sponsored links
TEDxWomen 2011

Laura Carstensen: Older people are happier

ローラ・カーステンセン:年をとるほど幸せになる

December 6, 2011

20世紀、寿命に前例にないほど多くの年数が加わりました。それでも、生活の質は良くなっているのでしょうか。意外にもそうなのです!心理学者のローラ・カーステンセンは、人は年を取るにつれ、幸せに、満足に、そして世界を前向きに捉えると実証する研究をTEDxWomenで紹介します。

Laura Carstensen - Psychologist
Laura Carstensen is the director of the Stanford Center on Longevity, and has extensively studied the effects on wellbeing of extended lifetimes. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
People are living longer
人々は長生きし
00:15
and societies are getting grayer.
社会は高齢化している
00:17
You hear about it all the time.
皆さんは常にそう耳にするでしょう
00:19
You read about it in your newspapers.
新聞で読んだりもしますね
00:21
You hear about it on your television sets.
テレビで聞いたりもしますか
00:23
Sometimes I'm concerned
時折 私は気になるのです
00:25
that we hear about it so much
頻繁にこの話を聞くので
00:27
that we've come to accept longer lives
長生きを受け入れるようになったのではないかと
00:29
with a kind of a complacency,
いわば自己満足で いや
00:32
even ease.
それどころか 安易に
00:34
But make no mistake,
でも 誤解しないでください
00:36
longer lives can
長生きすることで
00:39
and, I believe, will
あらゆる世代で
00:41
improve quality of life
生活の質を改善できるし
00:43
at all ages.
そうなると確信しています
00:45
Now to put this in perspective,
ここで 全体的に考えるべく
00:47
let me just zoom out for a minute.
しばし 背景に目を向けましょう
00:49
More years were added
20世紀の間に増えた
00:52
to average life expectancy
平均寿命の
00:55
in the 20th century
年数は
00:57
than all years added
人類の進化の過程における
00:59
across all prior millennia
何千年もの間に増えたすべての分の
01:02
of human evolution combined.
平均寿命年数を超えています
01:06
In the blink of an eye,
一瞬にして
01:09
we nearly doubled the length of time
自分たちが生きている時間の長さを
01:11
that we're living.
ほぼ2倍にしました
01:14
So if you ever feel like you don't have this aging thing quite pegged,
この高齢化が止まらないと不安に思っているのなら
01:16
don't kick yourself.
嘆かなくても大丈夫です
01:19
It's brand new.
これは最新の出来事です
01:21
And because fertility rates fell
しかも出生率が
01:23
across that very same period
平均寿命の増加と同時に
01:25
that life expectancy was going up,
低下しているので
01:27
that pyramid
かつてのピラミッド構造
01:31
that has always represented the distribution of age in the population,
年代別の人口分布を示すものとして
01:33
with many young ones at the bottom
今までは常に 多くの若者を底辺として、
01:36
winnowed to a tiny peak of older people
老齢になるまで生き抜いてきた少数の高齢者を
01:39
who make it and survive to old age
頂点とするそのピラミッド構造の形が
01:42
is being reshaped
長方形へと
01:44
into a rectangle.
変形しつつあります
01:46
And now, if you're the kind of person
もし 皆さんが人口統計に
01:49
who can get chills from population statistics,
不安を感じるような人ならば
01:51
these are the ones that should do it.
まさにそうすべき人たちなのです
01:55
Because what that means
なぜなら このお話は
01:57
is that for the first time in the history of the species,
人類の歴史で初めて
01:59
the majority of babies born
先進国で生まれた
02:02
in the Developed World
赤ちゃんの大部分が
02:04
are having the opportunity
成長する機会を持っているということに
02:06
to grow old.
等しいからです
02:09
How did this happen?
どうしてこんなことが起きたのでしょう
02:11
Well we're no genetically hardier than our ancestors were
私たちは1万年前の祖先ほど
02:14
10,000 years ago.
