sponsored links
TED2012

Billy Collins: Everyday moments, caught in time

ビリー・コリンズ 「日常の中のある光景」

February 28, 2012

詩を楽しいアニメーションにしたサンダンスチャンネルとの共同プロジェクトを、ビリー・コリンズがとぼけたウィットと芸術的深みを見せながら紹介します。この楽しくも心動かされる素敵な講演ではその中から5つの作品をご覧いただきます。最後に登場するとてもおかしな詩もお見逃しなく!

Billy Collins - Poet
A two-term U.S. Poet Laureate, Billy Collins captures readers with his understated wit, profound insight -- and a sense of being "hospitable." Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
I'm here to give you
私は皆さんに 本日分の
00:15
your recommended dietary allowance
推奨摂取量の詩を
00:17
of poetry.
お届けに上がりました
00:19
And the way I'm going to do that
その方法として
00:21
is present to you
私の5つの詩の
00:23
five animations
アニメーションを
00:25
of five of my poems.
お見せしようと思います
00:27
And let me just tell you a little bit of how that came about.
まずはその経緯を少しお話ししましょう
00:29
Because the mixing of those two media
この2つのメディアを組み合わせるのは
00:31
is a sort of unnatural or unnecessary act.
ある種不自然で不必要な行為だからです
00:33
But when I was United States Poet Laureate --
私が米国桂冠詩人だったとき・・・
00:36
and I love saying that.
この響きが何とも言えませんね
00:40
(Laughter)
(笑)
00:42
It's a great way to start sentences.
話の出だしとして申し分ないと思います
00:44
When I was him back then,
その桂冠詩人だったときに
00:47
I was approached by J. Walter Thompson, the ad company,
広告代理店のJ・ウォルター・トンプソンが
00:50
and they were hired
サンダンスチャンネルのための
00:53
sort of by the Sundance Channel.
企画を持ってきました
00:55
And the idea was to have me record some of my poems
私が詩を朗読し
00:57
and then they would find animators
それにアニメーションを
00:59
to animate them.
付けるというのがコンセプトでした
01:01
And I was initially resistant,
最初私は抵抗を感じました
01:03
because I always think
詩というのは単独で成立するものだと
01:05
poetry can stand alone by itself.
いつも思っていたからです
01:07
Attempts to put my poems to music
私の詩に音楽を付けようという試みは
01:09
have had disastrous results,
例外なく
01:12
in all cases.
ひどい結果に終わっていました
01:14
And the poem, if it's written with the ear,
音を意識して書かれた詩には
01:17
already has been set to its own verbal music
作る時点で既に 独自の言葉の音楽が
01:20
as it was composed.
与えられています
01:23
And surely, if you're reading a poem
それにまた 牛について
01:25
that mentions a cow,
書いた詩を読むとき
01:27
you don't need on the facing page
向かいのページにまさか
01:29
a drawing of a cow.
牛の絵は必要ないでしよう
01:31
I mean, let's let the reader do a little work.
少しは読者に想像の余地を残してあげないと
01:33
But I relented because it seemed like an interesting possibility,
それでも私が考えを変えたのは そこに興味深い—
01:36
and also I'm like a total cartoon junkie
可能性があったのと 私自身が子ども時代以来の
01:39
since childhood.
アニメ好きだったからです
01:42
I think more influential
私の想像力に影響を与えたのは
01:45
than Emily Dickinson or Coleridge or Wordsworth
エミリー・ディキンソンや コールリッジや ワーズワースよりむしろ
01:47
on my imagination
エミリー・ディキンソンや コールリッジや ワーズワースよりむしろ
01:50
were Warner Brothers, Merrie Melodies
ワーナー・ブラザーズや
01:52
and Loony Tunes cartoons.
メリー・メロディーズや ルーニー・テューンズだったのです
01:54
Bugs Bunny is my muse.
バッグス・バニーが私のインスピレーションの源です
01:57
And this way poetry could find its way onto television of all places.
それにまた テレビに詩が登場する道を開くことにもなります
02:01
And I'm pretty much all for poetry in public places --
私は詩を公共の場に出すことには大賛成です
02:05
poetry on buses, poetry on subways,
バスで 地下鉄で
02:08
on billboards, on cereal boxes.
広告板で シリアルの箱で詩を見るのです
02:11
When I was Poet Laureate, there I go again --
私が桂冠詩人だったときのことですが・・・また言ってしまいましたね
02:15
I can't help it, it's true --
ついついやってしまうんです・・・
02:19
(Laughter)
(笑)
02:22
I created a poetry channel on Delta Airlines
