19:44
TED2012

John Hockenberry: We are all designers

ジョン・ホッケンベリー:人生を「デザイン」する

Filmed:

車椅子のジャーナリスト、ジョン・ホッケンベリーは車椅子パーツのカタログでピカピカ光る車輪を見つけました。この車輪の教えてくれたもの -- 意図を持って自らの人生をデザインして生きることの意義を語ります。(TED2012の「デザインスタジオ」セッションより。ゲストキュレーター: チー・パールマン とデビッド・ロックウェル)

- Journalist
Journalist and commentator John Hockenberry has reported from all over the world in virtually every medium. He's the author of "Moving Violations: War Zones, Wheelchairs and Declarations of Independence." Full bio

I am no designer, nope, no way.
私はデザイナーなんて
とても そんなものではありません
00:16
My dad was,
父はそれが仕事でした
00:20
which is kind of an interesting way to grow up.
そんな家で育つのは面白いものです
00:22
I had to figure out what it is my dad did
父のする仕事の意味や
何でそんなものが大切なのか
00:25
and why it was important.
いろいろ考えさせられたものです
00:29
Dad talked a lot about bad design when we were growing up,
子供の頃から 悪いデザインについて
よく聞かされました
00:30
you know, "Bad design is just people not thinking, John," he would say
「ジョン 作る人が考えないから こうなるんだ」
何か問題が起こる度に父は言いました
00:34
whenever a kid would be injured by a rotary lawn mower
子供が芝刈り機で怪我したり
00:39
or, say, a typewriter ribbon would get tangled
タイプライターのリボンが絡まったり
00:41
or an eggbeater would get jammed in the kitchen.
泡立て器がつっかかって動かなくなったり
00:44
You know, "Design -- bad design, there's just no excuse for it.
「悪いデザインに言い訳なんてないんだよ
00:46
It's letting stuff happen without thinking about it.
よく考えないで作るから こういう事が起こる
00:52
Every object should be about something, John.
ジョン 物はそれぞれ目的を持って
使う人を考えて作られるべきだ
00:55
It should imagine a user.
ジョン 物はそれぞれ目的を持って
使う人を考えて作られるべきだ
00:58
It should cast that user in a story starring the user and the object.
使う人と物の両方が主役であることを
忘れてはいけない
00:59
Good design," my dad said, "is about supplying intent."
「良いデザインとは--」父は続けます
「意図がなければならない」
01:04
That's what he said.
こう言ったのです
01:10
Dad helped design the control panels for the IBM 360 computer.
父はIBM 360 コンピューターの
操作パネルのデザインに関わりました
01:12
That was a big deal; that was important. He worked for Kodak for a while; that was important.
重要な仕事でした
コダックでの仕事も重要なものでした
01:16
He designed chairs and desks and other office equipment for Steelcase; that was important.
スチールケース社での机や椅子などの
オフィス家具のデザインも重要な仕事でした
01:20
I knew design was important in my house because, for heaven's sake, it put food on our table, right?
我が家ではデザインは重要でした
生活がかかっていたのですから
01:26
And design was in everything my dad did.
父はやる事全てにデザインを取り入れました
01:31
He had a Dixieland jazz band when we were growing up,
ディキシーランド・ジャズバンドの仲間と
01:33
and he would always cover Louis Armstrong tunes.
ルイ・アームストロングの曲をよく演奏していました
01:36
And I would ask him every once in a while,
時々父に尋ねたものです
01:39
"Dad, do you want it to sound like the record?"
「レコードみたいな演奏がしたいの?」
01:41
We had lots of old jazz records lying around the house.
家には古いジャズのレコードが沢山ありました
01:44
And he said, "No, never, John, never.
「いやジョン それではダメなんだ
01:46
The song is just a given, that's how you have to think about it.
曲は単に前提となるもので
01:48
You gotta make it your own. You gotta design it.
それを自分なりに演奏するんだ
自分でデザインするんだよ
01:51
Show everyone what you intend," is what he said.
自分が何を意図としているのか
聞かせないと」
01:53
"Doing that, acting by design, is what we all should be doing.
「デザインを基に行動する事は大切なんだ」
01:57
It's where we all belong."
「誰にとってもね」と父は言いました
02:02
All of us? Designers?
「誰もが?デザイナーになるべきだって?」
02:04
Oh, oh, Dad. Oh, Dad.
お父さん お父さん
02:07
The song is just a given.
曲は単に前提となるもので
02:12
It's how you cover it that matters.
それをどう演奏するかが大切だ
02:14
Well, let's hold on to that thought for just a minute.
この言葉について ちょっと考えて見ましょう
02:16
It's kind of like this wheelchair I'm in, right?
