sponsored links
TED2012

Donald Sadoway: The missing link to renewable energy

ドナルド・サドウェイ 「再生可能エネルギーを本当に使えるようにするには」

March 1, 2012

太陽光や風力などの代替エネルギーを使うための鍵となる秘策はなんでしょう?それは蓄電池なのです。蓄電池があれば太陽が出ていなくても風が吹かなくても、電力を得ることができます。このとっつきやすくてひらめきを与えるようなトークでは、ドナルド・サドウェイが黒板を使って再生可能エネルギー用の巨大な電池の未来を説明します。そして彼は説くのです、「問題に対して今までとは異なる考え方が必要です。大きく、そして、安く考えるのです」と。

Donald Sadoway - Materials engineer
Donald Sadoway is working on a battery miracle -- an inexpensive, incredibly efficient, three-layered battery using “liquid metal." Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
The electricity powering the lights in this theater
この会場を照らす光の電力は
00:15
was generated just moments ago.
一瞬前に発電されたものです
00:18
Because the way things stand today,
今日では
00:21
electricity demand must be in constant balance
電気の需要に対して供給を合わせるということが
00:24
with electricity supply.
絶え間なく続いているのです
00:27
If in the time that it took me to walk out here on this stage,
私がこのステージに上がる間にも
00:30
some tens of megawatts of wind power
もし 数10メガワットの風力発電からの電力が
00:33
stopped pouring into the grid,
グリッドに流れなくなったとしたら
00:36
the difference would have to be made up
直ちに他の発電機から
00:39
from other generators immediately.
代替される必要がでてくるでしょう
00:41
But coal plants, nuclear plants
しかし火力発電や原子力発電だと時間が掛かりすぎ
00:45
can't respond fast enough.
即座に代替発電ができません
00:48
A giant battery could.
巨大蓄電池ならできるでしょう
00:50
With a giant battery,
大容量の蓄電池があれば
00:52
we'd be able to address the problem of intermittency
風力発電や太陽光発電をグリッドに組み込むのに
00:54
that prevents wind and solar
障害となっている
00:57
from contributing to the grid
間欠性の問題を解決することができ
00:59
in the same way that coal, gas and nuclear do today.
それらの発電を今日の火力や原子力と同様に使えるかもしれません
01:01
You see, the battery
わかりますよね
01:05
is the key enabling device here.
ここでは蓄電池が鍵となっています
01:07
With it, we could draw electricity from the sun
蓄電池があれば曇った時でさえも太陽から
01:10
even when the sun doesn't shine.
電気を引き出すことができます
01:13
And that changes everything.
そうすれば世界が変わります
01:15
Because then renewables
なぜなら風や太陽光といった
01:18
such as wind and solar
再生可能エネルギーが
01:20
come out from the wings,
自然界の脇役から 風に乗って
01:22
here to center stage.
主役に踊りでるのです
01:24
Today I want to tell you about such a device.
今日はそのような機器について話します
01:26
It's called the liquid metal battery.
液体金属電池と呼んでいるものです
01:29
It's a new form of energy storage
これは新しいタイプの
01:31
that I invented at MIT
エネルギー貯蔵媒体で
01:33
along with a team of my students
MITの学生・ポスドクチームと一緒に
01:36
and post-docs.
発明しました
01:38
Now the theme of this year's TED Conference is Full Spectrum.
さてTED2012のテーマはフルスペクトルです
01:40
The OED defines spectrum
オックスフォード英英辞典によれば
01:43
as "The entire range of wavelengths
スペクトルとは
01:46
of electromagnetic radiation,
「電磁波のあらゆる波長―
01:49
from the longest radio waves to the shortest gamma rays
超低周波から最長のガンマ線まであり
01:51
of which the range of visible light
目に見えるのはごく僅かである」と
01:54
is only a small part."
定義しています
01:57
So I'm not here today only to tell you
ですから このTEDでは単に
01:59
how my team at MIT has drawn out of nature
MITでの私のチームが自然に辿りついた
02:01
a solution to one of the world's great problems.
世界的問題の1つへの解決策だけを話すのではなく
02:04
I want to go full spectrum and tell you how,
フルスペクトルの如く様々な話をしたいです
02:07
in the process of developing
この新技術を開発する中で
02:10
this new technology,
私たちがどのようにして
02:12
we've uncovered some surprising heterodoxies
驚くような異説を発見したかについてです
02:14
that can serve as lessons for innovation,
それはイノベーションのための教訓であり
02:17
ideas worth spreading.
