sponsored links
TED2012

Atul Gawande: How do we heal medicine?

アトゥール・ガワンデ: 医療をどう治すか?

March 1, 2012

私たちの医療システムは壊れています。医師は素晴らしい (そして高価な) 治療を施せるようになりましたが、最も大切な目標を見失っています。人を実際に治すということです。医師であり作家でもあるアトゥール・ガワンデが現在の医療を見つめ直し、新しい医療のあり方を示します。そう、カウボーイではなく、ピットクルーのようになるのです。

Atul Gawande - Surgeon and journalist
Surgeon by day and public health journalist by night, Atul Gawande explores how doctors can dramatically improve their practice using something as simple as a checklist. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
I got my start
随筆を書いたり
研究を始めた頃
00:15
in writing and research
随筆を書いたり
研究を始めた頃
00:18
as a surgical trainee,
私は外科研修医で
00:20
as someone who was a long ways away
何をやるにおいても
00:23
from becoming any kind of an expert at anything.
その道のプロと呼ぶには
ほど遠い存在でした
00:25
So the natural question you ask then at that point
そこで知りたかったのは
00:28
is, how do I get good at what I'm trying to do?
どうしたら
良い医者になれるのか?
00:31
And it became a question of,
後にそれが
00:33
how do we all get good
どうしたら皆で
良い治療ができるか?
00:35
at what we're trying to do?
という疑問に繋がりました
00:37
It's hard enough to learn to get the skills,
技術を身につけるだけでも
困難なのに
00:40
try to learn all the material you have to absorb
膨大な知識を
吸収しなくてはいけません
00:44
at any task you're taking on.
あらゆるタスクに
おいてです
00:47
I had to think about how I sew and how I cut,
縫合や切開の仕方を
考えるだけでなく
00:49
but then also how I pick the right person
どんな患者に
手術を行うかも
00:52
to come to an operating room.
決めなくてはいけません
00:54
And then in the midst of all this
そんなことを
考えていたとき
00:56
came this new context
「良い」とは何かを
考えさせられる
00:58
for thinking about what it meant to be good.
新しい状況が
訪れました
01:00
In the last few years
ここ数年
01:02
we realized we were in the deepest crisis
医療が危機に
さらされていることが
01:04
of medicine's existence
明らかになってきました
01:07
due to something you don't normally think about
患者のために
何が良いかを
01:09
when you're a doctor
第一に考える医者が
01:11
concerned with how you do good for people,
見落としがちなもの—
01:13
which is the cost
医療費の問題です
01:16
of health care.
医療費の問題です
01:18
There's not a country in the world
世界中のどこにも
01:20
that now is not asking
医療費で
01:23
whether we can afford what doctors do.
悩んでいない国など
ありません
01:25
The political fight that we've developed
政治論争では
01:28
has become one around
この問題が
01:31
whether it's the government that's the problem
政府の問題か
01:33
or is it insurance companies that are the problem.
保険会社の問題なのかで
揉めています
01:36
And the answer is yes and no;
答えはイエスでもあり
ノーでもあり
01:41
it's deeper than all of that.
もっと深い次元の
問題なのです
01:45
The cause of our troubles
実はその原因は
01:47
is actually the complexity that science has given us.
科学によってもたらされた
複雑さにあります
01:49
And in order to understand this,
これを理解するために
01:52
I'm going to take you back a couple of generations.
数世代前を
考えてみましょう
01:54
I want to take you back
ルイス・トマスが
01:58
to a time when Lewis Thomas was writing in his book, "The Youngest Science."
『医学は何ができるか』を
書いた時代まで遡ります
02:00
Lewis Thomas was a physician-writer,
彼は医師であると同時に
作家で
02:03
one of my favorite writers.
私の好きな作家の1人です
02:05
And he wrote this book to explain, among other things,
彼は著書の中で
02:07
what it was like to be a medical intern
ボストン市立病院の
インターン医師としての
02:10
at the Boston City Hospital
経験を語っています
02:13
in the pre-penicillin year
ペニシリン普及以前の
02:15
of 1937.