この車椅子も そんなものかもしれませんね?
02:18
The original tune? It's a little scary.
楽譜にあるのは ちょっと怖い曲です
02:21
"Ooh, what happened to that dude?
「可哀想に あの人どうしたんだろう
02:23
He can't walk. Anybody know the story?
歩けないんだって 何があったのかな
02:26
Anybody?"
誰か知ってる?」
02:29
I don't like to talk about this very much, but I'll tell you guys the story today.
あまり人には話したくないのですが
今日はどうしてこうなったのか お話します
02:31
All right, exactly 36 years ago this week, that's right,
36年前の丁度この週でした
02:36
I was in a poorly designed automobile
デザインの悪い車に乗っていて
02:40
that hit a poorly designed guardrail
デザインの悪いガードレールにぶつかり
02:42
on a poorly designed road in Pennsylvania,
デザインの悪いペンシルベニアの道から
02:46
and plummeted down a 200-foot embankment
60 メートルの土手を
まっすぐに落っこったのです
02:49
and killed two people in the car.
車内の二人が死亡し
02:53
But ever since then, the wheelchair has been a given in my life.
それ以来 車椅子が
私の生活の前提となったのです
02:56
My life, at the mercy of good design and bad design.
私の人生はデザインの良し悪しに
左右される人生です
03:00
Think about it. Now, in design terms,
考えてみると デザイン上
03:05
a wheelchair is a very difficult object.
車椅子はとても難しいものです
03:08
It mostly projects tragedy and fear and misfortune,
車椅子は悲劇や恐怖
そして不幸を感じさせます
03:11
and it projects that message, that story, so strongly
見る人にはその悲惨なメッセージしか
目に入りません
03:15
that it almost blots out anything else.
見る人にはその悲惨なメッセージしか
目に入りません
03:18
I roll swiftly through an airport, right?
スイスイと空港内を動いても
03:20
And moms grab their kids out of the way and say, "Don't stare!"
お母さん方が子供達をぐいと引き寄せ
「見ちゃダメよ」と諭します
03:23
The poor kid, you know, has this terrified look on his face, God knows what they think.
可哀そうに 子供は恐怖におびえた表情で
いったいどんな気持ちでいるのでしょう
03:27
And for decades, I'm going,
こういう状況は何が原因で
03:32
why does this happen? What can I do about it? How can I change this? I mean there must be something.
どう対処し改善できるか ずっと考えてきました
何か出来るはずです
03:34
So I would roll, I'd make no eye contact -- just kinda frown, right?
車椅子で移動中 視線をそらし
ちょっと気難しそうにしてみたり
03:38
Or I'd dress up really, really sharply or something.
又は身なりをピシッと決めてみたり
03:43
Or I'd make eye contact with everyone --
反対に皆と目を合わせてみたり
03:49
that was really creepy; that didn't work at all.
これは気味悪がられ もちろんダメでした
03:51
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:53
You know anything, I'd try. I wouldn't shower for a week -- nothing worked.
一週間シャワーも浴びなかったりと
何でも試しましたが どれも無意味でした
03:55
Nothing whatsoever worked until a few years ago,
それが変わったのは
2~3年前のことです
03:59
my six-year-old daughters were looking at this wheelchair catalog that I had, and they said,
6歳の娘達が車椅子の
カタログを見て言いました
04:03
"Oh, Dad! Dad! Look, you gotta get these, these flashy wheels -- you gotta get 'em!"
「パパ!これ見て! このピカピカする車輪
パパの車いすに付けたら素敵!」
04:07
And I said, "Oh, girls, Dad is a very important journalist,
「パパは 立派なジャーナリストなんだから
04:12
that just wouldn't do at all."
こんなの変だよ」と答えました
04:16
And of course, they immediately concluded,
すると もちろん 二人はがっかりして
04:19
"Oh, what a bummer, Dad. Journalists aren't allowed to have flashy wheels.
「ジャーナリストだからって
ピカピカした車輪がダメなのなら
04:21
I mean, how important could you be then?" they said.
パパなんてそれほど立派でないんじゃない?」
なんて言われて
04:26
I went, "Wait a minute, all right, right -- I'll get the wheels." Purely out of protest,
それを受け入れるわけにも行かず
「分かったよ 買うよ」となりました
04:31
I got the flashy wheels, and I installed them and --
ピカピカ光る車輪を手に入れ
車椅子に取り付け--
04:36
check this out. Could I have my special light cue please?
見て下さい
照明を変えて頂けますか?
04:41
(Laughter)
(笑)
04:44
Look at that!
見てください
04:46
Now ... look at, look at this! Look at this!