広める価値のあるアイデアです
02:20
And you know,
ご存じの通り
02:23
if we're going to get this country out of its current energy situation,
近日のエネルギー問題からアメリカを救おうとするなら
02:25
we can't just conserve our way out;
単なる節約なんかではいけません
02:29
we can't just drill our way out;
新たな石油採掘に頼ることもできません
02:32
we can't bomb our way out.
爆破すればいいわけでもないのです
02:35
We're going to do it the old-fashioned American way,
古典的なアメリカ流の方法 つまり
02:37
we're going to invent our way out,
発明に道を見い出して
02:39
working together.
問題解決に協同で励むのです
02:41
(Applause)
(拍手)
02:43
Now let's get started.
では始めましょうか
02:46
The battery was invented about 200 years ago
電池というものは約200年前
02:48
by a professor, Alessandro Volta,
イタリアのパヴィア大学教授
02:51
at the University of Padua in Italy.
アレッサンドロ・ボルタが発明しました
02:53
His invention gave birth to a new field of science,
これによって
02:56
electrochemistry,
新たな科学分野である電気化学や
02:58
and new technologies
電気めっきなどの
03:00
such as electroplating.
新技術が生まれました
03:02
Perhaps overlooked,
見落としがちですが
03:04
Volta's invention of the battery
ボルタの発明は同時に
03:06
for the first time also
世界で初めて
03:08
demonstrated the utility of a professor.
教授の有用性を示したのです
03:10
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:12
Until Volta, nobody could imagine
それまでは教師が役に立つなんて
03:14
a professor could be of any use.
想像する人すらいませんでした
03:16
Here's the first battery --
これが世界初の電池です
03:19
a stack of coins, zinc and silver,
硬貨形の亜鉛と銀が山積みにされ 塩水漬けのボール紙により
03:22
separated by cardboard soaked in brine.
分けられています
03:25
This is the starting point
これが電池設計の
03:27
for designing a battery --
始まりだったのです
03:29
two electrodes,
2つの電極と電解液―
03:31
in this case metals of different composition,
この場合は
03:33
and an electrolyte,
異なる組成の金属と塩水が
03:35
in this case salt dissolved in water.
それらを担っていました
03:37
The science is that simple.
科学はそれほどシンプルなのです
03:39
Admittedly, I've left out a few details.
明らかに 私は詳しい話をいくつか省きました
03:41
Now I've taught you
私がお教えしたように
03:45
that battery science is straightforward
電池の科学はシンプルで
03:47
and the need for grid-level storage
送電網における電気貯蔵が
03:49
is compelling,
切実に求められています
03:51
but the fact is
しかし実際はというと
03:53
that today there is simply no battery technology
現在 グリッドが必要とするパフォーマンス特性―
03:55
capable of meeting
すなわち 通常よりも高出力で
03:58
the demanding performance requirements of the grid --
寿命も長く そしてコストも激安という要件を
04:00
namely uncommonly high power,
全て満たすことのできる
04:04
long service lifetime
電池の技術など
04:06
and super-low cost.
単純に存在しないのです
04:08
We need to think about the problem differently.
この問題を違う視点で考える必要があるのです
04:10
We need to think big,
大きく考え そして
04:13
we need to think cheap.
安くできる方法を考えるのです
04:15
So let's abandon the paradigm
従来の考えを捨て 最も斬新な
04:17
of let's search for the coolest chemistry
コンビを探しましょう そして大量の製品を
04:19
and then hopefully we'll chase down the cost curve
作ることによって
04:22
by just making lots and lots of product.
うまくいけば コスト削減できるでしょう
04:24
Instead, let's invent
運に任せずに 電力市場が
04:27
to the price point of the electricity market.
買う気になる価格のものを発明をするのです
04:29
So that means
つまり 周期表の―
04:32
that certain parts of the periodic table
高くつく種々の部分は
04:34
are axiomatically off-limits.
明らかに対象外とすることを意味します
04:36
This battery needs to be made
電池は地球に豊富な資源で
04:38
out of earth-abundant elements.
