13:20
that have covered the world
世界を覆い
13:22
and changed the biosphere.
生物圏を変えたミツバチやアリです。
13:24
And it happened again,
そして、また起こりました、
13:26
even more spectacularly,
さらにもっと壮大に、
13:28
in the last half-million years
過去五十万年に
13:30
when our own ancestors
私たちの祖先が
13:32
became cultural creatures,
文化的な生き物になり、
13:34
they came together around a hearth or a campfire,
暖炉やキャンプファイアの周りに集まり、
13:36
they divided labor,
作業を分担し、
13:39
they began painting their bodies, they spoke their own dialects,
体にペイントしはじめ、独自の方言を喋り、
13:41
and eventually they worshiped their own gods.
ついに独自の神を崇拝したときに。
13:44
Once they were all in the same tribe,
彼らがすべて同じ部族になると、
13:47
they could keep the benefits of cooperation locked inside.
内部に閉じ込められた協力の恩恵を維持することができました。
13:49
And they unlocked the most powerful force
そして、彼らは強力な力を解き放ちました
13:52
ever known on this planet,
この星で今までに知られている最も強力な力です。
13:54
which is human cooperation --
人間の協力--
13:56
a force for construction
構築と
13:58
and destruction.
破壊の力です。
14:00
Of course, human groups are nowhere near as cohesive
もちろん、人間の集団は、ミツバチの団結力には
14:03
as beehives.
遠く及びません。
14:05
Human groups may look like hives for brief moments,
人間の集団は僅かな瞬間に群れのように見えるかもしれませんが、
14:07
but they tend to then break apart.
その後、分裂する傾向にあります。
14:10
We're not locked into cooperation the way bees and ants are.
私たちは、ミツバチやアリのように協力を余儀なくされていません。
14:12
In fact, often,
実際、多くの場合、
14:15
as we've seen happen in a lot of the Arab Spring revolts,
アラブの春の多くの反乱で起こったことを見ると、
14:17
often those divisions are along religious lines.
多くは、それらの分裂は宗教の線に沿っています。
14:19
Nonetheless, when people do come together
それにもかかわらず、人々が一緒になって
14:23
and put themselves all into the same movement,
彼ら自身がすべて同じ行動にでると、
14:26
they can move mountains.
山を動かすことができます。
14:28
Look at the people in these photos I've been showing you.
皆さんにお見せしたこれらの写真の人たちを見てください。
14:31
Do you think they're there
彼らはそこで自己の利益を
14:34
pursuing their self-interest?
追求していると思われますか?
14:36
Or are they pursuing communal interest,
あるいは、彼らは、社会的な利益を追求し、
14:38
which requires them to lose themselves
それによって彼らが没入し
14:41
and become simply a part of a whole?
単に全体の一部になることを要求しているのでしょうか?
14:44
Okay, so that was my Talk
オーケー、これが、標準的な
14:49
delivered in the standard TED way.
TEDのやり方でのトークです。
14:51
And now I'm going to give the whole Talk over again
そしてこれから、全トークをもう一度やることにします、
14:53
in three minutes
三分で
14:55
in a more full-spectrum sort of way.
言わばもっと広範囲のやり方で。
14:57
(Music)
(音楽)
15:00
(Video) Jonathan Haidt: We humans have many varieties
(ビデオ)ジョナサン・ハイト: 私たち人間には、多種多様な
15:02
of religious experience,
宗教経験があり、
15:04
as William James explained.
ウィリアム・ジェームスの説明の通りです。
15:06
One of the most common is climbing the secret staircase
最も一般的なものの一つは、秘密の階段を昇り
15:08
and losing ourselves.
自己をなくすことです。
15:11
The staircase takes us
この階段は、私たちを
15:13
from the experience of life as profane or ordinary
俗または通常の人生経験から
15:15
upwards to the experience of life as sacred,
上に向けて聖、すなわち深くつながった人生経験に
15:18
or deeply interconnected.
連れて行きます。
15:20
We are Homo duplex,
私たちはホモ・デュプレックスであり、
15:22
as Durkheim explained.
デュルケームの説明の通りです。
15:24
And we are Homo duplex
そして、私たちがホモ・デュプレックスであるというのは
15:26
because we evolved by multilevel selection,
マルチレベルの選択によって進化したからであり、
15:28
as Darwin explained.
ダーウィンの説明の通りです。
15:30
I can't be certain if the staircase is an adaptation
私にはこの階段がバグではなく、適応であるかは
15:33
rather than a bug,
定かではありませんが、
15:35
but if it is an adaptation,
適応だとすれば、
15:37
then the implications are profound.
その意味は深遠です。
15:39
If it is an adaptation,
適応だとすれば、
15:41
then we evolved to be religious.
私たちは宗教的になるように進化したのです。
15:43
I don't mean that we evolved
私たちが組織化された巨大な宗教に参加するように進化した
15:46
to join gigantic organized religions.
という意味ではありません。
15:48
Those things came along too recently.
こうしたものはつい最近のものです。
15:50
I mean that we evolved
私たちは進化したのです、
15:52
to see sacredness all around us
周りのすべてに聖を見るように
15:54
and to join with others into teams
そして他人とチームに参加し
15:56
and circle around sacred objects,
聖なる物、人、考えの周りを回るように、
15:58
people and ideas.
進化したという意味です。
16:00
This is why politics is so tribal.
政治があれほど部族的なのはこのためです。
16:02
Politics is partly profane, it's partly about self-interest,
政治はある程度は俗であり、ある程度は自己の利害に関するものですが、
16:05
but politics is also about sacredness.
政治は聖に関するものでもあるのです。
16:08
It's about joining with others
他人と共に参加して
16:11
to pursue moral ideas.
道徳的観念を追求することに関するものです。
16:13
It's about the eternal struggle between good and evil,
善と悪との間の永遠の戦いに関するものであり、
16:15
and we all believe we're on the good team.
私たちはみな私たちこそ善のチームの側であると信じているのです。
16:18
And most importantly,
そして最も重要なことは、
16:21
if the staircase is real,
この階段が本物なら、
16:23
it explains the persistent undercurrent
現代生活の不満の絶えざる底流を
16:25
of dissatisfaction in modern life.
説明しています。
16:27
Because human beings are, to some extent,
というのは、人間存在は、ある程度、ミツバチのように
16:29
hivish creatures like bees.
群れたがる生き物だからです。
16:32
We're bees. We busted out of the hive during the Enlightenment.
私たちはミツバチです。私たちは、啓蒙主義の間に群れから抜け出しました。
16:34
We broke down the old institutions
私たちは、古い制度を壊し
16:37
and brought liberty to the oppressed.
抑圧に解放をもたらしました。
16:40
We unleashed Earth-changing creativity
私たちは地球を変える創造性を解き放ち
16:42
and generated vast wealth and comfort.
広大な富と快適さを生み出しました。
16:44
Nowadays we fly around
近頃、私たちは飛び回っています、
16:47
like individual bees exulting in our freedom.
自由を謳歌する個々のミツバチのように。
16:49
But sometimes we wonder:
しかし、私たちはふと思います:
16:51
Is this all there is?
これがあるものすべてなのか?
16:53
What should I do with my life?
私の人生でなすべきことは何なのか?
16:55
What's missing?
何が欠けているのか?
16:57
What's missing is that we are Homo duplex,
欠けているのは、私たちはホモ・デュプレックスなのに、
16:59
but modern, secular society was built
現代の非宗教的な社会が私たちの低い俗の自己を
17:01
to satisfy our lower, profane selves.
満足させるように構築されている、ということです。
17:04
It's really comfortable down here on the lower level.
この低いレベルにいるのは本当に快適です。
17:07
Come, have a seat in my home entertainment center.
私の家の娯楽施設にいらして、おくつろぎください。
17:10
One great challenge of modern life
現代生活の一つの偉大な挑戦は
17:13
is to find the staircase amid all the clutter
ガラクタの真っただ中で階段を見つけることであり
17:15
and then to do something good and noble
そして頂上まで昇ったら
17:18
once you climb to the top.
何か善で気高いことを行うことです。
17:21
I see this desire in my students at the University of Virginia.
バージニア大学で私の学生の中にこの欲求を見ました。
17:24
They all want to find a cause or calling
彼らはみな、大義ないし使命を見つけたいと望んでいます、
17:27
that they can throw themselves into.
彼らが自己を投げ出せるものを。
17:29
They're all searching for their staircase.
彼らはみな自分たちの階段を探しているのです。
17:31
And that gives me hope
これによって私は希望を与えられます。
17:34
because people are not purely selfish.
人々は全く利己的なのではありません。
17:36
Most people long to overcome pettiness
ほとんどの人々は、狭量さを克服し
17:38
and become part of something larger.
何か大きなものの一部になりたいと切望しています。
17:40
And this explains the extraordinary resonance
そして、これは、ほとんど400年前に呼び起された
17:42
of this simple metaphor
この単純なメタファーの
17:45
conjured up nearly 400 years ago.
たぐいまれな反響を説明しています。
17:47
"No man is an island
「どんな人間も、
17:50
entire of itself.
独りで全ての島なのではない。
17:52
Every man is a piece of the continent,
あらゆる人間は、大陸の一部、
17:54
a part of the main."
本土の一部分なのである。」
17:57
JH: Thank you.
JH: ありがとう。
18:00
(Applause)
(拍手)
18:02
Translator:Mitsumasa Ihara
Reviewer:Miwa Sasaki