ほら 見て見て
これを見てください
04:49
So what you are looking at here
ご覧になっているこんな物が
04:51
has completely changed my life,
私の人生をすっかり変えたのです
04:54
I mean totally changed my life.
本当に全く変えてしまったのです
04:58
Instead of blank stares and awkwardness,
じろじろ眺めてたり 居心地わるく感じて
いた人たちが 指差して 笑顔になります
05:00
now it is pointing and smiling!
じろじろ眺めてたり 居心地わるく感じて
いた人たちが 指差して 笑顔になります
05:03
People going, "Awesome wheels, dude! Those are awesome!
「おじさん!カッコいい車輪だね!すごいなあ!
05:07
I mean, I want some of those wheels!" Little kids say,
そんなの僕も欲しいなあ」
小さい子に頼まれた事もあります
05:11
"Can I have a ride?"
「乗せてくれる?」
05:14
(Laughter)
(笑)
05:16
And of course there's the occasional person --
もちろんたまに こんな人もいます
05:18
usually a middle-aged male who will say,
だいたい中年の男性ですが
05:20
"Oh, those wheels are great!
「おや 素敵な車輪ですね
それは安全のためですよね?」
05:22
I guess they're for safety, right?"
「おや 素敵な車輪ですね
それは安全のためですよね?」
05:23
(Laughter)
(笑)
05:26
No! They're not for safety.
もちろん 安全なんかに関係ありません
05:28
No, no, no, no, no.
そんなことじゃ ないんです
05:34
What's the difference here,
いったい違いは何でしょう
05:36
the wheelchair with no lights
光らない車椅子と 光る車椅子
05:38
and the wheelchair with lights?
光らない車椅子と 光る車椅子
05:40
The difference is intent.
違いは「意図」です
05:41
That's right, that's right; I'm no longer a victim.
そうなんです
もはや犠牲者ではなくなったのです
05:45
I chose to change the situation -- I'm the Commander of the Starship Wheelchair with the phaser wheels in the front. Right?
置かれた状況を変え フェイザー車輪付きの
スターシップ「車椅子号」の船長となったのです
05:49
Intent changes the picture completely.
意図が状況を全く変えてしまいます
05:55
I choose to enhance
シンプルな
デザイン要素を加える事によって
05:59
this rolling experience
シンプルな
デザイン要素を加える事によって
06:01
with a simple design element.
車椅子に対する反応を改善したのです
06:03
Acting with intent.
意図を持った行為です
06:06
It conveys authorship.
車椅子に個性が出るのです
06:09
It suggests that someone is driving.
乗っている人間を感じさせます
06:11
It's reassuring; people are drawn to it.
人々を安心させ 引きつけます
06:14
Someone making the experience their own.
乗っている人がを自らの生き方を
コントロールしているのです
06:17
Covering the tragic tune
悲劇的な曲を
06:21
with something different,
違った感じに演奏している
06:23
something radically different.
全く違う雰囲気で奏でる事によって
06:26
People respond to that.
人々の受け止め方も変わるのです
06:29
Now it seems simple, but actually I think
とても簡単なようですが
我々のような社会や文化では
06:31
in our society and culture in general,
意図というものに
06:34
we have a huge problem with intent.
大きな問題を抱えています
06:36
Now go with me here. Look at this guy. You know who this is?
この人を見てください
誰かご存知ですか
06:38
It's Anders Breivik. Now, if he intended to kill
これはアンネシュ・ブレイビクです
去年ノルウェーで
06:41
in Olso, Norway last year,
もし彼が意図を持って
06:45
dozens and dozens of young people --
沢山の若者を殺したのならば
06:47
if he intended to do that,
意図的にやったのなら
06:49
he's a vicious criminal. We punish him.
凶悪な犯罪人として 処罰されます
06:51
Life in prison. Death penalty in the United States, not so much in Norway.
アメリカなら終身刑か死刑です
ノルウェーではそこまででいかないでしょうが
06:54
But, if he instead acted out of a delusional fantasy,
でももし妄想的なファンタジーに浸って
こんな事をしたのならば
06:57
if he was motivated by some random mental illness,
つまり何かの精神病が原因だったとしたら
07:01
he's in a completely different category.
これは全く別の問題です
07:06
We may put him away for life, but
一生どこかに隔離するとしても
07:09
we watch him clinically.
患者として扱うわけです
07:11
It's a completely different domain.
根本的に違う部類となります
07:13
As an intentional murderer,
意図的な殺人犯だったとしたら
07:16
Anders Breivik is merely evil.
アンネシュは邪悪な人間でしかありません
07:19
But as a dysfunctional,
しかし彼が精神疾患を抱えており
07:22
as a dysfunctional murderer/psychotic,
事件が精神障害による殺人だったとしたら
07:24
he's something much more complicated.