遺伝的にたくましくはないですから
02:16
This increase in life expectancy
こうした平均寿命の延びは
02:18
is the remarkable product of culture --
注目すべき文化の産物なのです
02:20
the crucible
この文化とはつまり
02:23
that holds science and technology
健康や福祉を改善するための
02:25
and wide-scale changes in behavior
科学技術や大規模な行動変化を束ねた
02:27
that improve health and well-being.
るつぼなのです
02:30
Through cultural changes,
文化的な変化を通じ
02:33
our ancestors
私たちの祖先は
02:35
largely eliminated early death
大部分が早死を避け
02:37
so that people can now live out their full lives.
それで 人々は今 存分に一生を過ごせるようになりました
02:40
Now there are problems associated with aging --
目下 高齢化に伴う問題があります
02:44
diseases, poverty, loss of social status.
つまり 病気 貧困 社会的地位の喪失です
02:47
It's hardly time to rest on our laurels.
成功に甘んじている場合ではありません
02:50
But the more we learn about aging,
しかし、高齢化について学べば学ぶほど
02:52
the clearer it becomes
はっきりしてくるのは
02:54
that a sweeping downward course
完全に下り坂だというのは
02:56
is grossly inaccurate.
まったくもって正確ではない、ということです
02:58
Aging brings some rather remarkable improvements --
高齢化は進歩をもたらします
03:01
increased knowledge, expertise --
知識の増強 専門技術の向上
03:05
and emotional aspects of life improve.
それに生活での感情的側面が好転するのです
03:08
That's right,
そう まさに
03:14
older people are happy.
高齢者は幸せなのです
03:16
They're happier than middle-aged people,
この人たちは中高年より幸せですし
03:19
and younger people certainly.
若者と比べればなおさらです
03:21
Study after study
しかも 研究の度に
03:23
is coming to the same conclusion.
同じ結論に達しています
03:25
The CDC recently conducted a survey
最近 米国疾病予防管理センターはある調査を行いました
03:27
where they asked respondents simply to tell them
前の週に深刻な精神的苦痛を
03:30
whether they experienced significant psychological distress
経験したかどうかを語るよう 被験者に
03:33
in the previous week.
お願いするだけのものでした
03:35
And fewer older people answered affirmatively to that question
その結果 この質問に「はい」と答えた高齢者は
03:37
than middle-aged people,
中高年よりも また
03:40
and younger people as well.
若者よりも少なかったのです
03:42
And a recent Gallup poll
さらに 最近のギャラップ世論調査では
03:44
asked participants
対象者に 前日に
03:46
how much stress and worry and anger
どの程度 ストレス 心配事 怒りを
03:48
they had experienced the previous day.
感じたか尋ねました
03:50
And stress, worry, anger
その結果 ストレス 心配事 怒りは
03:52
all decrease with age.
みな 年齢と共に減少したのです
03:56
Now social scientists call this the paradox of aging.
社会科学者は これを高齢化のパラドックスと呼んでいます
04:00
After all, aging is not a piece of cake.
つまり高齢化は単純な話ではないのです
04:03
So we've asked all sorts of questions
そこで 私たちはあらゆる質問をし
04:06
to see if we could undo this finding.
この調査結果を覆せるか調べました
04:08
We've asked whether it may be
私たちは 果たして
04:12
that the current generations of older people
現代の高齢者世代が
04:14
are and always have been
いつの時代でも最高と
04:17
the greatest generations.
言えるかどうか訊いてみました
04:19
That is that younger people today
つまり 今日の若者は一般的に
04:21
may not typically experience these improvements
年をとっても 今お話ししたような進歩は
04:23
as they grow older.
経験しないかもしれないということです
04:26
We've asked,
さらに私たちは質問しました
04:28
well maybe older people are just trying to put a positive spin
まあ 高齢者は そうでなければ気のめいるような暮らしを
04:30
on an otherwise depressing existence.
ことさら前向きに評価しようとしているだけでしょうが
04:33
(Laughter)
(笑い)
04:35
But the more we've tried to disavow this finding,
しかし このような研究結果を否定しようとすればするほど
04:37
the more evidence we find
逆に、それを裏付ける
04:40
to support it.