1937 年のことです
02:17
It was a time when medicine was cheap
まだ薬が安く
02:20
and very ineffective.
たいした効果も
なかった時代です
02:24
If you were in a hospital, he said,
彼によると
02:28
it was going to do you good
当時の入院のメリットは
02:31
only because it offered you
暖かい部屋と食事
02:34
some warmth, some food, shelter,
寝る場所 そして
02:36
and maybe the caring attention
看護婦に気遣ってもらえる
ことくらいでした
02:40
of a nurse.
看護婦に気遣ってもらえる
ことくらいでした
02:42
Doctors and medicine
医者や薬に出来ることは
02:44
made no difference at all.
限られていたのです
02:48
That didn't seem to prevent the doctors
そんな状態でも
医者は相変わらず
02:50
from being frantically busy in their days,
忙しく立ち働いていたと
02:52
as he explained.
書かれてあります
02:54
What they were trying to do
医者の仕事は
02:56
was figure out whether you might have one of the diagnoses
患者を診て
治療できる病気かどうか
02:58
for which they could do something.
診断することでした
03:01
And there were a few.
治療できるものも
いくつかはありました
03:04
You might have a lobar pneumonia, for example,
例えば
大葉性肺炎の患者には
03:06
and they could give you an antiserum,
血清を投与できましたし
03:09
an injection of rabid antibodies
連鎖状球菌感染症の
患者には
03:11
to the bacterium streptococcus,
ウサギの抗体を
注射できました
03:15
if the intern sub-typed it correctly.
インターンが菌を正しく
分類できればの話ですが
03:18
If you had an acute congestive heart failure,
急性うっ血性 心不全の
患者なら
03:22
they could bleed a pint of blood from you
腕の血管から
03:25
by opening up an arm vein,
血液を 500ml ほど抜き
03:28
giving you a crude leaf preparation of digitalis
シギタリスの葉を投与し
03:31
and then giving you oxygen by tent.
テントで酸素供給をします
03:34
If you had early signs of paralysis
麻痺の前兆が見られ
03:39
and you were really good at asking personal questions,
プライベートな質問が
上手にできたとしたら
03:41
you might figure out
麻痺の原因が
03:44
that this paralysis someone has is from syphilis,
梅毒だと
わかるかもしれません
03:46
in which case you could give this nice concoction
その場合
水銀とヒ素の
03:49
of mercury and arsenic --
混合薬で治療できます
03:52
as long as you didn't overdose them and kill them.
やり過ぎて
死なせなければですが
03:56
Beyond these sorts of things,
この種の治療以外では
04:01
a medical doctor didn't have a lot that they could do.
医者に出来ることは
そんなにありませんでした
04:03
This was when the core structure of medicine
医療の基礎が
できあがったのは
04:08
was created --
この頃です
04:10
what it meant to be good at what we did
良い医療とは何か
04:12
and how we wanted to build medicine to be.
医療のあり方が
定義されたのです
04:15
It was at a time
その頃はまだ
04:17
when what was known you could know,
存在する知識を
全て知り
04:19
you could hold it all in your head, and you could do it all.
全てを記憶し
1人で何でもできる時代でした
04:21
If you had a prescription pad,
薬が処方できて
04:24
if you had a nurse,
看護師がいて
04:26
if you had a hospital
患者を回復させられる病院や
04:28
that would give you a place to convalesce, maybe some basic tools,
基本的な器具さえあれば
04:30
you really could do it all.
医者が自分で
何でもできたのです
04:33
You set the fracture, you drew the blood,
骨折の処置をし
採血し
04:35
you spun the blood,
血液を遠心分離機にかけ
04:38
looked at it under the microscope,
顕微鏡で見ることが
できました
04:40
you plated the culture, you injected the antiserum.
細菌培養をし
血清を注射し—
04:42
This was a life as a craftsman.