そう単純には片付きません
07:26
He's the breath of some
何か原始的な古い時代の混沌としたものを感じさせます
07:28
primitive, ancient chaos.
何か原始的な古い時代の混沌としたものを感じさせます
07:30
He's the random state of nature
突然変異的なものかもしれません
07:33
we emerged from.
突然変異的なものかもしれません
07:35
He's something very, very different.
彼はとにかく普通ではありません
07:37
It's as though intent is an essential component for humanity.
意図は人間性に欠かせないもので
あるように思えます
07:39
It's what we're supposed to do somehow.
人間である以上
07:43
We're supposed to act with intent.
我々は意図を持って デザインを意識して
行動することになっているのです
07:45
We're supposed to do things by design.
我々は意図を持って デザインを意識して
行動することになっているのです
07:48
Intent is a marker for civilization.
意図は文明の目印なのです
07:50
Now here's an example a little closer to home:
次は私にとってより身近なお話です
07:55
My family is all about intent.
私の家族は完全に意図的なものです
07:58
You can probably tell there are two sets of twins,
写真でお分かりかもしれませんが
双子が二組います
08:00
the result of IVF technology, in vitro fertilization technology,
IVF つまり体外授精の結果です
08:03
due to some physical limitations I won't go into.
私のような障害があると この手を使います
08:08
Anyway, in vitro technology, IVF,
体外受精は家畜の繁殖と同様に
意図的なものです
08:10
is about as intentional as agriculture.
体外受精は家畜の繁殖と同様に
意図的なものです
08:13
Let me tell you, some of you may have the experience.
経験された方もいるかもしれませんね
08:16
In fact, the whole technology of sperm extraction
脊髄損傷の患者から精子を取出す技術は
08:18
for spinal cord-injured males was invented by a veterinarian.
実は ある獣医によって開発されました
08:21
I met the dude. He's a great guy.
実際お会いしたのですが いい方です
08:26
He carried this big leather bag full of sperm probes for
大きな皮製の袋一杯に
精子採取用の器具を持っていました
08:28
all of the animals that he'd worked with,
いろんな動物用だそうです
08:33
all the different animals.
いろんな種類の動物に使われるものです
08:35
Probes he designed,
自分のデザインした器具を
とても誇りに思っていて
08:37
and in fact, he was really, really proud of these probes.
自分のデザインした器具を
とても誇りに思っていて
08:39
He would say, "You're right between horse and squirrel, John."
「ジョン 君は馬とリスの中間かね」なんて
言う人でした
08:42
(Laughter)
(笑)
08:46
But anyway, so when my wife and I decided
それはともかく
中年期に差し掛かり 妻と話し合って
08:49
to upgrade our early middle age -- we had four kids, after all --
4人も子供がいるわけだし
08:55
with a little different technology
少し違う技術で生活を楽しもう
08:58
that I won't explain in too much detail here --
と決めたわけです
詳細は省きますが--
09:00
my urologist assured me I had nothing whatsoever to worry about.
医者によれば心配は
全く要らないとのことです
09:03
"No need for birth control, Doc, are you sure about that?"
「避妊不要? 先生 本当に大丈夫ですか?」
09:07
"John, John, I looked at your chart.
「ジョン 精子検査の結果をみれば
09:09
From your sperm tests we can
「ジョン 精子検査の結果をみれば
09:13
confidently say that
君である事自体が避妊だからね」
09:15
you're basically a form of birth control."
君である事自体が避妊だからね」
09:17
Well!
なるほど
09:20
(Laughter)
(笑)
09:23
What a liberating thought! Yes!
これは気が楽です
09:27
And after a couple very liberating weekends,
そして妻と 気楽な週末を楽しみました
09:30
my wife and I,
そして妻と 気楽な週末を楽しみました
09:33
utilizing some cutting-edge erectile technology
最新の勃起改善技術を試したのです
09:35
that is certainly worthy of a TEDTalk someday
いつかTEDで披露するに値すると思いますが
今日はやめておきます
09:39
but I won't get into it now,
いつかTEDで披露するに値すると思いますが
今日はやめておきます
09:41
we noticed some familiar, if unexpected, symptoms.
数週間後 驚いた事に よく馴染みのある
兆候が現れました
09:43
I wasn't exactly a form of birth control.
僕であること自体が避妊だと信じたのは
どうも間違いだったようです
09:48
Look at that font there. My wife was so pissed.
この書体を見てください
妻が怒っていました
09:52
I mean, did a designer come up with that?
こんなデザイン誰がしたのでしょう
09:55
No, I don't think a designer did come up with that.
デザイナーがこんなのするわけありません
09:57
In fact, maybe that's the problem.
