sponsored links
TED2012

Nathan Wolfe: What's left to explore?

ネイサン ウルフ:探検すべきものに何が残っているのか?

February 27, 2012

私たちは月に行き、大陸を地図に記し、海の最も深い部分にも到達しました--二回も。次の世代が探検すべきものとして残っているものとは?生物学者で探検家のネイサン ウルフは答えを示します。:ほぼ、ありとあらゆるもの。私たちは始められる、彼は言います、目に見えない小さな物の世界とともに。

Nathan Wolfe - Virus hunter
Armed with blood samples, high-tech tools and a small army of fieldworkers, Nathan Wolfe hopes to re-invent pandemic control -- and reveal hidden secrets of the planet's dominant lifeform: the virus. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
Recently I visited Beloit, Wisconsin.
最近ウィスコンシン州のベロイトに行きました。
00:15
And I was there to honor a great 20th century explorer,
そこに行ったのは20世紀の偉大な冒険家
00:18
Roy Chapman Andrews.
ロイ チャプマン アンドリュースを称えるためです。
00:22
During his time at the American Museum of Natural History,
アメリカ自然史博物館にいた間、
00:24
Andrews led a range of expeditions to uncharted regions,
アンドリュースはゴビ砂漠のような、未知の地域において
00:27
like here in the Gobi Desert.
さまざまな探検を指揮しました。
00:31
He was quite a figure.
彼は相当な人物で
00:32
He was later, it's said, the basis of the Indiana Jones character.
後にインディアナジョーンズのモデルになったとも言われています。
00:34
And when I was in Beloit, Wisconsin,
私がベロイトにいたとき、
00:37
I gave a public lecture to a group of middle school students.
中学生たちに公開講義をしました。
00:40
And I'm here to tell you,
ここで言っておきたいのですが、
00:44
if there's anything more intimidating than talking here at TED,
TEDで講演するより足がすくむことがあるとすれば、
00:45
it'll be trying to hold the attention
1000人もの12歳児を45分間
00:48
of a group of a thousand 12-year-olds for a 45-minute lecture.
飽きさせないで講義することでしょう。
00:50
Don't try that one.
おすすめしません。
00:54
At the end of the lecture they asked a number of questions,
講義の終わりに彼らはたくさんの質問をしてきましたが
00:56
but there was one that's really stuck with me since then.
その中に一つだけ心に残っているものがあります。
00:59
There was a young girl who stood up,
ある女の子が立ちあがって
01:03
and she asked the question:
こんな質問をしてきました。
01:04
"Where should we explore?"
「私たちはどこを探検すればいいの?」
01:06
I think there's a sense that many of us have
思うに、私たちの多くは
01:08
that the great age of exploration on Earth is over,
地球探検の黄金時代は終わり、
01:10
that for the next generation
次の世代は
01:13
they're going to have to go to outer space or the deepest oceans
宇宙か深海に行かなければ
01:14
in order to find something significant to explore.
探検に値する発見はないと認識しています。
01:18
But is that really the case?
でもそれは本当でしょうか?
01:20
Is there really nowhere significant for us to explore
探検に値する場所は地球には
01:23
left here on Earth?
もう残されていないのでしょうか?
01:26
It sort of made me think back
この出来事で思い起こしたのは
01:27
to one of my favorite explorers in the history of biology.
私の憧れである、生物学の歴史上の探検家の一人
01:29
This is an explorer of the unseen world, Martinus Beijerinck.
不可視の世界の探検家、マルチヌス ベイエリンクです。
01:31
So Beijerinck set out to discover the cause
ベイエリンクはタバコモザイク病の原因を突き止めようと
01:35
of tobacco mosaic disease.
試みました。
01:37
What he did is he took the infected juice from tobacco plants
彼は感染したタバコの葉から汁を抽出し
01:40
and he would filter it through smaller and smaller filters.
何度もフィルターで濾していきました。
01:43
And he reached the point
そしてある結論に至りました。
01:46
where he felt that there must be something out there
当時すでに知られていた最小の生物 -- バクテリア
01:48
that was smaller than the smallest forms of life that were ever known --
それより小さな何かが存在するはずだと。
01:51
bacteria, at the time.
バクテリアより小さい物質
01:54
He came up with a name for his mystery agent.
彼はこの謎の物体にふさわしい名前を考え
01:56
He called it the virus --
ウイルスと呼びました--
02:00
Latin for "poison."
ラテン語で「毒」という意味です。
02:02
And in uncovering viruses,
そしてウイルスを解明していく中で、
02:04
Beijerinck really opened this entirely new world for us.
我々にまったく新しい世界を切り開いてくれました。
02:07
We now know that viruses make up the majority
現在知られるように、ウイルスは
02:10
of the genetic information on our planet,
地球上の遺伝情報の大半を占めており
02:12
more than the genetic information
それは他の生物の遺伝情報を
02:14
of all other forms of life combined.
全て合わせても、それ以上です。
02:16
And obviously there's been tremendous practical applications
そしてもちろん、この分野に関連した、とても多くの実用化が
02:18
associated with this world --
なされてきました--
02:21
things like the eradication of smallpox,
天然痘の根絶であったり、
02:22
the advent of a vaccine against cervical cancer,
その多くがヒトパピローマウイルスが原因だと知られている
02:25