証拠が見つかるのです
04:42
Years ago, my colleagues and I embarked on a study
何年も前に 私は同僚とある研究を始め
04:44
where we followed the same group of people over a 10-year period.
10年にわたり 同じ集団を追跡調査しました
04:46
Originally the sample was aged 18 to 94.
当初 被験者は18歳から94歳でした
04:49
And we studied whether and how their emotional experiences changed
そして 成長するにつれ 感情的経験が変わるかどうか また
04:53
as they grew older.
どのように変わるか調べました
04:56
Our participants would carry electronic pagers
被験者はポケットベルを携帯し
04:58
for a week at a time,
無作為に
05:01
and we'd page them throughout the day and evenings at random times.
昼夜を通して ポケットベルに連絡を入れました
05:03
And every time we paged them
そして 連絡を入れる度に
05:06
we'd ask them to answer several questions --
いくつかの質問に答えるようお願いしました 例えば
05:08
On a one to seven scale, how happy are you right now?
7段階評価で 今どのくらい幸せですか とか
05:10
How sad are you right now?
今どのくらい悲しいですか とか
05:13
How frustrated are you right now? --
今どのくらい欲求不満ですか といったもので
05:15
so that we could get a sense
それで 被験者が日々の生活で
05:17
of the kinds of emotions and feelings they were having
感じている感情や気持ちの種類について
05:19
in their day-to-day lives.
私たちは感じ取ることができたのです
05:21
And using this intense study
さらに このような集中的な
05:23
of individuals,
対個人の研究を行うことで
05:25
we find that it's not one particular generation
他者よりも良い結果を出しているのは
05:27
that's doing better than the others,
ある特定の世代ではなく
05:31
but the same individuals over time
同じ個人が 時と共に
05:33
come to report relatively greater
楽観的経験を
05:36
positive experience.
報告するようになっているのです
05:38
Now you see this slight downturn
かなりの高齢の年代については
05:40
at very advanced ages.
わずかながらの低下が見られますが
05:43
And there is a slight downturn.
ほんの少し下がっているだけです
05:45
But at no point does it return
しかし 若かりし頃の
05:47
to the levels we see
レベルまでには
05:49
in early adulthood.
戻ることはありません
05:51
Now it's really too simplistic
ただそれだけで 高齢者が「幸せだ」と言うのは
05:53
to say that older people are "happy."
少し単純すぎます
05:57
In our study, they are more positive,
そこで私たちの研究では 高齢者はより前向きではあるのですが
06:01
but they're also more likely than younger people
さらに 高齢者は若者よりも
06:04
to experience mixed emotions --
入り混じった感情 すなわち
06:06
sadness at the same time you experience happiness;
幸福と同時に悲しみも経験しやすいことがわかりました
06:09
you know, that tear in the eye
ほら 友達に微笑んでいる時に
06:11
when you're smiling at a friend.
目に涙を浮かべているといったことですよ
06:13
And other research has shown
また 別の研究では
06:16
that older people seem to engage with sadness
高齢者は もっと楽に 悲しみと
06:18
more comfortably.
向き合っているようだと示しています
06:20
They're more accepting of sadness than younger people are.
若者より多く悲しみを受け入れているのです
06:22
And we suspect that this may help to explain
そして このことが なぜ高齢者が若者よりも
06:25
why older people are better than younger people
熱のこもった感情的論争や議論を解決するのに
06:28
at solving hotly-charged emotional conflicts and debates.
長けているのか説明できるかもしれない と私たちは思っています
06:31
Older people can view injustice
高齢者は 絶望ではなく
06:36
with compassion,
思いやりを持って
06:39
but not despair.
不公平を見ることができるのです
06:41
And all things being equal,
そして 全てのものが平等ならば
06:44
older people direct their cognitive resources,
高齢者は 注意力や記憶のような
06:46
like attention and memory,
認識の資源を
06:48
to positive information more than negative.