きっとそれが原因かもしれません
09:59
And so, little Ajax was born.
間もなく このエイジャックスが生まれました
10:01
He's like our other children,
上の子供達と大して変わらないのに
状況が全く違うのです
10:04
but the experience is completely different.
上の子供達と大して変わらないのに
状況が全く違うのです
10:06
It's something like my accident, right?
私の遭った事故のようなものですね
どこからともなく やってきたのです
10:08
He came out of nowhere.
私の遭った事故のようなものですね
どこからともなく やってきたのです
10:12
But we all had to change,
生活ががらりと変わりました
10:13
but not just react to the given;
でも起こった事に反応するだけではなく
10:15
we bend to this new experience with intent.
この新しい経験に意図を持って
従う事にしました
10:18
We're five now. Five.
五人になりました 五人です
10:22
Facing the given with intent. Doing things by design.
意図を持って立ち向かい
デザインに基づいて行動する
10:26
Hey, the name Ajax -- you can't get much more intentional than that, right?
エイジャックスなんて変わった名前
意図的でないはずがありません
10:30
We're really hoping he thanks us for that later on.
将来気に入ってくれる事を願っています
10:34
(Laughter)
(笑)
10:39
But I never became a designer. No, no, no, no. Never attempted. Never even close.
私はデザイナーにはなりませんでした
なろうともしませんでした
10:41
I did love some great designs as I was growing up:
でも昔から気に入っていた
素晴らしいデザインは幾つかあります
10:44
The HP 35S calculator -- God, I loved that thing. Oh God, I wish I had one.
例えばこの電卓 HP 35S --
あれは良かった 今でもなつかしい
10:49
Man, I love that thing.
あれは本当に良かった
これは買うことができたのですが
10:53
I could afford that.
あれは本当に良かった
これは買うことができたのですが
10:57
Other designs I really couldn't afford, like the 1974 911 Targa.
手が届かなかいものでは
1974年の 911 タルガも好きでした
10:58
In school, I studied nothing close to design or engineering;
学生時代はデザインや工学とは
全く違った分野
11:03
I studied useless things like the Classics,
古典とかあまり実用的でないものばかり
勉強しました
11:06
but there were some lessons even there --
でもそこにも学ぶ事はありました
11:09
this guy, Plato, it turns out he's a designer.
この人 プラトンも
実はデザイナーだったのです
11:10
He designed a state in "The Republic,"
彼の著書『国家』の中で
政府をデザインしました
11:14
a design never implemented.
実現はしませんでしたが
11:17
Listen to one of the design features
これはプラトンのデザインした政府4.0の
特徴のひとつです
11:19
of Plato's Government 4.0:
これはプラトンのデザインした政府4.0の
特徴のひとつです
11:20
"The State in which the rulers are most reluctant to govern
「支配者がいやいや支配する政府が
11:23
is always the best and most quietly governed,
最も適切に静かに支配されるものだ
11:28
and the State in which they are most eager, the worst."
支配者が熱心であるほど
政府は悪いものになる」
11:31
Well, got that wrong, didn't we?
私たちはどこかで間違ったようですね
11:35
But look at that statement; it's all about intent. That's what I love about it.
でも この文の素晴らしいところは
意図そのものだということです
11:38
But consider what Plato is doing here. What is he doing?
プラトンがここでしていることは
何でしょう?
11:42
It's a grand idea of design -- a huge idea of design,
デザインという壮大な考えです
デザインという偉大な思想は
11:45
common to all of the voices of religion and philosophy
古典期に生まれた
宗教や哲学に共通して見られます
11:49
that emerged in the Classical period.
古典期に生まれた
宗教や哲学に共通して見られます
11:53
What was going on then?
この時代に何があったのでしょう?
皆 ある疑問に対して答えを探していたのです
11:55
They were trying to answer the question of
この時代に何があったのでしょう?
皆 ある疑問に対して答えを探していたのです
11:56
what would human beings do now that they were no longer simply trying to survive?
生存だけが目的の時代が終わり
人間は何をすべきかという疑問が生まれました
11:59
As the human race emerged from a prehistoric chaos,
先史時代の混乱やランダムで
過酷な自然を生き抜いた人類に
12:03
a confrontation with random, brutal nature,
先史時代の混乱やランダムで
過酷な自然を生き抜いた人類に
12:08
they suddenly had a moment to think -- and there was a lot to think about.
突然 考える時間ができたのです
考える事は沢山ありました
12:12
All of a sudden, human existence needed an intent.
突然 人類の存在に
意図が必要になったのです
12:16
Human life needed a reason.
生きる目的が必要になったのです
12:20
Reality itself needed a designer.
