sponsored links
TED2012

Liz Diller: A new museum wing ... in a giant bubble

リズ・ディラー: 美術館の新しい翼(よく)は巨大な泡

March 1, 2012

ありふれた建物の中に素晴らしい公共空間を作るには、どうすれば良いのでしょうか? リズ・ディラーが、ワシントンD.C.のハーシュホーン美術館における友好的で陽気(そしてセクシー)な増築のストーリーを語ってくれます。

Liz Diller - Designer
Liz Diller and her maverick firm DS+R bring a groundbreaking approach to big and small projects in architecture, urban design and art -- playing with new materials, tampering with space and spectacle in ways that make you look twice. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
私たちは空間というものを慣例的に
00:11
We conventionally divide space
個人と公共の領域に分けています
00:15
into private and public realms,
00:16
and we know these legal distinctions very well
私たちは法律的な個人と公共の
境目をよく知っています
なぜなら私たちは
00:20
because we've become experts
自らの財産と土地を守ることに
長けているからです
00:22
at protecting our private property and private space.
一方 私たちは
00:26
But we're less attuned
公共というもののニュアンスに
慣れていません
00:27
to the nuances of the public.
何が公共の空間を
特別なものにするのでしょうか?
00:31
What translates generic public space into qualitative space?
実は このテーマは
00:35
I mean, this is something
私たちのスタジオがこの10年間
00:36
that our studio has been working on
取り組んでいることで
00:38
for the past decade.
いくつかのケーススタディを
行ってきました
00:40
And we're doing this through some case studies.
私たちは多くの労力を使い
00:42
A large chunk of our work
00:43
has been put into transforming
廃墟となり誰も見向きもしなくなった
この工業施設を
00:45
this neglected industrial ruin
脱工業的で活気にあふれ
00:48
into a viable post-industrial space
過去と未来をつなぐ空間へと
00:51
that looks forward and backward
00:52
at the same time.
再生しています
00:53
And another huge chunk of our work
また 時代にそぐわなくなった場所を
00:56
has gone into making relevant
現在に結びつける活動にも
力を入れています
00:58
a site that's grown out of sync with its time.
リンカーンセンターでの例は
01:01
We've been working on democratizing Lincoln Center
普段はオペラチケットに300ドルも出せない
01:04
for a public that doesn't usually have $300
一般市民にも
その場が開かれるようにしました
01:08
to spend on an opera ticket.
私たちは公共の空間で
何かを食べたり
01:11
So we've been eating, drinking,
飲んだり考え事をしたり
生活したり
01:13
thinking, living public space
長い時間を過ごしています
01:15
for quite a long time.
そのことから わかることは
01:17
And it's taught us really one thing,
真に有用な公共空間を
作るためには
01:20
and that is to truly make good public space,
建築や都市計画
01:24
you have to erase the distinctions
風景やメディアデザイン
その他もろもろの
01:27
between architecture, urbanism,
区別を取り払う必要があるということです
01:29
landscape, media design
01:31
and so on.
これらの区別を
越えなくてはいけません
01:33
It really goes beyond distinction.
現在 私たちはワシントンD.C.で
01:35
Now we're moving onto Washington, D.C.
次のプロジェクトに
取り組んでいます
01:38
and we're working on another transformation,
ハーシュホーン博物館です
01:40
and that is for the existing Hirshhorn Museum
それはアメリカで
最も知られている公共広場
01:43
that's sited
01:45
on the most revered public space in America,
ナショナル・モール
に隣接しています
01:47
the National Mall.
ナショナル・モールは
01:50
The Mall is a symbol
アメリカ民主主義の
シンボルです
01:51
of American democracy.
素敵なことに
このシンボルは
01:54
And what's fantastic is that this symbol
ものや画像
01:57
is not a thing, it's not an image,
人工物ではなく
01:59
it's not an artifact,
空間なのです
02:01
actually it's a space,
両脇の建物によって形作られる
02:03
and it's kind of just defined by a line of buildings
ただの空間です
02:06
on either side.
02:08
It's a space where citizens can voice their discontent
市民が意見を述べ
力を示せる場所です
02:11
and show their power.
ここは アメリカ史における
02:12
It's a place where pivotal moments in American history
いくつもの歴史的瞬間の舞台となり
02:16
have taken place.
それらが永遠に刻み込まれています
02:18
And they're inscribed in there forever --
例えば ワシントン大行進や
02:20
like the march on Washington for jobs and freedom
マーティン・ルーサー・キングの
素晴らしいスピーチがありました
