sponsored links
TED2012

Nancy Lublin: Texting that saves lives

ナンシー・ルブリン 「命を救う携帯メール」

February 29, 2012

ナンシー・ルブリンが自身の社会団体と共に、十代の若者を助けようと彼らに携帯メールを送ってみると、ルブリンは驚くべき実態に気付かされました。虐め・鬱・暴力といった問題を返信メールで明かしてくれたのです。これを機に、ルブリンは携帯メールに特化した相談サービスを設立しましたが、その結果は彼女の期待を凌ぐほどに重大なものかもしれません。

Nancy Lublin - Activist
As the CEO and Founder of Crisis Text Line, Nancy Lublin is using technology and data to help save lives. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
To most of you, this is a device
多くの人にとって 携帯電話は
00:17
to buy, sell, play games,
ショッピングやゲームをしたり
00:19
watch videos.
ビデオを観る為のデバイスに過ぎません
00:22
I think it might be a lifeline.
しかし 私は 携帯電話が
00:24
I think actually it might be able to save more lives
ペニシリンよりも 多くの命を救うことのできる
00:26
than penicillin.
ライフラインになり得ると考えています
00:28
Texting:
テクスティング(携帯メール)
00:30
I know I say texting and a lot of you think sexting,
テクスティングというと
セクスティングを思い浮かべて
00:31
a lot of you think about the lewd photos that you see --
わいせつな写真を 連想する人も多いでしょう
00:34
hopefully not your kids sending to somebody else --
皆さんのお子さんが ハマっていないといいですが
00:37
or trying to translate the abbreviations
また 略語の解読に手こずっていませんか
00:40
LOL, LMAO, HMU.
www (ry kwsk などです
00:42
I can help you with those later.
ご存知なければ 後でお教えします
00:45
But the parents in the room
しかし ここにいる皆さんは
00:47
know that texting is actually
子どもたちとコミュニケーションをとるのに
00:49
the best way to communicate with your kids.
メールするのが一番だと わかっているでしょう
00:50
It might be the only way to communicate with your kids.
メールが唯一の手段かもしれないですね
00:53
(Laughter)
(笑)
00:56
The average teenager sends 3,339 text messages a month,
10代の若者は1ヶ月あたり
平均3339通のメールを送ります
00:57
unless she's a girl, then it's closer to 4,000.
女の子ならこの数値は
4000近くになるでしょう
01:02
And the secret is she opens every single one.
また驚いた事に彼女たちは
全てのメールを開封しています
01:05
Texting has a 100 percent open rate.
メールの開封率は100%なのです
01:09
Now the parents are really alarmed.
親たちはびっくりですよね
01:13
It's a 100 percent open rate
100%です 保証しましょう
01:14
even if she doesn't respond to you
「何時に帰るの?」という
01:16
when you ask her when she's coming home for dinner.
メールに娘から返信がなくても
01:18
I promise she read that text.
ちゃんと読んではいるのです
01:19
And this isn't some suburban iPhone-using teen phenomenon.
これは郊外に住む若い
iPhoneユーザーだけの現象ではなく
01:21
Texting actually overindexes
少数派民族や都市部の
01:27
for minority and urban youth.
若者ほど携帯メールを利用します
01:28
I know this because at DoSomething.org,
なぜ私が そんな事を知っているかと言うと
01:31
which is the largest organization
私が所属する
''Do Something'' という
01:33
for teenagers and social change in America,
若者と社会変革のためのNPOが
01:35
about six months ago we pivoted
半年程前から
01:38
and started focusing on text messaging.
携帯メールに注目し始めたからです
01:40
We're now texting out to about 200,000 kids a week
現在 週あたり20万程の
子どもたちにメールをし
01:41
about doing our campaigns to make their schools more green
彼らが通う学校のエコ化を行ったり
01:45
or to work on homeless issues and things like that.
ホームレス問題解決などの活動を進めています
01:48
We're finding it 11 times more powerful than email.
パソコンのメールと比較して
11倍も効果が出ました
01:51
We've also found an unintended consequence.
しかし 想定していなかったことも起きました
01:55
We've been getting text messages back like these.
こんなメールが送られてくるのです
02:01
"I don't want to go to school today.
「今日は学校に行きたくない
02:04
The boys call me faggot."
みんなにホモって言われるから」
02:07
"I was cutting, my parents found out,
「リストカットをしてたけど
02:09
and so I stopped.
親に見つかって止められた
02:14
But I just started again an hour ago."
けど一時間前にまた始めちゃった」
02:15
Or, "He won't stop raping me.
「ずっとレイプされてるんです
02:18
He told me not to tell anyone.
口止めされてるの
02:21
It's my dad. Are you there?"
犯人は父です 助けてください」
02:22
That last one's an actual text message that we received.
最後のは 私たちが実際に受け取ったメールです
02:25
And yeah, we're there.
絶対に 助けだします
02:28
I will not forget the day we got that text message.
私はこのメールを見た日を忘れません
02:31
And so it was that day that we decided
その日のうちに
メール相談サービスを
02:33
we needed to build a crisis text hotline.
始める事を決意しました
02:36
Because this isn't what we do.
放っておけませんよ
02:39
We do social change.
私たちは社会変革をしているのです
02:41
Kids are just sending us these text messages
子どもたちは使い慣れた携帯メールで
02:42
because texting is so familiar and comfortable to them
助けを求めています
02:44
and there's nowhere else to turn
彼らにとっては
02:47
that they're sending them to us.
メールを送るほかはないのです
02:49
So think about it, a text hotline; it's pretty powerful.
どうです? このサービスは