現実そのものにデザイナーが必要になり
12:23
The given was replaced
与えられただけだった状況が
12:26
by various aspects of intent,
いろいろな意図やデザイン
宗教などに置き換えられました
12:28
by various designs,
いろいろな意図やデザイン
宗教などに置き換えられました
12:31
by various gods.
いろいろな意図やデザイン
宗教などに置き換えられました
12:33
Gods we're still fighting about. Oh yeah.
宗教についてはまだ争いが続いています
12:36
Today we don't confront the chaos of nature.
今日 我々は自然の混乱に立ち向かわなくても良い代わりに
12:40
Today it is the chaos of humanity's impact on the Earth itself that we confront.
人類が地球にもたらした混乱に
立ち向かわなくてはなりません
12:43
This young discipline called design, I think,
このデザインという新しい概念は
12:49
is in fact the emerging ethos
この時代に生まれつつある文化の特性であり
12:52
formulating and then answering a very new question:
以下の新たな問いに答えるものだと思います
12:55
What shall we do now
我々がつくり出した混乱を前にして
我々は何をどうするのか?
12:58
in the face of the chaos that we have created?
我々がつくり出した混乱を前にして
我々は何をどうするのか?
13:00
What shall we do?
我々がつくり出した混乱を前にして
我々は何をどうするのか?
13:03
How shall we inscribe intent
我々の造り出すものや状況
13:05
on all the objects we create,
変化を与える場所に
13:08
on all the circumstances we create,
どうやって意図を刻み込んでいくのだろう?
13:10
on all the places we change?
どうやって意図を刻み込んでいくのだろう?
13:12
The consequences of a planet with 7 billion people and counting.
70億人 そして更に人口の増え続ける
惑星での課題です
13:15
That's the tune we're all covering today, all of us.
これが私たち 皆が演奏する曲なのです
13:19
And we can't just imitate the past. No.
過去を真似るわけには行きません
13:23
That won't do.
そうはいかないのです
13:26
That won't do at all.
それでは全くダメです
13:29
Here's my favorite design moment:
私の好きなデザインに関する想い出をお話します
13:30
In the city of Kinshasa in Zaire in the 1990s,
1990年代 ザイールの
キンシャサという街でのことです
13:33
I was working for ABC News, and I was reporting on
ABCニュースの仕事で
13:37
the fall of Mobutu Sese Seko, the dictator, the brutal dictator in Zaire,
国から略奪し破壊させたザイールの
残忍な独裁者モブツ・セセ・セコの
13:39
who raped and pillaged that country.
没落を取材していました
13:43
There was rioting in the middle of Kinshasa.
キンシャサの中心で暴動が起こり
13:45
The place was falling apart; it was a horrible, horrible place,
街は崩壊寸前でした
実にひどい状況でした
13:48
and I needed to go and explore the center of Kinshasa
仕事はキンシャサの中心に行って
暴動や略奪行為を
13:51
to report on the rioting and the looting.
取材することでした
13:55
People were carrying off vehicles, carrying off pieces of buildings.
人々は車や建物の一部を持ち去り
13:57
Soldiers were in the streets shooting at looters and herding some in mass arrests.
兵隊達は略奪者に向けて銃を撃ち
多数が逮捕されていました
14:01
In the middle of this chaos, I'm rolling around in a wheelchair,
この混乱の中を
私は車椅子でスイスイと動き回っていました
14:06
and I was completely invisible. Completely.
誰の目にも止まらなかった様です
全くです
14:09
I was in a wheelchair; I didn't look like a looter.
車椅子に乗っているので略奪者には見えないし
14:13
I was in a wheelchair; I didn't look like a journalist, particularly, at least from their perspective.
車椅子に乗っているので 記者にも見えません
少なくとも現地の人の目にはそう映りません
14:16
And I didn't look like a soldier, that's for sure.
兵隊にも見えません それはそうです
14:22
I was part of this sort of background noise of the misery of Zaire, completely invisible.
ザイールの悲惨な背景の一部となり
完全に人の目に映らなかったのです
14:24
And all of a sudden, from around a corner, comes this young man, paralyzed, just like me,
そこに突然 向こう側から私と同様に
下半身付随の若い男が現れました
14:30
in this metal and wood and leather
金属と木と皮で出来た車椅子に乗っています
14:35
pedal, three-wheel tricycle-wheelchair device,
ペダルの付いた三輪のものです
14:39
and he pedals up to me as fast as he can.
一生懸命ペダルをこいで
14:44
He goes, "Hey, mister! Mister!"
「ちょっと 旦那!旦那」と呼びながら
14:47
And I looked at him --
私のところに急いでやってきました
14:48
he didn't know any other English than that, but we didn't need English, no, no, no, no, no.