私はデルタ航空のための詩の番組を作っていて
02:25
that lasted for a couple of years.
それは2年ほど続きました
02:28
So you could tune into poetry as you were flying.
飛んでいる間 詩のチャンネルを楽しめるわけです
02:30
And my sense is,
私の感覚からするなら
02:33
it's a good thing to get poetry off the shelves
詩を本棚から取り出して日常の場面に配する
02:35
and more into public life.
というのは良いことです
02:38
Start a meeting with a poem. That would be an idea you might take with you.
詩との出会いを作れます これは取り入れたいアイデアです
02:40
When you get a poem on a billboard or on the radio
広告板やラジオ番組やシリアルの箱などに
02:43
or on a cereal box or whatever,
詩が出てくれば
02:46
it happens to you so suddenly
不意に接することになって
02:48
that you don't have time
多くの人が高校の時に身に付ける
02:50
to deploy your anti-poetry deflector shields
対詩回避シールドを展開する
02:52
that were installed in high school.
間がありません
02:56
So let us start with the first one.
それでは最初のを見ることにしましょう
03:01
It's a little poem called "Budapest,"
『ブダペスト』という題の短い詩です
03:04
and in it I reveal,
この中で私は創作プロセスの
03:07
or pretend to reveal,
秘密を明かすというか
03:09
the secrets of the creative process.
明かすようなふりをしています
03:11
(Video) Narration: "Budapest."
『ブダペスト』
03:16
My pen moves along the page
私のペンはページの上を
03:18
like the snout of a strange animal
奇妙な動物の鼻のように動き回る
03:21
shaped like a human arm
人の腕のような姿をし
03:24
and dressed in the sleeve
ゆったりした緑のセーターの
03:26
of a loose green sweater.
袖を身に纏っている
03:28
I watch it sniffing the paper ceaselessly,
それが紙の上を休みなく嗅ぎまわり
03:30
intent as any forager
今日の糧となる
03:33
that has nothing on its mind
地虫や昆虫しか
03:36
but the grubs and insects
頭にない狩人のように
03:38
that will allow it to live another day.
一心な様子を眺めている
03:41
It wants only to be here tomorrow,
明日もここにいるのが唯一の望み
03:44
dressed perhaps
格子縞のシャツの袖でも
03:47
in the sleeve of a plaid shirt,
纏えれば言うことはなく
03:49
nose pressed against the page,
鼻を紙の上に押しつけ
03:51
writing a few more dutiful lines
任務のように線をさらに書きつける
03:53
while I gaze out the window
その間私と言えば 窓の外を眺め
03:57
and imagine Budapest
ブダペストや
03:59
or some other city
その他の
04:01
where I have never been.
行ったこともない街のことを思っている
04:03
BC: So that makes it seem a little easier.
少し簡単そうに見せていますが
04:07
(Applause)
(拍手)
04:10
Writing is not actually as easy as that for me.
書くというのは 私にとってそこまで簡単ではありません
04:12
But I like to pretend that it comes with ease.
でも簡単にできるように見せたいのです
04:16
One of my students came up after class, an introductory class,
入門的な詩の授業の後 学生がやってきて言ったんです
04:21
and she said, "You know, poetry is harder than writing,"
「詩は文章より難しいですよね」と
04:24
which I found both erroneous and profound.
これは間違ってますが 鋭いものがあります
04:29
(Laughter)
(笑)
04:32
So I like to at least pretend it just flows out.
だから少なくとも ただ流れ出てくるかのように見せたいのです
04:35
A friend of mine has a slogan; he's another poet.
詩人でもある友人がよく言うのは
04:38
He says that, "If at first you don't succeed,
「最初うまくいかなかったら
04:41
hide all evidence you ever tried."
試みた痕跡をみんな隠せ」ということです
04:44
(Laughter)
(笑)
04:47
The next poem is also rather short.
次の詩も短いものです
04:49
Poetry just says a few things in different ways.
詩というのはちょっとしたことを違ったように言っているだけです
04:52
And I think you could boil this poem down to saying,
この詩は煎じ詰めると「クマを食べる身になることもあれば
04:55
"Some days you eat the bear, other days the bear eats you."
クマに食べられる身になることもある」ということです
04:58
And it uses the imagery
そしてここでは人形の家の
05:01
of dollhouse furniture.
家具のイメージを使っています
05:03
(Video) Narration: "Some Days."
『ある時には』
05:05
Some days
ある時には
05:09
I put the people in their places at the table,
私は人々をテーブルに付かせる
05:11