医者は職人だったのです
04:45
As a result, we built it around
その結果 築き上げられた
04:50
a culture and set of values
文化と価値観は
04:53
that said what you were good at
良い医者とは
04:55
was being daring,
度胸があり
04:58
at being courageous,
勇敢で
05:00
at being independent and self-sufficient.
1人で何でも出来る
ということでした
05:02
Autonomy was our highest value.
自立性が最も
重要だったのです
05:06
Go a couple generations forward
しかし数世代が経って
05:12
to where we are, though,
現在の我々の時代は
05:14
and it looks like a completely different world.
すっかり様変わりした
ように見えます
05:16
We have now found treatments
何万もある
人間の病気に対する
05:18
for nearly all of the tens of thousands of conditions
何万もある
人間の病気に対する
05:21
that a human being can have.
治療法がわかっています
05:25
We can't cure it all.
全てを治癒できる
わけではないし
05:27
We can't guarantee that everybody will live a long and healthy life.
健康長寿を
全人類に保証もできませんが
05:29
But we can make it possible
それに近いことが
可能になりつつあります
05:32
for most.
それに近いことが
可能になりつつあります
05:34
But what does it take?
でも それには
何が必要でしょう?
05:37
Well, we've now discovered
現在4千もの
05:39
4,000 medical and surgical procedures.
内科的・外科的
治療法が存在し
05:41
We've discovered 6,000 drugs
認可されている薬は
05:45
that I'm now licensed to prescribe.
6千もあります
05:48
And we're trying to deploy this capability,
これだけのものを
05:51
town by town,
1つ1つの町の
05:53
to every person alive --
1人1人に
届けようとしています
05:55
in our own country,
自国はもちろん
05:59
let alone around the world.
世界中にもです
06:01
And we've reached the point where we've realized,
また 医療の面でも
06:03
as doctors,
ついに 医者として
06:06
we can't know it all.
全ての知識を身につけ
06:08
We can't do it all
全ての処置を
自分で行うことは
06:10
by ourselves.
無理な段階に達したのです
06:13
There was a study where they looked
入院患者1人を世話するのに
06:15
at how many clinicians it took to take care of you
何名の医療関係者が必要かを
06:17
if you came into a hospital,
年代別に
06:19
as it changed over time.
調べた研究があります
06:21
And in the year 1970,
1970 年には
06:23
it took just over two full-time equivalents of clinicians.
フルタイムの医療関係者
2人分の仕事量でした
06:25
That is to say,
とは言っても それは
06:28
it took basically the nursing time
ほとんどが看護の時間で
06:30
and then just a little bit of time for a doctor
通常1日に1度の
医師の回診の時間を
06:33
who more or less checked in on you
通常1日に1度の
医師の回診の時間を
06:35
once a day.
少し足したものでした
06:37
By the end of the 20th century,
二十世紀終わりには
06:39
it had become more than 15 clinicians
同様のごく一般的患者に
15名以上の
06:42
for the same typical hospital patient --
医療関係者が
対応するようになりました
06:45
specialists, physical therapists,
複数の専門医や
理学療法士
06:48
the nurses.
看護師たちです
06:51
We're all specialists now,
今や 我々皆が
専門分野を持っていて
06:54
even the primary care physicians.
家庭医ですら
専門医と言えます
06:56
Everyone just has
誰もが治療全体の
06:58
a piece of the care.
一部だけを
受け持っているのです
07:00
But holding onto that structure we built
その現状で
07:03
around the daring, independence,
大胆で
1人で何でもできる人材を基に
07:05
self-sufficiency
大胆で
1人で何でもできる人材を基に
07:07
of each of those people
構成された医療制度は
07:09
has become a disaster.
機能しなくなっているわけです
07:12
We have trained, hired and rewarded people
我々は一匹狼の
カウボーイのような人材を
07:14
to be cowboys.
育て 雇い 賞賛してきました
07:18
But it's pit crews that we need,
しかし現在
必要とされているのは
07:21
pit crews for patients.