作られる必要があります
04:40
I say, if you want to make something dirt cheap,
私ならこう言います 格安に作りたいなら
04:42
make it out of dirt --
そこらにある土を使えとね
04:45
(Laughter)
(笑)
04:47
preferably dirt
好ましいのは
04:49
that's locally sourced.
地元の土を原料にすることです(笑)
04:51
And we need to be able to build this thing
私たちはこういった製品を作るのに
04:54
using simple manufacturing techniques and factories
莫大な費用がかからない
04:57
that don't cost us a fortune.
シンプルな製造技術と工場を使う必要があります
05:00
So about six years ago,
6年ほど前に
05:04
I started thinking about this problem.
この問題について考え始めました
05:06
And in order to adopt a fresh perspective,
そして新たな視点を養うため
05:08
I sought inspiration from beyond the field of electricity storage.
電気貯蔵以外の分野からのインスピレーションを求めました
05:11
In fact, I looked to a technology
実のところ 私が注目したのは
05:15
that neither stores nor generates electricity,
電気を貯めたり発電したりする技術ではなく
05:18
but instead consumes electricity,
電気を消費する技術で
05:21
huge amounts of it.
しかも大量に消費する技術でした
05:23
I'm talking about the production of aluminum.
そう これはアルミニウムの製造の話です
05:25
The process was invented in 1886
製造過程は1886年
05:29
by a couple of 22-year-olds --
二人の22歳の若者
05:31
Hall in the United States and Heroult in France.
アメリカのホールとフランスのエルーが発明しました
05:33
And just a few short years following their discovery,
その発見のほんの数年後
05:36
aluminum changed
アルミニウムは
05:39
from a precious metal costing as much as silver
銀と同じ価値の貴金属という存在から
05:41
to a common structural material.
平凡な建築材料へとなりました
05:44
You're looking at the cell house of a modern aluminum smelter.
今見えているのはアルミニウム精錬所の中です
05:47
It's about 50 feet wide
15メートルの幅と
05:50
and recedes about half a mile --
800メートルの奥行きがあり
05:52
row after row of cells
ボルタ電池に似た
05:54
that, inside, resemble Volta's battery,
小さなコンテナがずらりと並んでいます
05:57
with three important differences.
重要な違いが3つあります
06:00
Volta's battery works at room temperature.
ボルタ電池は室温で動作し
06:02
It's fitted with solid electrodes
固体電極と塩水の電解液から
06:05
and an electrolyte that's a solution of salt and water.
できています
06:08
The Hall-Heroult cell
ホール・エルーの電解炉セルは
06:11
operates at high temperature,
アルミニウム金属生成物が
06:13
a temperature high enough
融解するのに十分な高温の中で
06:15
that the aluminum metal product is liquid.
動作しています
06:17
The electrolyte
電解質は
06:19
is not a solution of salt and water,
塩と水の溶液ではなく
06:21
but rather salt that's melted.
むしろ融解塩です
06:23
It's this combination of liquid metal,
つまり 液体金属と融解塩と
06:25
molten salt and high temperature
高温な状態の組み合わせこそが
06:27
that allows us to send high current through this thing.
大電流を流すことを可能にします
06:30
Today, we can produce virgin metal from ore
現代では 鉱石からアルミニウムを生産するのに
06:34
at a cost of less than 50 cents a pound.
1キロ当たり1ドル弱のコストでできます
06:37
That's the economic miracle
これは現代の電気冶金における
06:40
of modern electrometallurgy.
経済的な奇跡です
06:42
It is this that caught and held my attention
この奇跡こそがきっかけとなって
06:44
to the point that I became obsessed with inventing a battery
私は 経済的に 莫大な規模の経済性を追求できるような
06:47
that could capture this gigantic economy of scale.
電池の発明に夢中になりました
06:51
And I did.
そしてやりとげたのです
06:55
I made the battery all liquid --
両極用の液体金属と
06:57
liquid metals for both electrodes
電解質の融解塩から成る
07:00
and a molten salt for the electrolyte.
完全な液体電池を作ったのです
07:02
I'll show you how.
どのように反応するのかお話します
07:04
So I put low-density
まず低密度の液体金属を
07:24
liquid metal at the top,
一番上に置きます
07:27
put a high-density liquid metal at the bottom,
高密度の液体金属は一番下で
07:31
and molten salt in between.
その間に融解塩を置きます
07:37
So now,
さてさて
07:43
how to choose the metals?