bend their legs at the knees,
関節が曲げられるなら
05:14
if they come with that feature,
彼らの脚を膝のところで折り曲げ
05:16
and fix them into the tiny wooden chairs.
小さな木の椅子に据える
05:18
All afternoon they face one another,
午後の間中 顔を見合わせたまま
05:22
the man in the brown suit,
茶色いスーツの男や
05:25
the woman in the blue dress --
青いドレスの女が
05:27
perfectly motionless, perfectly behaved.
身じろぎもせず 行儀良くしている
05:29
But other days I am the one
別な時には
05:33
who is lifted up by the ribs
私の方が体をつまみ上げられ
05:35
then lowered into the dining room of a dollhouse
人形の家の食堂に下ろされて
05:37
to sit with the others at the long table.
他の人たちと共に長テーブルにつく
05:41
Very funny.
まったくお笑いだ
05:44
But how would you like it
しかしその日その日を
05:46
if you never knew from one day to the next
どう過ごすことになるのか分からなかったとしたら
05:48
if you were going to spend it
どう思うだろうか?
05:51
striding around like a vivid god,
肩が雲に達する躍動的な神のように
05:53
your shoulders in the clouds,
大股で歩き回って過ごすことになるのか
05:56
or sitting down there
それとも壁紙に取り囲まれて
05:59
amidst the wallpaper
席につき
06:01
staring straight ahead
小さな作り物の顔で
06:03
with your little plastic face?
正面を見つめて過ごすことになるのか 分からなかったとしたら?
06:05
(Applause)
(拍手)
06:11
BC: There's a horror movie in there somewhere.
これにはどこか恐怖映画のような趣があります
06:16
The next poem is called forgetfulness,
次の詩は『忘却』という作品で
06:19
and it's really just a kind of poetic essay
記憶の低下を題材にした
06:21
on the subject of mental slippage.
詩的なエッセイのようなものです
06:23
And the poem begins
この詩は ある種の
06:27
with a certain species of forgetfulness
忘却性ではじまります
06:29
that someone called
文芸的健忘と
06:32
literary amnesia,
呼ぶ人もいますが
06:34
in other words, forgetting the things that you have read.
つまりは 読んだことを忘れるということです
06:36
(Video) Narration: "Forgetfulness."
『忘却』
06:43
The name of the author is the first to go,
最初に失われるのが著者の名前で
06:45
followed obediently
それに続いて いつの間にか
06:48
by the title, the plot,
書名 筋書き
06:50
the heartbreaking conclusion,
悲痛な結末
06:52
the entire novel,
小説の全体が消え
06:54
which suddenly becomes one you have never read,
突然 読んだことがないものになり
06:56
never even heard of.
聞いたこともないものになる
06:59
It is as if, one by one,
かつては宿していた
07:01
the memories you used to harbor
記憶が1つひとつ
07:03
decided to retire to the southern hemisphere of the brain
南脳半球にある 電話も通じない
07:06
to a little fishing village
小さな漁村へと
07:10
where there are no phones.
引っ込むことに決めたかのようだ
07:12
Long ago,
だいぶ以前に
07:14
you kissed the names of the nine muses good-bye
9人のミューズの名前にお別れのキスをし
07:16
and you watched the quadratic equation
二次方程式が荷物を
07:19
pack its bag.
まとめるのを見た
07:21
And even now,
今でさえ
07:23
as you memorize the order of the planets,
惑星の順番を覚えるはなから
07:25
something else is slipping away,
別なものが抜け落ちていく
07:27
a state flower perhaps,
州の花だったり
07:29
the address of an uncle,
叔父の住所や
07:31
the capital of Paraguay.
パラグアイの首都
07:33
Whatever it is
思い出そうと
07:35
you are struggling to remember,
あがいているものが何であれ
07:37
it is not poised on the tip of your tongue,
喉に出かかるどころか
07:39
not even lurking
脾臓の
07:42
in some obscure corner
目立たない片隅に
07:44
of your spleen.
隠れてさえいない
07:46
It has floated away
神話上の暗い川に乗って
07:48
down a dark mythological river
流れていってしまったのだ
07:50
whose name begins with an L
その川の名前は 覚えている限りでは
07:53
as far as you can recall,
Lで始まるのだが
07:56
well on your own way to oblivion
忘却の地へと向かう途上にあって
07:58
where you will join those
泳ぎ方や 自転車の乗り方さえ
08:01
who have forgotten even how to swim
忘れてしまった人たちに
08:03
and how to ride a bicycle.
やがて加わることになる
08:05