なかなか心強いでしょう
02:51
It's fast, it's pretty private.
やり取りは早く プライバシーも守れます
02:53
No one hears you in a stall, you're just texting quietly.
文字を打つだけなら
盗み聞きされることもありません
02:55
It's real time.
しかも リアルタイムです
02:59
We can help millions of teens with counseling and referrals.
何百万人もの子どもたちを 救うことができます
03:01
That's great.
素晴らしいことです
03:04
But the thing that really makes this awesome is the data.
さらに素晴らしいことは
そこから得られる情報です
03:06
Because I'm not really comfortable just helping that girl
なぜなら カウンセリングをしたり
03:10
with counseling and referrals.
支援を与えるよりも
03:13
I want to prevent this shit from happening.
そもそも 問題を未然に防ぎたいからです
03:15
So think about a cop.
警察について考えてみましょう
03:18
There's something in New York City.
ニューヨークで事件が起こります
03:22
The police did it. It used to be just guess work, police work.
初めは警察は勘に頼って 事件を追っていました
03:23
And then they started crime mapping.
その後 彼らは犯罪マップを作成しました
03:26
And so they started following and watching
コソ泥や法廷に召喚された人など
犯罪に関するあらゆるデータを図解して
03:29
petty thefts, summonses, all kinds of things --
コソ泥や法廷に召喚された人など
犯罪に関するあらゆるデータを図解して
03:31
charting the future essentially.
今後の対策を立てていきました
03:34
And they found things like,
そして次のようなことが分かりました
03:36
when you see crystal meth on the street,
道端でシャブを目にしても
03:38
if you add police presence,
警察の存在を匂わせると
03:40
you can curb the otherwise inevitable spate
そうしなければ起こっていたであろう
03:42
of assaults and robberies that would happen.
暴行や強盗を 阻止することができるのです
03:45
In fact, the year after
実際に ニューヨーク警察が
03:48
the NYPD put CompStat in place,
CompStat というシステムを導入した後
03:49
the murder rate fell 60 percent.
殺人率が60%も下がったのです
03:52
So think about the data from a crisis text line.
メール相談から得られる
情報について考えてみてください
03:55
There is no census on bullying and dating abuse
これまでは 虐め 暴行 摂食障害
04:00
and eating disorders and cutting and rape --
リストカット レイプなどの集計は
04:03
no census.
一つもありませんでした
04:06
Maybe there's some studies, some longitudinal studies,
多くの資金と時間が掛かっている
04:08
that cost lots of money and took lots of time.
長期的な研究や
04:10
Or maybe there's some anecdotal evidence.
事例証拠は存在するかもしれません
04:13
Imagine having real time data
これらの問題一つひとつに対して
リアルタイムの情報が
04:15
on every one of those issues.
手に入ると想像してください
04:18
You could inform legislation.
法律に訴えることもできます
04:20
You could inform school policy.
学校の方針に訴えることもできます
04:22
You could say to a principal,
校長先生にこう言えます
04:23
"You're having a problem every Thursday at three o'clock.
「毎週木曜日の三時に 問題があるようですが
04:25
What's going on in your school?"
学校で何が起きているのですか?」
04:28
You could see the immediate impact of legislation
法律による迅速な対処が得られますし
04:30
or a hateful speech that somebody gives in a school assembly
生徒集会での 悪意あるスピーチにも
04:33
and see what happens as a result.
しかるべき対応が なされることになります
04:35
This is really, to me,
私にしてみれば 今述べたことが
04:39
the power of texting and the power of data.
携帯メールの力であり 情報の力なのです
04:40
Because while people are talking about data,
人々が 情報について話すとき
04:44
making it possible for Facebook
小学校の頃の友達を
04:46
to mine my friend from the third grade,
フェイスブックで見つけることができるとか
04:47
or Target to know when it's time for me to buy more diapers,
私がいつオムツを買いにくるか
お店が把握しているとか
04:50
or some dude to build a better baseball team,
よい野球チームが組めるとか
そういうことが大半です
04:53
I'm actually really excited about the power of data and the power of texting
でも私は 情報の力 そして
携帯メールの力に期待しています
04:56
to help that kid go to school,
あの少年が学校に行けるようにし
05:01
to help that girl stop cutting in the bathroom
あの子のリストカットを止めさせて
05:03
and absolutely to help that girl whose father's raping her.
絶対に 父親のレイプから彼女を守ります
05:05
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
05:09
(Applause)
(拍手)
05:12
Translator:Naoki Funahashi
Reviewer:Takahiro Shimpo

sponsored links

Nancy Lublin - Activist
As the CEO and Founder of Crisis Text Line, Nancy Lublin is using technology and data to help save lives.

Why you should listen

Nancy Lublin is Founder and CEO of Crisis Text Line, the nations first free, 24/7 text line for people in crisis. To date, almost 10 million text messages have come through the text line.

Nancy recently left her post as CEO of DoSomething.org, one of the largest global organizations for young people and social change. Previously, she founded Dress for Success, the organization that helps women transition from welfare to work. 

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.