which we now know is mostly caused by human papillomavirus.
子宮頸がんのワクチンの誕生などです。
02:28
And Beijerinck's discovery,
ベイエリンクの発見は、
02:32
this was not something that occurred 500 years ago.
500年も前にあったようなことでありません。
02:34
It was a little over 100 years ago
ウイルスを発見したのは
02:36
that Beijerinck discovered viruses.
100年ちょっと前の話なのです。
02:39
So basically we had automobiles,
つまり、我々は車は持っていたのに、
02:41
but we were unaware of the forms of life
地球の遺伝情報の大半を占める
02:43
that make up most of the genetic information on our planet.
生物については知らなかったのです。
02:46
We now have these amazing tools
いまや不可知の世界を調べる
02:49
to allow us to explore the unseen world --
素晴らしい機器があります。--
02:51
things like deep sequencing,
例えば大規模シークエンシングは、
02:53
which allow us to do much more than just skim the surface
ある特定の種の表層を調べ
02:55
and look at individual genomes from a particular species,
個々のゲノムを観察する以上に
02:59
but to look at entire metagenomes,
全体的なメタゲノム、すなわち
03:02
the communities of teeming microorganisms in, on and around us
私たちの体内、肌、周囲に存在する、あふれんばかりの微生物のコミュニティーを観察し
03:04
and to document all of the genetic information in these species.
これらの遺伝情報を全て記録することができます。
03:08
We can apply these techniques
こうした技術は土壌から肌、
03:12
to things from soil to skin and everything in between.
その間に存在する全てに適用できます。
03:13
In my organization we now do this on a regular basis
我々の団体が現在、定期的に行っているのは
03:18
to identify the causes of outbreaks
大発生した感染症の原因、
03:21
that are unclear exactly what causes them.
不確かな発生源を突き止めることです。
03:23
And just to give you a sense of how this works,
どのように行うのかと言いますと、
03:27
imagine that we took a nasal swab from every single one of you.
今、皆さん一人一人から鼻腔用綿棒で採取したとして、
03:29
And this is something we commonly do
これが、インフルエンザのような呼吸器ウイルスを
03:32
to look for respiratory viruses like influenza.
検出するのによく用いる手法です。
03:33
The first thing we would see
最初に見えるのは
03:36
is a tremendous amount of genetic information.
途方もないほどの遺伝情報です。
03:38
And if we started looking into that genetic information,
この遺伝情報を詳しく調べ始めると、
03:41
we'd see a number of usual suspects out there --
お決まりのものを多く見ます--
03:44
of course, a lot of human genetic information,
大量のヒトの遺伝情報はもちろん、
03:46
but also bacterial and viral information,
バクテリアやウイルスの遺伝情報、
03:48
mostly from things that are completely harmless within your nose.
ほとんどが鼻腔内では完全に無害です。
03:51
But we'd also see something very, very surprising.
しかし、とても驚くべきものも目にします。
03:54
As we started to look at this information,
この遺伝情報を調べ出すと、
03:57
we would see that about 20 percent of the genetic information in your nose
鼻腔の遺伝情報の約20%は
03:59
doesn't match anything that we've ever seen before --
今までに見たことのある、どれにも合致しないのです--
04:03
no plant, animal, fungus, virus or bacteria.
植物、動物、真菌、ウイルスやバクテリアにもないです。
04:06
Basically we have no clue what this is.
つまり、これが何なのか、全く分からないのです。
04:09
And for the small group of us who actually study this kind of data,
そして、この種のデータを研究している私たちグループ内で
04:13
a few of us have actually begun to call this information
この遺伝情報をこう呼ぶ人が出てきました。
04:17
biological dark matter.
生物学的暗黒物質と。
04:20
We know it's not anything that we've seen before;
今までに目にしたことのないものです。
04:23
it's sort of the equivalent of an uncharted continent
これはちょうど未知の大陸みたいなもので
04:26
right within our own genetic information.
私たち ヒトの遺伝情報の中にあるです。
04:29
And there's a lot of it.
そしてたくさんあります。
04:32
If you think 20 percent of genetic information in your nose is a lot
鼻腔内の遺伝情報の20%が生物学的暗黒物質で
04:33
of biological dark matter,
相当な割合だと考えるなら
04:37
if we looked at your gut,
内臓を調べた場合、
04:38
up to 40 or 50 percent of that information is biological dark matter.
40~50%もの遺伝情報が生物学的暗黒物質なのです。
04:40
And even in the relatively sterile blood,
比較的無菌の血液でさえも、
04:44
around one to two percent of this information is dark matter --
1~2%の遺伝情報が暗黒物質なのです。--
04:46
can't be classified, can't be typed or matched with anything we've seen before.
分類不可で、いかなる発見済みのものとも合致しません。
04:49
At first we thought that perhaps this was artifact.
当初は、機器が不正確なのだと思っていました。
04:54
These deep sequencing tools are relatively new.
大規模シークエンシングは比較的新しいものでしたので。
04:56
But as they become more and more accurate,
しかし、機器がどんどん正確さを増すにつれ、
04:59
we've determined that this information is a form of life,