患者のための
ピットクルーです
07:24
There's evidence all around us:
その証拠は
あちこちにあります
07:26
40 percent of our coronary artery disease patients
我々の社会における
07:28
in our communities
冠状動脈疾患の
患者の 40% は
07:31
receive incomplete or inappropriate care.
不完全あるいは
不適切な治療を受けています
07:33
60 percent
喘息患者や
07:37
of our asthma, stroke patients
脳卒中患者の 60% が
07:39
receive incomplete or inappropriate care.
不完全あるいは
不適切な治療を受けています
07:42
Two million people come into hospitals
2百万人もの患者が
07:46
and pick up an infection
元々持っていなかった病気に
07:49
they didn't have
病院で感染しています
07:51
because someone failed to follow
誰かが基本的な
感染予防策を
07:53
the basic practices of hygiene.
実行しなかったからです
07:56
Our experience
実際の所
07:59
as people who get sick,
病気になり
08:01
need help from other people,
助けが必要になれば
08:03
is that we have amazing clinicians
素晴らしい医者を
08:05
that we can turn to --
頼りにすることが出来ます
08:08
hardworking, incredibly well-trained and very smart --
献身的で 素晴らしい教育を受けた
頭脳明晰な人々です
08:10
that we have access to incredible technologies
目を見張るような
テクノロジーにも
08:13
that give us great hope,
大いに期待できます
08:16
but little sense
でもこれらのものが
08:18
that it consistently all comes together for you
治療のそれぞれのステップで
必要に応じ
08:20
from start to finish
上手くまとまり
使われているとは
08:24
in a successful way.
とても思えません
08:27
There's another sign
ピットクルーが
必要だという
08:30
that we need pit crews,
兆候は他にもあります
08:32
and that's the unmanageable cost
それは我々の手に余る
08:34
of our care.
医療費です
08:37
Now we in medicine, I think,
我々医療関係者からすると
08:40
are baffled by this question of cost.
医療費問題には
当惑させられます
08:42
We want to say, "This is just the way it is.
「これが現実なんだ」「必要なコストなんだ」と
言いたくなります
08:44
This is just what medicine requires."
「これが現実なんだ」「必要なコストなんだ」と
言いたくなります
08:48
When you go from a world
時代が変わり
08:50
where you treated arthritis with aspirin,
関節炎には大して効果もない
08:52
that mostly didn't do the job,
アスピリンを
処方していたのが
08:55
to one where, if it gets bad enough,
今や酷いケースには
08:58
we can do a hip replacement, a knee replacement
股関節・膝関節
置換を施し
09:00
that gives you years, maybe decades,
数年から数十年の
不自由のない
09:02
without disability,
生活を与えられるように
なりました
09:05
a dramatic change,
劇的な変化です
09:07
well is it any surprise
10 セントのアスピリンより
09:09
that that $40,000 hip replacement
4万ドルの股関節置換の方が
09:11
replacing the 10-cent aspirin
高価だというのは
09:14
is more expensive?
驚くことでもない
09:16
It's just the way it is.
そういうものなのだと
09:18
But I think we're ignoring certain facts
でも医療の側ができる事を
09:21
that tell us something about what we can do.
示唆するデータもあるのです
09:23
As we've looked at the data
複雑さが増した結果
09:28
about the results that have come
複雑さが増した結果
09:30
as the complexity has increased,
何が起きたかデータを見て
分かったことは
09:33
we found
何が起きたかデータを見て
分かったことは
09:35
that the most expensive care
最も高価な治療法が
09:37
is not necessarily the best care.
最も良い治療法だとは
限らないということです
09:39
And vice versa,
逆に
09:42
the best care
最も良い治療法が
09:44
often turns out to be the least expensive --
最も安価なもの
09:46
has fewer complications,
合併症の少ない
09:49
the people get more efficient at what they do.
上手くこなしやすいもの
であったりします
09:52
And what that means
つまり
09:55
is there's hope.