No wonder you rise in the middle of the night
夜中に目を覚まし
08:08
to look up the date of a famous battle
戦争の本を開いて 有名な戦闘のあった日付を
08:11
in a book on war.
探すのも無理はない
08:14
No wonder the Moon in the window
窓の外の月が
08:16
seems to have drifted out of a love poem
かつてはそらで言えた恋愛詩から
08:18
that you used to know by heart.
抜け出したかのように見えるのも無理はない
08:21
(Applause)
(拍手)
08:27
BC: The next poem is called "The Country"
次の詩は『田舎』です
08:35
and it's based on,
これは
08:37
when I was in college
大学の時に知り合って
08:39
I met a classmate who remains to be a friend of mine.
今も親しくしている友達とのことを元にしています
08:41
He lived, and still does, in rural Vermont.
彼は昔も今もバーモントの田舎住まい
08:44
I lived in New York City.
私の方はニューヨークに住んでいて
08:46
And we would visit each other.
互いによく行き来していました
08:48
And when I would go up to the country,
私が田舎に行ったときには
08:50
he would teach me things like deer hunting,
彼が鹿狩りとか・・・
08:52
which meant getting lost with a gun basically --
これは銃を持って迷子になるのと ほぼ同義でしたが・・・
08:55
(Laughter)
(笑)
08:58
and trout fishing and stuff like that.
あるいはマス釣りなんかを教えてくれ
09:00
And then he'd come down to New York City
彼がニューヨークに来ると
09:02
and I'd teach him what I knew,
私が知っていることを教えましたが
09:04
which was largely smoking and drinking.
それは概ね煙草と酒でした
09:06
(Laughter)
(笑)
09:08
And in that way we traded lore with each other.
そうやって私達は互いの知識を交換していたのでした
09:10
The poem that's coming up
これから出てくる詩は
09:13
is based on him trying to tell me a little something
彼が田舎の暮らし特有の家庭の作法について
09:15
about a domestic point of etiquette
ちょっと教えようとしたことが
09:18
in country living
元になっています
09:20
that I had a very hard time, at first, processing.
最初私には理解しがたく感じられたのです
09:22
It's called "The Country."
では『田舎』をご覧ください
09:24
(Video) Narration: "The Country."
『田舎』
09:26
I wondered about you
どこで擦っても点けられる
09:29
when you told me never to leave
マッチの入った箱を
09:31
a box of wooden strike-anywhere matches
家の中に放って置いてはいけないと
09:33
just lying around the house,
君が言ったのを訝しく思った
09:36
because the mice might get into them
ネズミが入って火を付けるかも知れないと言うのだから
09:39
and start a fire.
ネズミが入って火を付けるかも知れないと言うのだから
09:41
But your face was absolutely straight
しかしいつもマッチを
09:43
when you twisted the lid down
しまっておくという
09:46
on the round tin
丸い缶の蓋を閉めていた時の
09:48
where the matches, you said, are always stowed.
君の顔は真面目そのものだった
09:50
Who could sleep that night?
その夜どうして眠ることができるだろう
09:53
Who could whisk away the thought
一匹のネズミが
09:55
of the one unlikely mouse
花柄の壁紙の裏の
09:57
padding along a cold water pipe
冷たい水道管を伝って
10:00
behind the floral wallpaper,
尖った歯の先にマッチをくわえて
10:03
gripping a single wooden match
やってくる尋常でない様を
10:05
between the needles of his teeth?
どうして頭から追い払うことができるだろう
10:07
Who could not see him rounding a corner,
そのネズミが角を曲がる時 青い先端が
10:10
the blue tip scratching against rough-hewn beam,
荒削りの梁を擦って 突然 炎が上がり
10:13
the sudden flare
明るく輝くその瞬間に その生き物が
10:16
and the creature, for one bright, shining moment,
突如として時代を飛び越え
10:18
suddenly thrust ahead of his time --
今や 火を起こした者となり
10:22
now a fire-starter,
今や 忘れられた儀式の
10:24
now a torch-bearer
指導者
10:26
in a forgotten ritual,
小さな茶色いドルイド僧となって
10:28
little brown druid
古代の夜を照らす姿を
10:30
illuminating some ancient night?
どうして想像せずにいられるだろう
10:32
And who could fail to notice,
燃え上がる断熱材の中に照らされる
10:34
lit up in the blazing insulation,
仲間のネズミたちの小さな顔に浮かぶ
10:37
the tiny looks of wonderment
驚異の表情に
10:39
on the faces of his fellow mice --
どうして気づかずにいられるだろう
10:41
one-time inhabitants
それは田舎にあった
10:44