02:23
and the great speech that Martin Luther King gave there.
ベトナム戦争への抗議デモや
02:26
The Vietnam protests, the commemoration of all that died
エイズ流行の問題を訴えるデモ
02:30
in the pandemic of AIDS,
女性の性と生殖の権利を訴えたデモは
02:32
the march for women's reproductive rights,
つい最近のものです
02:35
right up until almost the present.
ナショナル・モールは
この国で市民が意見を唱える上で
02:38
The Mall is the greatest civic stage
最も偉大な場所なのです
02:41
in this country for dissent.
ナショナル・モールは
言論の自由そのものです
02:45
And it's synonymous with free speech,
たとえ明確に言いたいことが
分からなくてもです
02:49
even if you're not sure what it is that you have to say.
市民感情のはけ口と
なる場所なのかもしれません
02:51
It may just be a place for civic commiseration.
市民のエネルギーがあふれるモールと
02:57
There is a huge disconnect, we believe,
それを囲む博物館の間には
03:00
between the communicative and discursive space of the Mall
大きな壁があると
私たちは考えています
03:04
and the museums that line it to either side.
これらの博物館は多くの場合
受動的なのです
03:08
And that is that those museums are usually passive,
展示をする側の博物館と
03:12
they have passive relationships between the museum
情報の受け手としての観客の間には
03:15
as the presenter and the audience,
受動的な関係があります
03:17
as the receiver of information.
私たちは恐竜を見たり
03:19
And so you can see dinosaurs
昆虫や機関車のコレクションなどを
03:21
and insects and collections of locomotives
見ることができます
03:25
and all of that,
しかし そこに参加しているわけではなく
03:26
but you're really not involved;
ただ話を聴くだけです
03:28
you're being talked to.
2009年に リチャード ・ コシャレックが
03:30
When Richard Koshalek took over as director of the Hirshhorn
ハーシュホーン美術館の
ディレクターに就いたとき
03:34
in 2009,
彼は美術館が
03:36
he was determined to take advantage
合衆国で最もユニークな場所
すなわち―
03:39
of the fact that this museum was sited
連邦政府権力のお膝元にあることを
03:42
at the most unique place:
うまく利用したいと考えました
03:44
at the seat of power in the U.S.
芸術と政治は
03:45
And while art and politics
常に本質的かつ無条件で
密接に結びついているものですが
03:48
are inherently and implicitly together always and all the time,
ワシントンでは
ワシントン固有の
03:53
there could be some very special relationship
特別な関係性がありうる
と考えています
03:57
that could be forged here in its uniqueness.
芸術は究極的な意味において
04:01
The question is, is it possible ultimately
国家的・世界的な事柄に関する対話に
04:04
for art to insert itself
入っていくことができるのでしょうか?
04:06
into the dialogue of national and world affairs?
博物館は文化交流における
外交の役割を担えるのでしょうか?
04:09
And could the museum be an agent of cultural diplomacy?
ワシントン D.C.には180 以上の大使館
04:13
There are over 180 embassies in Washington D.C.
500以上のシンクタンクがあります
04:18
There are over 500 think tanks.
この知的で国際的なエネルギーを
04:21
There should be a way
取り込み 博物館を通して活かす方法が
04:22
of harnessing all of that intellectual and global energy
何かしらあるはずです
04:25
into, and somehow through, the museum.
それには 専門知識を持った
ブレーンが必要です
04:27
There should be some kind of brain trust.
そこで私たちが
ハーシュホーン美術館の
04:30
So the Hirshhorn, as we began to think about it,
手助けをすることになり
リチャードのチームと
04:34
and as we evolved the mission,
このミッションに取り組んでいます
04:36
with Richard and his team --
それは彼の活力の源泉と
なっています
04:38
it's really his life blood.
現代美術の展示を超えて
04:40
But beyond exhibiting contemporary art,
ハーシュホーンは公のフォーラム
04:44
the Hirshhorn will become a public forum,
芸術や文化 政治や政策に関する
04:47
a place of discourse
04:49
for issues around arts,
04:51
culture, politics and policy.
議論が行われる場所に
なろうとしています
それは世界経済フォーラムのような
国際的な影響力を持つでしょう
04:56
It would have the global reach of the World Economic Forum.
TEDカンファレンスのような学際的な場に
05:00
It would have the interdisciplinarity of the TED Conference.
そして 街角のような
気軽さを持つ場になるでしょう
05:03
It would have the informality of the town square.
この新しい構想を実現するには
05:08
And for this new initiative,
ハーシュホーン美術館は
05:10
the Hirshhorn would have to expand