次は使う金属をどうやって選びましょうか?
07:45
For me, the design exercise
私の場合
07:48
always begins here
設計する際はいつも
07:50
with the periodic table,
ドミトリ・メンデレーエフが作った
07:52
enunciated by another professor,
周期表を使って
07:54
Dimitri Mendeleyev.
始めるのです
07:56
Everything we know
私たちが知るすべてのものは
07:58
is made of some combination
この周期表にある原子の
08:00
of what you see depicted here.
様々な組み合わせによってできています
08:02
And that includes our own bodies.
人間の体も例外ではないです
08:05
I recall the very moment one day
私は当時 地球に豊富な資源で
08:07
when I was searching for a pair of metals
密度は異なるが相互反応が高いという
08:10
that would meet the constraints
これら全ての制約を満たす
08:13
of earth abundance,
両極用の金属を探していました
08:15
different, opposite density
その時に起こったあの瞬間のことを
08:17
and high mutual reactivity.
覚えています
08:20
I felt the thrill of realization
その答えを得たと悟ったとき
08:22
when I knew I'd come upon the answer.
私はその実感に震えました
08:24
Magnesium for the top layer.
最上層部にマグネシウム
08:29
And antimony
そして最下層部に
08:32
for the bottom layer.
アンチモンの組み合わせです
08:34
You know, I've got to tell you,
話さずにはいれないことがあります
08:37
one of the greatest benefits of being a professor:
教授であることの素敵な恩恵の1つは
08:39
colored chalk.
多色のチョークで表現できることです
08:42
(Laughter)
(笑)
08:44
So to produce current,
電流を発生させるために
08:47
magnesium loses two electrons
マグネシウムは電子を2個失って
08:50
to become magnesium ion,
マグネシウムイオンへと変化します
08:52
which then migrates across the electrolyte,
それは電解質中を動き回り
08:55
accepts two electrons from the antimony,
アンチモンから電子を2個吸収した後
08:57
and then mixes with it to form an alloy.
混ざり合って結合状態が形成されます
09:00
The electrons go to work
ここで発生した電子は
09:03
in the real world out here,
この現実世界で 機器に電力を供給するという役割を
09:05
powering our devices.
担っているのです
09:08
Now to charge the battery,
また 電池を充電するためには
09:14
we connect a source of electricity.
電力の発生源に接続します
09:17
It could be something like a wind farm.
ここでは風力発電としましょう
09:20
And then we reverse the current.
そして逆方向に電流を流します
09:24
And this forces magnesium to de-alloy
この流れを受けると マグネシウムは強制的に
09:28
and return to the upper electrode,
結合を解除して上部電極に戻り
09:33
restoring the initial constitution of the battery.
元の構成を復元するのです
09:36
And the current passing between the electrodes
電極間を通る電流は
09:41
generates enough heat to keep it at temperature.
適温を保つのに適度な熱を生み出します
09:44
It's pretty cool,
少なくとも概念的には
09:47
at least in theory.
かっこいいですよね
09:50
But does it really work?
しかし実現できるでしょうか?
09:52
So what to do next?
次はどうすればいいのでしょう?
09:54
We go to the laboratory.
ここからは実験室での話です
09:56
Now do I hire seasoned professionals?
ベテランの専門家を雇うのかって?
09:58
No, I hire a student
いえいえ 私は学生を雇って
10:02
and mentor him,
彼のメンターとなり
10:05
teach him how to think about the problem,
私の視点から問題を捉えられるよう
10:07
to see it from my perspective
指導した後
10:10
and then turn him loose.
彼自身が考えるようにしました
10:12
This is that student, David Bradwell,
これがその学生 デビッドです
10:14
who, in this image,
この写真での彼の顔は
10:16
appears to be wondering if this thing will ever work.
試作が成功するかを心配しているようです
10:18
What I didn't tell David at the time
この時には言いませんでしたが
10:21
was I myself wasn't convinced it would work.
うまくいくか確信はありませんでした
10:23
But David's young and he's smart
しかしデビットは若く賢くて
10:26
and he wants a Ph.D.,
彼は博士号が欲しかったのです
10:28
and he proceeds to build --
だから試作を始めました
10:30
(Laughter)
(笑)
10:32
He proceeds to build
彼は先の組み合わせに基づく
10:34
the first ever liquid metal battery
史上初の液体金属電池を
10:36
of this chemistry.