of what once was your house in the country?
かつての君の家の かつての住人たちだ
10:46
(Applause)
(拍手)
10:50
BC: Thank you.
どうも
10:53
(Applause)
(拍手)
10:55
Thank you. And the last poem is called "The Dead."
最後の詩は『死者』です
10:57
I wrote this after a friend's funeral,
友人の葬儀の後に書いたものですが
11:00
but not so much about the friend as something the eulogist kept saying,
その友達についてというよりは
11:02
as all eulogists tend to do,
弔辞を述べる人がよく口にする
11:04
which is how happy the deceased would be
「集まってくれたみんなを見下ろして どんなに故人が
11:06
to look down and see all of us assembled.
喜んでいるか」という話を扱っています
11:09
And that to me was a bad start to the afterlife,
私からすると 自分の葬儀を見て喜ばなきゃいけないというのは
11:11
having to witness your own funeral and feel gratified.
死後の生活の始まりとして あまりいいものには思えなかったのです
11:14
So the little poem is called "The Dead."
それでは『死者』という短い詩をお聞きください
11:17
(Video) Narration: "The Dead."
『死者』
11:21
The dead are always looking down on us,
死者はいつも私達を
11:23
they say.
見下ろしているという
11:26
While we are putting on our shoes or making a sandwich,
靴を履く時も サンドイッチを作る時も
11:28
they are looking down
彼らは天国の
11:31
through the glass-bottom boats of heaven
ガラス底のボートから見下ろしている
11:33
as they row themselves slowly
ゆっくりと永遠を
11:36
through eternity.
漕ぎ進みながら
11:38
They watch the tops of our heads
私達の頭のてっぺんが
11:40
moving below on Earth.
下界で動き回るのを見ている
11:42
And when we lie down
私達が
11:44
in a field or on a couch,
暖かな午後の囁きにでも誘われて
11:46
drugged perhaps
野原やソファで
11:48
by the hum of a warm afternoon,
横になるときには
11:50
they think we are looking back at them,
彼らは見つめ返されていると思い
11:53
which makes them lift their oars
オールを引き上げて
11:56
and fall silent
押し黙り
11:58
and wait like parents
親のように
12:00
for us to close our eyes.
私達が目を瞑るのを待っている
12:03
(Applause)
(拍手)
12:08
BC: I'm not sure if other poems will be animated.
他の詩にもアニメーションが付けられるのか
12:15
It took a long time --
分かりません 時間がかかりますから
12:17
I mean, it's rather uncommon to have this marriage --
この組み合わせは むしろ珍しく
12:19
a long time to put those two together.
両者を一緒にするには時間がかかるのです
12:22
But then again, it took us a long time
しかしスーツケースに車輪を付けるのだって
12:24
to put the wheel and the suitcase together.
長い時間がかかりました
12:26
(Laughter)
(笑)
12:28
I mean, we had the wheel for some time.
車輪は随分昔からあったんです
12:31
And schlepping is an ancient and honorable art.
そして重い荷を引っ張るというのも 古くからある
12:34
(Laughter)
立派な技術なのです (笑)
12:37
I just have time
ごく最近の詩を1篇だけ
12:40
to read a more recent poem to you.
読める時間が残っています
12:42
If it has a subject,
この詩にテーマがあるとしたら
12:45
the subject is adolescence.
それは思春期です
12:48
And it's addressed to a certain person.
ある人に向けて書いたものです
12:50
It's called "To My Favorite 17-Year-Old High School Girl."
題は『私の大好きな17歳の女子高生の君に』です
12:52
"Do you realize that if you had started building the Parthenon
生まれた日に建て始めていたら
12:58
on the day you were born,
あと1年でパルテノンが
13:01
you would be all done in only one more year?
完成していたのを知っていましたか?
13:03
Of course, you couldn't have done that all alone.
もちろん1人で作れるものではありませんから
13:06
So never mind;
気にすることはありません
13:08
you're fine just being yourself.
君はそのままで問題ないのです
13:10
You're loved for just being you.
君自身として君は愛されています
13:12
But did you know that at your age
でも知っていましたか?
13:15
Judy Garland was pulling down 150,000 dollars a picture,
君の年にはジュディ・ガーランドは映画1本につき15万をドル稼ぎ
13:17
Joan of Arc was leading the French army to victory
ジャンヌ・ダルクはフランス軍を勝利に導き
13:22
and Blaise Pascal had cleaned up his room --
ブレーズ・パスカルは自分で部屋を片付けていたのを——
13:26