現代的で柔軟性のある建物に
05:11
or appropriate a site
生まれ変わる必要があります
05:13
for a contemporary, deployable structure.
これがハーシュホーン美術館です
05:16
This is it. This is the Hirshhorn --
直径70メートルの
コンクリート製ドーナツです
05:17
so a 230-foot-diameter concrete doughnut
70年代初頭
05:20
designed in the early '70s
ゴードン・バンシャフトが設計しました
05:23
by Gordon Bunshaft.
武骨で物静か
05:24
It's hulking, it's silent,
閉塞的かつ尊大
05:26
it's cloistered, it's arrogant,
これはデザインの挑戦です
05:27
it's a design challenge.
建築家から憎まれながらも
愛される建物で
05:30
Architects love to hate it.
05:31
One redeeming feature
良いところの一つは
建物が地面から持ち上げられており
05:33
is it's lifted up off the ground
空っぽで何もない
05:35
and it's got this void,
中心部分を持っていることです
05:37
and it's got an empty core
その外観は企業や連邦政府のスタイルに
05:38
kind of in the spirit and that facade
よくあっているようです
05:41
very much corporate and federal style.
中心部分を囲むリング状の建物が
05:45
And around that space,
実際のギャラリーとなっています
05:47
the ring is actually galleries.
展示会をするのはとても難しいです
05:49
Very, very difficult to mount shows in there.
ハーシュホーンがオープンしたとき
05:51
When the Hirshhorn opened,
ニューヨーク・タイムズの評論家
05:53
Ada Louise Huxstable, the New York Times critic,
エイダ・ルイーズ・ハックステーブルは
05:55
had some choice words:
「モダンなネオ刑務所」
05:57
"Neo-penitentiary modern."
「不完全なコレクションのための
不完全な記念碑と不完全なモール」
05:59
"A maimed monument and a maimed Mall
と表現しました
06:02
for a maimed collection."
40年が経ち
06:03
Almost four decades later,
新しい進歩的プロジェクトにおいて
06:05
how will this building expand
この建物はどのように
拡張されるのでしょうか?
06:07
for a new progressive program?
一体どこに広げれば良いでしょう?
06:09
Where would it go?
ナショナル・モールの中に
06:10
It can't go in the Mall.
増築するスペースはありません
06:11
There is no space there.
中庭に新しい建物を作ることもできません
06:12
It can't go in the courtyard.
すでに風景と彫刻美術によっていっぱいです
06:14
It's already taken up by landscape and by sculptures.
中心の空間はどうでしょうか?
06:19
Well there's always the hole.
しかし どのようにすれば
この中央の空間を取り出し
06:21
But how could it take the space of that hole
外から見えるようにできるでしょうか?
06:25
and not be buried in it invisibly?
どうすれば象徴的なものになるでしょうか?
06:27
How could it become iconic?
06:29
And what language would it take?
どのような言葉を用いればよいでしょうか?
ハーシュホーンはモールの中でも
記念碑的な施設の中に位置しています
06:33
The Hirshhorn sits among the Mall's momumental institutions.
それらのほとんどは新古典主義です
重く不透明で
06:36
Most are neoclassical, heavy and opaque,
石やコンクリートで作られています
06:39
made of stone or concrete.
問題は
06:41
And the question is,
そこに居場所を見つけたとして
06:43
if one inhabits that space,
モールの材料は何になるのかです
06:45
what is the material of the Mall?
周りを囲む建物とは
異なる材料になるでしょう
06:48
It has to be different from the buildings there.
それは全く異なるものになるでしょう
06:51
It has to be something entirely different.
それは空気のようなものでしょう
06:53
It has to be air.
私たちはそれは光のようなものだとも
想像しています
06:55
In our imagination, it has to be light.
それは はかなく形のないものでしょう
06:57
It has to be ephemeral. It has to be formless.
そしてそれは自由なものでしょう
06:59
And it has to be free.
(ビデオ)
07:01
(Video)
これは大きなアイディアです
07:13
So this is the big idea.
巨大なエアバッグです
07:16
It's a giant airbag.
エアバッグは入れ物の
かたちを反映しつつも
07:18
The expansion takes the shape of its container
建物のてっぺんやら
端やらから
07:22
and it oozes out wherever it can --
溢れ出してきます
07:24
the top and sides.
詩的に言うのであれば
07:26
But more poetically,
ナショナル・モールに満ちる―
07:28
we like to think of the structure
民主主義の空気を吸いこんで
07:30
as inhaling the democratic air of the Mall,
内部に取り込んだ建物だといえるでしょう
07:31
bringing it into itself.
改修前と改修後です
07:35
The before and the after.
メディアには「泡」と称されました
07:39
It was dubbed "the bubble" by the press.
07:43
That was the lounge.
ラウンジです
泡の内部は基本的にひとつづきの空間で
07:45
It's basically one big volume of air
様々な方向に溢れ出しています
07:48
that just oozes out in every direction.