それ以上英語は解らないようでしたが
言葉はいりません
14:51
We sat there and compared wheels and tires and spokes and tubes.
お互いの車輪やタイヤ
スポークやチューブを比べたり
14:54
And I looked at his whacky pedal mechanism;
変わったペダルのメカニズムも
見せてもらいました
15:00
he was full of pride over his design.
自前のデザインにとても誇らしげでした
15:04
I wish I could show you that contraption.
皆さんにもお見せしたいものです
15:07
His smile, our glow
彼の笑顔や 私たちが生き生きと
デザインという世界共通語で話す様子は
15:09
as we talked a universal language
彼の笑顔や 私たちが生き生きと
デザインという世界共通語で話す様子は
15:11
of design,
周りの混乱からは全く見えないようでした
15:13
invisible to the chaos around us.
周りの混乱からは全く見えないようでした
15:16
His machine: homemade, bolted, rusty, comical.
彼のものは 自家製で所々ネジでとめてあり
錆びていて おかしくもありました
15:19
My machine: American-made, confident, sleek.
私のは アメリカ製のしっかりした
洗練されたデザインです
15:23
He was particularly proud of the comfortable seat, really comfortable seat
彼は乗り心地のよい座席が
特に気にいっているようでした
15:26
he had made in his chariot
彼は乗り心地のよい座席が
特に気にいっているようでした
15:30
and its beautiful fabric fringe around the edge.
端にはひらひら布飾りがついて
まるで英雄を運ぶ戦闘馬車のようです
15:32
Oh, I wish I'd had those sparkly wheels back then to have shown him, man!
このピカピカ光る車輪があの時あったら
見せたかった
15:37
He would have loved those! Oh yeah.
きっと喜んだと思います
きっと解ってくれたと思います
15:41
He would have understood those;
きっと喜んだと思います
きっと解ってくれたと思います
15:44
a chariot of pure intent -- think about it --
純粋な意図を持つ戦闘馬車に
あの秩序を失った街で出会ったわけです
15:45
in a city out of control.
純粋な意図を持つ戦闘馬車に
あの秩序を失った街で出会ったわけです
15:49
Design blew it all away for a moment.
そんな中でしばらくデザインの事しか
目に入りませんでした
15:51
We spoke for a few minutes and then each of us vanished back into the chaos.
数分間 会話を楽しんで
それぞれ来た混乱の中に戻っていきました
15:54
He went back to the streets of Kinshasa;
若者はキンシャサの街に消えて行き
15:58
I went to my hotel. And I think of him now, now ...
私は自分のホテルに戻りました
今でも彼を思い出します
16:01
And I pose this question.
そしてこう思うのです
16:07
An object imbued with intent --
意図を吹き込まれた物には
16:10
it has power,
パワーがあります
16:13
it's treasure, we're drawn to it.
価値があり 心を惹かれます
16:15
An object devoid of intent --
意図のないものは
16:18
it's random, it's imitative,
意味もなく 模倣的です
16:21
it repels us. It's like a piece of junk mail to be thrown away.
不快であり 郵便受けのチラシのように
ゴミとなるものです
16:24
This is what we must demand of our lives,
私たちの人生や物事や状況に
16:27
of our objects, of our things, of our circumstances:
意図を持って立ち向かうという事を
16:32
living with intent.
常に追い求めるべきなのです
16:36
And I have to say
この点に関しては
16:39
that on that score, I have a very unfair advantage over all of you.
私のほうが皆さんより有利かと思います
16:41
And I want to explain it to you now because this is a very special day.
今日は特別な日なので
その理由を お話します
16:46
Thirty-six years ago at nearly this moment,
36年前の丁度今頃
16:52
a 19-year-old boy awoke from a coma
19歳の少年が昏睡から覚めました
16:57
to ask a nurse a question,
看護婦に質問しようとしたところ
17:01
but the nurse was already there with an answer.
看護婦は答えを既に準備していました
17:03
"You've had a terrible accident, young man. You've broken your back.
「ひどい事故に遭って 背骨が折れ
17:05
You'll never walk again."
残念ながらもう歩けないのよ」
17:09
I said, "I know all that -- what day is it?"
私は「そんなこと知っているよ-- 今日の日付が知りたいんだ」と答えました
17:11
You see, I knew that the car had gone over the guardrail on the 28th of February,
車がガードレールを突き破ったのは
2月28日だと覚えていました
17:16
and I knew that 1976 was a leap year.
1976年がうるう年だということも
覚えていたので
17:23
"Nurse! Is this the 28th or the 29th?"
「看護婦さん 今日は28日それとも29日?」と聞くと
17:27
And she looked at me and said,
私の方を見て「3月1日よ」と
教えてくれました
17:32
"It's March 1st."