no wait, I mean he had invented the calculator?
いやつまり 計算機を発明していたのを?
13:29
Of course, there will be time for all that
もちろん そういったことをする時間は
13:33
later in your life,
君の人生にまだたっぷり残っています
13:35
after you come out of your room
自分の部屋を出て
13:37
and begin to blossom,
美しく花開いた後にも
13:39
or at least pick up all your socks.
あるいは少なくとも靴下をみんな拾った後にも
13:41
For some reason I keep remembering
なぜかよく思い出すのは
13:45
that Lady Jane Grey was queen of England
レディ・ジェーン・グレイが
13:47
when she was only 15.
ほんの15歳でイングランド女王になったことです
13:49
But then she was beheaded, so never mind her as a role model.
もっとも その後斬首されたので
13:52
(Laughter)
お手本にしなくてもよいでしょう (笑)
13:55
A few centuries later,
その何世紀か後
13:58
when he was your age,
君の年の時に
14:00
Franz Schubert was doing the dishes for his family,
フランツ・シューベルトは皿を洗って家の手伝いをしながらも
14:02
but that did not keep him
若年にして
14:06
from composing two symphonies, four operas
2つの交響曲 4つの歌劇
14:08
and two complete masses as a youngster.
2つの荘厳ミサを作曲しています
14:11
(Laughter)
(笑)
14:14
But of course, that was in Austria
もちろんこれは叙情的ロマン主義の
14:16
at the height of Romantic lyricism,
頂点たるオーストリアでの話で
14:18
not here in the suburbs of Cleveland.
ここクリーブランド郊外とは違います
14:21
(Laughter)
(笑)
14:23
Frankly, who cares
はっきり言ってどうでもいいのです
14:25
if Annie Oakley was a crack shot at 15
アニー・オークレイが15で射撃の名手だったとか
14:27
or if Maria Callas debuted as Tosca at 17?
マリア・カラスが17の時トスカでデビューを果たしたことなんて
14:30
We think you're special just being you --
ありのままの君として君は特別です
14:34
playing with your food and staring into space.
食べ物をおもちゃにし 宙をぼーっと見つめて
14:37
(Laughter)
(笑)
14:40
By the way,
ところで
14:43
I lied about Schubert doing the dishes,
シューベルトが皿を洗っていたというのは嘘です
14:45
but that doesn't mean he never helped out around the house."
でもだからといって 彼が家の手伝いをしなかったとは言えません
14:48
(Laughter)
でもだからといって 彼が家の手伝いをしなかったとは言えません
14:51
(Applause)
(笑いと拍手)
14:53
Thank you. Thank you.
どうもありがとうございました
14:55
(Applause)
(拍手)
14:58
Thanks.
どうも
15:03
(Applause)
(拍手)
15:05
Translator:Yasushi Aoki
Reviewer:Sawa Horibe

sponsored links

Billy Collins - Poet
A two-term U.S. Poet Laureate, Billy Collins captures readers with his understated wit, profound insight -- and a sense of being "hospitable."

Why you should listen

Accessibility is not a word often associated with great poetry. Yet Billy Collins has managed to create a legacy from what he calls being poetically “hospitable.” Preferring lyrical simplicity to abstruse intellectualism, Collins combines humility and depth of perception, undercutting light and digestible topics with dark and at times biting humor.

While Collins approaches his work with a healthy sense of self-deprecation, calling his poems “domestic” and “middle class,” John Taylor has said of Collins: “Rarely has anyone written poems that appear so transparent on the surface yet become so ambiguous, thought-provoking, or simply wise once the reader has peered into the depths.”

In 2001 he was named U.S. Poet Laureate, a title he kept until 2003. Collins lives in Somers, New York, and is an English professor at City University of New York, where he has taught for more than 40 years.

Credits for the animations in this talk:

"Budapest," "Forgetfulness" and "Some Days" -- animation by Julian Grey/Head Gear

"The Country" -- animation by Brady Baltezor/Radium

"The Dead" -- animation by Juan Delcan/Spontaneous
 

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.