膜となる部分は半透明です
07:50
The membrane is translucent.
シリコンコーディングの
グラスファイバーを使っています
07:52
It's made of silcon-coated glass fiber.
年に2回 1ヶ月ずつ
膨らむ予定です
07:56
And it's inflated twice a year for one month at a time.
これが内側からの眺めです
08:00
This is the view from the inside.
我々がどのようにして
08:03
So you might have been wondering
連邦政府の承認を得ることができたのか
08:05
how in the world
不思議に思うかもしれません
08:07
did we get this approved by the federal government.
このプロジェクトは二つの機関によって
承認される必要があったのですが
08:09
It had to be approved by actually two agencies.
その一つはナショナル・モールの
08:14
And one is there to preserve
尊厳と神聖さを守るための機関です
08:17
the dignity and sanctity of the Mall.
この形を見せるたびに
顔を赤らめてしまいますが
08:20
I blush whenever I show this.
みなさまの解釈にお任せします
08:23
It is yours to interpret.
ひとつ言えることは
08:26
But one thing I can say
それは偶像破壊と
08:28
is that it's a combination
崇拝の
08:31
of iconoclasm
組み合わせです
08:33
and adoration.
さらに創造的な解釈も使いました
08:37
There was also some creative interpretation involved.
1910年の建築法によると
08:40
The Congressional Buildings Act of 1910
ワシントンD. C.での建物の高さは
08:43
limits the height of buildings in D.C.
尖塔やドーム、ミナレットを除いて
08:45
to 130 feet,
約40メートル(130 フィート)
以下に制限されています
08:47
except for spires, towers, domes and minarettes.
逆に言うと教会や国家の建造物であれば
法適用が免除されるわけです
08:50
This pretty much exempts monuments of the church and state.
私たちの泡は
45メートル(153フィート)あります
08:54
And the bubble is 153 ft.
横には神殿を表示しています
08:57
That's the Pantheon next to it.
中には3万4千立方メートルの
圧縮空気が入っています
09:00
It's about 1.2 million cubic feet of compressed air.
私たちは泡が聖堂として扱われるように
09:03
And so we argued it
交渉しました
09:05
on the merits of being a dome.
泡は 堂々たるモール内の建物に並んで
09:07
So there it is,
泡は 堂々たるモール内の建物に並んで
09:09
very stately,
非常に堂々としていますね
09:10
among all the stately buildings in the Mall.
ハーシュホーンはランドマークとなる
建物ではありませんが
09:14
And while this Hirshhorn is not landmarked,
歴史的な事柄にとてもとても
気をつかう必要があります
09:17
it's very, very historically sensitive.
このため私たちは建物の表面に
触れることができず
09:19
And so we couldn't really touch its surfaces.
痕跡を残すことは許されませんでした
09:22
We couldn't leave any traces behind.
このため泡は端からケーブルによって
09:23
So we strained it from the edges,
引っ張られ固定されます
09:26
and we held it by cables.
ボンデージ技術の
ケーススタディです
09:28
It's a study of some bondage techniques,
これは実際に非常に重要なところです
09:31
which are actually very, very important
泡は常に風を受けているからです
09:33
because it's hit by wind all the time.
上部には鉄製のリングがついていますが
09:34
There's one permanent steel ring at the top,
モールの中からこれを見ることはできません
09:36
but it can't be seen from any vantage point on the Mall.
また 光の加減についても
09:39
There are also some restrictions
制約がありました
09:42
about how much it could be lit.
泡は半透明のため内部から輝きます
09:43
It glows from within, it's translucent.
しかし 国会議事堂やその他の施設よりも
09:45
But it can't be more lit than the Capitol
輝いてはいけないのです
09:48
or some of the monuments.
泡があまり明るくないのは
このためなのです
09:50
So it's down the hierarchy on lighting.
09:50
So it comes to the site twice a year.
泡は年2回だけ出現します
泡は配送トラックから降ろされます
09:54
It's taken off the delivery truck.
立ちあげられます
09:57
It's hoisted.
そして 低圧縮空気によって
09:59
And then it's inflated
膨らみます
10:01
with this low-pressure air.
そしてケーブルによって固定されます
10:03
And then it's restrained with the cables.
そして底に重しとして水が入れられます
10:04
And then it's ballasted with water at the very bottom.
モールを管理する役人たちに
10:08
This is a very strange moment
設置期間を尋ねられたのは
10:12
where we were asked by the bureaucracy at the Mall
とても奇妙な瞬間でした
10:15
how much time would it take to install.
最初の設置には1週間ほどかかりますと
言いました
10:18
And we said, well the first erection would take one week.
彼らはそのことがとても
気に入りました
10:20
And they really connected with that idea.
そのあとは 簡単でした