マイナスよりプラスの情報に向けるのです
06:50
If we show older, middle-aged, younger people images,
もし 皆さんがこのような
06:53
like the ones you see on the screen,
映像を 高齢者 中高年 若者に見せて
06:56
and we later ask them
できるだけ全てを思い出すよう
06:59
to recall all the images that they can,
後で私たちがお願いをした場合
07:01
older people, but not younger people,
若者ではなく 高齢者は
07:04
remember more positive images
マイナスの映像よりも
07:07
than negative images.
プラスの映像を覚えています
07:09
We've asked older and younger people
さらに 高齢者と若者に
07:11
to view faces in laboratory studies,
実験室で顔を見てもらうよう依頼しました
07:13
some frowning, some smiling.
そこには しかめ面もあれば 微笑みもありましたが
07:15
Older people look toward the smiling faces
その結果 高齢者は微笑みの方に目をやり
07:17
and away from the frowning, angry faces.
しかめ面や怒った顔を避けていました
07:20
In day-to-day life,
日々の生活においては
07:23
this translates into greater enjoyment
これは より大きな喜びや
07:25
and satisfaction.
満足という形になって現れていると言えます
07:27
But as social scientists, we continue to ask
しかし 社会科学者として 私たちは
07:31
about possible alternatives.
引き続き 他の可能性を探りました
07:33
We've said, well maybe older people
高齢者が比較的
07:35
report more positive emotions
前向きな感情を報告するのは
07:37
because they're cognitively impaired.
認識面が弱まっているせいなのかも知れない とか
07:39
(Laughter)
(笑い)
07:42
We've said, could it be
あるいは プラスの感情の方が
07:45
that positive emotions are simply easier to process than negative emotions,
マイナスの感情より簡単に処理できるので
07:47
and so you switch to the positive emotions?
プラスの感情に変えているなど
07:50
Maybe our neural centers in our brain
もしくは 脳内の神経中枢が
07:53
are degraded such
衰え そのことでもはや
07:55
that we're unable to process negative emotions anymore.
マイナスの感情を処理できなくなっている であるとか
07:57
But that's not the case.
しかし それは違います
08:00
The most mentally sharp older adults
もっとも精神力高い高齢者が
08:02
are the ones who show this positivity effect the most.
このポジティブな感情処理をする人たちです
08:05
And under conditions where it really matters,
そして 本当に重要な状況では
08:09
older people do process the negative information
確かに 高齢者は プラスの情報と同様に
08:12
just as well as the positive information.
マイナスの情報も処理します
08:14
So how can this be?
では なぜこんなことになるのでしょう
08:17
Well in our research,
実は今までの研究によって
08:20
we've found that these changes
これらの変化は 唯一人間にのみ備わっている
08:22
are grounded fundamentally
時間を監視するという能力が しっかりあるということであり
08:24
in the uniquely human ability to monitor time --
しかもその監視できる時間には
08:26
not just clock time and calendar time,
単に時計やカレンダーだけではなく
08:29
but lifetime.
寿命までもが含まれるのだということを発見しました
08:31
And if there's a paradox of aging,
そして もし高齢化のパラドックスがあるならば
08:34
it's that recognizing that we won't live forever
それは 私たちが永遠には生きないという認識で
08:36
changes our perspective on life
人生への見方が肯定的に
08:39
in positive ways.
変わるということなのです
08:41
When time horizons are long and nebulous,
若い頃に顕著なように
08:44
as they typically are in youth,
計画対象期間が長く漠然としている時
08:47
people are constantly preparing,
人は たえず準備をして
08:49
trying to soak up all the information they possibly can,
できる限り 全ての情報を吸収しようとし
08:52
taking risks, exploring.
危険を冒し 探求していくのです
08:55
We might spend time with people we don't even like
私たちは どこか興味深いという理由で
08:57
because it's somehow interesting.
好きでもない人と時間を過ごすことすらあります
09:00
We might learn something unexpected.
そして実際 予想もしていないことまで学ぶこともあります
09:03
(Laughter)
(笑い)
09:05
We go on blind dates.
合コンだってありえます
09:07
(Laughter)
(笑い)
09:09
You know, after all,
まあ どのみち
09:11
if it doesn't work out, there's always tomorrow.