私たちは、この情報は何らかの生物、
05:01
or at least some of it is a form of life.
少なくともいくつかは生物なのだという結論に達しました。
05:05
And while the hypotheses for explaining the existence of biological dark matter
そして生物学的暗黒物質の存在を説明する仮説は
05:08
are really only in their infancy,
まだ生まれたばかりですが、
05:12
there's a very, very exciting possibility that exists:
その存在の可能性に大きな興奮を感じさせてくれます。
05:14
that buried in this life, in this genetic information,
この生物に、この遺伝情報の中に埋もれているのは
05:18
are signatures of as of yet unidentified life.
今だに未知の生物が存在する、という証です。
05:21
That as we explore these strings of A's, T's, C's and G's,
これらの、アデニン、チミン、シトシン、グアニンの配列を
調べることで、
05:26
we may uncover a completely new class of life
この全く新しい生物種を解明できるかもしれません。
05:30
that, like Beijerinck, will fundamentally change
ベイエリンクのように、生物学の本質に関する
05:33
the way that we think about the nature of biology.
私たちの認識を根本的に変えることになります。
05:35
That perhaps will allow us to identify the cause of a cancer that afflicts us
それによりおそらく私たちを苦しめるガンの原因の特定や、
05:37
or identify the source of an outbreak that we aren't familiar with
未だ知られていない感染源の特定、
05:42
or perhaps create a new tool in molecular biology.
あるいは分子生物学における新しいツールの開発などが
可能になるかもしれません。
05:45
I'm pleased to announce that,
嬉しいお知らせがあります。
05:48
along with colleagues at Stanford and Caltech and UCSF,
スタンフォード大学、カリフォルニア工科大学、
カリフォルニア大学、そしてサンフランシスコ校の
同僚たちとともに
05:50
we're currently starting an initiative
新たな生命体の存在、
05:55
to explore biological dark matter for the existence of new forms of life.
生物学的暗黒物質の研究に向けた取り組みを
スタートさせました。
05:57
A little over a hundred years ago,
百数十年前、
06:01
people were unaware of viruses,
人は地球の遺伝情報の多くを占める生物である
06:03
the forms of life that make up most of the genetic information on our planet.
ウイルスについて知りませんでした。
06:05
A hundred years from now, people may marvel
今から100年後の人たちは
06:10
that we were perhaps completely unaware of a new class of life
ひょっとしたら自分たちの鼻の中にいる新たな生物種について
06:12
that literally was right under our noses.
全く知らなかったことに驚くかもしれません。
06:16
It's true, we may have charted all the continents on the planet
確かに地球上の全ての大陸はもう地図に記され、
06:19
and we may have discovered all the mammals that are out there,
哺乳類は残らず発見されたかもしれません。
06:22
but that doesn't mean that there's nothing left to explore on Earth.
それでも地球上で探検する領域がもう無い訳ではありません。
06:25
Beijerinck and his kind
ベイエリンク達は
06:29
provide an important lesson for the next generation of explorers --
新世代の探検家たちに重要な教訓を示しました--
06:31
people like that young girl from Beloit, Wisconsin.
ベロイトで会った少女の様な人たちにです。
06:35
And I think if we phrase that lesson, it's something like this:
この教訓は言うならば、このようなものでしょう。
06:38
Don't assume that what we currently think is out there is the full story.
今、私たちが認識するものが全てだと決めつけないこと。
06:42
Go after the dark matter in whatever field you choose to explore.
探検すると決めた領域の暗黒物質を追求すること。
06:46
There are unknowns all around us
未知は私たちの周りにあふれていて
06:51
and they're just waiting to be discovered.
発見されることを待ち望んでいるのです。
06:53
Thank you.
ありがとうございました。
06:56
(Applause)
(拍手)
06:57
Translator:Takahito Sugeno
Reviewer:YUTAKA KOMATSU

sponsored links

Nathan Wolfe - Virus hunter
Armed with blood samples, high-tech tools and a small army of fieldworkers, Nathan Wolfe hopes to re-invent pandemic control -- and reveal hidden secrets of the planet's dominant lifeform: the virus.

Why you should listen

Using genetic sequencing, needle-haystack research, and dogged persistence (crucial to getting spoilage-susceptible samples through the jungle and to the lab), Nathan Wolfe has proven what was science-fiction conjecture only a few decades ago -- not only do viruses jump from animals to humans, but they do so all the time. Along the way Wolfe has discovered several new viruses, and is poised to discover many more.

Wolfe's research has turned the field of epidemiology on its head, and attracted interest from philanthropists at Google.org and the Skoll foundation. Better still, the research opens the door to preventing epidemics before they happen, sidelining them via early-warning systems and alleviating the poverty from which easy transmission emerges.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.