作り始めました
10:38
And based on David's initial promising results,
彼の最初の研究結果は有望でした この初期研究費用は
10:40
which were paid
MITの起業助成で賄いました
10:43
with seed funds at MIT,
有望な結果が基となって
10:45
I was able to attract major research funding
私は民間企業や連邦政府からの
10:48
from the private sector
多額な研究資金を
10:51
and the federal government.
引きつけることができました
10:53
And that allowed me to expand my group to 20 people,
これによって研究チームは20人にまで増やすことができ
10:55
a mix of graduate students, post-docs
院生やポスドクのほか
10:58
and even some undergraduates.
学部生さえもチームにいました
11:00
And I was able to attract really, really good people,
いい人たちばかりを集めることができました
11:02
people who share my passion
私の科学と社会貢献への情熱を
11:05
for science and service to society,
共有してくれる人たちです
11:07
not science and service for career building.
決して キャリア形成の手段として科学や研究を行う人たちではありません
11:09
And if you ask these people
液体金属電池を研究する理由を
11:13
why they work on liquid metal battery,
チームに聞くと その回答は
11:15
their answer would hearken back
1962年ライス大学で
11:17
to President Kennedy's remarks
ケネディ大統領が述べた言葉を
11:19
at Rice University in 1962
思い出させます
11:21
when he said -- and I'm taking liberties here --
勝手に少し変更して言いますが
11:24
"We choose to work on grid-level storage,
「この電池を研究するのは
11:26
not because it is easy,
それが簡単だからではない
11:28
but because it is hard."
それが困難だからだ」
11:30
(Applause)
(喝采)
11:32
So this is the evolution of the liquid metal battery.
次に 液体金属電池の進化過程をお話しします
11:39
We start here with our workhorse one watt-hour cell.
熱心な仲間と共に 最初は矢印の1Wh 電池から始めました
11:42
I called it the shotglass.
これを「ショットグラス」と呼んでいます
11:45
We've operated over 400 of these,
私たちは これを400個以上試作して
11:47
perfecting their performance with a plurality of chemistries --
マグネシウムとアンチモン以外にもある複数の化学反応に
11:50
not just magnesium and antimony.
ミスがでないようにしました
11:53
Along the way we scaled up to the 20 watt-hour cell.
徐々に出力を上げていき 20Wh の電力に到達しました
11:55
I call it the hockey puck.
「ホッケーパック」と呼んでいます
11:58
And we got the same remarkable results.
これでも同様に優れた結果がでました
12:00
And then it was onto the saucer.
さらに大型の「ソーサー」へと作り進み
12:02
That's 200 watt-hours.
今度は200Whです
12:04
The technology was proving itself
この技術は頑丈で
12:06
to be robust and scalable.
同じ条件で大規模化が可能だと証明されました
12:08
But the pace wasn't fast enough for us.
しかし開発速度が十分ではなかったのです
12:11
So a year and a half ago,
1年半前に
12:13
David and I,
デビッドと私は
12:15
along with another research staff-member,
他のメンバーを引き連れて
12:17
formed a company
会社を立ち上げました
12:19
to accelerate the rate of progress
そこで製品化までの時間を
12:21
and the race to manufacture product.
早めようとしました
12:23
So today at LMBC,
さてLMBC(液体金属電池社)では
12:25
we're building cells 16 inches in diameter
現在 直径40センチのセルを
12:27
with a capacity of one kilowatt-hour --
作っていますが
12:29
1,000 times the capacity
最大容量は当初の「ショットグラス」型の1000倍の
12:31
of that initial shotglass cell.
1kWhもあります
12:34
We call that the pizza.
これを「ピザ」と呼んでいます
12:36
And then we've got a four kilowatt-hour cell on the horizon.
近い将来 4kWhのセルができるでしょう
12:38
It's going to be 36 inches in diameter.
直径は91センチ強になる予定です
12:41
We call that the bistro table,
名前は「ビストロテーブル」ですが
12:43
but it's not ready yet for prime-time viewing.
ゴールデンタイム放送にはまだ早いです
12:45
And one variant of the technology
この技術の改良品が
12:47
has us stacking these bistro tabletops into modules,
「ビストロテーブル」を何個も積み重ねてモジュール化し
12:49
aggregating the modules into a giant battery
そのモジュールを集約して巨大な電池としたものです
12:53
that fits in a 40-foot shipping container
これを搬送する場合には
12:56
for placement in the field.