sponsored links

Jonathan Haidt - Social psychologist
Jonathan Haidt studies how -- and why -- we evolved to be moral. By understanding more about our moral roots, his hope is that we can learn to be civil and open-minded.

Why you should listen

Haidt is a social psychologist whose research on morality across cultures led up to his much-quoted 2008 TEDTalk on the psychological roots of the American culture war. He asks, "Can't we all disagree more constructively?" In September 2009, Jonathan Haidt spoke to the TED Blog about the moral psychology behind the healthcare debate in the United States. He's also active in the study of positive psychology and human flourishing.

At TED2012 he explored the intersection of his work on morality with his work on happiness to talk about “hive psychology” – the ability that humans have to lose themselves in groups pursuing larger projects, almost like bees in a hive. This hivish ability Is crucial, he argues, for understanding the origins of morality, politics, and religion. These are ideas that Haidt develops at greater length in his new book, The Righteous Mind: Why Good People are Divided by Politics and Religion. Learn more about his drive for a more productive and civil politics on his website CivilPolitics.org. And take an eye-opening quiz about your own morals at YourMorals.org

During the bruising 2012 political season, Haidt was invited to speak at TEDxMidAtlantic on the topic of civility. He developed the metaphor of The Asteroids Club to embody how we can reach. common groun. Learn how to start your own Asteroids Club at www.AsteroidsClub.org.

Watch Haidt talk about the Asteroids Club on MSNBC's The Cycle >>

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.