望みはあるわけです
09:57
Because [if] to have the best results,
もし 最良の結果を
得るためには
10:00
you really needed the most expensive care
国内 あるいは世界中で
10:03
in the country, or in the world,
最も高価な治療法が
必要だとしたら
10:06
well then we really would be talking about rationing
誰を国の医療保険から
振るい落とすか
10:08
who we're going to cut off from Medicare.
議論していかなければ
ならないでしょう
10:11
That would be really our only choice.
他に手はありません
10:15
But when we look at the positive deviants --
しかし「良い逸脱」に目を向け
10:19
the ones who are getting the best results
最も安価で
最高の結果を出している
10:21
at the lowest costs --
治療法を調べてみると—
10:24
we find the ones that look the most like systems
最もシステム化されたものが
10:26
are the most successful.
最も成功しているのです
10:29
That is to say, they found ways
つまりそこでは
10:31
to get all of the different pieces,
別々の要素
10:34
all of the different components,
別々の部品を
10:36
to come together into a whole.
上手くまとめる方法を
見つけているということです
10:38
Having great components is not enough,
優れた部品があるだけでは
不十分なのに
10:41
and yet we've been obsessed in medicine with components.
医療に関して我々は
部品にこだわってきました
10:44
We want the best drugs, the best technologies,
最高の薬
最高のテクノロジー
10:48
the best specialists,
最高の専門医を
求めてきました
10:51
but we don't think too much
しかしそれらが
どう統合されるかは
10:54
about how it all comes together.
あまり考えて
きませんでした
10:56
It's a terrible design strategy actually.
お粗末な設計戦略です
10:59
There's a famous thought experiment
有名な思考実験に
11:03
that touches exactly on this
まさに これを
扱ったものがあります
11:06
that said, what if you built a car
「最高の部品だけ集めて一台の車を
組み立てたらどうなるか?」
11:08
from the very best car parts?
「最高の部品だけ集めて一台の車を
組み立てたらどうなるか?」
11:10
Well it would lead you to put in Porsche brakes,
ブレーキはポルシェ
11:13
a Ferrari engine,
エンジンはフェラーリ
11:16
a Volvo body, a BMW chassis.
車体はボルボで
シャーシはBMW
11:18
And you put it all together and what do you get?
これらを集めて組み立てたら
何ができるでしょう?
11:21
A very expensive pile of junk that does not go anywhere.
動きもしない
高価なガラクタです
11:24
And that is what medicine can feel like sometimes.
これが時に
医療現場で感じることです
11:28
It's not a system.
システムになっていないのです
11:33
Now a system, however,
そのシステムなんですが
11:36
when things start to come together,
システムが
上手く働き出すと
11:38
you realize it has certain skills
システムとして
振る舞うための
11:41
for acting and looking that way.
特定の能力があることに
気付きます
11:44
Skill number one
能力その1は
11:47
is the ability to recognize success
「成功を認識する能力と
問題を認識する能力」です
11:49
and the ability to recognize failure.
「成功を認識する能力と
問題を認識する能力」です
11:51
When you are a specialist,
専門医は
11:54
you can't see the end result very well.
最終的な結果を
うまく予想できません
11:56
You have to become really interested in data,
データにとても深い関心を
持つ必要があります
11:59
unsexy as that sounds.
地味な仕事ですね
12:02
One of my colleagues is a surgeon in Cedar Rapids, Iowa,
アイオワ州の
シーダーラピッズ市で
12:04
and he got interested in the question of,
外科医をしている同僚が
12:07
well how many CT scans did they do
市内で CT スキャンが
どれほど
12:11
for their community in Cedar Rapids?
行われているのか
興味を持ちました
12:13
He got interested in this
その理由は
12:15
because there had been government reports,
政府の報告書や
新聞・雑誌記事に
12:17
newspaper reports, journal articles
CT スキャンが
12:19
saying that there had been too many CT scans done.
過度に実施されていると
書かれていたからです
12:21
He didn't see it in his own patients.