10:24
And then it was really easy all the way through.
ですので 政府やその他の機関を説得するのに
10:28
So we didn't really have that many hurdles, I have to say,
実際には言うほどのハードルはなかったのです
10:32
with the government and all the authorities.
一方で技術的には
10:34
But some of the toughest hurdles
難しいハードルがありました
10:35
have been the technical ones.
これは縦糸と横糸です
10:37
This is the warp and weft.
これは点群です
10:38
This is a point cloud.
ここに強い圧力がかかります
10:40
There are extreme pressures.
泡はこれまでに例のない建築物です
10:42
This is a very, very unusual building
重力による圧力がかからない一方
10:44
in that there's no gravity load,
(空気による)全方向への圧力がかかります
10:46
but there's load in every direction.
そろそろプレゼンの締めに入っていきます
10:48
And I'm just going to zip through these slides.
10:52
And this is the space in action.
ここが活動が行われるスペースです
議論のための柔軟な内装
10:56
So flexible interior for discussions,
このような感じです
10:58
just like this, but in the round --
内側では 光や再構成を利用した
11:01
luminous and reconfigurable.
パフォーマンスや映画や展示など
11:02
Could be used for anything,
いろいろなことに
11:05
for performances, films,
使えます
11:06
for installations.
最初のプログラムとして
11:09
And the very first program
外交問題評議会と共同で企画されている
11:11
will be one of cultural dialogue and diplomacy
文化対話と外交に関する
11:13
organized in partnership
プログラムが計画されています
11:15
with the Council on Foreign Relations.
形式と内容がここでは一緒になっています
11:17
Form and content are together here.
泡は反建築物です
11:19
The bubble is an anti-monument.
参加型民主主義の理想が
11:22
The ideals of participatory democracy
厳格さよりは しなやかさによって
11:24
are represented through suppleness
表現されます
11:27
rather than rigidity.
芸術と政治が
11:28
Art and politics
博物館の壁の外の曖昧な空間を
満たしていますが
11:29
occupy an ambiguous site outside the museum walls,
しかし博物館の中央部分では
11:33
but inside of the museum's core,
その空気が
11:37
blending its air
モールの民主主義の空気と
ブレンドされるのです
11:39
with the democratic air of the Mall.
泡が 最初にふくらむのは
11:41
And the bubble will inflate
うまくいけば
11:46
hopefully for the first time
2013年の終わり頃になるでしょう
11:48
at the end of 2013.
ありがとうございました
11:50
Thank you.
(拍手)
11:53
(Applause)
Translator:Toshiya Komoda
Reviewer:Yuko Yoshida

sponsored links

Liz Diller - Designer
Liz Diller and her maverick firm DS+R bring a groundbreaking approach to big and small projects in architecture, urban design and art -- playing with new materials, tampering with space and spectacle in ways that make you look twice.

Why you should listen

Liz Diller's firm, Diller Scofidio & Renfro, might just be the first post-wall architects. From a mid-lake rotunda made of fog to a gallery that destroys itself with a robotic drill, her brainy takes on the essence of buildings are mind-bending and rebellious. DS+R partakes of criticism that goes past academic papers and into real structures -- buildings and art installations that seem to tease the squareness of their neighbors.

DS+R was the first architecture firm to receive a MacArthur "genius" grant -- and it also won an Obie for Jet Lag, a wildly creative piece of multimedia off-Broadway theater. A reputation for rampant repurposing of materials and tricksy tinkering with space -- on stage, on paper, on the waterfront -- have made DS+R a sought-after firm, winning accounts from the Juilliard School, Alice Tully Hall and the School of American Ballet, as part of the Lincoln Center overhaul; at Brown University; and on New York's revamp of Governer's Island. Their Institute for Comtemporary Art has opened up a new piece of Boston's waterfront, creating an elegant space that embraces the water.

Learn more about the Hirshhorn Museum >>

 

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.