12メートル輸送コンテナにいれます
12:58
And this has a nameplate capacity of two megawatt-hours --
最大容量は2メガWh つまり
13:00
two million watt-hours.
200万Whもあります
13:03
That's enough energy
これはアメリカ家庭200世帯分の
13:05
to meet the daily electrical needs
日々の電力需要を満たすのに
13:07
of 200 American households.
十分なエネルギーです
13:09
So here you have it, grid-level storage:
さあここにグリッドに組み込める貯蔵電池があります
13:11
silent, emissions-free,
静かで 排出ガスもなく
13:14
no moving parts,
動く部品もありません
13:17
remotely controlled,
遠隔操作もでき
13:19
designed to the market price point
助成金なしでも 市場で通じる価格になるように
13:21
without subsidy.
設計されています
13:24
So what have we learned from all this?
ここから何が学べたでしょう?
13:27
(Applause)
(拍手)
13:29
So what have we learned from all this?
ここから何が学べたでしょう?
13:35
Let me share with you
ではいくつかの驚きと
13:37
some of the surprises, the heterodoxies.
通説と異なっていた視点を共有しようと思います
13:39
They lie beyond the visible.
目では見られないことです
13:42
Temperature:
温度について―
13:44
Conventional wisdom says set it low,
世間一般の概念通りにすれば
13:46
at or near room temperature,
室温か それに近い低温に設定し
13:48
and then install a control system to keep it there.
それから制御装置を設置して温度を保ちます
13:50
Avoid thermal runaway.
熱逸走を防ぐためです
13:53
Liquid metal battery is designed to operate at elevated temperature
液体金属電池は温度上昇時でも
13:55
with minimum regulation.
最低限の温度調整で作動するよう設計されています
13:58
Our battery can handle the very high temperature rises
この電池は電流急増による
14:01
that come from current surges.
温度の急上昇にも対処できるのです
14:04
Scaling: Conventional wisdom says
拡張性について― 世間一般の概念での価格戦略とは
14:08
reduce cost by producing many.
大量生産でコストを減らすことです
14:11
Liquid metal battery is designed to reduce cost
液体金属電池の場合 単純化し部品数を減らすことで
14:13
by producing fewer, but they'll be larger.
コストを減らす一方 拡張していくこともできます
14:16
And finally, human resources:
最後に人的資源について―
14:19
Conventional wisdom says
世間一般の概念では
14:21
hire battery experts,
豊富な経験と知識を
14:23
seasoned professionals,
活用できるよう
14:25
who can draw upon their vast experience and knowledge.
電池の専門家や熟練者を雇えと言っています
14:27
To develop liquid metal battery,
今回の場合
14:30
I hired students and post-docs and mentored them.
大学生と院生を雇って彼らを指導したのです
14:32
In a battery,
私は電池の潜在能力を
14:35
I strive to maximize electrical potential;
最大限に引き出そうと努めました
14:37
when mentoring,
同様に 彼らを指導するときは
14:40
I strive to maximize human potential.
彼らの潜在能力を引き出そうと努めました
14:42
So you see,
わかりますよね
14:44
the liquid metal battery story
この液体金属電池の話は
14:46
is more than an account
新技術発明の
14:48
of inventing technology,
単なる報告ではないです
14:50
it's a blueprint
発明者を発明する青写真でもあるのです
14:52
for inventing inventors, full-spectrum.
これこそフルスペクトルですよね
14:54
(Applause)
(拍手)
14:57
Translator:Naoki Funahashi
Reviewer:Akinori Oyama

sponsored links

Donald Sadoway - Materials engineer
Donald Sadoway is working on a battery miracle -- an inexpensive, incredibly efficient, three-layered battery using “liquid metal."

Why you should listen

The problem at the heart of many sustainable-energy systems: How to store power so it can be delivered to the grid all the time, day and night, even when the wind's not blowing and the sun's not shining? At MIT, Donald Sadoway has been working on a grid-size battery system that stores energy using a three-layer liquid-metal core. With help from fans like Bill Gates, Sadoway and two of his students have spun off the Liquid Metals Battery Corporation (LMBC) to bring the battery to market.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.