彼自身の患者には
あてはまらないので
12:24
And so he asked the question, "How many did we do?"
「ここではどうなんだろう?」と思い
12:28
and he wanted to get the data.
データを集めることにしました
12:30
It took him three months.
それには3ヶ月かかりました
12:32
No one had asked this question in his community before.
これを調べた人は
いなかったのです
12:34
And what he found was that,
データから分かったのは
12:37
for the 300,000 people in their community,
地域住民 30 万人に対して
12:39
in the previous year
前年に
12:41
they had done 52,000 CT scans.
5万2千回もの CT スキャンが
行われていました
12:43
They had found a problem.
問題があったわけです
12:48
Which brings us to skill number two a system has.
そこでシステムが持つ
2番目の能力に移ります
12:51
Skill one, find where your failures are.
能力その1は
「問題を見つける」でした
12:56
Skill two is devise solutions.
能力その2は
「解決策を作る」です
12:59
I got interested in this
私がこれに興味を持ったのは
13:03
when the World Health Organization came to my team
世界保健機関が
私のチームを訪ね
13:05
asking if we could help with a project
手術での死亡率を減らす
プロジェクトへの
13:07
to reduce deaths in surgery.
協力を求められた時です
13:09
The volume of surgery had spread
外科手術は
数の上では
13:11
around the world,
世界に増え広まって
いましたが
13:13
but the safety of surgery
その安全性は
13:15
had not.
広まっていませんでした
13:17
Now our usual tactics for tackling problems like these
通常 このような
問題の解決には
13:19
are to do more training,
訓練時間を増やしたり
13:22
give people more specialization
人をより専門化させたり
13:24
or bring in more technology.
テクノロジーを
取り入れたりします
13:27
Well in surgery, you couldn't have people who are more specialized
しかし 外科医は
皆すでに専門化しており
13:30
and you couldn't have people who are better trained.
十分な訓練を受けています
13:33
And yet we see unconscionable levels
にもかかわらず
異常な水準で
13:36
of death, disability
避けられたはずの
13:39
that could be avoided.
死亡や障害が
発生しています
13:43
And so we looked at what other high-risk industries do.
そこで他の
ハイリスクな業界に
13:45
We looked at skyscraper construction,
目を向けました
高層ビル建設や
13:47
we looked at the aviation world,
航空業界を調べて
13:49
and we found
我々が発見したのは
13:52
that they have technology, they have training,
テクノロジーや訓練の他に
もう1つ
13:54
and then they have one other thing:
使われているものが
あることでした
13:56
They have checklists.
チェックリストです
13:59
I did not expect
ハーバードの
外科医である私が
14:02
to be spending a significant part
多くの時間を費やして
14:04
of my time as a Harvard surgeon
チェックリストなどに
14:06
worrying about checklists.
頭を悩ませることになろうとは
思いもしませんでしたね
14:08
And yet, what we found
しかし我々が発見したのは
14:11
were that these were tools
それが専門家の能力を
更に引き出す
14:13
to help make experts better.
ツールだということです
14:16
We got the lead safety engineer for Boeing to help us.
我々はボーイングの
安全対策エンジニアに
14:19
Could we design a checklist for surgery?
手術用のチェックリストは作れるか
聞きました
14:23
Not for the lowest people on the totem pole,
専門性の低い作業者用
ではありません
14:26
but for the folks
外科医を含む
チーム全員が使える
14:28
who were all the way around the chain,
外科医を含む
チーム全員が使える
14:30
the entire team including the surgeons.
チェックリストです
14:32
And what they taught us
我々が学んだのは
14:34
was that designing a checklist
複雑さに対処するための
14:36
to help people handle complexity
チェックリストを作ることは
14:38
actually involves more difficulty than I had understood.
考えていたより
難しいということです
14:40
You have to think about things
皆が立ち止まって
リストを確認する
14:43
like pause points.