私の方を見て「3月1日よ」と
教えてくれました
17:34
And I went, "Oh my God.
「大変だ やることが 山ほどある」
17:36
I've got some catching up to do!"
「大変だ やることが 山ほどある」
17:39
And from that moment, I knew
その時から 自分の人生は
17:41
the given was that accident;
事故が前提になって
17:44
I had no option but to make up
歩けずになんとかしなければならないことが
17:47
this new life without walking.
解っていました
17:51
Intent -- a life with intent --
意図--意図を持って生き
17:54
lived by design,
デザインに基づいて
17:58
covering the original
与えられた人生を
それ以上に生きるしかないのです
17:59
with something better.
与えられた人生を
それ以上に生きるしかないのです
18:01
It's something for all of us to do or find a way to do in these times.
こういう時には
皆 そうするしかないのです
18:03
To get back to this,
ここに立ち返るしかないのです
18:08
to get back to design,
デザインに戻るのです
18:11
and as my daddy suggested a long time ago,
昔 お父さんが教えてくれたように生きるのです
18:13
"Make the song your own, John.
「自分なりの演奏をするんだよ ジョン
18:17
Show everybody what you intend."
何を意図するのか皆に聞かせるんだ」
18:20
Daddy,
お父さん 聞いてください
18:39
this one's for you.
お父さん 聞いてください
18:41
(Music)
(音楽)
18:43
♫ Jo Jo was a man who thought he was a loner ♫
♫ ジョジョは自分を一匹狼と思っていたけれど ♫
18:48
♫ but he was another man. ♫
♫ 実はそうではなかったんだ ♫
18:52
♫ Jo Jo left his home in Tucson, Arizona to attend a California bash. ♫
♫ ジョジョはアリゾナのツーソンを後にした
カリフォルニアの イベントに出るためにね ♫
18:54
♫ Get back, get back, ♫
♫ 戻るんだ 戻るんだよ♫
19:01
♫ get back to where you once belonged. ♫
♫ かつていた所へ戻るんだ ♫
19:04
♫ Get back, get back, ♫
♫ 戻るんだ 戻るんだよ♫
19:07
♫ get back to where you once belonged. ♫
♫ かつていた所へ戻るんだ ♫
19:10
(Applause)
(拍手)
19:19
Translated by Akiko Hicks
Reviewed by DSK INOUE

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

John Hockenberry - Journalist
Journalist and commentator John Hockenberry has reported from all over the world in virtually every medium. He's the author of "Moving Violations: War Zones, Wheelchairs and Declarations of Independence."

Why you should listen

Three-time Peabody Award winner, four-time Emmy award winner and Dateline NBC correspondent, John Hockenberry has broad experience as a journalist and commentator for more than two decades. He is the co-anchor of the public radio morning show “The Takeaway” on WNYC and PRI. He has reported from all over the world, in virtually every medium, having anchored programs for network, cable and radio. Hockenberry joined NBC as a correspondent for Dateline NBC in January 1996 after a fifteen-year career in broadcast news at both National Public Radio and ABC News. Hockenberry's reporting for Dateline NBC earned him three Emmys, an Edward R Murrow award and a Casey Medal.

His most prominent Dateline NBC reports include an hour-long documentary on the often-fatal tragedy of the medically uninsured, an emotionally gripping portrait of a young schizophrenic trying to live on his own, and extensive reporting in the aftermath of September 11th. In 2009 Hockenberry was appointed to the White House Fellows Commission by President Barack Obama where he participates in the selection of the annual Fellows for this most prestigious of Federal programs. Hockenberry is also the author of A River out of Eden, a novel based in the Pacific Northwest, and Moving Violations: War Zones, Wheelchairs and Declarations of Independence, a memoir of life as a foreign correspondent, which was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award in 1996. He has also written for The New York Times, The New Yorker, I.D., Wired, The Columbia Journalism Review, Details, and The Washington Post.

Hockenberry spent more than a decade with NPR as a general assignment reporter, Middle East correspondent and host of several programs. During the Persian Gulf War (1990-91), Hockenberry was assigned to the Middle East, where he filed reports from Israel, Tunisia, Morocco, Jordan, Turkey, Iraq and Iran. He was one of the first Western broadcast journalists to report from Kurdish refugee camps in Northern Iraq and Southern Turkey. Hockenberry also spent two years (1988-90) as a correspondent based in Jerusalem during the most intensive conflict of the Palestinian uprising. Hockenberry received the Columbia Dupont Award for Foreign News Coverage for reporting on the Gulf War.

 

More profile about the speaker
John Hockenberry | Speaker | TED.com