うまくいかなくても いつでも明日という日はあるのですから
09:13
People over 50
50歳以上の人々は
09:16
don't go on blind dates.
合コンはしないでしょうけれど
09:18
(Laughter)
(笑い)
09:21
As we age,
年を取るにつれ
09:26
our time horizons grow shorter
計画対象期間は短くなり
09:28
and our goals change.
目標が変わります
09:30
When we recognize that we don't have all the time in the world,
ずっとこの世にいるわけではないと気づけば
09:33
we see our priorities most clearly.
自分が何を優先すべきか 最もはっきり見えるのです
09:36
We take less notice of trivial matters.
そして 些細な事柄に注意が向かなくなり
09:38
We savor life.
人生を満喫するのです
09:41
We're more appreciative,
さらに もっと人に感謝をし
09:43
more open to reconciliation.
もっと和解を受け入れることでしょう
09:45
We invest in more emotionally important parts of life,
また人生の 感情的に重要な点に重きを置き
09:48
and life gets better,
人生がより良くなり
09:51
so we're happier day-to-day.
日々 いっそう幸せになるのです
09:54
But that same shift in perspective
しかし これと同じ視点の変化によって
09:57
leads us to have less tolerance than ever
これまでより 不公平に我慢が
09:59
for injustice.
できなくなります
10:02
By 2015,
2015年までには
10:04
there will be more people in the United States
アメリカで 60歳以上の人口が
10:06
over the age of 60
15歳以下よりも
10:09
than under 15.
多くなるでしょう
10:11
What will happen to societies
高齢者で頭でっかちになる社会に
10:14
that are top-heavy with older people?
何が起きるのでしょうか
10:16
The numbers won't determine
単なる数字が
10:19
the outcome.
結果を決めるわけではありません
10:22
Culture will.
文化が  決めるのです
10:24
If we invest in science and technology
もし 科学技術に投資して
10:27
and find solutions for the real problems
高齢者が直面する現実問題に対し
10:30
that older people face
解決法を見つけ
10:32
and we capitalize
しかも 高齢者の
10:35
on the very real strengths
極めて本質的な力を
10:37
of older people,
フルに生かすなら
10:39
then added years of life
追加された生存年数で
10:41
can dramatically improve quality of life
全ての年代において 劇的に
10:43
at all ages.
生活の質が改善されるのです
10:46
Societies with millions
そして 過去のどの世代よりも
10:48
of talented, emotionally stable citizens
健康的で教養がある
10:51
who are healthier and better educated
才能にあふれ 感情的に安定した
10:53
than any generations before them,
何百万もの市民を抱えながら
10:56
armed with knowledge
人生の実際問題に関する
10:58
about the practical matters of life
知識を武器にし しかも
11:00
and motivated
大きな問題の解決に
11:02
to solve the big issues
意欲的な社会は
11:04
can be better societies
私たちがこれまでに知っているよりも
11:06
than we have ever known.
良い社会になるはずです
11:09
My father, who is 92,
最後に 92歳になる父が
11:13
likes to say,
好んで言った言葉を引用します
11:16
"Let's stop talking only about
「高齢者をどう生かすのかだけを
11:18
how to save the old folks
話すのは止めて この人たちに
11:20
and start talking about
私たち皆をどう守ってもらうのかを
11:22
how to get them to save us all."
話し始めようではありませんか」
11:24
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
11:28
(Applause)
(拍手)
11:30
Translator:Yumi Akiyama
Reviewer:Ayako Kato

sponsored links

Laura Carstensen - Psychologist
Laura Carstensen is the director of the Stanford Center on Longevity, and has extensively studied the effects on wellbeing of extended lifetimes.

Why you should listen
Dr. Carstensen is Professor of Psychology and Public Policy at Stanford University, where she is the founding director of the Stanford Center on Longevity, which explores innovative ways to solve the problems of people over 50 and improve the well-being of people of all ages. She is best known in academia for socioemotional selectivity theory, a life-span theory of motivation. She is also the author of A Long Bright Future: An Action Plan for a Lifetime of Happiness, Health, and Financial Security — an updated edition will be released in 2011.
sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.