タイミングを考える
必要があります
14:45
You need to identify the moments in a process
危険が発生する前に
14:47
when you can actually catch a problem before it's a danger
問題を察知し対処すべき
タイミングを
14:50
and do something about it.
見つけ出さなければ
なりません
14:52
You have to identify
このチェックリストは
14:54
that this is a before-takeoff checklist.
離陸前チェックリストに
相当するものなのです
14:56
And then you need to focus on the killer items.
次に危険因子に注目します
14:59
An aviation checklist,
飛行のチェックリストとは—
15:02
like this one for a single-engine plane,
これは単発機用のものですが
15:04
isn't a recipe for how to fly a plane,
飛行の仕方の
手順ではありません
15:06
it's a reminder of the key things
チェックをしないと
忘れられたり見逃される
15:08
that get forgotten or missed
チェックをしないと
忘れられたり見逃される
15:10
if they're not checked.
重要項目の
備忘録なのです
15:13
So we did this.
我々はこれを作りました
15:15
We created a 19-item two-minute checklist
手術チーム向けの
19 項目からなる
15:17
for surgical teams.
2分でできる
チェックリストです
15:20
We had the pause points
手を止めて
確認するタイミングは
15:22
immediately before anesthesia is given,
麻酔開始の直前
15:24
immediately before the knife hits the skin,
皮膚を切開する直前
15:27
immediately before the patient leaves the room.
患者が手術室を
出る直前です
15:30
And we had a mix of dumb stuff on there --
当然あってしかるべき
項目もあれば—
15:33
making sure an antibiotic is given in the right time frame
抗生物質の適時投与の
項目などがそうですが
15:36
because that cuts the infection rate by half --
これで感染率が
半分に下がります
15:39
and then interesting stuff,
一方で変わった項目もあります
15:41
because you can't make a recipe for something as complicated as surgery.
手術ほど複雑なものに
決まった手順は作れませんが
15:43
Instead, you can make a recipe
チームが想定外のことに
15:46
for how to have a team that's prepared for the unexpected.
備えるための
手順は作れます
15:48
And we had items like making sure everyone in the room
例えば手術室にいる
全員の名前を
15:51
had introduced themselves by name at the start of the day,
手術開始時に紹介し合う
項目を作りました
15:54
because you get half a dozen people or more
なぜなら
何人ものメンバーが
15:57
who are sometimes coming together as a team
その日初めてチームとして
15:59
for the very first time that day that you're coming in.
参加するという事も
あるからです
16:02
We implemented this checklist
我々はこのチェックリストを
16:05
in eight hospitals around the world,
世界中の8つの病院で
導入しました
16:07
deliberately in places from rural Tanzania
意図して広く
タンザニアの田舎から
16:10
to the University of Washington in Seattle.
シアトルのワシントン大学まで
選びました
16:12
We found that after they adopted it
導入後の調査では
16:15
the complication rates fell
合併症発生率が
16:18
35 percent.
35% 下がりました
16:20
It fell in every hospital it went into.
導入した全ての病院でです
16:22
The death rates fell
死亡率は
16:25
47 percent.
47% 下がりました
16:27
This was bigger than a drug.
投薬より大きい成果です
16:30
(Applause)
(拍手)
16:32
And that brings us
ここで大切なのが
16:38
to skill number three,
能力その3です
16:40
the ability to implement this,
「実践する能力」です
16:43
to get colleagues across the entire chain
関係者全員に
16:45
to actually do these things.
このチェックリストを
実践してもらうことです
16:48
And it's been slow to spread.
でも普及には
時間がかかっており
16:51
This is not yet our norm in surgery --
まだ手術時の標準には
なっていませんし
16:53
let alone making checklists
分娩室や他の分野の
16:57
to go onto childbirth and other areas.
チェックリストもできていません
16:59
There's a deep resistance
強い抵抗があるのです
17:02
because using these tools
なぜなら こういった
ツールを使うことは
17:04
forces us to confront
我々がシステムではないことを
17:06
that we're not a system,
直視させ
17:08
forces us to behave with a different set of values.
異なる価値観での行動を
強いるからです
17:10
Just using a checklist
単にチェックリストを
使うことが
17:13
requires you to embrace different values from the ones we've had,
新しい価値観の
受け入れを求めるのです
17:15
like humility,
例えば 謙虚さ
17:18
discipline,
規律
17:22
teamwork.
チームワークなどです
17:25
This is the opposite of what we were built on:
我々が育てられたものとは
逆のものです
17:27
independence, self-sufficiency,
独立性 自己完結性
17:30
autonomy.
自主性などです
17:32
I met an actual cowboy, by the way.
ところで本物のカウボーイに
会う機会があって
17:35
I asked him, what was it like
千頭もの牛を連れ
何百キロもの距離を
17:38
to actually herd a thousand cattle
移動させるのは
どんなものなのか
17:41
across hundreds of miles?
尋ねてみました
17:43
How did you do that?
どうしたら
そんなことができるのか?
17:45
And he said, "We have the cowboys stationed at distinct places all around."
「あちこちにカウボーイを
配置しているんだ」と彼は答えました
17:47
They communicate electronically constantly,
彼らは電子通信で
常に連絡を取り合うし
17:50
and they have protocols and checklists
対応事項全ての
17:53
for how they handle everything --
約束事や
チェックリストがあるんです—
17:55
(Laughter)
(笑)
17:57
-- from bad weather
悪天候から
17:59
to emergencies or inoculations for the cattle.
緊急事態や家畜の予防接種まで
全てにです
18:01
Even the cowboys are pit crews now.
カウボーイですら
今やピットクルーなんです
18:04
And it seemed like time
私達 医者にも
いよいよ
18:08
that we become that way ourselves.
そうなる時が
来たようです
18:10
Making systems work
システムを上手く
働かせるのは
18:12
is the great task of my generation
我々の世代の
医師や科学者の
18:14
of physicians and scientists.
重大な仕事です
18:17
But I would go further and say
更に こうも感じます
18:19
that making systems work,
医療 教育 気候の変化
18:21
whether in health care, education,
貧困の根絶などの
問題に当たる
18:23
climate change,
システムを上手く
働かせるのは
18:25
making a pathway out of poverty,
我々の世代が
一丸となって
18:27
is the great task of our generation as a whole.
携わる必要のある
重大な仕事なのだと
18:29
In every field, knowledge has exploded,
あらゆる分野で
知識が激増しました
18:33
but it has brought complexity,
その結果 複雑さや
18:36
it has brought specialization.
専門化がもたらされました
18:38
And we've come to a place where we have no choice
我々はこの問題を認識し
18:41
but to recognize,
対応していかなくては
なりません
18:43
as individualistic as we want to be,
人間 ユニークで
ありたいものですが
18:45
complexity requires
世の複雑さに
対応するためには
18:48
group success.
集団としての成功が
大切です
18:51
We all need to be pit crews now.
我々は今 皆が
ピットクルーになる必要があるのです
18:53
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
18:57
(Applause)
(拍手)
18:59
Translator:Keiichi Kudo
Reviewer:YUTAKA KOMATSU

sponsored links

Atul Gawande - Surgeon and journalist
Surgeon by day and public health journalist by night, Atul Gawande explores how doctors can dramatically improve their practice using something as simple as a checklist.

Why you should listen

Atul Gawande is author of three best-selling books: Complications, a memoir of surgery; Better: A Surgeon's Notes on Performance; and The Checklist Manifesto. His new book is Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End.

He is also a surgeon at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, a staff writer for The New Yorker, and a professor at Harvard Medical School and the Harvard School of Public Health. He has won the Lewis Thomas Prize for Writing about Science, a MacArthur Fellowship, and two National Magazine Awards. In his work in public health, he is Executive Director of Ariadne Labs, a joint center for health systems innovation, and chairman of Lifebox, a nonprofit organization making surgery safer globally.

Photo: Aubrey Calo

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.